7 Burst results for "Forest Law School"

"forest law school" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

08:20 min | 3 months ago

"forest law school" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"Present and future travis. Mo- houser author sweet girl had this to say about the book a promise that you've never read a book that so beautifully intimately reveals the sole at the center of sports. Fandom the understand so fully what it means to route five sauces a book about love and history and culture it's true arrived honestly and without pretence and it is quite simply one of the greatest sports books who will ever read before we jump into the uninterrupted interview. Today i'd like to thank you for being here. We are grateful for your presence and Really appreciate your time. Join us here on the. I'm your host landis wait. I'm a recovering. Trial lawyer turned author. Turn podcast bookstores stories. And if you wanna thanks to do one day you check me out at Landes way dot com. Find out more about Me and Writing for everything related to the podcast got charlotte readers. Podcasts dot com because show notes on each episode images links. We also got a community blog. there If you're a writer you can submit their. We've got a lot of great content speaking of great content We put out a book report. Every two weeks is free to sign up for and there's some free stuff you get when you sat up you can check that out at the podcast website Hey we won't spammy because frankly that takes way too much time speaking of free stuff if you like audiobooks and you go to to libro dot. Fm l. i. b. r. dot fm and Sound up with Their audiobook service Use the promo code charlotte reader and get a free. O.'neil last thing. I want to tell you right. Quick for jumping into the episode is that we have what's called a patriot channel. At dot com slash charlotte readers. Podcasts a place where authors and do a deeper dive into the craft of writing and the business of riding and you can join us there and support the podcast when you do for as low as five dollars a month. Eight dollars tip We put out a lot of content that page and We've had a lot of fun doing it. I certainly learned a lot about the craft and business of writing on our paycheck. So join us Paycheck poor through our website. Charlotte raiders podcast dot com. Enough of this prologue. Let's get to today's episode. Yeah welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Landis should be on here. Yeah congratulations on the book. Thank you yeah. And by the way being a graduate of wake forest law school and having son who went to wake forest and passionate demon deacons fan and he hates carolina. More than duke. By the way if you can believe it yeah. I really enjoyed the book particularly reflections on growing up. A deacon fans wanna start there with the how much black and gold actually runs through southern veins. I guess it would depend on on on how you measure it I i was born and would soon grow which sale month. My father was not a wake forest graduate a big wake forest fan and I grew up going to wake football and basketball games as as often as we could. For a little while We had season tickets to to football so it was always a part of my life. I mean And i was introduced to the school through sports. You know that was how i related to those how i became attached to it and I said before that. I'm sorta lucky to wake. Forest is such a good university. Because you know really out here. Because i wanted to get back to that. We had moved away from winston. I wanna get back from winston. You know i was drawn by the nostalgia for You know the sports. I've grown up watching. Thank goodness i got a good education there as well. But there's there's quite a bit of black go. I thought you were going to say for a second. Thank goodness great university because the sports have been hit and miss over the just trying to be positive. Which kind of head into this question. Because you know we're gonna talk about sports throughout this because your book is filled with information bet But one of the things in attract me was you know what does it mean to be from the real south you quoted ron mcgee who was on our podcast. Say it starts in clemson and death valley. Do you agree with that description and you put it somewhere else. Oh i think if you're going to if you had to pick one single solitary spot to say this is where the deep south starts. I think the hill in death valley is as good as any I think that might be better than the gafni peach. Which is when always grow here news when he passed the gaffey peach. You're in the deep south But i think the hill clemson is often goodwin to I tend to agree more with Folks to like. John shelton reed christopher mattress. Who are do you know. The deep south kind of winds. Its way through the whole region because there are parts of eastern north carolina that are much more stereotypically deep south than mush of say upstate. South carolina And so it. It really don't think there's like a a if you're going to draw a line around it it would be very squiggly line and would not be a hard fast straight line. It would be you know. it would kind of go all the place you know because i you know. Most of middle georgia's the deep south but his atlanta. You know do you need you. Need to draw a circle around the beltway about launch. excuse me And and carve out for many south or is it part of the south. You know it's when you really start thinking about it. It's surprisingly hard to say where it begins where it ends as probably not as easy as defining the sweet tea line which i think somewhere north richmond virginia. I had a friend in college from south georgia who was where he's from He lived below the nightline. That g g anna. And i think he put it somewhere around bacon below bacon. Georgia there's as many nats in the air is there has oxygen so what's clear from your buck And we're going to talk about today that you really have a love of sports you grew up with even took it with you as a kid when you had to move Of all places to somewhere in the middle of nowhere in south carolina. When you've been living in west salem as a kid talk about that culture shock for you as a child going from what was really kinda basketball country to a different part of the world there. It was It i write about in the book going to my first football game at clemson. And i've been to you on that point. Dozens of college football games but they'd all been wake forest games at wake forest and citgo to clemson. Where you've got. I think at that time. Death valley held something like seventy thousand people. Every last one of an arch One of things. I heard shortly after we moved to greenville was that On game day saturdays clemson south carolina becomes the fourth largest city in the state. Because so many people descending on the town for the game it was. You know as i ride the book. Our remember watching tigers in rub power truck and run down the hill. And i don't remember a thing. After that was it was absolute sensory overload. A i blow fuse you know how a circuit so mahathir broke at that point and i never did. You know we back later and you know the clumps games and.

