35 Burst results for "Foresee"

Did social media actually counter election misinformation?

KCBS Radio Midday News

03:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Did social media actually counter election misinformation?

"So while the votes are still being tally that didn't stop the president from taking to social media to declare victory, Twitter and Facebook laid out their plans on what they would allow. How did it play out? They both foresaw the situation that ultimately played out very late last night, I guess early Wednesday morning, which is that the president? Two things one. He tended to. Ah claim victory in a couple states that hadn't been called. He also kind of suggested. That he had won the overall race, even though obviously that has not been called on. Then he also sought to undermine some of the revolt that were coming in. So he was saying things like, you know, Democrats were trying to steal the election. He talked about Democrats dropping ballots and finding balance is if they kind of were rigged or came out of nowhere. And those were both instances that are against Facebook and Twitter rules and we saw them sort of label and hide some of the president's post at the results. But he said that they magically hey, was magic. They starting To lose, and it's not really magic. It's counting. Right? I mean, we've now been talking about this for for weeks, if not months that this is not going to be a decision That would happen Tuesday night and Pennsylvania in particular as we've all been following I believe has, you know a week or five days before any doubts were postmarked yesterday, I need to be counted and obviously, after very important states, So we're seeing this kind of play out something that I think a lot of people addicted. But at the same time when you have the president of the United States kind of going out in real time and questioning the results, and Got it, putting that out into the Internet. These companies feel a need to step in. And at the very least, label and try to add more information goes. So what about YouTube? How did they handle misinformation? The YouTube has a couple of different types of labels. One of the ones that they actually added to one of the president's videos that was shared this morning was from his speech last night. You may recall that he basically claimed victory in a couple different states. He also said that the election was a fraud, and it was embarrassing and and YouTube at a label that says results may not be final. And then there's a link there. And if you click on that link, it goes to. Ah, result I believe from Reuters or The Associated Press. That basically, you know, thes company similar approach that Twitter and Facebook are taking, but basically trying to direct people to more reliable sources of information so that they're not taking in this case, the president at face value I wonder why he hasn't sued Twitter. Ah, well, he has issued an executive order You may recall. This was way back in May against social media companies for labeling his tweets to have been a lot of pushback, obviously from Republicans that these companies are biased against conservatives. What could happen is that ah that that could still play out. I guess we have a lot way a long way to go here as he's going to come in. We're already seeing the trump campaign. I believe Try to do some of these states on demand recounts, So I imagine Facebook and Twitter could potentially be on their list of people to go after a swell

Twitter Facebook Youtube Pennsylvania United States The Associated Press Reuters
Six constitutional amendments are on Florida's 2020 ballot

WIOD Programming

01:36 min | Last month

Six constitutional amendments are on Florida's 2020 ballot

"Rhetoric from President Trump calling the elections integrity into question, claiming, for instance, that mail in voting is not secure, raises fears about a contested election. But an attorney who represented George W. Bush in the legal battle over Florida's president to recount in 2000 does not foresee problems. This will not be repeated 2000 and second. I don't anticipate any serious problems this year in Florida. And probably in any states. Barry Richard says Florida has made several changes no more hanging chads for one designed to reduce the risk of election disasters. Six proposed amendments to the state Constitution include one that would open Florida's primaries, Amendment three would create a single primary for all candidates of all parties. The top two finishers in that would go on to the general election. Supporters say it would force candidates to appeal to a wider audience. Those include a South Florida businessman Mike Fernandez. Who has put more than a million dollars into the campaign to get Amendment three passed Amendment Four on this year's ballot would require proposed amendments in future years to pass twice in two different elections to become part of the state constitution. But Kate McFall of the Humane Society of the United States who helped get an amendment passed in 2018, that band Greyhound racing in the state. Says it already takes 60% of voters to approve amendments. And that's challenge enough. If amendment forward pass. We have serious concerns that it would make it even more difficult if approved future proposed amendments that get Thesixty Percent in one election would go on the ballot for the next one for the second approval it would need where Florida's news I'm John Mc Weston.

