17 Burst results for "Fort Scott Kansas"

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 7 months ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As the massive corona virus vaccination effort has gotten underway. We've talked a lot about vaccine hesitancy. People who do not plan to take the Corona virus vaccine. Roughly a quarter of both White and black. Americans don't plan to get the vaccine, according to the latest NPR, PBS News Hour Maris survey. 37% of Latino respondents said they would not get the shot. White Republicans, though, arm or vaccine hesitant than any other group, with 49% of Republican men, saying they do not plan on getting vaccinated, and rural residents were more likely to say that they don't want the vaccine, too. In the small town of Fort Scott, Kansas. One in 11 people has been infected by the coronavirus. Even so, reporters Sarah Jane Tribble found. Some are still questioning how severe the virus really is. 70 year old Linda Findley lives just outside of Ford's God. She's always been active in the community, helping with the Elks and fundraising like a lot of people here. She doesn't think coded 19. Is that dangerous? I don't even know what I think about it. I don't know if I trust the testing, if because it's so messed up, or I've had nieces and nephews of habit. I've lost good friends to it or supposedly. It's too that it seems like no matter what is Finley positive to calm her two little docks and dogs? They get excited when she's on the phone. Everything seems to be growing a virus that mean it's just no matter what somebody has its Corona virus. I don't know whether is there isn't her husband died About two years ago, Robert ran a popular auto body shop. He slipped on the ice and hit his head hard at the end of a work day. The emergency room, along with the hospital had closed days before Fort Scott is one of nearly 140 rule communities that have lost the hospital in the past decade. But not having a hospital doesn't really come up. When people hear talk about coveted, you know, when I got it, I was in good health, and I did take me a while to recover. That's Dave Martin. He's the former city manager, and he's pretty sure he caught Cove in 19 at work last August. I do remember him waking up one of my bad nights and thinking when I was running a temperature and not feeling very well, not thinking. Oh, wow, this could kill me. Congee get killed next day, too, so it didn't really stick with me. After recovering, Martin went ahead with his retirement, he took his wife to Disney, and then they hiked Yellowstone that casual disregard for the dangers of coveted where he's healthcare leaders here. Jason Wesco helps lead the regional clinic that took over primary care services. When the hospital closed me, my family, I think we are a significant minority. I think most people just keep doing have maybe modified a little bit. Maybe they put on a mask in public, but I the way I see it is. I think life here has changed a lot less, and it's changed in D. C. And I think we're seeing the impact of that right. Like much of rural America. The coronavirus skipped over Fort Scott last spring, but the pandemic hit hard in the fall peeking in December. Across the county. Two dozen have died from Cove. It And most people know someone who had the virus and survived. Residents just seemed tired of talking about it. And Finley says she won't get the vaccine. How did they come up with a vaccine that quickly and how do they even know for sure that it's working? The three vaccines approved by federal regulators in the US are being given out to millions? Their efficacy has been shown through massive clinical trials in the U. S and globally. But Linda's skepticism isn't unusual in southeastern Kansas, and that also concerns health leaders like Wesco of the community Health Center. Yeah, I mean, yeah, there's there's hesitancy. I'm sensing that it's less but I guess my point Is when directly provided the opportunity to get it. It's probably a different discussion. When the vaccine is widely available. Wesco says he's hopeful attitudes are changing. His clinic has a wait list for vaccines and is giving out as many doses as they can get their hands on. I'm Sarah Jane Tribble. That reporting came from NPR's partnership with Kaiser Health News. For those lucky enough to get the vaccine. Probably nothing is a sweet as that first hug with a loved one. Those we've had to stay away from in order to keep them. And ourselves safe and we're seeing a wave of those now as vaccination picks up my daughter and son Rob here just just before you see me. As first time a suit for a long time. Well, we have drug Yeah,.

Jason Wesco Sarah Jane Tribble Robert Linda Dave Martin Martin Rob December Linda Findley U. S 37% Kaiser Health News 49% One D. C. NPR Yellowstone US Fort Scott, Kansas Finley
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:16 min | 7 months ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Virus vaccination effort has gotten underway. We've talked a lot about vaccine hesitancy, people who do not plan to take the Corona virus vaccine. Roughly a quarter of both white and black. Americans don't plan to get the vaccine, According to the latest NPR PBS news Hour Maris survey, 37% of Latino respondents said they would not get the shot. White Republicans, though, arm or vaccine hesitant than any other group, with 49% of Republican men, saying they do not plan on getting vaccinated, and rural residents were more likely to say that they don't want the vaccine, too. In the small town of Fort Scott, Kansas. One in 11 people has been infected by the crowd, a virus even so, reporters Sarah Jane Tribble found. Some are still questioning how severe the virus really is. 70 year old Linda Findley lives just outside of Fort Scott. She's always been active in the community helping what the Elks and fundraising like a lot of people here. She doesn't think coded 19. Is that dangerous? I don't even know what I think about it. I don't know if I trust the testing, if because it's so messed up, or I've had nieces and nephews of habit. I've lost good friends to it or supposedly. It's too, that it seems like no matter what is Finley pauses to calm her two little docks and dogs. They get excited when she's on the phone. Everything seems to be growing a virus that mean it's just no matter what somebody has its Corona virus. I don't know whether is there isn't her husband died About two years ago, Robert ran a popular auto body shop. He slipped on the ice and hit his head hard at the end of a work day. Emergency room along with the hospital had closed days before Fort Scott is one of nearly 140 rule communities that have lost the hospital in the past decade. But not having a hospital doesn't really come up. When people hear talk about coveted, you know, when I got it, I was in good health, and I did take me a while to recover. That's Dave Martin. He's the former city manager, and he's pretty sure he caught Cove in 19 at work last August. Remember waking up one of my bad nights and thinking when I was running a temperature and not feeling very well, not thinking. Oh, wow, this could kill me. Congee get killed the next day two, so it didn't really stick with me. After recovering, Martin went ahead with his retirement, he took his wife to Disney, and then they hiked Yellowstone that casual disregard for the dangers of coveted worries. Healthcare leaders here Jason Wesco helps lead the regional clinic that took over primary care services. When the hospital closed me, my family, I think we are a significant minority. I think most people just keep doing of have maybe modified a little bit. Maybe they put on a mask in public, but I the way I see it is I think life here has changed a lot less, and it's changed in D. C and I think we're seeing the impact of that right. Like much of rural America. The coronavirus skipped over Fort Scott last spring, but the pandemic hit hard in the fall peeking in December. Across the county. Two dozen have died from Cove. It And most people know someone who had the virus and survived. Residents just seemed tired of talking about it. And Finley says she won't get the vaccine. How did they come up with a vaccine that quickly and how do they even know for sure that it's working? The three vaccines approved by federal regulators in the US are being given out to millions? Their efficacy has been shown through massive clinical trials in the U. S and globally. But Linda's skepticism isn't unusual in southeastern Kansas, and that also concerns health leaders like Wesco of the community Health Center. Yeah, I mean, yeah, there's there's hesitancy. I'm sensing that it's less, but I guess my point is, when directly provided the opportunity to get it. It's probably a different discussion. When the vaccine is widely available. Wesco says he's hopeful attitudes are changing. His clinic has a wait list for vaccines and is giving out as many doses as they can get their hands on. I'm Sarah Jane Tribble. That reporting came from NPR's partnership with Kaiser Health News. For those lucky enough to.