center of sports Charlotte raiders wake forest law school charlotte houser landis winston death valley football ron mcgee travis Landis John shelton reed christopher neil clemson basketball carolina goodwin
"forest law school" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:34 min | 7 months ago

"forest law school" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Jackie loughery lives with her husband. Her son her daughter her two grandkids and her daughter-in-law in antioch california a suburb. Outside of san francisco. Jackie told k. Q. e. d. that. She pays three thousand dollars a month in rent steep but they could swing it until the pandemic hit and they lost their jobs. We started falling back on rent. I would say may of last year because it took a while for people to get unemployment and stuff and then when we did we were trying to play catch up on bills we were playing play. Catch up on the ran. Of course katrina chisholm believes in atlanta with her son. She fell behind on her rent for the same reason and she told. Npr one day last january. There was a knock on her door. I remember going to the door and a sherston era in scared me. Because i didn't know why he was at my house. In the sheriff's hand was an eviction notice. Once you get eviction no one's gonna want you to read from them so me and my son will be. I don't want to be a homeless situation. Jackie in katrina stories aren't unusual these days more than ten million americans are behind with their rent payments. According to census data examined by the center on budget and policy priorities the federal government and some states imposed moratorium on evictions the pandemic and congress approved nearly fifty billion dollars to help people catch on rent. But a lot of that money hasn't yet been distributed by states and counties the federal moratorium was set to expire tomorrow. But the cdc just extended it for one more month till the end of july and vowed no more extensions after that. But there's an even bigger underlying problem here. Of course the economy will eventually recover some people. In katrina and jackie's shoes will get their finances back in order get their jobs back their lives back. But this nation's housing crisis goes back long before the pandemic and it'll last long after talk ra bardy today on point the threat of fiction and financial ruin today and the solution going forward to america's chronic housing crisis. Well joining me from new york. Is emily benn for professor at wake forest law school and founding director of the wake forest law health justice clinic. She's also the chair of the american bar. Association's covid nineteen task force committee on evictions professor ben for welcome. Thank you magna. Hit the pleasure to be here. Molly sullivan also joins us. She's the housing reporter for san francisco's k. Q. e. d. and she joins us today from portland oregon. Actually molly welcome to you. Thanks so much for having me. So i wanna talk about the big picture. Nationwide about addiction moratoriums. But i'd love to actually just start more zeroed in on your reporting in california molly if we could. Can you give us a sense as to what's been happening in the bay area Just even the over the course of the first half of this year twenty twenty one regarding addictions sure a you know california. The bay area in particular is a place that's known for extremely high housing. And you know an affordability you know way before the pandemic even began and i think what we saw when the coronavirus pandemic hit and people lost their jobs. Businesses shut down is that we started to see you know people were losing jobs and they would need some level of assistance to stay house and to make the rent rent's that are incredibly high in this region And so what we began to see was a bribe protections roll out with at the local the state and the federal level and the real aim there was to prevent people from falling into homelessness people. Who had you know were unable to pay rent at that time. Whether because they lost their job they had a family member that got sick. They hit to take care of them. They got covid themselves. And so i think what we saw was probably the biggest government investment both the protections that came out of that with these different moratoriums but also just a huge investment in terms of rental assistance. Try to keep these people from falling through the cracks and adding to an increased affordability problem as well as possibly growing homeless rights. So so did did that intervention work not just the moratorium but i'd mentioned a sort of the the federal funding that congress had approved Problem though being that it hasn't actually been fully distributed by All states and counties but has had ruled out been better in california. You know it's something that still definitely a work in progress just yesterday. The state lawmakers passed and approved The third extension of an addiction moratorium in california. This now will will. Actually you know. Protect people longer than the federal cdc moratorium. That's in place. This is going to have protect people from vision. Who aren't able to pay their rent. Through the end of september now and it also something really important you brought up the rental assistance in that it actually increases the amount of aid that you know landlords and tenants who have been struggling right now. We'll get paid out to clear. Some of that missed rent death. It's gonna bring it up to one. Hundred percent paid out instead of paying about eighty percent of the mist. Rent debt And that's pretty huge. Because that could incentivize more people to both applied for the program landlords you know might be more likely to want to participate but in terms of rollout. Slow like we've heard everywhere. We last checked. We asked the state for the latest housing Numbers with their program. They've got about five point. Two billion dollars in federal renta to distribute and so far you know from the people that have applied for half of that money so far less than ten percent has actually gotten into the hands of people who need it and before yesterday before they extended the moratorium. I mean this was set to expire in a matter of days at the end of june. So that could have met a whole bunch of people who were just waiting to receive aid not getting it. Well okay so. Emily benn for let me turn turn back to you. How than how significant or meaningful is the..