Florida President Trump South Florida George W. Bush Donald Trump Kate Mcfall John Mc Weston Barry Richard Mike Fernandez United States Attorney Humane Society Of
Coronavirus in France: Curfews to come into force in several cities

Monocle 24: Midori House

02:09 min | Last month

Coronavirus in France: Curfews to come into force in several cities

"Let's begin here in Europe as cases of Corona virus continue to rise across the continent governments have been doling out new restrictions from a citywide curfew in Paris in seven other French cities to right here in London, which will move into high alert level on the traffic light system. That's already looking like a speed bump to progress a few short days after it was implemented earlier this week we. Heard from Mongols Health and science correspondent nets. Dr To Chris Smith and he explained why lockdowns may cub infection rates but are really in some sense just delaying the inevitable. I am skeptical and the reason I'm skeptical I think is an information deficit. I haven't actually seen the case made for. If we do this, this happens if we do this, this happens and this is how certain we are behind these numbers. Remember it's only a while ago. That someone said we're going to shop pubs at ten o'clock at night, and this is going to reduce cases. This is going to reduce transmission. Yes. It will reduce transmission in the pub but what models and maths equations don't foresee is the predictable unpredictability of people, which is they then go out of the pub in the street mass transmission out there are back to someone else's place mentality with a whole bunch of of takeout and far more. Transmissions in that setting. So I think on the one hand if you just the question would lockdown translate into fewer cases on say, yes. If you then the questions about differently, what are the long term repercussions of this does this actually translate into a long term difference in the trajectory difference in outcome well, more people die later, just not today those are the sorts of questions we need to see set out so that we can all be. In the decision making because at the moment is coming across as a bit of some some people with big brains of said this, and this is what we're gonNA do based on some other input from some economists and I don't think he's transparent enough and I think is now is critical more than ever to take the public along for the journey to because that is missing at the moment morale is falling support is wavering, and if we're GonNa make these things, work evidence proves to us we have to have everyone on board onside an all acting together decisively otherwise, we would just fiddling while Rome Burns.

Chris Smith Europe Paris Rome Burns London Lockdowns
Never Spend Your Emergency Fund Again

You Need a Budget

03:30 min | Last month

Never Spend Your Emergency Fund Again

"Today I want to talk about what it might look like if you use a little bit of a tactic in the software I don't talk about the software per se very often but I wanted to give you a little tip today a lot of times when people are following wine ebbers specific where fallen rule to. Their embracing their true expenses it means that they're looking ahead and they're trying to find those larger less frequent expenses and they're breaking them up into manageable monthly amounts. So Christmas if you're gonNA spend twelve, hundred dollars a year easy math. You would take the twelve hundred dollars you divided by twelve, and then you would give yourself a one hundred dollar monthly bill. You could do the same thing for an HVAC repair. You could do the same thing for your Bosh Dryer not recommended and replace that thing so. You're always looking ahead to those larger amounts and then you're saying, okay, what would I need to save or set aside these are traditionally called sinking funds and put him right into wine APP and it's your category where you build up that money over time. Clear. What a lot of the time traditional advice would be. You have an emergency fund and that also makes good sense. Right? We're living in a bit of an emergency year. So you would say, well, I'm going to have three to six months of expenses saved for an emergency. What happens is you have wine numbers that. Don't have emergencies anymore, and the reason is because they're falling in to they're looking ahead and they're thinking about those expenses will come up their true expenses and they are embracing them with love affection and money because you need that third thing. More than any other so. When you are not having emergencies anymore do you still need an emergency fund? You may call that fun now. Something like. Something that really really caught us off guard that we did not see coming and the next time we'll see coming. That's a little bit along category name, but the idea is something happens and it really does catch you guard and it wasn't part of your rule to true expenses. You don't have a sinking fund setup that's when you could use an emergency fund. What I want you to do in the software is never spent directly from that blanket kind of grove. Emergency, Fund category. Instead I want you to make sure that you're always moving money to where that money actually will be used. So if you didn't foresee HVAC going out. How how I do not know but you don't foresee that. And is not covered under warranty. So you're going to have to get rid of actual cash. You could set up a category called home appliances repair something like that or more specifically HVAC I don't think it should be that specific but home appliances, maintenance and repair. And then you would move the money from your emergency fund that little pile of money used for things that you didn't actually budget for and you move the money to the home appliance repair category, and then you would spend that unfortunate large dollar amount from that category. Why? This is what gives you data for going forward. So you will not be caught on your hills again. So you never spent directly if you have an emergency fund category in Why am because you've just got cash set aside I don't know what will happen. This is truly for emergencies not because my car tires wore out, that's not an emergency that. Happens, but you have an actual emergency that takes emergency money. You would then move it to a category for the actual spending. So then you have the historical data to point back to and say, Oh, next time next time that will not catch us off guard