Jason Wesco Sarah Jane Tribble Dave Martin Robert Linda D. C Fort Scott Martin December 49% U. S 37% NPR Linda Findley One Kaiser Health News Finley Fort Scott, Kansas last August Wesco
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:52 min | 7 months ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Virus vaccination effort has gotten underway. We've talked a lot about vaccine hesitancy, people who do not plan to take the Corona virus vaccine. Roughly a quarter of both white and black. Americans don't plan to get the vaccine, According to the latest NPR PBS news Hour Maris survey, 37% of Latino respondents said they would not get the shot. White Republicans, though, arm or vaccine hesitant than any other group, with 49% of Republican men, saying they do not plan on getting vaccinated, and rural residents were more likely to say that they don't want the vaccine, too. In the small town of Fort Scott, Kansas. One in 11 people has been infected by the crowd, a virus even so, reporters Sarah Jane Tribble found. Some are still questioning how severe the virus really is. 70 year old Linda family lives just outside of Ford's God. She's always been active in the community, helping with the Elks and fundraising. Like a lot of people here. She doesn't think Cove in 19. Is that dangerous? I don't even know what I think about it. I don't know if I trust the testing, if because it's so messed up, or I've had nieces and nephews of habit. I've lost good friends to it or supposedly. It's too that it seems like no matter what is Finley positive to calm her two little docks and dogs? They get excited when she's on the phone. Everything seems to be growing a virus that mean it's just no matter what somebody has its Corona virus. I don't know whether it is there isn't her husband died About two years ago, Robert ran a popular auto body shop. He slipped on the ice and hit his head hard at the end of a work day. The emergency room, along with the hospital had closed days before Fort Scott is one of nearly 140 rule communities that have lost the hospital in the past decade. But not having a hospital doesn't really come up. When people hear talk about coveted, you know, when I got it, I was in good health, and I did take me a while to recover. That's Dave Martin. He's the former city manager, and he's pretty sure he caught Cove in 19 at work last August. I do remember waking up one of my bad nights and thinking when I was running a temperature and not feeling very well and I'm thinking, Oh, wow, this could kill me. That's Congee get killed the next day two, so it didn't really stick with me. After recovering, Martin went ahead with his retirement, he took his wife to Disney, and then they hiked Yellowstone that casual disregard for the dangers of coveted where he's healthcare leaders here. Jason Wesco helps lead the regional clinic that took over primary care services. When the hospital closed Lee my family, I think we are a significant minority. I think most people just keep doing have have Navy modified a little bit. Maybe they put on a mask in public, but I the way I see it is I think life here has changed a lot less, and it's changed in D. C and I think we're seeing the impact of that right. Like much of rural America. The coronavirus skipped over Fort Scott last spring, but the pandemic hit hard in the fall peeking in December. Across the county. Two dozen have died from Cove. It And most people know someone who had the virus and survived. Residents just seemed tired of talking about it. And Finley says she won't get the vaccine. How did they come up with a vaccine that quickly and how do they even know for sure that it's working? The three vaccines approved by federal regulators in the US are being given out to millions? Their efficacy has been shown through massive clinical trials in the U. S and globally. But Linda's skepticism isn't unusual in southeastern Kansas, and that also concerns health leaders like Wesco of the community Health Center. Yeah, I mean, yeah, there's there's hesitancy. I'm sensing that it's less, but I guess my point is, when directly provided the opportunity to get it. It's probably a different discussion. When the vaccine is widely available Whisk Oh says he's hopeful attitudes are changing. His clinic has a wait list for vaccines and is giving out as many doses as they can get their hands on. I'm Sarah Jane Tribble. That reporting came from NPR's partnership with Kaiser Health News. For those lucky enough to get the vaccine. Probably nothing is a sweet as that first hug with a loved one. Those we've had to stay away from in order to keep them. And ourselves safe, and we're seeing a wave of those now as vaccination picks up my daughter and son, Rob here just just before to see me. As first time a suit for a long time. Well, we have dug Yeah, Get up here for my birthday of the 1960 may well be drinking. I'll tell you that because I've gotten the vaccine..

Jason Wesco Sarah Jane Tribble Robert Dave Martin December 49% Martin Rob D. C 37% NPR Kaiser Health News U. S One Cove Linda Lee Yellowstone Fort Scott, Kansas last August
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on WLRN News

WLRN News

04:42 min | 7 months ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on WLRN News

"Effort has gotten underway. We've talked a lot about vaccine hesitancy, people who do not plan to take the Corona virus vaccine. Roughly a quarter of both white and black. Americans don't plan to get the vaccine, According to the latest NPR PBS news Hour Maris survey, 37% of Latino respondents said they would not get the shot. White Republicans, though, arm or vaccine hesitant than any other group, with 49% of Republican men, saying they do not plan on getting vaccinated, and rural residents were more likely to say that they don't want the vaccine, too. In the small town of Fort Scott, Kansas. One in 11 people has been infected by the crowd, a virus even so, reporters Sarah Jane Tribble found. Some are still questioning how severe the virus really is. 70 year old lead. The family lives just outside of Fort Scott. She's always been active in the community helping what the Elks and fundraising like a lot of people here. She doesn't think covert 19. Is that dangerous? I don't even know what I think about it. I don't know if I trust the testing, if because it's so messed up, or I've had Mrs and nephews of habit. I've lost good friends to it are supposedly. It's too that it seems like no matter what is Finley pauses to calm her two little docks and dogs. They get excited when she's on the phone. Everything seems to be growing a virus that mean it's just no matter what somebody has its Corona virus. I don't know whether is there isn't Her husband died About two years ago, Robert ran a popular auto body shop, He slipped on the ice and hit his head hard at the end of a work day. Emergency room along with the hospital had closed days before Fort Scott is one of nearly 140 rule communities that have lost the hospital in the past decade. But not having a hospital doesn't really come up. When people hear talk about Cove it you know, when I got it. I was in good health, and I did take me a while to recover. That's Dave Martin. He's the former city manager, and he's pretty sure he caught Cove in 19 at work last August. Remember waking up one of my bad nights and thinking when I was running a temperature and not feeling very well, not thinking. Oh, wow, this could kill me. Can get killed next day, too, so it didn't really stick with me. After recovering, Martin went ahead with his retirement, he took his wife to Disney, and then they hiked Yellowstone that casual disregard for the dangers of coveted worries. Healthcare leaders here Jason Wesco helps lead the regional clinic that took over primary care services. When the hospital closed me, my family, I think we are a significant minority. I think most people just keep doing have have maybe modified a little bit. Maybe they put on a mask in public, but I the way I see it is. I think life here has changed a lot less, and it's changed in D. C. I think we're seeing the impact of that right. Like much of rural America. The coronavirus skipped over Fort Scott last spring, but the pandemic hit hard in the fall peeking in December. Across the county. Two dozen have died from Cove. It And most people know someone who had the virus and survived. Residents just seemed tired of talking about it. And Finley says she won't get the vaccine. How did they come up with a vaccine that quickly and how do they even know for sure that it's working? Three vaccines approved by federal regulators in the US are being given out to millions and their efficacy has been shown through massive clinical trials in the U. S and globally. But Linda's skepticism isn't unusual in southeastern Kansas. That also concerns health leaders like Wesco of the community Health Center. Yeah, I mean, yeah, There's there's hesitancy. I'm sensing that it's less, but I guess my point is, when directly provided the opportunity to get it. It's probably a different discussion. When the vaccine is widely available. Wesco says he's hopeful attitudes are changing. His clinic has a wait list for vaccines and is giving out as many doses as they can get their hands on. I'm Sarah Jane Tribble. That reporting came from NPR's partnership with Kaiser Health News. For those lucky enough to get the vaccine. Probably nothing is a sweet as that first hug with a loved one. Those we've had to stay away from in order to keep them and ourselves safe. And we're seeing a wave of those now as vaccination picks up my daughter and son were appeared just just before to see me. As the first time I've seen for a long time. Oh, We hugged it out. Yeah, I.