Emily benn Molly sullivan emily benn Jackie loughery san francisco Hundred percent Jackie congress yesterday last january last year atlanta wake forest law school california wake forest law health justice three thousand dollars new york more than ten million katrina chisholm two grandkids
"forest law school" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"forest law school" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"Then chief district attorney of the next county over he was known to be relentless, a bulldog, and also fair and a smart man. He had the judicial it. He did not suffer fools lightly he suffered them not at all a cracking pointed voice, and a matinee idol, handsome face gave him command of all arrayed before him. To rail love trying cases before him. Albright had a sly sense of subtle humor possessed a semaphore signal. Flashing is was downright funny and chambers, and looked after all the lawyers in front of him as long as they respected their work, and did it earnestly and will he was one of the reasons. The law was a jealous mistress. And so. I've had that experience to judge that. Have Been in court and have tried cases themselves I think that's probably one of the marks of good judges actually been there and done it right because. They understand the pressure lawyers under the stand what it takes to put on a case and. And yet sometimes you appear in front of smoothie judges. And in this case, I guess in cases. How high profile could have been murder case and you're going to trial You had to have a little bit of butterflies absolute going into that absolute Did you wiggle out of it the same way that editorial? We're out of here. Yeah. Yeah got lucky. Some people said some things. Should set, and I heard him, and you heard, and that's the mark of a good trial lawyer. Is Listening right because you go in with the plan. But. Things are going to happen court right? Sure you're going to hear somebody. Say something, and if you're if you're looking at your notes and your planning next question. You might miss. The key to case there was something said in this case that turned out to be. The key I don't know I can't recall who taught me, but they said always be half an hour early. 'cause you get to watch and listen and you know telling. One, of the most pressing things anybody I've said to me, look at the jury pool and see what books and newspapers and magazines. They're reading to tell you about. Had A judge from Seattle Washington listen. One time longtime ago. Sit asked jurors. What the bumper stickers are on the back of their car. I was trying A case one time and big big retrial, less and less time during the jury selection and judges. Let's ask a lot of questions. They don't always give you the leeway to ask him what books they read and they kinda look at you like come on, let's all because case alerts. Do and I asked him. What books they were reading and I got this one guy he said out. Thank you WANNA know. What book so what are you GonNa? Do then right. You're right. You know the jury of the Jurors GonNa. Ask Him when they get back there so at least i. Know. Tell them go ahead and says. Well I'm reading I'm representing the any so I'm reading. This book called the runaway jury. John. Aggression! And I thought okay. I hope I don't have runaway jury here. Did you have those sort of real life experiences where you were you able to interact with the bailiffs and the juror absolutely and that was fun. I, I was taught. That you own the courtroom that it's your courtroom that when you walk in there, that's your place. Wherever I've tried. Cases I've always gone to the courtroom many times before sat in their thought about it, so you position yourself, etc, and you just of get a confidence. That you know where you're going, and you know what you're going to do. But as you say, you've got to be flexible, all of a sudden something will come out of left field. And what are you GonNa? Do with it. Yes speaking man flex gets back to right on the books you. I don't think you would call this. Traditional legal thriller necessarily although there was some thrilling courtroom saints toward the end of the book. Did you learn some things in writing this book? DIG THAT ARE GONNA. Influence what you do with your next book, and if so, what did you learn? And what are you thinking about? Well. The second thing I'm getting ready to finish your at least the manuscript. The primary thing is I learned to lead with editorial and keep it a little simpler. So Eddie's a consistent thread. Again I I am for better or worse a storyteller, so there's a lot of stories stuff in here and I have every expectation that Alice Osborne her to proofreaders will win this thing down pretty good. This is turned into a more ambitious thing than I visioned when I started. Are you going to be? You know so part of being author is getting that feedback, and then accepting editors using because you've got a lot of good stories. You WanNa tell it's just you gotta decide am I gonNA. Tell them all in this piece going to tell them and something else. If I will on from now until those awhile still have stories to tell US guess you'RE NOT GONNA! You'RE GONNA NOT GONNA want for the storytelling. Well Vernon we're a time. It's been a great great fun talking with you. Bet Lawyer in writing the Bet true life stories in Winston Salem days. Not so much our days wake forest, law school, but coming from that same same area. I didn't get downtown much when when I was in law school. You know we. Are Drank houses were. Pretty much closer to campus. You know it was it was. The beer place they had something called the safari around when I was sorry for. The car the Safran this room. By my late brother Joe Henry. Related everybody you know. The the safari is one of these very dark you walk in. It's very dark. You have your feet. Stick to the floor because of beer. This been right, and you get a pitcher for about a buck and a half or something. And what was what was the beer place? There was a great place. Primoz or Something people used to go there wasn't anything downtown? No, the only thing downtown was sort of Sir Winston in the bottom of the old. Gosh I can't even think of even the building they've turned it into. All of those places on that row now have been stripped because they made it. Go Down to the stadium and everything. That's a nice places. Anyway we're talking. We're talking about here. Anyway look thanks. thanks FOR BEING A. Terrell Verney Glenn whoever, in talking to hear actually being on the show, but my pleasure really enjoyed this. Thank you very much okay. Well. That's it for today. Another author giving voice to the written words next Tuesday we'll have another in-depth episode with readings and conversations about the written word and the writing life of a local or regional author, who, before then be on the lookout for another under the covers episode where we do much the same thing we do here, but quicker and sometimes away from the studio, because there are just too many good authors, not enough town. If you like what we're doing, please consider leaving a short written review on Apple podcasts or the podcast platform of your choice. Because when you do our authors, voices travel much farther and wider in podcast land, and if you're inclined. Inclined to help us, authors give voice to the written words. You'd like some member only content today by authors me as our thanks, please consider becoming a member supporter. You can find out how.

