17 Burst results for "Fort Scott"

"fort scott" Discussed on Successful Farming Podcast

Successful Farming Podcast

02:07 min | 5 months ago

"fort scott" Discussed on Successful Farming Podcast

"Welcome to the successful farming podcast. I'm jodi hanky in this episode. You're going to hear how one woman's passions and agricultural experiences as a child and in college has led to her career brandy. Buzzard is communications director for the red angus association of america. She also advocates for the well being of animal. Agriculture owns a ranch in. Kansas has a family and blogs about those experiences. Successful farming's bill spiegel talks with brandy and the many paths. She has taken on her journey. Tell me a little bit about you like where you grew up how you got involved in agriculture. Well i have a pretty boring. I guess background. I guess i i live in the same county. I grew up which i love. I i grew up in anderson county around colony kansas. And now i live in greeley. I grew up like most rural kansas kids. I was in four h. Ffa and we have what i would call a a hobby ranch had lot of horses and we had four h. animals and we didn't have a cow calf heard or stockers anything like that in terms of production cattle production beef production but we always had roping calves or open steer so we had cattle. But we didn't use them. You know i guess we sold them and they went onto the beef chain. So i guess is that but we were not like production facility. Now i went to fort scott community college and then onto k. State i always knew that. I wanted to be involved in agriculture. You know very few ag careers you know like a teacher. Veterinarian maybe ag lender insurance salesman like those are kinda the ones you know. So i just figured i would into one of those. I was going to be a vet. And i shadowed a lot of vets. When i was in high school and then i realize i would have to do surgery and that way way too much on my shoulders and think about having to do surgery on little cat so i decided not to do that. And then I found my way into animal science at k. State and got my master's there as well. And i've always loved science. But i kinda love communicating science. And i figured out maybe i should have added.

jodi hanky red angus association of ameri bill spiegel Buzzard kansas anderson county fort scott community college greeley Ffa Kansas
"fort scott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott" Discussed on KCRW

"For the arts. This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Corona virus pandemic has put Immense strain on U. S hospitals not only have nearly 1300 healthcare workers died, but dozens of hospitals have filed for bankruptcy. And rural America is bearing the brunt of this trend, which started before the pandemic more than 130 rural hospitals have closed in the past decade. 15 In 2020 alone, joined now. By Sarah Jane Tribble of Kaiser Health News who's been covering these closures. And the communities which they affect Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me. You have a podcast called where it hurts, And it's about Fort Scott, Kansas on what happened to the people there after the town hospital closed. Why did you have spend more than here reporting on this one Small town? Well, Scott, I'm from Roll Kansas. I grew up on a gravel road in the southeastern part of the state. Just in our from this town, Fort Scott. My parents still live there. It was my mom who called me one day and totally Mercy Hospital was closing. And it closed at the same time. My older sister, who was living just outside of Kansas City, was sick with pancreatic cancer. So I was thinking a lot about how people use the health system at the time. You've reported on some of the many reasons why rural hospitals are losing money, including their own areas. They're losing population and the aging population. But now that this this hospital mercy in Fort Scott is closed, Where do people Who need medical help go for treatment. Well, people have to drive further. They have to drive further to have a baby to get dialysis. They even have to drive further for their chemotherapy treatment, and that's really hard. Rule. Americans as a whole tend to be an older and sicker population, and they have lower incomes. I spoke to people who couldn't afford that Dr. One of the saddest things is when a small town hospital closes. It affects those people's sense of place. Their pride in their community, and the people feel less secure and more vulnerable. Like Linda Finley, her husband died just after the hospital closed, and now she lives alone. You know, I don't think losing the hospitals the end of the world for Fort Scott But I sure think it What an ugly notch in her belt and not just Fort Scott. All these other hospitals that have closed down. I mean, my guy. You need to feel like you're safe and could be taken care of where those air really fears. We know that people who live in rural places where hospital has closed are more likely to die than those who live in cities where a hospital has closed and now course were in the eighth month of a pandemic. And in fact, in rural America, Corona virus cases seem to be at record levels. What does this mean? For people who live in communities like Fort Scott, where hospitals have closed? Yeah, it's really troubling. We know. Covert 19 is more dangerous for certain people like older Americans, but also people who are obese and people who have chronic diseases like diabetes. Plus, we know the virus is especially difficult for people of color. When you consider that role, hospital closures have happened more frequently in the South. It's a recipe for more deaths. And surgeon. What are you hearing out of Fort Scott during this pandemic with the hospital gown? Just this week, I heard there's a surge of cases in southeast Kansas. So after Mercy Hospital closed in Fort Scott two years ago, the next closest hospital became via Christie in a town called Pittsburgh. That hospital said this week that they have 20 Cove in 19 patients in their beds. That's a significant number for them, so they're temporarily stopping elective surgeries and procedures to deal with this surge of patients and That's going to hurt their bottom line. I'm wondering what you've learned from people in Fort Scott that other communities might learn from right now. I talked with a lot of people in Fort Scott, who have really significant health care needs, and they were scared when the hospital closed. But even if the hospital had not closed, not all of their health problems could have been taken care of at the hospital. Hospitals are not always the best place for people who need help managing their chronic illnesses like emphysema and diabetes, not to mention addiction and mental health issues. I saw people in Fort Scott gradually come to terms with this idea that a traditional hospital may not be what they really need. Often just a good community Health clinic can fill some of the gaps and some rule places have tried a kind of hybrid hospital just an emergency room with maybe a few overnight beds. Sarah Jane, troubled health reporter at Kaiser Health News, Talking about the closing of rural hospitals and the stories she found in one small Kansas town where that's happened, you can hear more. In her narrative podcast where it hurts. Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for being with us. You're welcome, Scott. President Trump and Joe Biden are making last minute pitches to seniors. Trump campaign yesterday did crowded rallies in Florida and Georgia. Biden spoke to socially distant supporters in Michigan. Nearly one and for eligible voters are over 65 this election that makes him critical to the candidates for Trump. He's trying to show more empathetic side when talking about the pandemic. He's earned poor marks for how he's handled it. But after recovering from covert 19 himself, and as the calendar winds down to election day, he's trying out a new approach. NPR White House correspondent issue Roscoe joins us to tell us about it, Kisha Thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me with some questions about the president's own health Still in the air, he was in Florida with a group of seniors. And of course, we will note, according to the U. S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention people who are.