Jason Wesco Sarah Jane Tribble Dave Martin Robert Martin Linda 49% Fort Scott December 37% D. C. NPR Kaiser Health News U. S US One Finley Cove last August Three vaccines
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KCRW

"For the arts. This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Corona virus pandemic has put Immense strain on U. S hospitals not only have nearly 1300 healthcare workers died, but dozens of hospitals have filed for bankruptcy. And rural America is bearing the brunt of this trend, which started before the pandemic more than 130 rural hospitals have closed in the past decade. 15 In 2020 alone, joined now. By Sarah Jane Tribble of Kaiser Health News who's been covering these closures. And the communities which they affect Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me. You have a podcast called where it hurts, And it's about Fort Scott, Kansas on what happened to the people there after the town hospital closed. Why did you have spend more than here reporting on this one Small town? Well, Scott, I'm from Roll Kansas. I grew up on a gravel road in the southeastern part of the state. Just in our from this town, Fort Scott. My parents still live there. It was my mom who called me one day and totally Mercy Hospital was closing. And it closed at the same time. My older sister, who was living just outside of Kansas City, was sick with pancreatic cancer. So I was thinking a lot about how people use the health system at the time. You've reported on some of the many reasons why rural hospitals are losing money, including their own areas. They're losing population and the aging population. But now that this this hospital mercy in Fort Scott is closed, Where do people Who need medical help go for treatment. Well, people have to drive further. They have to drive further to have a baby to get dialysis. They even have to drive further for their chemotherapy treatment, and that's really hard. Rule. Americans as a whole tend to be an older and sicker population, and they have lower incomes. I spoke to people who couldn't afford that Dr. One of the saddest things is when a small town hospital closes. It affects those people's sense of place. Their pride in their community, and the people feel less secure and more vulnerable. Like Linda Finley, her husband died just after the hospital closed, and now she lives alone. You know, I don't think losing the hospitals the end of the world for Fort Scott But I sure think it What an ugly notch in her belt and not just Fort Scott. All these other hospitals that have closed down. I mean, my guy. You need to feel like you're safe and could be taken care of where those air really fears. We know that people who live in rural places where hospital has closed are more likely to die than those who live in cities where a hospital has closed and now course were in the eighth month of a pandemic. And in fact, in rural America, Corona virus cases seem to be at record levels. What does this mean? For people who live in communities like Fort Scott, where hospitals have closed? Yeah, it's really troubling. We know. Covert 19 is more dangerous for certain people like older Americans, but also people who are obese and people who have chronic diseases like diabetes. Plus, we know the virus is especially difficult for people of color. When you consider that role, hospital closures have happened more frequently in the South. It's a recipe for more deaths. And surgeon. What are you hearing out of Fort Scott during this pandemic with the hospital gown? Just this week, I heard there's a surge of cases in southeast Kansas. So after Mercy Hospital closed in Fort Scott two years ago, the next closest hospital became via Christie in a town called Pittsburgh. That hospital said this week that they have 20 Cove in 19 patients in their beds. That's a significant number for them, so they're temporarily stopping elective surgeries and procedures to deal with this surge of patients and That's going to hurt their bottom line. I'm wondering what you've learned from people in Fort Scott that other communities might learn from right now. I talked with a lot of people in Fort Scott, who have really significant health care needs, and they were scared when the hospital closed. But even if the hospital had not closed, not all of their health problems could have been taken care of at the hospital. Hospitals are not always the best place for people who need help managing their chronic illnesses like emphysema and diabetes, not to mention addiction and mental health issues. I saw people in Fort Scott gradually come to terms with this idea that a traditional hospital may not be what they really need. Often just a good community Health clinic can fill some of the gaps and some rule places have tried a kind of hybrid hospital just an emergency room with maybe a few overnight beds. Sarah Jane, troubled health reporter at Kaiser Health News, Talking about the closing of rural hospitals and the stories she found in one small Kansas town where that's happened, you can hear more. In her narrative podcast where it hurts. Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for being with us. You're welcome, Scott. President Trump and Joe Biden are making last minute pitches to seniors. Trump campaign yesterday did crowded rallies in Florida and Georgia. Biden spoke to socially distant supporters in Michigan. Nearly one and for eligible voters are over 65 this election that makes him critical to the candidates for Trump. He's trying to show more empathetic side when talking about the pandemic. He's earned poor marks for how he's handled it. But after recovering from covert 19 himself, and as the calendar winds down to election day, he's trying out a new approach. NPR White House correspondent issue Roscoe joins us to tell us about it, Kisha Thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me with some questions about the president's own health Still in the air, he was in Florida with a group of seniors. And of course, we will note, according to the U. S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention people who are.

Fort Scott Scott Simon Mercy Hospital Kansas Sarah Jane Sarah Jane Tribble Kaiser Health News U. S Centers for Disease Contr NPR News America President Trump Kansas City U. S Joe Biden pancreatic cancer NPR community Health clinic
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of diabetes obesity and tobacco smoking are higher than the state average they're also high rates of premature deaths but when you talk to I was going others there's also hope these numbers that high rates of obesity diabetes poverty why right so there is a whole series of things that happened in a region like southeastern Kansas that has generational poverty that has gone back beyond grandparents and there are people who lived off the manufacturing there is a coal industry in southeastern Kansas and when that went away and new jobs came and they weren't always qualified to do those jobs the amount of poverty in southeastern Kansas which is common in a lot of rural areas is often because they haven't been able to adjust to the changing world around them but also because there hasn't been federal monies going into those places as well the hospitals themselves we're dependent on you know the number of patients they could take care of in the hospital mercy hospital closed the year before close to average nine patients a day so for the residents themselves they may work hard but if there's not jobs to support them they can't earning incomes you know you've been visiting for Scott I think you told me all over half a dozen times in the last year how has it changed without that health care without that hospital well the two leaders who were once very very angry and concerned are now beginning to accept that maybe they can live without a hospital here three to Baker the former president of the now closed hospital I don't think there is any of us who haven't gone through the stages of grief and that aren't still may be caught somewhere in one of those stages it's been almost a year right on a year and we don't like what happened but it's time to accept it and create something new and move on Sarah Jane travel has been reporting on the healthcare crisis in fort Scott Kansas she's a senior correspondent for Kaiser health news thank you for talking with us thank you and here is Pam Fessler has reported on efforts to fight poverty in the US for over a decade along the way she seen how sometimes a single person can have the most impact on a recent trip to Albany New York she met three men who grew up in poverty and are now trying to help others get out she has this reporter's notebook Paul Collins Hackett sits in Albany's youth opportunity office trying to guide a teenage boy through the ins and outs of getting the job the early you're on time if you're on time the late late nights when I show up he's like a Big Brother encouraging but direct when the young man tells Collins Hackett that he wants the job to help his mother so I can help her pay bills and stuff so we're not getting kicked out houses of the times and moving around a lot Collins Hackett leans in even closer I completely respect their struggle my father passed away when I was three and my mother's blood so I've always been super poor and having to help out with those and stuff like that so the fact that you have all those people that you're helping ages rises to the occasion brothers however I can help let me know please and so it goes in Albany's poorest neighborhoods where recent study found that teens face some of the toughest conditions in the country crime inadequate housing missing parents several people who grew up in similar circumstances are now working with the city and non profits to help these kids survive and hopefully thrive every government program you can think of Collins Hackett's boss Jonathan Jones credits his single mothers persistence for getting him where he is today the city's commissioner of recreation youth and work for services Jones says she pushed him to take advantage of every academic opportunity now on the wall of the office the Jones runs is a mural painted by one of the teens he mentored a seventeen year old gang member yeah this is him walking up the steps in order to be calm maybe or a person in a suit the mural shows a young man his pants hanging below his bottom leaving behind a gun a knife and a needle and heading up towards a man with his arm extended this is the things that he sees a success there are pictures of a house a car a diploma in symbols for peace of mind soul yeah nobody knows doesn't that bother him I ask no because I know I had and that he will forget this Jones says you have to do what you can and hope for the best research shows that there are many factors that can help break the cycle of poverty good schools access to healthcare safer neighborhoods but there's no magic bullet sometimes it's a combination of things or an encounter with the right person or experience I was really deep into violence you know that was my thing Justin Gaddy has an office a few blocks from Jones is he had very little supervision growing up and got so deep into gangs and guns that initially T. scenes he was convicted on federal racketeering charges he faces the possibility of life in prison when I actually got a sentence I didn't get the time I was supposed to get instead he got only six years that made me think some miles on my son just lucky break he needed to start thinking about turning his life around now years later he's an outreach worker trying to stop other teens from falling into gang life Mike Collins Hackett in Joe's Gaddy things it's crucial that the kids he deals with recognize that he knows exactly what they're up against but I went to the same day also look at me now I when I never thought I'd be where I'm at right now and and I got here by taking this route and I'm like and this is how we can help you which in his case is re directing them from the streets into sports jobs and other activities all three of these men know they can't help everyone but they realize from their own experiences that those they do reach might someday succeed and inspire somebody else Pam Fessler NPR news Albany New York decades of overfishing destroyed much of the fish stocks off America's west coast hardest hit were species known as ground fish that trawlers dragged up in their nets in the year two thousand large parts of the Pacific Ocean were declared disaster zones and close to trawlers devastating the industry now nearly two decades later fish stocks have rebounded and come new year's day thousands of square miles of ocean will reopen it's a success story being celebrated by both fishermen and environmentalists who work together to bring back the fish Brad Pettinger is a long time trawler captain who operates off the coast of Oregon he worked the SIS one rock fish soul and perch were abundant industry Bruce bringing up was of two two hundred two hundred forty million pounds of fish across the locks and that was dropped by a quarter in just a couple years after the government declared the area a disaster zone conservationists fishermen and fish processors worked through counsel to save the fish and the fishing industry initially the different groups were at loggerheads as Pettinger who served on the council but they worked out a plan fish quotas were cut dramatically trawlers went from pulling in nine million pounds of fish down to a hundred thousand pounds per year it put many out of business it was just a really is a bad bad environment don't know was making money it was a dark time would be for the best way to put it those fishermen who stayed in the game had to change how they finished their nets dragged in on wanted fish and sea life that had to be tossed overboard we have read the scores will be anywhere from twenty to forty percent a on the species and we know when one of them bottom trawlers modify their nets to allow small fish to escape they avoided rocky areas where fish breed areas that their nets could permanently damage and they stuck to quotas that are strictly monitored have observer or a camera on the vessel that insures that the all the Fisher California's don't discard happening that though the RBC and so really we get the science right early on chance Jed the regional director for the environmental defense fund's ocean program says as a result fish stocks rebounded decades earlier than expected he called the efforts a conservation home run according to judge it's the biggest environmental story that no one knows about and now you do.