Albright Winston Salem Seattle murder A. Terrell Verney Glenn Sir Winston Joe Henry Alice Osborne John Eddie Vernon
"forest law school" Discussed on Celtics Life NBA Basketball Podcast

Celtics Life NBA Basketball Podcast

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"forest law school" Discussed on Celtics Life NBA Basketball Podcast

"So <Speech_Male> I think they have <Speech_Male> opportunity to do <Speech_Male> some real good, even <Speech_Male> if they don't pause the <Speech_Male> League but to use the League <Speech_Male> as. <Speech_Male> A way for us to re imagine <Speech_Male> how <Speech_Male> important we think Covasna's <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> and I don't see them <Speech_Male> doing that so <Speech_Male> i. think just <Speech_Male> opened the show by saying <Speech_Male> the another two parallel <Speech_Male> tracks <Speech_Male> and I liked <Speech_Male> Jeremy. <Speech_Male> Simply these are serious <Speech_Male> times. We have two <Speech_Male> very serious <Speech_Male> things happening <Speech_Telephony_Male> in our country that are very <Speech_Male> intertwined <Speech_Male> We have <Speech_Male> this kind of existential <Speech_Male> crisis <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> race relations <Speech_Male> of this country alongside <Speech_Male> nearly <Speech_Male> unprecedented <Silence> pandemic at least in. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Modern <Silence> memory so. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The way <SpeakerChange> that the NBA <Speech_Male> handles. The stuff is <Speech_Male> not easy. <Speech_Male> But <SpeakerChange> I suspect. <Speech_Male> <Silence> It's not doing <Speech_Male> enough. <Speech_Male> Good good place to <Speech_Male> leave it. I have <Speech_Male> to get going I. Professor <Speech_Male> drew on anything <Speech_Male> else. We should <Silence> cover <SpeakerChange> before we go. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Now, they <Speech_Male> saw man. Thank you ask <Speech_Male> some great questions that. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> history's going to judge. <Speech_Male> US is going to <Speech_Male> judge all of us <Speech_Male> three of us. Everybody <Speech_Male> else in this <SpeakerChange> country, all <Speech_Male> the sports leagues everybody <Silence> else. <Speech_Male> How <Speech_Male> with the. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> how that was covert. <Silence> How does <Speech_Male> the system <Speech_Male> racism that <Speech_Male> exploded? 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Think Robert Williams <Speech_Male> could help the celtics <Speech_Male> down low, and <Speech_Male> you can read about <SpeakerChange> that on Celtic's <Silence> abduct. <Speech_Male> For <Silence> me <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm working <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and not the most exciting <Speech_Male> project <Speech_Male> world. Everybody <Speech_Male> but I'm working on <Speech_Male> a <Silence> sports law treatise. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For Carolina <Speech_Male> Academic Press <Speech_Male> Colleague of Mine <Speech_Male> Tim Davis at Wake <Silence> Forest Law School <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> the signed a contract <Speech_Male> treatise in <Speech_Male> so maybe that'll <Silence> be fun to work on. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Continuing to <Speech_Male> try and <Speech_Male> publish short <Speech_Male> form pieces like <Silence> the it is published. <Speech_Male> That I mentioned <Speech_Male> earlier published <Speech_Male> a piece before <Speech_Male> that couple weeks before <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> in the defeated <Speech_Male> <hes> about <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you know the <Speech_Male> the power that <Speech_Male> college athletes <Speech_Male> are showing <Speech_Male> in this moment <Speech_Male> house, the very beginning <Speech_Male> when you had a <Speech_Male> Marvyn Wilson Down to <Speech_Male> Florida state, saying he <Speech_Male> wouldn't play <Speech_Male> based on some of the things <Speech_Male> is coach, said <Speech_Male> the players Missouri <Speech_Male> various <SpeakerChange> things <Speech_Male> so. <Speech_Music_Male> Just trying to do what I <Speech_Music_Male> can. <Speech_Male> You know that the right about <Speech_Male> the stuff and hopefully <Speech_Male> make. <Speech_Male> Impact often <Speech_Male> feel like I'm not doing <Speech_Male> in doing enough, <Speech_Male> but. <Speech_Male> Yes, we all have to <Speech_Music_Male> play our <SpeakerChange> do our best. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> can find the pot. onless <Speech_Male> pod catcher trips, <Speech_Male> please. <Speech_Music_Male> Visit <Speech_Male> Facility if he like <Speech_Music_Male> what you hear, please. <Speech_Music_Male> I? <Speech_Music_Male> Don't like <Speech_Music_Male> something. <Speech_Music_Male> I have suggestion. <Speech_Music_Male> Let us know <Speech_Music_Male> the comment on twitter <Speech_Music_Male> with the hesitancy sequel. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Always trying <Speech_Music_Male> to bring you. The deepest is <Speech_Music_Male> to set scourge <Music> tangled conduct <Music> whatever <Speech_Music_Male> I. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Love to be back, thank <Music> you.