Fort Scott Scott Simon Mercy Hospital Kansas Sarah Jane Sarah Jane Tribble Kaiser Health News U. S Centers for Disease Contr NPR News America President Trump Kansas City U. S Joe Biden pancreatic cancer NPR community Health clinic
"fort scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of hot spot around the Bay Area today conquered expecting a high of 96 degrees 91 in Napa Sacramento incentives. This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Corona virus pandemic has put Immense strain on U. S hospitals not only have nearly 1300 healthcare workers died, but dozens of hospitals have filed for bankruptcy. And rural America is bearing the brunt of this trend, which started before the pandemic more than 130 rural hospitals have closed in the past decade. 15 In 2020 alone, joined now. By Sarah Jane Tribble of Kaiser Health News who's been covering these closures. And the communities which they affect Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me. You have a podcast called where it hurts. And it's about Fort Scott. Kansas on what happened to the people there after the town hospital closed. Why did you have spend more than eager reporting on this one small town? Well, Scott, I'm from Roll Kansas. I grew up on a gravel road in the southeastern part of the state just in our from this town, Fort Scott. My parents still live there. It was my mom who called me one day and told me Mercy Hospital was closing. And it closed at the same time. My older sister, who was living just outside of Kansas City, was sick with pancreatic cancer. So I was thinking a lot about how people use the health system at the time. You've reported on some of the many reasons why rural hospitals losing money, including their own areas, they're losing population in the aging population. But now that this this hospital mercy in Fort Scott has closed, Where do people who need medical help go for treatment? Well, people have to drive further. They have to dry further to have a baby to get dialysis. They even have to drive further for their chemotherapy treatment, and that's really hard. Roll Americans as a whole 10 ditty and older and sicker population and they have lower incomes. I spoke to people who couldn't afford that Dr. One of the saddest things is when a small town hospital closes. It affects those people's sense of place. Their pride in their community, and the people feel less secure and more vulnerable. Like Linda Finley, her husband died just after the hospital closed, and now she lives alone. You know, I don't think losing the hospitals the end of the world for Fort Scott But I sure think it What an ugly notch in her belt and not just for Scott. All these other hospitals that have closed down. I mean, my gosh, You need to feel like you're safe and could be taking care of where those air really fears. We know that people who live in rural places where hospital has closed are more likely to die than those who live in cities where a hospital has closed and now course were in the eighth month of a pandemic on DH infact in rural America, Corona virus cases seem to be at record levels. What does this mean? For people who live in communities like Fort Scott, where hospitals have closed? Yeah, it's really troubling. We know. Covert 19 is more dangerous for certain people like older Americans, but also people who are obese and people who have chronic diseases like diabetes. Plus, we know the virus is especially difficult for people of color, winding sitter that role. Hospital closures have happened more frequently in the South. It's a recipe for more deaths. And surgeon. What are you hearing out of Fort Scott during this pandemic with the hospital? Just this week, I heard there's a surge of cases in southeast Kansas. So after mercy Hospital closed and fourth Scott two years ago, the next closest hospital became via Christie in a town called Pittsburgh. That hospital said this week that they have 20 Cove. It 19 patients in their beds. That's a significant number for them. So they're temporarily stopping elective surgeries and procedures to deal with this surge of patients and That's going to hurt their bottom line. I'm wondering what you've learned from people in Fort Scott that other communities might learn from right now. I talked with a lot of people in Fort Scott, who have really significant health care needs, and they were scared when the hospital closed. But even if the hustle had not closed, not all of their health problems could have been taken care of at the hospital. Hospitals are not always the best place for people who need help managing their chronic illnesses like emphysema and diabetes, not to mention addiction and mental health issues. I saw people in Fort Scott gradually come to terms with this idea that a traditional hospital may not be what they really need. Often just a good community Health clinic can fill some of the gaps and some rule places have tried a kind of hybrid hospital just an emergency room with maybe a few overnight beds. Sarah Jane Trouble, the health reporter at Kaiser Health News, Talking about the closing of rural hospitals and the stories she found in one small Kansas town where that's happened, you can hearme or in her narrative podcast where it hurts. Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for being with us. You're welcome, Scott. President Trump and Joe Biden are making last minute pitches to seniors. Trump campaign yesterday did crowded rallies in Florida and Georgia. Biden spoke to socially distant supporters in Michigan. Nearly one and for eligible voters are over 65 this election that makesem critical to the candidates for Trump. He's trying to show more empathetic side when talking about the pandemic. He's earned poor marks for how he's handled it. But after recovering from covert 19 himself, and as the calendar winds down to election day, he's trying out a new approach. NPR.

Fort Scott Scott Simon Mercy Hospital Sarah Jane Sarah Jane Tribble Kaiser Health News NPR News Kansas President Trump America Bay Area Sacramento Joe Biden Kansas City Sarah Jane Trouble U. S
"fort scott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott" Discussed on KCRW

"This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Corona virus pandemic has put Immense strain on U. S hospitals not only have nearly 1300 healthcare workers died, but dozens of hospitals have filed for bankruptcy. And rural America is bearing the brunt of this trend, which started before the pandemic more than 130 rural hospitals have closed in the past decade. 15 In 2020 alone, joined now. By Sarah Jane Tribble of Kaiser Health News who's been covering these closures. And the communities which they affect Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me. You have a podcast called where it hurts, And it's about Fort Scott, Kansas on what happened to the people there after the town hospital closed. Why did you have spend more than here reporting on this one Small town? Well, Scott, I'm from rule Kansas. I grew up on a gravel road in the southeastern part of the state. Just in our from this town, Fort Scott. My parents still live there. It was my mom who called me one day and told me Mercy Hospital was closing. And it closed at the same time. My older sister, who was living just outside of Kansas City, with sick with pancreatic cancer. So I was thinking a lot about how people use the health system at the time. You've reported on some of the many reasons why rural hospitals losing money, including their own areas, they're losing population and the aging population. But now that this this hospital mercy in Fort Scott is closed, Where do people Who need medical help go for treatment. Well, people have to drive further. They have to drive further to have a baby to get dialysis. They even have to drive further for their chemotherapy treatment, and that's really hard. Rule. Americans as a whole tend to be an older and sicker population, and they have lower incomes. I spoke to people who couldn't afford that Dr. One of the saddest things is when a small town hospital closes. It affects those people's sense of place. Their pride in their community, and the people feel less secure and more vulnerable. Like Linda Finley, her husband died just after the hospital closed, and now she lives alone. You know, I don't think losing the hospitals the end of the world for Fort Scott But I sure think it Put an ugly notch in your belt and not just Fort Scott. All these other hospitals that have closed down. I mean, my guy. You need to feel like you're safe and could be taken care of where those are real fears. We know that people who live in rural places where hospital has closed are more likely to die than those who live in cities where our hospital has closed and now course were in the eighth month of a pandemic, and in fact, in rural America, Corona virus cases seem to be at record levels. Ah, What does this mean? For people who live in communities like Fort Scott, where hospitals have closed? Yeah, it's really troubling. We know. Covert 19 is more dangerous for certain people like older Americans, but also people who are obese and people who have chronic diseases like diabetes. Plus, we know the virus is especially difficult for people of color. When you consider that role, hospital closures have happened more frequently in the South. It's a recipe for more deaths. And surgeon. What are you hearing out of Fort Scott during this pandemic with the hospital gown? Just this week, I heard there's a surge of cases in southeast Kansas. So after Mercy Hospital closed in Fort Scott two years ago, the next closest hospital became via Christie in a town called Pittsburgh. That hospital said this week that they have 20 Cove in 19 patients in their beds. That's a significant number for them, so they're temporarily stopping elective surgeries and procedures to deal with this surge of patients and That's going to hurt their bottom line. I'm wondering what you've learned from people in Fort Scott that other communities might learn from right now. I talked with a lot of people in Fort Scott, who have really significant health care needs, and they were scared when the hospital closed. But even if the hospital had not closed, not all of their health problems could have been taken care of at the hospital. Hospitals are not always the best place for people who need help managing their chronic illnesses like emphysema and diabetes, not to mention addiction and mental health issues. I saw people in Fort Scott gradually come to terms with this idea that a traditional hospital may not be what they really need. Often just a good community Health clinic can fill some of the gaps and some rule places have tried a kind of hybrid hospital just an emergency room with maybe a few overnight beds. Sarah Jane, Triple a health reporter at Kaiser Health News, talking about the closing of rural hospitals and the stories she found in one small Kansas town where that's happened, you can hear more. In her narrative podcast where it hurts. Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for being with us. You're welcome, Scott. President Trump and Joe Biden are making last minute pitches to seniors. Trump campaign yesterday did crowded rallies in Florida and Georgia. Biden spoke to socially distant supporters in Michigan. Nearly one and for eligible voters are over 65 this election that makes him critical to the candidates for Trump. He's trying to show more empathetic side when talking about the pandemic. He's earned poor marks for how he's handled it. But after recovering from covert 19 himself, and as the calendar winds down to election day, he's trying out a new approach. NPR White House correspondent issue Roscoe joins us to tell us about it, Nisha thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me with some questions about the president's own health.