diabetes
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wellness options for guests including their eat well menu on demand fitness gear lending program and signature heavenly bed learn more at Weston dot com a member of Marriott Bonnefoy this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Layla father nearly twenty rural hospitals close this year alone more than any year in the past decade and that piece of closures is expected to continue as the cost of healthcare rises with too few patients to cover expenses the town of fort Scott Kansas lost its one hundred and thirty two year old Catholic hospital at the end of two thousand eighteen and P. R. ends Kaiser health news have followed the city as it has tried to cope without it surging trouble with Kaiser health news travel to fort Scott this month where she found a town that was angry and scared but also coming to terms with what's left and Sara Jane joins me now in the studio good morning good morning so when the hospital closes what happens to a community what do the people of fort Scott said a mess and they still need well after the customer closed a year ago the cancer center also closed and then the dialysis center closed and a lot of residents I talked on this most recent trip we're most concerned about the lack of a place to deliver a baby mercy hospital in fort Scott delivered more than two hundred and thirty babies in the year before it closed now those mothers need to travel to the nearest hospital which is about thirty miles away to respect him for example had complications that put her on bed rest so when the time came to drive the hospital the drive really bothered her which you do live in a city you do travel seven to the hospital but this is a different kind of traffic you're on a two lane highway a lot of times you could get behind you know semi you get behind a tractor you know and it can be potentially unsafe driving conditions sometimes you're lucky if you have cell service so what kind of healthcare is actually left in fort Scott well it's not all bad news that nearby hospital thirty miles away has kept the emergency department open at least temporarily and the large regional health centre hired most of the local doctors and they took over the buildings there in fort Scott is providing many.

Marriott Bonnefoy fort Scott Kansas old Catholic hospital P. R. Sara Jane fort Scott Weston dot NPR
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Menu on demand fitness gear lending program and signature heavenly bed learn more at Weston dot com a member of Merion von boy and from the listeners who support this NPR station this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Layla father nearly twenty rural hospitals close this year alone more than any year in the past decade and that piece of closures is expected to continue as the cost of healthcare rises with too few patients to cover expenses the town of fort Scott Kansas lost its one hundred and thirty two year old Catholic hospital at the end of two thousand eighteen and P. R. and Kaiser health news have followed the city as it has tried to cope without it surging trouble with Kaiser health news travel to fort Scott this month where she found a town that was angry and scared but also coming to terms with what's left and Sara Jane joins me now in the studio good morning good morning so when the hospital closes what happens to a community what do the people of fort Scott said a mess and they still need well after the hospital closed a year ago the cancer center also closed and then the dialysis center closed and a lot of residents I talk to on this most recent trip we're most concerned about the lack of a place to deliver a baby mercy hospital in fort Scott delivered more than two hundred and thirty babies in the year before it closed now those mothers need to travel to the nearest hospital which is about thirty miles away to respect him for example had complications that put on bed rest so when the time came to drive the hospital the drive really bother her with you do live in a city you do travel seven to the hospital but this is a different kind of traffic you're on a two lane highway a lot of times you could get behind you know semi you get behind a tractor you know and it can be potentially unsafe driving conditions sometimes you're lucky if you have cell service so what kind of healthcare is actually left in fort Scott well it's not all bad news that nearby hospital thirty miles away has cut the emergency department open at least temporarily and a large regional health centre hired most of the local doctors and they took over the buildings there in fort Scott is providing many.

fort Scott Kansas old Catholic hospital P. R. Sara Jane fort Scott Weston dot Merion NPR
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Temperatures sixties low seventies around the coast and only low eighties inland this is weekend edition from NPR news under the car seat of RO one small towns lose their hospitals people with health emergencies often need a helicopter to get them to critical care but air ambulances aren't required to respond to every call and precious time can slip away well first responders scramble to book a flight surgeon trouble reports from fort Scott Kansas on what can happen when people in rural America call for help my family had closed up his popular autobody shop on a cold February evening he went out to get the mail and slipped on the ice the driveway when he came back inside he blacked office he told his wife Linda about the fall he ate dinner went to bed the next morning when the call for help your and what's going on my husband guy yesterday and now you look at the morning and I can't wait so it starts in as crew took one look at the seven year old size and suspected a brain hemorrhage Robert needed to get to a hospital with a neurology center the closest is ninety miles north in Kansas city for its got hospital closed in December EMS worker asking for a helicopter medivac so the dispatcher ports got dials err methods if you want to remain on the line like that but Michael bailable or would like to get a call back it is one of the biggest air ambulance operators in the US it has helicopters at bases in towns near fort Scott the company's dispatcher begin searching for medical crew they can get to the families fast within a minute she's back with an update my number to current not available on my part and have declined earlier this summer Linda Finley sat at her kitchen counter and listened to the nine one one call I didn't know that they can just refuse I don't know what to say about that air ambulance companies aren't required to report response times or say why flights are turned down there's also no requirement that the closest aircraft will come for someone else to listen to that nine one one call Joe houses a paramedic and leads the Kansas board of emergency medical services how says it's pretty typical flights can be decline because of bad weather and safety issues the crew that says no might be on another call or recovering from previous trips house says if we can somehow wave that magic wand and have a singular center that can stand at the closest available resource to the patient when they need it I doubt that would be phenomenal rule communities nationwide are increasingly dependent on air ambulances as local hospitals close accounts was figure out how to provide emergency care minutes can make the difference between life and death in medicine time is tissue it's the amount of brain tissue damage that occurs in a stroke it's the amount of sepsis second set into a system or trauma that can set into a system that's rich rock president of the industry trade group the association of aeromedical services he's pointed to fort Scott is a town where service has helped fill the gap in rural health care back in fort Scott it takes.