NBA US Covasna twitter Professor Basketball Tim Davis celtics Carolina Florida Robert Williams Forest Law School Missouri Celtics.
"forest law school" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

11:33 min | 2 years ago

"forest law school" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"Night off. This morning I awoke woke retrieved my iphone from the living room slid back under my weighty anthropology blanket tapped open my insight timer. Meditation APP slipped my headphones into into my ears closed. My eyes and listened as a female voice greeted me with a chirpy high beauty before she guided a twelve minute. Meditation on clarity motivation and confidence afterward while a pot of trader. Joe's coffee percolated in the kitchen. I wrote three longhand stream of consciousness pages. Creativity ritual inspired by Julia. Lia Cameron's Ebook the artist's way in my journal a new one. I bought a few months ago at a museum next to the Duomo Milan. It has a brown cover with the Italian word. Marone I wanNA stamped and lime green ink brown like my last name. My apartment is quiet except for the occasional Brooklyn Honking Horn. I've allocated the next two hours I to begin to write this book that I've been thinking about for a year and living for approximately twenty seven years since the day. I stepped onto the grounds of the University of Virginia School of law. Aw as a one L. Law student. So how do you have found that. Listeners are interested in the routines of writers. You know everybody has a different routine different way to go about it. What you read red gives a little bit of insight into what you did? Has Your routine changed over time. what is your routine. Can you just give us a brief insight to that. I love the routine being a writer and I I like structure and I used to think real writers wrote all day long but what I realize is. I can't write for more than two hours at a time. That's how I was when I was writing briefs and now when I'm writing really deeply personal stuff that takes a lot out of me physically and emotionally two hours so I like structure dot com or daytime. First thing tomorrow you do anything before I do I will I make coffee for a routine is important to you to follow the routine. How many drafts of these books before they became a book? Howley tenfold Foale drafts? Did you enjoy editing process. More or the first draft process the first draft process. People telling you needed to fix it. I don't mind them anti me. I need to fix it. I just get very stressed when there's a lot of typos and stuffy next round. Just talk about the introverted writer. For a second because writing his becoming a business requires riders to Find Agents to submit manuscript rejections to talk publicly to get all social official media of all things. How do your tips help an introverted writer? I think being a writer is a wonderful fall experience for an introvert and because we do as quote I read earlier. It is a very. It's a thing that we do in solitude but what's really helped me be able to get up here and talk to people about. This is being excited about my books and I was never a social media person really before my introversion book came out but I got on instagram and I got on linked and even as a lawyer. I never used Lincoln but when my book came out I started had just being on the social media platforms and especially on instagram. I just started taking my book with me everywhere and taking pictures of it and random places and just posting that and I got so many people reaching out to me in fact. I think that's how you and I met so it's amazing followers on instagram. Yeah it's a great way for quiet. Introverted writers to connect with each other and help support each other's community and in the community ready to promote each other's work. I've just found I've made so many friends and contacts and colleagues over reaching out through social media and also also writing shorter articles that that feed from the books is another way to really get your word out there in smaller sound vice. Good advice for riders fighters Think because if you cannot be obsessed with something you shouldn't write about it to begin with breath and if you spend all that time going through ten drafts you should be obsessed about getting out there and talking about it right yes. I absolutely think we shouldn't right with someone else thinks we should right. We have to write what we're excited about. And you know what would you say to lawyers. there's probably some lawyers in this room today have got an idea for a book Thinking about writing that I also thinking about all the other things they gotta do right. What's your advice to these lawyers? Who Want to get something on the page but looking at daunting challenge? Break it down in a pieces and the first thing I would recommend is go to staples and by these giant post. Its and find a spot spot in your house or your apartment condo wherever you live and just jot down ideas one at a time on these posters. I do this on my wall of Windows. I was in my apartment in Brooklyn and once I had twelve ideas all related to the same concept. I knew I had twelve chapters of a book and then I would just add little post sits underneath those and I would sit there and this is before I started writing anything. I'd sit there sipping my coffee in the morning to stare at at my post. It's but I knew there was something there. And then after it started developing again structure. You