Fort Scott Scott Simon Mercy Hospital Kansas Sarah Jane Sarah Jane Tribble Kaiser Health News NPR News America President Trump Kansas City U. S Joe Biden pancreatic cancer community Health clinic NPR
"fort scott" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"You guys thes community colleges between 2000 and $5000. Dollars per year per year. We're talking about no more than 100 bucks a week for your college for your post high school education. That's what I'm talking about. It's affordable. It's doable. No stress, no entrance exams. None of the waiting vo biting your nails waiting to see you got accepted. You walk up, you enroll. And you're accepted and you're doing it for a fraction of what other people are paying, walking out with an incredible, unbelievable degree getting into it in no particular order. Foothill College. This is all sent in my listeners. Foothill College located low salt those HILLS, California, an institution offers a broad range academic brought all kinds of academic programs. Left and right, different. I mean, very diverse 1500 year. These are the numbers being sent to me here. All of these colleges I'm not even going to say the amounts except to tell you there between $1000 a year and $5000 a year. Very doable Numbers. Walla Walla Community College, located near one of our best stations, while the wall community college there in Washington State. Unbelievable program. Hugely diverse. Great. Now I can't even list all of the various programs if I'm going to get through these 30 Next up. I love how these community colleges keep popping up in some of the most expensive states in the union, Santa Barbara City College, highly ranked people walk out happy with great degrees. I'm going to butcher the next one technical college system of George's Altamaha Technical College. All of these between five grand a year to all the way down to one grand a year. It's unbelievable. Next up North Central Kansas Technical College. I love the Midwest. It is so beautiful, stuffed with some of the nicest people you'd ever want to meet in your life. I'm so proud to hail my family tree from the Midwest South Dakota, namely Lovett Lake Area Technical Institute in Watertown, South Dakota. Speaking of all of these degrees guys to be had for five grand or less per year, according to this printout that I have right here. Lake Area Technical Institute, Watertown, South Dakota. I've been to that town many times. My beloved family summer trips is a kid. Beautiful country. Amazing Institute. Get your degree for far less and enjoy habitation with some of the finest people on earth. Will you do it? Fort Scott Community College Fort Scott, Kansas Love all these Midwestern towns. Fantastic degrees. I am looking at bullet point after bullet point of what they offer with regards to degrees..

Foothill College Walla Walla Community College Fort Scott Community College F Midwest South Dakota Lovett Lake Area Technical Ins Altamaha Technical College North Central Kansas Technical Santa Barbara City College wall community college Watertown Midwest Amazing Institute Kansas California George Washington State
"fort scott" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"fort scott" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"I prefer to have someone on you know, in the foxhole with me of win a sketch is dying or, you know, an improvised scene is dying. And, you know, I'm a team sport guy, and so like Stand up, You know, all respect those guys and gals but doing on a daily, you know, nightly basis, But for me, it's too scary. I want someone in the ship with me. We're going down to look at each other and be like, Oh, here we go. This is not flying because that time I did it. I immediately called a buddy who works for that company and text him afterwards going to I just I just do keys for a large chunk of change from a local. You know, local boy does good. And then clearly you're not that good was it was it was it was It was intimidating to say the least. And, yes, that sort of having no one else to blame it on the side, you know? This yourself in your apathy or your work ethic is too much for me to handle. No, can't do it. But here you are hosting this and explain the premise of tournament of laughs. You basically just you know, it was, you know, pitched a while. Back by the producers as a way to Ah, you know, make up for the march Madness tournament for for you know being, you know, cancel this year and yes, basically stand up. People who primarily, you know from stand up with, you know, the different folks do like Michael Rapaport triumph. The insult comic dog, you know, have fun making home videos. And then Yeah, letting letting audience you decide who moves on. Andi. I'm basically putting or doing your old gig. You know, I kind of like the host of SportsCenter. I You know, just doing little commentary before and afterwards and just kind of explaining when you know a number eight seed of Has upset a number two seed or what have you and yeah, it's You know, today we film it based on tonight or last night, you know results, So it's about as close to home the smell. Turn around that we used to have. Ah, Which is which is one because I'll do like, you know a table read here in an hour or so. And then. Well, you know, but yeah, turn around, turn around pretty pretty exciting, too, because it's just like, go, go, go. We got it. We got a film so they can edit it and have it ready for next week and And you know, just one thing after another. He's Jason's today because the show is tournament of laughs. It airs Sundays at 10 Eastern on TBS. When you were in college at Fort Scott Community College. Did we ever show any of your highlights on SportsCenter? I don't think so. Okay, there was maybe on ESPN four might even further down like in between, you know, footage of a father and son playing catch outback. You know, it was it was it was a highlight had money. What was the highlight? Of your college basketball career. That's a good question. Probably probably when we played against Ruben Patterson and independent Community College and he had, like 50 points on us. I would say 40 of more dunks like that was the highlight. He went to Cincinnati after that, did he Yeah. I mean, I mean to play basketball. How much you wanted Classic, you know, probably hugging you. Whoa, Coach with a different mentality, You know, maybe the nineties, you know, and I was also wondering about Ted Lasso. Yeah. Now you did those pro Moe's for the Premier League with NBC and then All of a sudden. Are we going to a Siri's on Ted Lasso? Is this like a Brockmeyer? Jim Brockmeyer, Right? Know that which is one of my father's favorite shows when he when he heard we were doing the show you and I'm told the premise was like, Hey, Brockmeyer, which is you know if I can make my dad happy that way on all fours, but But, yeah, I mean, yeah, just 77 short years later now coming to Annapolis on Apple Plus channel near you, But yeah, the trailer drops tomorrow, actually. Andi, yet we're still in the first season. It comes out August 14th on Apple. Plus, and it's the same premises. The first commercial I'm gonna I'm a small time in college football Coach Get tired to coach professional No Premier League team stolen FC Richmond But But, Yeah, wait 10 episodes. Ah, but all in all states in about a month is the moustache Real? Julia very much. It wasn't It wasn't in the second commercial. The second commercial. We didn't have time to grow it, But we had some of the genes of China things at us, and I'll help you help me do that, by the others for the TV show all real all real and the accent's real, too. If I had enough jacking it But do you do know soccer? Or is that part of the fun of this? That I think you're a football coach going? Are you a A real football coach like our football Then you go over there, okay? Is that like the whole? Probably I was a football coach from Wichita State. Which doesn't have a football team, so you know, and then Yeah, I had a viral video. Kind of like, you know that great video of Roy Williams, you know, walking into the locker room after a target victory and dancing and everything for his players. And that video of the eye of the owner of Ah professional soccer team over there in the UK and so they hire me, you know, just to sort of shake things up. Um, because they're at the point of possibly being relegated and all that. And so, yeah, but dance your question. I learn. I learn more and more with every with every night that I you know, play FIFA. I learned a little bit more about the beautiful game. But logically. No, I didn't. I don't know much and A lot of those commercials like the guy who plays my assistant coach Brandon the Hunt, who's also my coach on the show in Monday, co writers co creators, that's how we describe he describes. You know, football or soccer to me is by using metaphor, whether it be from You know, 19 eighties hip hop Broadway musicals like he can break it down for me, if if I You know, paralleling something I already know. And that's sort of part of the fun of police for the drive for the comedy of the show, and then then the rest is all just, you know the high stakes. Are you too old now I think you're turning 1 45 So are you too old to play video games at home? Will your wife allow you to play the game? Oh, yeah. No. We got a little six year old boy who we play, We will play through. You know, Lego Star Wars mean deep deep concern in our household about him becoming addicted, But I way have we have a group of guys from from the show that do play FIFA like they have a thing called Pro clubs. You know that we play almost, you know. Almost nightly, You know, like a golf course, like, hey, you know, we have a text chain going. Hey, you know, someone send out the bat signal..