seven year
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Patients says Joe anger a cancer researcher who led a study last year. Not only in the anxiety of their diagnosis than so fring. The anxiety of how do they get their care? And how do they travel to get it under study confirmed that the work will cancer patients like Karen have to do to find get care is a major reason they die more often real hospital closures? He says, don't help patients the issue of travel. Also creates income disparities in terms of access to care, because those with more income on going to be more likely to travel to get their care, more readily. And so these issues of income disparity and geographic disparity. St- start overlap Krista Posta has seen this firsthand in southeastern Kansas. She leads a group of health clinics in the low income. Region. It's not unusual for us to see someone walk in in-state cancer that they put off because they didn't have money in have insurance or it's just the way our we wait too long here for now. Karen is coping after her sister-in-law ferries her from the treatment center to the lab. And back, we wait for the lab test to be processed. And then Karen gets her chemo shot. Now, we are back on the road, and Karen is prepared and I have found that if I eat a few rich crackers crackers on the way home. I don't get nauseated for the next hour. She quietly munches swallowed hard and doesn't get sick. I'm Sarah, Jane travel near fort Scott, Kansas. Sitcom fans got some good news this week. The remake of one day at a time is returning for a fourth season. The beloved show about a Cuban American family premiered on Netflix in two thousand seventeen but it was canceled in March provoking widespread social media campaign for its renewal and next season fans can watch the show stars Rita Moreno, just Machado and Gomez on its new home. The cable channel pop TV to tell us more about the significance of this deal. Monica Castillo joins me. She was a film writer for the New York Times, and now at its for cherry picks a female lead film website. Welcome. Thank you for having me. So I what was your reaction to this news of the revival of one day at a time. Oh my goodness. I was overjoyed. I completely lost all focus on my work. It was really emotional for me to hear the cancellation news. And I know a number of fans who also were very emotionally invested in these characters in the story. And then if felt like Netflix. Was taking that away. And for people who haven't really watched the series can you just tell us quickly about the characters? Sure. So the main focus of the show is the average family. It's a single mom with two kids and her mom has moved back in with her there. Whacky lamb Lord and all the things that happened around this family that thinks that they get involved in that conversations that come up and you find out what she's a Jesus now..

Karen Monica Castillo Netflix Kansas Krista Posta New York Times Joe researcher fort Scott chemo Rita Moreno Sarah Gomez Jane Machado one day
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

10:02 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Cepa thirty six times Jeffries and Dodd prior. We got a problem big time one hundred or so closures of rule hospitals over the last decade of raise concerns about the, you know, the clinicians, and workers who carry these institutions through their final days. And then left jobless, yeah. Mercy hospital fort Scott Kansas, shut down in December while Cumberland river hospital in Tennessee. It closed its doors and March these are both institutions that are around for generations. We've had some other clinic, shut down here locally, as well. Rollo providers have struggled to stay profitable. As reimbursements has declined and they have struggled to retain physicians in many regards, a lot of people, a lot of doctors just getting out of the business. Don't wanna do it anymore. Tighter, the paperwork tie the hassle tired of, you know, being lawsuits, things like that. Yes. And, and yeah. So it's, it's become a problem in some of these rural areas of America. I tell you, I, I cannot imagine. Having to do the amount of, of, of paperwork, and the amount of administrative stuff that they deal with on top of trying to save lives. It's extrordinary. I could not imagine anyone being having the desire to do it coupled with a nursing shortage, and we got a healthcare problem at debate about health care spending, and how we deal with healthcare in America. Well, there's a new study that says Texas may have the second worst nursing shortage in the country. Alexis turf Bergen. She is the dean of UT Austin school of nursing. The biggest causes is complete the changing demographics, we're seeing in our country. So in the United States, of course, the population is growing, which means there's going to be quite or needs for healthcare services, but also the demographics of our population, so we have an aging population in the United States, and certainly in Texas. Yeah. The American federation of colleges of nursing says enrollment at entry level programs at nursing is increasing, but just not fast enough. It's not growing fast enough to meet the projected demand of our society getting older. So is this another result of a softer generation coming up that can't handle it? I can't handle this. You can get it that way. I see it as an opportunity if you want to be a nurse. You can make a lot of money right now. The hours might be long. But that's okay. What's wrong with hard work? No. I mean this, this could lead to the nurses that we have making more money. This is great. What what I'm saying is, I'm not saying that this is in a good opportunity. Why aren't more? People interested winus seemed to be a little bit of a lessening of interest in that field. Do you want to spend eight hours a day changing bedpans, not may never did? That's the that's the answer. Why why what? Because we used to have plenty of people did one hours a day because we have an American culture that does not the way other compared to other cultures and other countries, we don't take care of the elderly, not really, we don't take care of them into. No, no. They're, they're outcast grandma's inconvenient. Right now. Yeah. Asian families they bring grandma and grandpa into the house shot word live with them. That's how it works. It's a it's American culture. Yeah. Yeah. That's why we have a maze of nursing homes across what I'm trying to say. It takes a very special person that does want to do that kind of work, and I'm a long way from that. Kind of person believe me. I'm wondering why does it appear that there is a little bit less? There are less people that want to do that. They're let sure less people that are that person. Is it the way they're being raised? Are they to scream weaker? Get right to those younger people. There was a more variety of options out there career options. Well we're seeing in the tech field in the business field. These kids when they graduate from college can go on, and make even more money. There's more options out there. Yeah. Choose from less interest in that appear less interest. In the medical field is a whole less interest in police work less interest in firework. It's not good. Seven forty. You could join us five one two eight three six zero five ninety mayor Steve Adler. From Austin, Texas. He chairs the Campo planning. That's the capital area metropolitan planning organization. They play in roads and things like that he voted in favor of an eight billion dollar overhaul of I thirty five this month and includes new lanes and the demolition of the upper deck. But now the mayor tells folks that he doesn't believe new lanes will, you know, address congestion issues it will actually make it worse. I'm sorry. I don't understand that kind of thinking. I really don't his thinking is based on, he doesn't think constituents are going to, like, what he's thinking Adler says he gave his support a away to keep Austin in the running for any future state funding for toll roads as well, as you know, garner, major support for high capacity. Mass transit spanning, I thirty five c supported the lanes, I built you some lanes. I got eight billion now you could support my trains, and rickshaws. If we don't expand on thirty five in addition to everything else that's being talked about. We got big big problems that has to be part of the plan. We had a, you know, a transportation activist on yesterday and you could catch it on our podcast. She says, adding lanes die thirty-five will increase congestion. But the only way that it would improve the flow of congestion is, if we had more lanes to the entire length of I thirty five from Minnesota to the border, then it would she said it might increase traffic flow. But it may create a choke point. Downtown. If you only add lanes north of the river, then the river is going to be a nightmare. So it's going to be worse than what we have now which the whole thing, chokepoint single chokepoint. It'll become a bigger chokepoint if we don't add lanes through the entire length of the interstate at least, you know, all the way down to San Antonio it all the way up to Waco. It will create a worst, chokepoint think of a funnel pouring water into a funnel. Yeah. More lanes and then reducing them all of a sudden, it's going to create congestion, the concept. But we, we can't just go now it's not worth it. It's not gonna help. Now, we can't do that to keep looking at this story does right here with the mayor saying that it's going to make congestion worse. But yet he supporting it, he supports it. And he says it's going to make things worse. That is proof of what I've been trying to tell this community for the past five years, the mayor does not want to improve the flow of traffic. He wants you to get so frustrated with roads that you get on a bus or a train or a bike or walk now. You're correct. He doesn't want to improve the flow of traffic regarding your automobile is. It is Suzanne Austin, good morning. Hi, this man. What's on your mind? Chime in on the nursing shortage wiser nursing shortage. Yeah. I just want to say I work at a downtown hospital Dolan assay, which, but nursing bedside nursing and getting very difficult the amount of patients, you have to take on the amount of abuse, you take on, and the amount of extra paperwork, that you have to do without the port and taking care of grown, people is difficult. It's a whole different ballgame. When you've got three hundred pound man everywhere, all over, you know what, what, what kind of room to get cussed at by the drug addict, because you won't get in pay medicine there in time since the abuse hospital care is awful. How long have you it for a long time? How long how long how long have you been in fifteen years, you sound like you? Maybe you're the second fellow burn going. Yeah. What, what kind of what kind of abuse, are you getting, what kind of abuse, are you getting on the job? She was there. I spit at I get fired because I don't get medicine to when you're a drug addict, they're abusing the system and like I said, taking care of grown people isn't as pretty is in the bucks ain't how you're there. You know, when you're actually really dealing with it while you're doing that. Why, why are you miserable? You, you have control. Wow, you hate this place. You know, there are those real people that are real patients, that that's why I'm there for the people that really need somebody to take good care of. And that's where I come in. That's gonna be us in the hospital and you want a good nurse. Taking care of you, ballpark, it, how much does it new nurse? Make your above that. But what is it? Dollars an hour you get stipend. So you won't even really get that upfront. So you come out with loans, and you can't even have enough to pay rent pay your bills, and then they put you in program. So you're not even really making twenty two out the gate, something tells you something tells me that you're not signing up for the program to encourage more nursing. I don't think you're going to be the spokesperson. Honestly, hostile nursing needs a big cleanup. You know, there's a lot of administration involved that doesn't really deal bedside making changes that have no idea, and it's just making it harder for nurses. So everybody wants to do nurse practitioner PA now 'cause it gives you a little bit less work like you said, less work, more money is what everybody's looking for that. It's not really realistic gonna become pain. You're just kind of doing the dirty work for the doctors that don't wanna do it. Well, yeah. Grumbling mcdonald. I'll be honest with you. We don't know who you are. We don't know your identity. We don't even know what hospital. Do you live in? But if I had a nurse if I was running the place and you came in and, and had the had these issues. It may be time for you to leave. Seriously as as. That way. Everybody thinks that way that's important thing. But that's true. If you're that miserable. Liv Tyler miserable bedtime nursing for the birds and you get a twenty four year old is right out of school, but, you know, a golden spoon their whole life, and it has to come into a med surge or ICU. And you got grown as men pooping on you Pook puke on you. That is not what they signed up for sales meetings. Does your little babies, you know, they only paint the pretty picture in the book. But when you get out to real life, it's nothing like the book moon, man. It's really good..