don't have to write all day every day. Give yourself a little time slots for me. Two hours is perfect. I know if I write a page or write ten pages. I've done my two hours and eventually the pages pile up so in other words. Look for any of you out there. They're thinking about writing this book. Martin Clark Arkansas. On the podcast and season four Written these legal thrillers. He was adjudged all the time he was writing. And he says you know if you write one page a day the end of the year you got enough pages for enough okay. So that's all it takes one page cover one last question before parting parting thoughts. How has writing these books changed your life? It's changed my life entirely. I perceive all those things I talked about as weaknesses. I also have had a lot of life experiences. I've changed jobs a lot of disappointments and and and have a lot of unresolved shame guilt and writing about all this. Even though I'm very exposed in my books it's really changed. I the way I look at myself and the way. I'm able to help my students now who come to me and confide that they're worried about whether they're cut out for our profession but now how writing about it has really helped me realize now I was cut out to be a lawyer. I just didn't know what assets I brought to the equation at the time so writing about it has has brought that to the surface enabled me to help other junior lawyers. Who really want to do this and contribute? But just don't know how so this is part memoir part how to book right absolutely. There's a Lotta memoir in there right so parting thoughts as to how introverts can reinvent and cultivate their authentic nick lawyer persona with this last. Read that you've got there'll be many people in the legal profession will not understand our quietude and who will think doc based on stereotypes that there is no role for people like us in the law. Let's proven wrong. Work your exposure agenda then work another one make nips Tux and adjustments in your plan. User quiet lawyering skills at every opportunity. Continue to envision yourself as an effective advocate because of your quietude sued because of your ability to listen think problem solve and test the strengths and weaknesses of ideas before sharing your thoughts through the power of legal writing eating or your mindful spoken voice be Authentic and law school in lecture classes. Small Seminar Courses Group Work Study sessions and oral arguments. Let's be yourself in law offices interacting with senior and junior attorneys with tough and gentle clients with difficult and cooperative opposing counsel will with challenging and even keeled judges and before juries as you imagine your life and career as a quiet author remember author. Tanner's I advice to learn to speak does not necessitate learning to be talkative. Be Quiet when you want or need to be closure office door to work and then open ed again. When you're ready to share be a thinker be a writer? When you're over stimulated and crave downtime replenish your hard work and integrity will shine bright right? Most importantly your legal career will be more personally enjoyable in the long run. The greater number of quiet lawyers whom we encouraged to set an example of living authentic took lives the healthier our legal profession will become. Bu Change the profession impact our legal system nation and the world. So how great advice. I don't think you blush today so we accomplish that and I appreciate you coming on the show and sharing this message with us Audience the the links to hotties book are going to be in the show notes a Charlotte Russe podcast dot com. You can find out more about her. There also information about Turk twitter account and her instagram account. If you do this kind of thing so let's give how hand if you would please. Let's just say another fun. Author giving voice to their written words you can find out more about SCHRAFFT's the podcast dot com and you can listen for free on apple podcast wherever you get your park. Yes until next week on land this way for Charlotte readers August stressful. Christmas is coming and host land. Dissuade has a trilogy of books to get you in the Christmas spirit. He wrote the first in the series the Christmas heist as a Christmas gift for his family. which the former dean of wake forest law school called across between my cousin Vinny and miracle on on thirty Fourth Street in a second book the legally binding Christmas? The characters returned to save Christmas once again. The final book in the trilogy. The Christmas redemption when the twenty eighteen holiday category of the Twelfth Annual National Indie Excellence Awards and was the twenty eighteen holiday category honorable honorable mention in the tenth annual. Reader's favourite awards one reviewer said believing without seeing a powerful idea and it's at the heart of the a Christmas redemption. These books are available at Park. Road books mainstream books foggy pine books and online. And when you sign up for the email list at Charlotte readers podcast DOT com. You'll receive for free. The first book in the series as an e book complete with illustrations. Please don't forget our sponsors parkwood books and Charlottenburg lauber lakes to our sponsors and the resources are on the webpage and in the show notes Charlotte readers. PODCAST is available on on social media on facebook at Charlotte Readers podcast on twitter at Charlotte reader on Instagram and on Lincoln Atlantis Wade..