football soccer FIFA basketball Apple Fort Scott Community College Ted Lasso Michael Rapaport Ruben Patterson ESPN golf Jim Brockmeyer Cincinnati Andi Jason NBC Siri Wichita State
"fort scott" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Had breakfast yesterday morning with our sky copter team as I'm in fort Scott slate of term limits team we got together yesterday and pilot said you Mrs an good flying weather yeah I certainly am it's not going to stick around if you like this weather checking out Kirk malicious blog this morning on WSB radio dot com curfew calling for quite a change that's for sure much wetter one on the way it's gonna extend through much of next week it won't rain every day won't rain all day when it does but it's certainly going all add up over time now we stay dry for today and for tonight on nine on the mileage meter today increasing clouds this afternoon hi sixty three low tonight forty nine tomorrow cloudy only a thirty percent chance of a light shower mainly afternoon or evening high sixty four Saturday a forty percent chance of a morning shower then a heavy showers strong thunderstorm ninety percent likely especially late afternoon or evening hi seventy one low fifty one recapping our forecast for today increasing clouds during the afternoon and a high around sixty three temperatures around the area right now the suburban school bus stops Alpharetta twenty nine Kennesaw thirty Marianna thirty two and Lawrenceville thirty thirty five on Peachtree street I'm meteorologist Kirk knowledge ninety five point five WS space enjoy breaking biscuits with the boys but now time for us all to go back to work triple team traffic comfortable good shape over there seventy five eighty five north and south of just plot their downfall you big greasy but they'll be crashes or slow gold or a different story on the south side.

fort Scott Kirk WSB Kennesaw
"fort scott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wellness options for guests including their eat well menu on demand fitness gear lending program and signature heavenly bed learn more at Weston dot com a member of Marriott Bonnefoy this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Layla father nearly twenty rural hospitals close this year alone more than any year in the past decade and that piece of closures is expected to continue as the cost of healthcare rises with too few patients to cover expenses the town of fort Scott Kansas lost its one hundred and thirty two year old Catholic hospital at the end of two thousand eighteen and P. R. ends Kaiser health news have followed the city as it has tried to cope without it surging trouble with Kaiser health news travel to fort Scott this month where she found a town that was angry and scared but also coming to terms with what's left and Sara Jane joins me now in the studio good morning good morning so when the hospital closes what happens to a community what do the people of fort Scott said a mess and they still need well after the customer closed a year ago the cancer center also closed and then the dialysis center closed and a lot of residents I talked on this most recent trip we're most concerned about the lack of a place to deliver a baby mercy hospital in fort Scott delivered more than two hundred and thirty babies in the year before it closed now those mothers need to travel to the nearest hospital which is about thirty miles away to respect him for example had complications that put her on bed rest so when the time came to drive the hospital the drive really bothered her which you do live in a city you do travel seven to the hospital but this is a different kind of traffic you're on a two lane highway a lot of times you could get behind you know semi you get behind a tractor you know and it can be potentially unsafe driving conditions sometimes you're lucky if you have cell service so what kind of healthcare is actually left in fort Scott well it's not all bad news that nearby hospital thirty miles away has kept the emergency department open at least temporarily and the large regional health centre hired most of the local doctors and they took over the buildings there in fort Scott is providing many.

Marriott Bonnefoy fort Scott Kansas old Catholic hospital P. R. Sara Jane fort Scott Weston dot NPR
"fort scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Menu on demand fitness gear lending program and signature heavenly bed learn more at Weston dot com a member of Merion von boy and from the listeners who support this NPR station this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Layla father nearly twenty rural hospitals close this year alone more than any year in the past decade and that piece of closures is expected to continue as the cost of healthcare rises with too few patients to cover expenses the town of fort Scott Kansas lost its one hundred and thirty two year old Catholic hospital at the end of two thousand eighteen and P. R. and Kaiser health news have followed the city as it has tried to cope without it surging trouble with Kaiser health news travel to fort Scott this month where she found a town that was angry and scared but also coming to terms with what's left and Sara Jane joins me now in the studio good morning good morning so when the hospital closes what happens to a community what do the people of fort Scott said a mess and they still need well after the hospital closed a year ago the cancer center also closed and then the dialysis center closed and a lot of residents I talk to on this most recent trip we're most concerned about the lack of a place to deliver a baby mercy hospital in fort Scott delivered more than two hundred and thirty babies in the year before it closed now those mothers need to travel to the nearest hospital which is about thirty miles away to respect him for example had complications that put on bed rest so when the time came to drive the hospital the drive really bother her with you do live in a city you do travel seven to the hospital but this is a different kind of traffic you're on a two lane highway a lot of times you could get behind you know semi you get behind a tractor you know and it can be potentially unsafe driving conditions sometimes you're lucky if you have cell service so what kind of healthcare is actually left in fort Scott well it's not all bad news that nearby hospital thirty miles away has cut the emergency department open at least temporarily and a large regional health centre hired most of the local doctors and they took over the buildings there in fort Scott is providing many.

fort Scott Kansas old Catholic hospital P. R. Sara Jane fort Scott Weston dot Merion NPR
"fort scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Used to be at the fort Scott hospital, fifteen minutes from home. She would run errands in the morning stop by the hospital for her shot, and then drive herself home before the fatigue and nausea. Head. Now, though it's a trip to another town for treatment. Right here. Not the first stop light or stop sign, but the second so I joined her and her driver, sister-in-law deady, coin on a weekly trip at this new place cancer patients go in the back door. I told somebody just feels like we just go in right by the trash, it is a very welcoming. The cancer center is an hour long drive from Cairns farm inbetween, we've has pastures cows grazing and fields of crops, the two lane highways are narrow and uneven. And when a big truck carrying livestock barrels towards us in the opposite lane, the Chevy equinox in shakes it passes. But the drive is actually the least of Cairns worries as she walks up to the nurses cancer care is complicated. RV ladies. We're good. Well, I say, we're good. I went to the emergency room Tuesday. St hydrated. The pukes. They give you the gave me. Yeah, I went to the doctor, I but over there, they don't have any way to give you fluids at the doctor's office. Now, she's lucky friends and relatives. Take turns driving with her for the typically two hour round trip every Monday, and they patiently wait on days, it takes longer like today..