Texas America American federation of college Austin UT Austin school of nursing Steve Adler United States Mercy hospital fort Scott Kans Cumberland river hospital Bergen Jeffries Liv Tyler Tennessee winus Dodd Suzanne Austin Waco
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I mean, my point is right. And I'm concerned. But I do think it's something's out of control of just say finally, I've been I. Do not like Donald Trump, and I do not like his presidency. I felt the Democrats have done their best to slap people like me in the face of last week on a lot of different issues. Well, we may have to pursue that another time we gather at this table, David Brooks, Mark shields. Thank you. And finally tonight the world through his lens. Jeffrey Brown has a look at the extraordinary journey a photographer Gordon parks to children with the dog. Who are they and what are their lives like a young man walking away from us? Whereas you coming from. And where is he going armed with his camera? Gordon parks told stories of individuals and through them of the larger world, he had a fantastic ability to compose a series of elements within a picture to convey a sense of of a story. Philip Brooke men is curator of Gordon parks. The new tied an exhibition at the National Gallery of art in Washington spanning the first ten years of his career in nineteen forty to nineteen fifty. It's a chance to see how a young man self taught. And without a high school diploma became one of the twentieth. Century's master artists perks came to. To an understanding really before he ever picked up a camera that it could be a tool for him to us to be able to express his own feelings about his life. Gordon parks was born in fort Scott Kansas in nineteen twelve the youngest of fifteen children. He credited his mother, Sarah who died when he was sixteen with giving him confidence and strength even growing up and the poverty and prejudice park smoke of his childhood in nineteen Ninety-seven news hour interview, the disadvantage sometimes pushing here. You know, if you use it, right? Because you want to. Rid yourself of those things that hurt you emotionally when you're coming up inspired by the work of Dorothea Lang Walker, Evans and other depression, era, photographers, he signed, magazines parks. I picked up a camera at the age of twenty five in Saint Paul. And then Chicago he took portraits, including marva Trotter Lewis, a performer model and wife of boxer Joe Louis he'd be funded and photographed leading African American artists and scholars including Langston Hughes. Charles white L lane lock. And he did his first journalism covering Eleanor Roosevelt, visit to a southside community center parcs called the camera. He's choice of weapons Gordon parks. Always had a sense that that media, the the camera and photography and writing and media could be very important tool in helping the world. Understand the image of African American people. And it was through that understanding that you could make the world a better place in one thousand nine hundred forty two parks was awarded a prestigious fellowship allowing him to work as a photographer for the farm security administration his first assignment documenting African American life in Washington DC, then deeply segregated city among his early works. This photo of a young boy lost his leg in a streetcar. Accident really struck by how intense the relationships are in the picture relationships between shifts between the photographer the boy, but also the relationship between the boy and the two girls sitting across tree these are things that hurts put them there for us to find. He knew he was giving. It was here. Parks created one of his most famous photos, a portrait of Ella. Watson a cleaning lady in a government building at first. Ask her about her life. I am so disastrous that I just felt that most photographs from. The way that would. Make me. I feel I'll make the public feel about Washington Washington. Dc nineteen forty two the now I- conic image called American gothic. After the fame painting by grant wood was part of a larger series on Watson, her family and community in extended photo, essay style that parks would go on to us throughout his career parks often, he would meet people, and he would talk to them. He would learn their stories. He would understand who they were, you know, long before he would ever bring a camera. He was able to use his own experiences in his own struggles to understand and empathize with others in one thousand nine hundred forty four standard oil, hard parks is a photographer. He would continue to hone his craft and earn his first real paycheck, traveling around the country shooting scenes and portraits. Like, this one of an oil worker at the pinola Greece plant in Pittsburgh what he's done. He's created a portrait of heroic African American worker. Working for standard oil. You know, this is a immediately technical photograph to produce. And you know, in a very short time parts has learned the skills mastered, those skills, he photographed white fishermen and farmers black pilots training for war. And he continued to break barriers in nineteen forty nine. He was hired as the first black staff photographer at life.