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"forest law school" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

09:17 min | 2 years ago

"forest law school" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"Word the only and because that's that's all about the darkness and depression and You know Henry's playing some time and the OPN and as you so the piano oldest constant began to jangle abandoned drunken minstrels and use this reference to the alien heart heart see our. I always liked that. There are two poems that Coleridge wrote the head to do with the Harp One was the The olien harp as you mentioned and the second was dejection and owed and I don't know if he remembered writing the first one when he wrote the second one but in the first one. He's he's sort of lazing about out and it's a Saturday afternoon or Sunday afternoon. And he's got this beautiful lady on his arm and he hears the wind blowing through the instrument and it's just it's just exquisite and it's just wonderful says says there these long notes and it's just you know. His heart is just bursting and then later in the poem dejection and owed when he's experiencing this this bout of darkness in depression. He hears the same thing and in to his ears. Then suddenly it has become this this raking Noise this disconsolate. Mess of sound and and I have seen in the book where Henry the narrator sits down at the family's grand piano after his father is left and he he I think he's also struggling with depression. He begins to play and initially. It has the that He's playing those long squashes notes and so forth but as he continues to drink wine and I think some Polish vodka that he found he was there air His depression sets in he. He's unable to fend it off any longer and then he begins to hear the The Pinault being out of tune in everything all the chords that are now Disharmonious begin to begin to bother him before the break. We're going to have one so you can read another piece. Has that was music into the book before you do that. I've got I've got a question all these literary allusions as you're writing a book okay. You're trying to tell a story. You gotta worry about plot you gotTA worry about characters. I mean that's like throwing on the brakes right. Oh I got to think. Let me think about this. I'm going to put this litter elision. Let me go look up this and so is that what may take seven years or was that just life is why it took so long. I that that's really not that photograph memory and you remember the stuff and it falls on the page in front of. I certainly don't have a photographic memory but all these things the the the the poems in the books That are referenced in the Book Were Poems and books that were so important to me somewhere. Along the way where I have read The poem or I had read the book in it. It touched me in such a way and left such something so powerful with me and it was easy it was just too. It was just so natural for it to be so such a part of the story because so many of these emotions that I had felt at various points points in my life were closely connected to these works of literature and in these poems that it it was absolutely natural where you work works so many of them. And I'm wondering what your next book because I'm looking at the list here. Herman Melville Thomas Will Grand Pavilion foreigner. William Shakespeare Dickson jere token how committed Arnesen. I guess I'm left for the next. Maybe one or two maybe one or two. I was reading Emerson today and I came across the palm of his while. You're working the law firm. Quick break everybody out there regardless of course and And I came across the palm of his. where he he was? He was writing about losing his five year old son and in it I just found it devastating thing it was just crippling and I and I made a note to myself and I know that I'll never forget it as long as I live. Well let's do music before the break you you don't you turn to page two of six if you would You we've music into the book in various places a urine artist. You're so you play guitar and also piano right. That's right so you've worked into the into the same here a little melody Reference to it so let let's read that okay The quick setup on this is that Henry's is there with his a girl whom he has fallen in love with and and Someone who he is deeply passionate about and this is at the very beginning of their courtship. And there's there've been so many days where he sat at his piano and played with all his heart passion hoping that she might just come and stand at his doorway and hear him playing and know that that that was music that he was playing for her answer. Now he or she is. She's come in to the room and she's she's there with him and he he has his chance. The room was small in the uneven floor. Held only the piano a couch in an old chair. The Piano I stood against an inside wall I sat down to play in story stood behind me next to me watching. I could hear her breathing. I opened the book of music and then closed it again. I could read it without seeing it played the fantasy impromptu chopin's posthumous opus sixty eighty six. The one I always played thinking she might happen to come by my door and hear the music note was for her Allegra. Etcheto begin an inactive in the left hand struck like a bell before shadowing then darker Pacheco's again in the left hand in approaching cannonade fiercely sleep ascending runs in the right intricate delicate unrelenting a sense of acceleration tempered by cascading retreat. And we begin again breath surge dissipate surge pedal pedal pedal this cut time rhythm pushes you along after only a minute. We are brought up short by crashing left hand cadence and it is here that a sweet simple melody ensues pianissimo. That has no parallel in modern music. To my knowledge this perfect melody was in my bursting heart. The song long story with exquisite fleeting variations. It lingers FROLICS demurely relents and has gone the light of a single day at once the surging silver cannonade returns and the melody now hidden and faint to the ears. Remembrance becomes almost forgotten at the end of this magnificent tumult when the pieces drawing to a close and fading into silence. The sweet perfect melody appears once more this time in the left hand alone this time only once and it work right. He got the girl he got the girl and then and then we went and that's spun into a mystery involving girl and her family the and that kind of thing that is another layer of the book. You're right so when we come back in just a moment We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA deal into the writing life segment with Philip Roth. A couple more readings from the book so stay with Christmas is coming in. Host land. Dissuade has a trilogy of books to get you in the Christmas spirit. He wrote the first in the series the Christmas heist as a Christmas gift for his family. which the former dean of wake forest law school called a cross between my cousin vinny and Miracle Rickel on thirty Fourth Street in his second book the legally binding Christmas? The characters return to save Christmas once again the final book in the trilogy the Chris Redemption when the twenty eighteen holiday category of the Twelfth Annual National Indie Excellence Awards and was the twenty eighteen holiday category honorable mention in the tenth annual. Reader's favourite awards one reviewer said believing without seeing is a powerful idea and it's at the heart of the Christmas redemption. These books are available at Park. Road books mainstream books foggy pine books and online. And when you sign up for the e mail list at Charlotte Readers PODCAST DOT com. You'll receive four free the first book in the series as an evoke complete with illustrations Chins Charlotte readers. PODCAST and host land. Dissuade are grateful to you for listening to this show. If you like the show please leave a short written review on on Apple podcasts also known as I tunes or the podcast platform of your choice because your review helps author share their stories with more listeners. Thank thank you for your support. All right. We're back with Philip Louis author of the bureau fields and Philip now we're GonNa do something that I'm calling the writing life segment To start off with a few truth questions and this is only your.