fort Scott hospital Cairns Chevy fifteen minutes two hour
"fort scott" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Is not use the forms with a crease. Golden road game of the week. I'm gonna guess Sparty knocking off Duke to advance who I final four since two thousand fifteen the Duke freshman combined for fifty seven hundred sixty seven points. And I remember when we had Bruce Pearl the Auburn head coach on this was back at the beginning of the season. When Auburn went toe to toe with Duke, and that was I think in the Maui invitational, and Bruce Pearl said there beatable, they're not very deep, and here's dukes freshman combining for fifty seven hundred sixty seven points. Michigan state will play Texas Tech coming up on Saturday night. But you know, you start to think about this with who's in. And you don't think of teams like Texas Tech and Auburn getting this far, and you know, because they're football schools, but both those coaches coach beard, and Bruce Pearl I think coach beard will join us in Minneapolis. Is that right for will? Yeah. What would you re? Read all of the places because this is what happens in the coaching world where you might get a good job. Or there might be a great end result where you're playing for a championship or chance to play for championship. But you forget their road their path, and it happens in my business to a lot of people. I'm very lucky that I didn't have to go, you know, six or seven stops around the country, these coaches, they will coach anywhere. They just want a job and continue to coach. And then try to move onto the next job. You got the I do the places where coach beard has been before Texas starting in ninety one. He was an assistant at Texas for about four years, and he went to incarnate word as an assistant Abilene Christian as an assistant North, Texas as an assistant fort Scott seminal state, which is a junior college Texas Tech associate head coach from two thousand one to eleven South Carolina. Warriors, McMurray Angelo state Little Rock and since two thousand sixteen with the red raiders, South Carolina warriors. The South Carolina warriors two thousand eleven two thousand twelve it's a semi pro basketball team based in Myrtle Beach. All right golden road game of the weekend. Brought to you by the great folks at golden road. And we'll have a meet and greet on Thursday, Minneapolis the bus. Stop.

Bruce Pearl Texas Tech beard Texas Auburn Duke South Carolina Minneapolis Michigan Sparty associate head Little Rock Myrtle Beach basketball Abilene Christian football fort Scott
"fort scott" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on 1A

"Plans and keep our doctors, and we had more access to a fair market healthcare choices like we were promised almost a decade ago. Then maybe possibly fort Scott may still to this day have a hospital government expansion does not work because at the end of the day. That's all it is government expansion that does not work unquote that statement from state Representative Trevor Jacobs who represents fort, Scott, Kansas. Jim, what do you think? Well, it doesn't surprise me. The Senator who also represents for Scott is posed a Medicaid expansion and quote unquote government expansion into healthcare as well. Trevor represents I think a pretty distinct point of view in the Kansas legislature in Kansas, politics, generally, conservative, Republicans really have held sway here in recent years that is beginning to change in two thousand sixteen and then again in two thousand eighteen with the election of a democratic governor. But the legislature is still pretty balkanized in terms of the political philosophies which makes. Issues like Medicaid expansion, very complicated. And that was a very complicated explanation of his position. I think with regards to what the Representative said, and we come to Sarah, Jane, tripled breath presentative makes raises a good point healthcare is expensive. It's not getting cheaper anytime soon. Many conservative lawmakers argued that expanding Medicaid would kind of bus the budgets. We'd see some of the things that the Representative wrote in his statement about pharmaceutical vendors in the cost of insurance plans and having what he called fair market healthcare choices is there any data from states that have expanded Medicaid to support Representative Jacobs's argument, there's a bit ten Pat unpack there. So if you're a state conservative state, and you're looking at your budgets, Medicaid costs a lot of money. It is a big number on your budget and the idea of expanding it is just it almost too much to take. But in reality, what happened with the Affordable Care Act is the government said we really want you to expand. We're going to give you money. We're going to give you lots of money. One hundred percent. That dials down to ninety percent of the funds for that expansion population. And it stays at ninety percent of the funds for the expansion population after twenty twenty and so you're not paying most of that out of your state budget. There's the federal government chipping in. So there's that factor. Now, there is the fear that you know, that costs will go up for the state initially because people without insurance or going to run to the hospital and their doctors and get care, and there is some data showing that there is a slight increase in those costs. But the overall data shows it does not a total increase in Medicaid spending. And there's not a significant increase in spending for the state from Medicaid show. Just wanna make sure we're clear, it may well have cost Kansas a lot of money, but can just never would have been paying all that money because the federal government would've brought the money, right? Kansas patriot rights like him arosh, the promise of new technology that brings medicine to the people in remote areas as always just over the horizon, and we never seem to get there. Will it happen someday? Probably. But for decades now, it seems we've been tantalised with promises that never come to fruition. What about alternative ways of? Providing healthcare, whether it's telemedicine another one of our listeners asked about intermediate facilities, not quite a family..

Medicaid fort Scott Representative Jacobs Kansas state Representative Representative federal government legislature Jim Senator Trevor Pat Sarah Jane ninety percent One hundred percent
"fort scott" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on 1A

"I'm Joshua Johnson were discussing a growing trend of. Hospital closures in rural America stone tweeted, this was a known risk for states refusing to expand Medicare and the GOP systematic dismantling of the Affordable Care Act, but those states voted red for the quote unquote freedom to choose their healthcare plan. Elections have consequences before we bring one more voice into the conversation. Sarah, Jane trouble, I think s stoneman expanding Medicaid rather than Medicare. But can you briefly explain what that Medicaid expansion was right? So Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act was to bring more people without insurance into the fold. So that they could go to hospitals and get their healthcare it increased up to one hundred and thirty eight percent of the poverty level. Lots of people who earned in two thousand nineteen that'd be about sixteen thousand dollars for a single person about thirty four thousand dollars for a family of four. And so if you were earning that much in certain states at expanded, Medicaid, you could get on the roles now, there's a crucial difference. I just want to mention lots of people know at Medicare is usually. The service that the government provides or healthcare coverage the government provides for people sixty five and older or with disabilities. Medicaid is for people of low income is there any evidence that expanding Medicaid would have prevented these hospitals from closing? What do we know? Or do. We know. Well, I was talking to one healthcare expert who covers rural America, and they said, it was sort of the straw that broke the camel's back in a lot of these cases. But there have been trends over the years for decades of rural hospital closures and the reasons for that does include sequestration when the government did some budgets budgetary manipulation. They cut Medicare funds a lot of these real hospitals are very dependent on Medicare funds as well. And there's some changes in the way, they calculate bad debt when people don't pay their bills that they do have insurance. So this was sort of just adding to the pile. Let's add one more local voices from Kansas who's been watching the politics of healthcare there. Joining us from our across America partner station, KM UW, public radio in Wichita is Jim McLean. He's the chief political reporter for the Kansas news service. Jim welcome to the program. Hey, great to be here. And can I Joshua? Can. I just say hi, Sarah turns out, we're both from Parsons, Kansas. Yeah. Hi, Tim, get this kid to talk to you. Again. What are the odds of that? How about that public radio bringing people together every single day gym in our last thing that we heard from a woman in fort Scott who's hospital recently closed. We reached out to the state Representative who represents that area Trevor Jacobs, and we asked him if expanding Medicaid would have prevented the hospital closing can I read you his statement and get your reaction, it's a little lengthy. But but bear with me. So here's this. Here's the statement from state rep Trevor Jacobs who represents fort Scott quote in the business world and the natural world, Darwin and capitalism have the same equal outcomes. The strongest survive it is not government's job to be in the business of keeping privately owned nonprofit hospitals open or afloat, maybe if we the people weren't being raked across the coals by the pharmaceutical vendors, and if we the people were able to keep our once affordable insurance..