Gordon parks Parks Watson Donald Trump Washington Charles white Ella standard oil Jeffrey Brown Mark shields David Brooks Dc National Gallery of art Washington Washington Eleanor Roosevelt pinola Greece Philip Brooke Evans Langston Hughes
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on 1A

"Plans and keep our doctors, and we had more access to a fair market healthcare choices like we were promised almost a decade ago. Then maybe possibly fort Scott may still to this day have a hospital government expansion does not work because at the end of the day. That's all it is government expansion that does not work unquote that statement from state Representative Trevor Jacobs who represents fort, Scott, Kansas. Jim, what do you think? Well, it doesn't surprise me. The Senator who also represents for Scott is posed a Medicaid expansion and quote unquote government expansion into healthcare as well. Trevor represents I think a pretty distinct point of view in the Kansas legislature in Kansas, politics, generally, conservative, Republicans really have held sway here in recent years that is beginning to change in two thousand sixteen and then again in two thousand eighteen with the election of a democratic governor. But the legislature is still pretty balkanized in terms of the political philosophies which makes. Issues like Medicaid expansion, very complicated. And that was a very complicated explanation of his position. I think with regards to what the Representative said, and we come to Sarah, Jane, tripled breath presentative makes raises a good point healthcare is expensive. It's not getting cheaper anytime soon. Many conservative lawmakers argued that expanding Medicaid would kind of bus the budgets. We'd see some of the things that the Representative wrote in his statement about pharmaceutical vendors in the cost of insurance plans and having what he called fair market healthcare choices is there any data from states that have expanded Medicaid to support Representative Jacobs's argument, there's a bit ten Pat unpack there. So if you're a state conservative state, and you're looking at your budgets, Medicaid costs a lot of money. It is a big number on your budget and the idea of expanding it is just it almost too much to take. But in reality, what happened with the Affordable Care Act is the government said we really want you to expand. We're going to give you money. We're going to give you lots of money. One hundred percent. That dials down to ninety percent of the funds for that expansion population. And it stays at ninety percent of the funds for the expansion population after twenty twenty and so you're not paying most of that out of your state budget. There's the federal government chipping in. So there's that factor. Now, there is the fear that you know, that costs will go up for the state initially because people without insurance or going to run to the hospital and their doctors and get care, and there is some data showing that there is a slight increase in those costs. But the overall data shows it does not a total increase in Medicaid spending. And there's not a significant increase in spending for the state from Medicaid show. Just wanna make sure we're clear, it may well have cost Kansas a lot of money, but can just never would have been paying all that money because the federal government would've brought the money, right? Kansas patriot rights like him arosh, the promise of new technology that brings medicine to the people in remote areas as always just over the horizon, and we never seem to get there. Will it happen someday? Probably. But for decades now, it seems we've been tantalised with promises that never come to fruition. What about alternative ways of? Providing healthcare, whether it's telemedicine another one of our listeners asked about intermediate facilities, not quite a family..

Medicaid fort Scott Representative Jacobs Kansas state Representative Representative federal government legislature Jim Senator Trevor Pat Sarah Jane ninety percent One hundred percent
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on 1A

"That has the have you seen that thinking evolve on that too? Maybe being opposed to the expansion in announcing the hospital closing. And then now saying that oh, this could actually be good for us. Yes. And only thing I can talk about is just my group of friends, I go with the majority of them. I can see the that. That's something. We should probably think about doing. So I think. Kansan Zor figuring that out. Oh, I should have gone. The other way to show you something else. It's not too late. We'll go this way on the way downtown. That was Janice few inns in fort, Scott, Kansas speaking to one as James Morrison joining us in studio to discuss what's happening in Kansas and elsewhere is Sarah Jane, triple she's a senior correspondent with Kaiser health news. Sarah, welcome to one A. Thank you. Great to be here. Sarah. Jane, your reactions to what we just heard. You're a native Kansan you were telling me earlier, right? That's right. I grew up in southeastern Kansas, which is known as one of the most. An unhealthy parts of the state by any healthcare outcome measures, low income uninsured Hyon higher uninsured rates and the rest of the state and so forth. I grew up in Parsons, Kansas. So when you flying to conceal you drive down south you pass through fort Scott to get to my hometown. Talk about the impact to a community when a rural hospital close as we heard some of the things from Janice and what she's noticed, but what other kinds of impacts. Should we bear in mind? I think the biggest thing that you heard in Genesis tape is the idea of drive around town and looking at the big lawyers peerless is fort Scott employer too, big one. But it only has a few hundred employees. So that's the largest employer. In town. Hospitals are often either the largest or second or third largest employer in a rural community. So that translates immediately into economic impact. There was a twenty fifteen study that noted that on average ninety nine jobs are lost on average about five point three million in salaries are lost when a hospital closes you. See unemployment rates, go up. There was a twenty two thousand and six study that noted that unemployment rates went up one point four percent in these communities, the that impact immediately because you see doctors moving out of town you see lots of for sale signs on the houses. And then there's the trickle down effect. She mentioned. Nd that price chopper's closing price. Chopper may or may not be closing because the hospitals closing, but they weren't making enough money there, the revenues, and you see that happening across the country and across the state, and and there's that impact then there's the emotional impact in these communities when the hospital is the place where almost all the children are born in a family or all the children in our family are born it has a very emotional connection for that family. And you almost always know somebody who's working at the hospital who is Ben to the hospital. It's it's kind of a foundation, sir. Why wire these hospitals closing why is this happening? Well, I think some of the factors are predictable. Right. You have towns that are shrinking incised slowly, you have a loss of income from that. You also have a lower median income in many of these communities than in the urban counterparts. There's a larger elderly population as well. Then there's also some interesting trends that you might not expect there's a term I learned a few weeks ago called out migration. And that's when actually Janice mentioned this when she was speaking to James they. Don't necessarily go to the hospital that much so they'll bypass the local hospital because they know that in Kansas City. There is expert children's hospital or they'll go out to another hospital. That's a critical access hospital that may have a more services because they had some more surgeons or something they may have orthopedics cardiology that this other rule hospital that it's near closing or about to close or has closed cut the services because they were trying to save money. So there's this out migrating trend. There's also the trend of higher deductibles on insurance. I've talked to some people who say, you know, our deductibles went up to twenty five hundred dollars, and I just can't afford to go to the doctor anymore..

Sarah Jane Janice Kansas fort Scott James Morrison Kansas City Zor Parsons Scott Ben Kaiser twenty five hundred dollars four percent
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on 1A

1A

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on 1A

"This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson. In Washington healthcare can be hard enough to get in rural America. Now, it is getting harder with hospitals closing down. Nearly a hundred rural hospitals have closed in the past decade. Another six hundred are at risk. Many are in the fourteen states that have not expanded Medicaid, but is expanding Medicaid. The solution. Is it that simple? Or is something bigger happening. How are these hospital closures affecting conservative lawmakers who opposed Medicaid expansion in their states our new project one a across America headed to fort Scott, Kansas a town of about eight thousand people mercy health system stopped running that towns hospital on New Year's Eve now the one hundred seventy one bed facility sits mostly empty longtime resident Janice few inns is a retired teacher. She gave one as James Morrison a tour of her town and the hospital if you need to move that seek. Can just with only side. Sure. Yeah. There's a it's just an automatic to just, you know, back automatically do you need more room. No, this is fine. Well, it'll be interesting for you to see the little town. We. Kind of struggled through that recession. You know, the began in two thousand eight things just start to build up. Then something will go out. And we go. Hoping. This is somebody came in just last year him really fixed that up put a new price chopper, and it's only been there year. Now, they're already leaving. And everybody's just like mercy said they were closing. And then then just a few months later price chopper's close. Now, this is the big industry is peerless products. They manufacture windows for commercial buildings, and they just added that large building back there. The old hospital was right up on that hill. And I think I told you that they before they were going to tear it down the community came and formed a circle around. Everybody held hands. We brought our kids too because they were all three born there. We wanted them to remember where they were boring because that was going to be gone. Now, some doctors offices will remain at fort Scott's hospital, a private physical therapy company has moved in. And mercy health system says it will keep the emergency room open through this month jenness few and says, she's hopeful that city leaders will find a replacement hospital operator, she's a registered Republican who says she supports expanding Medicaid in Kansas. When you still have our emergency services. Thankfully, that was the first thing we all worried about is what happens when something. Traumatic cabins to us. So that's still going to be here. I believe and then the doctor's offices are still going to be here. So it seems like there's still some operations going on outside of the emergency room here. Yes. But it's not nearly as much as used to go on. Yes. Basically what we're missing is. For instance, my husband had to have gallbladder surgery, and you know, that comes on quickly, and we could come in here, and he had it within an hour having the attack that's going to be gone. Now, if he had it we'd have to get an EMMY and listen drive, thirty miles to get to a hospital and us in particular, the doctor who did that is not here any longer. So we'd have to go and get a new doctor. When was it that you learned that the the hospital was going to close here? Oh, I think it was right before Christmas. So it was quick than a month. Until I knew like a lot of the discussion around like, the hospitals closing is would expanding Medicaid help it out has there been any discussion of that. Or do you think that that would have helped a hospital? It would have helped some because I think it was would have meant two point one million or something like that for this hospital a year in that wouldn't have been enough to save it they say, but it probably would have helped and part of the. Mercy said that the hospital wasn't being used enough. Well, isn't it's underutilized because the people can't afford to come the ones who would have qualified for the Medicare expansion would have been able to. Imagine you talked a lot of people spin around town..