Henry depression Coleridge Apple Charlotte Readers Philip Roth Herman Melville Thomas Philip Louis William Shakespeare Dickson Arnesen Emerson Grand Pavilion Pacheco Philip The olien harp wake forest law school vinny Miracle Rickel
"forest law school" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"forest law school" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Decide to go to law school. Can you explain this? So I was always fairly argumentative and if so much in common Jason. Friends, this podcast could be like seven years. I think. But yeah, so I, I decided on a minor league trip at some point like I, I need a little bit more education in my life. I like learning I enjoy it. I, I want to pursue it further. I like being around it. And Waclaw Wake Forest law school was, so amazing about me missing class here and there to do minor league baseball games. I sent in a CD of my work with my law school application, just so they knew like I'm weird and whatever, and they knew what they were getting into wanted. And this is worth giving me time off for. Yeah. Like, hey, this is a passion of mine. I, I, I need to still do this if I'm going to go to school, though. The hope was, hey I can I can go to a school where I'm doing game. So I had actually applied the law school at George Mason, and I interviewed at one point for the radio job, and it was the year that. They went to the final four, but I didn't get the job and it was like, oh, that would've been fun. But the, the idea was, hey, can I do both? They afforded me that chance. And I'm so glad I did it because some of the concepts of talking to a jury and having them see things the way you present them apply. So directly to what we do as play by play announcers. It's, it's actually it was unexpected and glorious. And what was your intention? When you went there wasn't presumably to shore up, your debating skills for on air broadcasting. I imagine there was some other end goal. And at the time. Yeah, it was it frankly, it was just learning. It was I, I want to know all about this, and it wasn't a backup plan. But it was also, if I can add value to my life, while doing the thing that I still love rather than just, you know, spending another four hours on the. Same thing, just because I have free time. Can I find this structure that helps me understand the deeper, meanings of why things exist as they do and cannot do I have another skill that communication applies to? And, and the law ended up being something I could Marshall along with communication. So you also while going along school working for the, for the many different broadcasting jobs. You took a side job with an institute at Syracuse working on disability policy research. There's obvious reasons why you might be interested in that. But was that something you wanted to pursue as a job? No. I that was I, I had gotten in touch with this Burton Blatt institute through somebody, I knew at Syracuse, and I wanted to scale back my minor league baseball inning. So I had worked in Syracuse before as kind of a number two announcer, and I was traveling. A little bit in two thousand and six and I called the guy who doing games at the time. Bob MC, elegant and GM John Simone. And I said, you know if if I came back, could I do some games while I did the the policy research, and they said, yeah, so I it was it was much more an opportunity for me to dabble in something that was that was interesting to me, not that it was going to be a career, but also scale back by innings a little bit and, and get a chance to apply the legal education somewhere that I thought would be interesting. And then Bob ended up leaving actually August first that year and I took over for him he got the blue jackets job on radio. He was he was working for Columbus at the time and still is. And I, I ended up I was trying to minimize my innings and then I ended up taking over for him. And I, I was the lead announcer there until twenty fourteen. We'll be right back with more. That's what she said with Sarah Spain is there something that interferes with your?.

Bob MC Syracuse baseball Burton Blatt institute Waclaw Wake Forest Jason George Mason John Simone Sarah Spain Columbus Marshall GM seven years four hours