Medicaid Medicare Kansas Joshua Johnson Trevor Jacobs reporter Sarah America fort Scott Jim McLean stoneman GOP state rep state Representative UW Jane Tim
"fort scott" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on 1A

"That has the have you seen that thinking evolve on that too? Maybe being opposed to the expansion in announcing the hospital closing. And then now saying that oh, this could actually be good for us. Yes. And only thing I can talk about is just my group of friends, I go with the majority of them. I can see the that. That's something. We should probably think about doing. So I think. Kansan Zor figuring that out. Oh, I should have gone. The other way to show you something else. It's not too late. We'll go this way on the way downtown. That was Janice few inns in fort, Scott, Kansas speaking to one as James Morrison joining us in studio to discuss what's happening in Kansas and elsewhere is Sarah Jane, triple she's a senior correspondent with Kaiser health news. Sarah, welcome to one A. Thank you. Great to be here. Sarah. Jane, your reactions to what we just heard. You're a native Kansan you were telling me earlier, right? That's right. I grew up in southeastern Kansas, which is known as one of the most. An unhealthy parts of the state by any healthcare outcome measures, low income uninsured Hyon higher uninsured rates and the rest of the state and so forth. I grew up in Parsons, Kansas. So when you flying to conceal you drive down south you pass through fort Scott to get to my hometown. Talk about the impact to a community when a rural hospital close as we heard some of the things from Janice and what she's noticed, but what other kinds of impacts. Should we bear in mind? I think the biggest thing that you heard in Genesis tape is the idea of drive around town and looking at the big lawyers peerless is fort Scott employer too, big one. But it only has a few hundred employees. So that's the largest employer. In town. Hospitals are often either the largest or second or third largest employer in a rural community. So that translates immediately into economic impact. There was a twenty fifteen study that noted that on average ninety nine jobs are lost on average about five point three million in salaries are lost when a hospital closes you. See unemployment rates, go up. There was a twenty two thousand and six study that noted that unemployment rates went up one point four percent in these communities, the that impact immediately because you see doctors moving out of town you see lots of for sale signs on the houses. And then there's the trickle down effect. She mentioned. Nd that price chopper's closing price. Chopper may or may not be closing because the hospitals closing, but they weren't making enough money there, the revenues, and you see that happening across the country and across the state, and and there's that impact then there's the emotional impact in these communities when the hospital is the place where almost all the children are born in a family or all the children in our family are born it has a very emotional connection for that family. And you almost always know somebody who's working at the hospital who is Ben to the hospital. It's it's kind of a foundation, sir. Why wire these hospitals closing why is this happening? Well, I think some of the factors are predictable. Right. You have towns that are shrinking incised slowly, you have a loss of income from that. You also have a lower median income in many of these communities than in the urban counterparts. There's a larger elderly population as well. Then there's also some interesting trends that you might not expect there's a term I learned a few weeks ago called out migration. And that's when actually Janice mentioned this when she was speaking to James they. Don't necessarily go to the hospital that much so they'll bypass the local hospital because they know that in Kansas City. There is expert children's hospital or they'll go out to another hospital. That's a critical access hospital that may have a more services because they had some more surgeons or something they may have orthopedics cardiology that this other rule hospital that it's near closing or about to close or has closed cut the services because they were trying to save money. So there's this out migrating trend. There's also the trend of higher deductibles on insurance. I've talked to some people who say, you know, our deductibles went up to twenty five hundred dollars, and I just can't afford to go to the doctor anymore..

Sarah Jane Janice Kansas fort Scott James Morrison Kansas City Zor Parsons Scott Ben Kaiser twenty five hundred dollars four percent
"fort scott" Discussed on 1A

1A

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on 1A

"This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson. In Washington healthcare can be hard enough to get in rural America. Now, it is getting harder with hospitals closing down. Nearly a hundred rural hospitals have closed in the past decade. Another six hundred are at risk. Many are in the fourteen states that have not expanded Medicaid, but is expanding Medicaid. The solution. Is it that simple? Or is something bigger happening. How are these hospital closures affecting conservative lawmakers who opposed Medicaid expansion in their states our new project one a across America headed to fort Scott, Kansas a town of about eight thousand people mercy health system stopped running that towns hospital on New Year's Eve now the one hundred seventy one bed facility sits mostly empty longtime resident Janice few inns is a retired teacher. She gave one as James Morrison a tour of her town and the hospital if you need to move that seek. Can just with only side. Sure. Yeah. There's a it's just an automatic to just, you know, back automatically do you need more room. No, this is fine. Well, it'll be interesting for you to see the little town. We. Kind of struggled through that recession. You know, the began in two thousand eight things just start to build up. Then something will go out. And we go. Hoping. This is somebody came in just last year him really fixed that up put a new price chopper, and it's only been there year. Now, they're already leaving. And everybody's just like mercy said they were closing. And then then just a few months later price chopper's close. Now, this is the big industry is peerless products. They manufacture windows for commercial buildings, and they just added that large building back there. The old hospital was right up on that hill. And I think I told you that they before they were going to tear it down the community came and formed a circle around. Everybody held hands. We brought our kids too because they were all three born there. We wanted them to remember where they were boring because that was going to be gone. Now, some doctors offices will remain at fort Scott's hospital, a private physical therapy company has moved in. And mercy health system says it will keep the emergency room open through this month jenness few and says, she's hopeful that city leaders will find a replacement hospital operator, she's a registered Republican who says she supports expanding Medicaid in Kansas. When you still have our emergency services. Thankfully, that was the first thing we all worried about is what happens when something. Traumatic cabins to us. So that's still going to be here. I believe and then the doctor's offices are still going to be here. So it seems like there's still some operations going on outside of the emergency room here. Yes. But it's not nearly as much as used to go on. Yes. Basically what we're missing is. For instance, my husband had to have gallbladder surgery, and you know, that comes on quickly, and we could come in here, and he had it within an hour having the attack that's going to be gone. Now, if he had it we'd have to get an EMMY and listen drive, thirty miles to get to a hospital and us in particular, the doctor who did that is not here any longer. So we'd have to go and get a new doctor. When was it that you learned that the the hospital was going to close here? Oh, I think it was right before Christmas. So it was quick than a month. Until I knew like a lot of the discussion around like, the hospitals closing is would expanding Medicaid help it out has there been any discussion of that. Or do you think that that would have helped a hospital? It would have helped some because I think it was would have meant two point one million or something like that for this hospital a year in that wouldn't have been enough to save it they say, but it probably would have helped and part of the. Mercy said that the hospital wasn't being used enough. Well, isn't it's underutilized because the people can't afford to come the ones who would have qualified for the Medicare expansion would have been able to. Imagine you talked a lot of people spin around town..