Medicaid fort Scott Kansas Joshua Johnson America Mercy Washington EMMY James Morrison Janice
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Ads have free anything or limited time off, whatever. It's always get my free book, request, my formation, all this sort of stuff. Right. So we build all that out for our client. It's and within a year or two this stuff really starts to snowball. And you see what happens is now this person is the authority because they're the person who's pushing out the information on persons, pushing the content. The same thing online, you get active on Facebook on YouTube and next thing, you know, you're starting to get the media requests people are coming to you for interviews and all of these sorts of things happen. And you know, I'm still just a dentist. There are my skill set is very equal to majority of dentists out there, but I'm perceived here and very different level, and that's strategically built. So that's what I need by thirty plot. So many many examples I could give but that's the strategy. You know, what's amazing? We talked about Southwest Airlines, you know, earlier number one airline twenty seven percent of all see miles. I've had so many dentists come on this show, and they were discussing like say dental implants or they were causing dentistry or whatever. And they've emailed me back. They said dude, you put that on YouTube. I've gotten so many patients that because here they were Denison, New Jersey doing implants. And they're saying that this guy's being interviewed on this national show. And then what surprising? The most is how many people were actually flying into see them. And then when I look at when I look at websites, the people wanna see their own work. Like if I had to have say I have a facelift, and I go to your website, and there's none of your before. And after work, and then I go to another guy's website, and he's got ten or fifteen these these are Dr Carlos Biassa cheese work these were done by him himself. And as those are the people that are getting patience to jump at airplane and fly across and I was starting to sorta mining Kansas City, and he felt so bad because he was doing this on big implant case and the guy flew, and I think it was from fort, Scott, Kansas and the guy actually. The guy in fort, Scott, Kansas, who's just crushing it and the diplomat international congresswoman pathology, he says, dude, if you go to his website, he doesn't have one before and after case, but when this guy comes in lectures to your study club, he shows twenty cases, and they're not even on his website. He's it's like crazy crazy. I wanna go. I wanna go back to on the website deal. One hundred sixty hours a week when you're when you're softwares recording this phone conversation. How big do you need to open that funnel? Is that a big factor? I mean most Dennis answer their phone eight to five Monday to Thursday and most of the research icy. That's only about fifty percent of the incoming calls come in which is thirty two hours a week, which is nineteen percent of the hundred sixty hours week and the other half or coming in the other eighty one percent of the hours in your how how important is it to open that funnel to answering calls. I if you're open eight to five well right now when I drive into work, the freeways are pack from about seven to eight. So is that win they're calling and you should be answering the phone or does that not really matter market was seven to seven and the reasonable about the two seven answering the phone or seventy seven answering the phone and making the pizza and the and the root canals. I think you. Can be open eight thirty to five thirty kind of thing. I mean, we run eight to six here. But as the phone seven two seven six days a week is what the market avenue, and it's really easy to do that. I mean, very simply you just get a cell phone you pay a staff member..

Dr Carlos Biassa YouTube Scott Kansas Southwest Airlines Facebook Kansas City New Jersey Dennis One hundred sixty hours twenty seven percent hundred sixty hours eighty one percent nineteen percent thirty two hours fifty percent
"fort scott kansas" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"fort scott kansas" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"It's a little harder out in the western part, but they're, they're realizing how important it is to reach out to other Democrats into unaffiliated to make sure that we get these people out to vote. And that's just going on tremendously. Here. I live in Johnston county, which is in the Kansas City metropolitan area and the the the activity here is amazing. When we go into the office, there's just people there all the time phone banking or coming in for signs coming into get list to go out and canvass. It's amazing. It's really exciting, Kansas sitting tends to be maybe slightly older population, but what does the the youth vote? The youth energy looked like this year. Have been another one of our targets and we have organizers on the main campuses around the state. So k. u. k. state Ford, hey, state down in Pittsburgh. And so we have those organizers who are actively daily going out to get, make sure they get people registered to vote. And I was over at a KU event just about a week or so ago is a training session, and it was great to see the young people coming and learning what they need to do to get out and get to the voters, and then taking those lists and going out and knocking on doors. So you know, not only are they working on the campus to talk to people, but they're willing to go out into the communities around the campuses to and and make sure voters get out. So I'm very hopeful. What are some of the issues that you think voters are really concerned with the year because of the dire straits. I think that the Brownback administration put us in by cutting taxes and cutting revenue flow. We're still dealing with making sure we can fund our public education. So that's still a big one. Whether it's in the the suburbs or whether it's out in, you know, smaller rural areas, everyone's worried about making sure school stay open. But the other critical thing is Medicaid expansion, and we just recently had a hospital close in fort Scott, Kansas. So these, some of these more rural hospitals are not able to stay open and serve the those, those smaller communities. Because many of them do rely on, you know, the Medicaid services. So that's pretty important. I think that that's a big issue, those two things and then probably just make. Sure that we get back to a more stable revenue plan. That's fair for people might think that once it came out that there were actually businesses that weren't having to pay any taxes, people weren't very happy with that. So it's just about, it's about, you know, I think people realize we have to pay taxes, that's that's the way the state makes their money and then. But you know, Brownback went from a system of of having three sources of revenue with the income sales and property. He wanted to get rid of the income tax. But yeah, that just cut too sharply into the revenue and costs us in in keeping our roads up and keeping our schools funded and a lot of services. So. So those are some big issues. And then I think also just mental health services, making sure that we're providing for some of our neediest in the state. There's been some real problems with people being able to access services through through Medicaid. And then also some of our hospitals have had to close. I mean, just the the mental facilities people are really starting to see what happens when you cut so sharply. Cut back on the revenue. Is there any concern about of voter, registration, and voter rolls being updated and things like that? I know that people may know of crisco buck as the co chair of this voter, integrity, quote, unquote committee. And of course he is currently the secretary of state and is running for governor. And so you know, I don't know if there's any concerns about overly restrictive voter registration laws or anything like that. Big cred Sern. Yeah, we've had this concern about Kobe for years when he has. You know, specifically targeted with this voter ID law, you know, in in which is just made it so difficult for, you know, people who don't have the means maybe to track down their birth certificate and and find all the things that you had to had to have to get his no proof of citizenship kind of thing..

Brownback Kansas k. u. k. state Ford Kansas City Johnston county fort Scott Kobe Pittsburgh