Medicaid fort Scott Kansas Joshua Johnson America Mercy Washington EMMY James Morrison Janice
"fort scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:47 min | 3 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"S stone tweeted, this was a known risk for states refusing to expand Medicare and the GOP systematic dismantling of the of the Affordable Care Act, but those states voted red for the quote unquote freedom to choose their healthcare plan. Elections have consequences before we bring one more voice into the conversation. Sarah, Jane trouble, I think as stoneman expanding Medicaid rather than Medicare. But can you briefly explain what that Medicaid expansion was right? So Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act was to bring more people without insurance into the fold. So that they could go to hospitals and get their healthcare it increased up to one hundred and thirty eight percent of the poverty level. Lots of people who earn in two thousand nineteen that'd be about sixteen thousand dollars for a single person about thirty four thousand dollars for a family of four. And so if you were earning that much in certain states that expanded Medicaid, you could get on the roles now, there's a crucial difference. I just wanna mention lots of people know what Medicare is. Usually the service that the government provides. Healthcare coverage the government provides for people sixty five and older or with disabilities. Medicaid is for people with low income is there any evidence that expanding Medicaid would have prevented these hospitals from closing? What do we know? Or do. We know. Well, I was talking to one healthcare expert who covers rural America. And I said, it was sort of a camel that broke the straws the straw that broke the camel's back in a lot of these cases. But there have been trends over the years for decades of rural hospital closures and the reasons for that does include sequestration when the government did some budget budgetary manipulation they cut Medicare funds allow these rural hospitals are very dependent on Medicare funds as well. And there's some changes in the way, they calculate bad debt when people don't pay their bills that they do have insurance. So this was sort of just adding to the pile. Let's add one more local voices from Kansas who's been watching the politics of healthcare there. Joining us from our across America partner station, KM UW, public radio in Wichita is Jim McLean. He's the chief political reporter for the Kansas new service. Jim welcome to the program. Hey, great to be here. And can I can I just say hi to Sarah turns out, we're both from Parsons, Kansas. Yeah. Hi, Jim good to talk to you. Again. What are the odds of that? How about that? Public radio bringing people together every single day. In our last thing that we heard from a woman in fort Scott who's hospital recently closed. We reached out to the state Representative who represents that area Trevor Jacobs, and we asked him if expanding Medicaid would have prevented the hospital closing can I read you his statement and get your reaction, it's a little lengthy. But but bear with me, here's this. Here's the statement from state rep Trevor Jacobs who represents fort Scott quote in the business world and the natural world, Darwin and capitalism have the same equal outcomes. The strongest survive it is not government's job to be in the business of keeping privately owned nonprofit hospitals open or afloat, maybe if we the people weren't being raked across the coals by the pharmaceutical vendors, and if we the people were able to keep our once affordable insurance plans and keep our doctors, and we had more access to a fair market healthcare choices like we were promised almost a decade ago. Then maybe possibly fort Scott may still to this day have a hospital government expansion does not work because at the end of the day. That's all it is. As government expansion that does not work unquote that statement from state Representative Trevor Jacobs who represents fort, Scott, Kansas. Jim, what do you think? Well, it doesn't surprise me. The Senator who also represents for Scott is posed a Medicaid expansion and quote unquote government expansion into healthcare as well. Trevor represents I think a pretty distinct point of view in the Kansas legislature, and in Kansas, politics, generally, conservative, Republicans really have held sway here in recent years that is beginning to change in two thousand sixteen and then again in two thousand eighteen with the election of a democratic governor. But the legislature is still pretty balkanized in terms of the political philosophies, which makes issues like Medicaid expansion, very complicated. And that was a very complicated explanation of his position. I think yeah. With regards to that balkanisation. You mentioned Kansas has a new democratic governor Laura Kelly, she is pushing hard this legislative session for Medicaid expansion. I understand there's polling that shows a majority of cans would support that expansion, but talk about the political landscape that that expansion has to get through to survive. Right. Numerous polls for several years have shown that a majority of cans support expansion roughly about seventy seven percent now say that they do and as you mentioned. We have a new democratic governor, Laura Kelly, and she campaigned on expansion was one of the issues that she stressed during her campaign, and she believes entry has a mandate to proceed, and we expect her to unveil her expansion proposal sometime next week, but Republican legislative leaders are already, you know, essentially organizing their opposition to that they say that they will not consider an expansion proposal that doesn't include things like a work requirement. You see that being tried in a handful of states across the country. They also say that a fair number of the people who would qualify for expansion that one hundred and thirty eight percent of the federal poverty level that Sarah. Jane mentioned a fair number of them already have private insurance. And so they want the expansion proposal to exclude those people from Medicaid coverage somehow. With regards to what the Representative said. And we come into Sarah Jane tripled. The Representative makes raises a good point healthcare is expensive. It's not getting cheaper anytime soon. Many conservative lawmakers argue that expanding Medicaid would kind of bust the budgets. We'd see some of the things that the Representative wrote in his statement about pharmaceutical vendors in the cost of insurance plans and having what he called fair market healthcare choices is there any data from states that have expanded Medicaid to support Representative Jacobs's argument. Yeah, there's a bit ten pack unpack there. So if you're a state conservative state, and you're looking at your budgets, Medicaid costs a lot of money. It is a big number on your budget and the idea of expanding it is just it's almost too much to take. But in reality, what happened with the Affordable Care Act is a government said we really want you to expand. We're going to give you money. We're going to give lots of money one hundred percent. That dials down to ninety percent of the funds for that expansion population. And it stays at ninety percent of the funds for expansion population. After twenty twenty. And so you're not paying most of that out of your state budget. There's the federal government chipping in. So there's that factor. Now, there is the fear that you know, that costs will go up for the state initially because people without insurance are gonna run to the hospital doctors and get care, and there is some data showing that there is a slight increase in those costs. But the overall data shows it does not total increase in Medicaid spending. And there's not a significant increase in spending for the state for Medicaid. So I just want to make sure we're clear it may well have cost Kansas a lot of money, but Kansas never would have been paying all that money because the federal government would've brought the money, right? Let me get to some of your comments in the time. We have left with Jim McLean, and Sarah, Jane, triple quite a few. If you have written to us about the distances. You have to go to get to good healthcare. Danielle tweeted, my parents were considering retiring to a rural community in Maine. They're rethinking it because access to healthcare is difficult the effects on an aging population are huge Adam writes, I leave in win. Field Missouri just outside of Saint Louis. The closest hospital is a small centre fifteen minutes away. But when our child was born we were told that we could not go there and instead had to drive forty five minutes to have her se- section all is good. By the way, both are happy and healthy and internet king rights, metropolitan areas have the majority of healthcare facilities. They can meet the needs of rural populations people drive to three hours for healthcare in Oklahoma children's hospital in Oklahoma City gets patients from Kansas with regards to the distances. That patients have to go, Sarah. Jane, Kansas, patriot writes, like a Mirage the promise of new technology that brings medicine to the people in remote areas is always just over the horizon, and we never seem to get there. Will it happen someday? Probably but for decades now, it seems we've been tantalised with promises that never come to fruition. What about alternative ways of providing healthcare? Whether it's telemedicine another one of our listeners asked about intermediate facilities not. Quite the family. Doctor not quite a full blown hospital, but like yield emergency clinics and urgent care clinics. Outpatient facilities. What about other ways of filling that gap? There's a lot of conversation in hospital circles about new models of care for rural America, and what we're seeing is a bellwether shift in how healthcare is happening in America the urban areas, we have hospitals. We have outpatient center as we have lots of options for our healthcare. But in rural America, those are striking obviously. And so Senator Grassley for one he he reintroduced legislation in two thousand seventeen the reach legislation where he was saying, well, let's shift and put a new Medicare payment category that will pay hospitals for just having outpatient and emergency. They don't have to have inpatient beds. That's still out there somewhere. It's like a lot of bills out there floating. But there is talk about these new models of care. And I think these communities are really trying to say, what do we really need? And how can we get it? Now, Jim in the midterms last year there were voters in Idaho, Nebraskan, Utah who approved a ballot measures that. Mortared Republican officials to expand Medicaid is there any prospect of that in Kansas. No, we don't have initiative and referendum here in in Kansas. The legislature would have to put the question on the ballot which is not likely to happen. So the decision on Medicaid expansion rests squarely with lawmakers and three Republicans state lawmakers as I understand it recently left their party to join the Democrats in all of them support expanding Medicaid, are they more an exception or the the growing rule. I mean, how is this affecting politics in Kansas? Yeah. Politics, and Kansas is is changing all three of those legislators are from Johnson county, which was a county right into the in the Kansas City suburbs, and they had been moderate Republicans for their entire careers. And as you mentioned switched over and are now, Democrats that county is changing politically like many suburban areas are across the country. I should mention that an expansion. Bill did pass the legislature in two thousand seventeen but then Republican governor Sam Brownback vetoed that Bill, of course, a veto is not a risk this session. But it's it's the legislature has changed ever. So slightly sense, then and Medicaid expansion advocates are fairly certain they can get a Bill through the house if they can get it on the floor. The Senate is the question Mark at the moment. Jim mclean. A political reporter working with KM UW public radio in Wichita, Kansas. One of our one A across America partner stations. Jim thanks for talking to us. A great beer. Thank you and Sarah. Jane, triple senior correspondent for Kaiser health news and another native Kansan surging. Thanks very much. Thank you. I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one A. Now this week. We've been discussing topics suggested by listeners today's subject one the healthcare category of topics by a whole lot. It got more than half the vote. Doug Hastings wanted to know what would federal health care for everyone really cost and how what our tax burdens change. Good question with some complex answers. So joining us in studio is Dan diamond he covers healthcare policy and politics at politico. And he's the host of the podcast pulse. Check, dan. Welcome back to one A. Glad to be here. Joshua. We also welcome back. Julie rovner chief Washington correspondent at Kaiser health news. Julie welcome. Thanks for having me that we welcome your questions and thoughts on this question for the remainder of our program..

Medicaid Kansas Sarah Jane Jim McLean government America Representative Jacobs legislature Medicare fort Scott Scott UW reporter state Representative Representative
"fort scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:47 min | 3 years ago

"fort scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"M U dot org. Comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one A, Sarah. Jane, your reactions to what we just heard. You're a native Kansan you were telling me earlier, right? That's right. I grew up in southeastern Kansas, which is known as one of the most unhealthy parts of the state by any healthcare outcome measures low income uninsured. Hi in higher uninsured rates in the rest of the state and so forth. I grew up in Parsons, Kansas. So when you fly into consider you drive down south you pass through fort Scott to get to my hometown. Talk about the impact to a community when a rural hospital closes we heard some of the things from Janice in what she's noticed, but what other kinds of impacts. Should we bear in mind? I think the biggest thing that you heard in Genesis tape is the idea of drive around town and looking at the big implores peerless is fort Scott employer. It's a big one. But it only has a few hundred employees. So that's the largest employer. Town hospitals are often either the largest or second or third largest employer in a rural community. So that translates immediately into economic impact. There was a two thousand fifteen study that noted that on average ninety nine jobs are lost on average about five point three million and salaries are lost when a hospital closes use the unemployment rates, go up. There was a twenty two thousand six study that noted that unemployment rates went up one point four percent in these communities, the that impact immediately because you see doctors moving out of town you see lots of for cell signs on the houses. And then there's the trickle down effect. She meant. And that price chopper's closing price. Chopper may or may not be closing because the hospitals closing, but they weren't making enough money their their revenues, and you see that happening across the country and across the state, and and there's that impact then there's the emotional impact in these communities when the hospital is the place where almost all the children are born in a family or all the children have family are born it has a very emotional connection for that family. And you almost always know somebody who's working at the hospital who has been to the hospital. Yeah. It's it's kind of a foundation and just to kind of Orientale if you're not familiar with that part of Kansas fort Scott's right up near the Missouri state line. It's it's basically just a just west from Israel like right across the state line. And it's not far from the corner where Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Arkansas meet that intersection is south of fort, Scott, fort, Scott, like right over the Missouri state line maternity care and pregnancy care was on the mind of several of you who talked about how this impacts you where you are. Janice writes, I was pregnant in nineteen eighty two and on Medicaid the closest obstetrician that accepted. My insurance was thirty five minutes away. And the closest hospital was an hour and ten minutes away. Omnious dandelions rights, Missouri has one of the worst maternal mortality rates in the country. Ranking forty second out of fifty states in two thousand eighteen the lack of access to care is part of the problem is just a small piece of the puzzle of our failing maternity care system. But it is an important one time is of the essence in an obstetric emergency, Sarah. Why are these hospitals closing? Why is this happening? Why I think some of the factors are predictable. Right. You have a towns that are shrinking in size. Slowly, you have a loss of income from that. You also have a lower median income in many of these communities than in the urban counterparts. There's a larger elderly population as well. Then there's also some interesting trends that you might not expect there's a term I learned a few weeks ago called out migration. And that's when actually Janice mentioned this when she was speaking to. James, they don't necessarily go to the hospital that much so they'll bypass the local hospital because they know that in Kansas City. There is an expert children's hospital or they'll go out to another hospital. That's a critical access hospital that may have a more services because they had some more surgeons or something they may have orthopedics cardiology that this other role hospital that it's near closing or about to close or has close cut the services because they were trying to save money. So there's this out migrating trend. There's also the trend of higher deductibles on insurance. I've talked to some people who say, you know, our deductibles went up to twenty five hundred dollars, and I just can't afford to go to the doctor anymore. So you have hospitals in these communities that didn't have the kind of specialties that people were looking for with the robustness that people wanted. So they were kind of not even in the habit of going to these hospitals when it really counted. Well, the big stuff I should say in fort, Scott, you know, that hospital was rebuilt in two thousand and two they had sixty three pads they rebuilt they then took the bed cow. Countdown because people weren't going to the hospital in an order to take that big countdown, then you remove specialties. Right. So what you're seeing across the US are specialties being removed because they're trying to save money. Stone tweeted, this was a known risk for states refusing to expand Medicare and the GOP systematic dismantling of the Affordable Care Act, but those states voted red for the quote unquote freedom to choose their healthcare plan. Elections have consequences. We'll talk more about the politics of this in just a moment with Sarah, Jane, triple of Kaiser health news will add another voice to our conversation. And we'll get some more of your voices in just a moment. I'm Joshua Johnson. And you're listening to one A from W A, M, U and NPR. I'm Peter O'Dowd on the US Mexico border. The conversation about walls and security is more nuanced than anything you'll hear out of Washington. Even some Democrats agree that some kind of steel barrier is necessary. The Ballard fence is a good thing. The barbed wires atrocious. Concertina-wire always sends a bad message a trip to the border fence next time on here. Here. And.

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