C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

The Book Review

05:41 min | 2 months ago

C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

"Scott Anderson joins us now from the catskills. He is a contributing writer for the New York, Times magazine, and the author of many books. His latest is called the quiet Americans four CIA spies. Of the Cold War tragedy in three acts, Scott Welcome back to the podcast. Thanks much nice to be here. So you are allowed on the podcast to talk about your previous book Lawrence in Arabia which came out in twenty thirteen hand, which of course feels like now centuries ago which makes it clear to our listeners are longtime listeners that this is not your first. Book. Involving spies I'm curious what what's the draw for you but I think Speiser inherently fascinating in not just to an awful lot of people and of thought about what is I think it's the the allure of having a secret life. I think that I think that for an awful lot of people this idea that you have a whole separate identity is really fascinating New People. What I was drawn to in both the Lawrence and with in the quite America's the foresee a officers I follow is that in both cases, this was at a time when individuals out in the field had a tremendous freedom of action. So it wasn't. People sitting behind desks following policy that they're actually out in the field doing crazy stuff. You also have a personal connection to the story right in terms of what your father did for living you talk a little bit about that. Sure. My father was agricultural adviser for the Agency for International Development, which was a branch of the State Department. I grew up in. East. Asia in in Korea and Taiwan as Indonesia. and. So this was the nineteen fifties, nineteen sixties when I came along American government workers abroad often in those sorts of countries often were two hats whatever their official job was my father's job as agriculture adviser but it was also part of this great anti Communist crusade was happening around the world. So the upfront hearts and minds, soft power aspect of my father's work was working on agrarian reform in line with countries like these countries were were the land was was had been controlled infra centuries by all darkies. But the the more hard power in the darker side of what my father was doing was was setting up rural vigilante squads, home guard militias to watch over the local populace and to make sure that they weren't being swayed by the communist in certainly in countries like Taiwan or South Korea. If you were exposed or accused of being a leftist, your life was not going to go. Well, you know I'm now getting a sense of why one of the four characters in your previous book was an agronomist perhaps. That's right. Yeah it's well It's it's an interesting thing because. It just for national development was often used by the CIA as a cover because. Are Out, in the field, they're not, they're not saying, I'm destined to capitol there often out among the local population and probably have a better sense of what's happening. Outside what you one thing I'll say I've noticed over time in different countries. I've been almost invariably the ex Patriot community that knows best what's happening in the country are tend to be the people are out in the field in often the Middle East is the oil guys. They have a sense much more than than people sitting around in the capital. Let's start with frank wizner. The first person you mentioned, and this is not the the first book to be written at least in part about wisner who was he and what made him. So central to the story wizards amazing Turkey was a corporate lawyer who was working at a Wall Street firm when even before World War Two broke out and he quit his law firm to join the navy, he ended up being an operative for the office to teacher services, which is the the wartime intelligence agency of the of the army that they owe asset kind of the precursor to the CIA. That's right. That's right and he ends up being A. Kind of the first American to to to witness. The Soviet takeover of country in Eastern Europe, and this was in Romanian to summer of nineteen forty. Four So full year before the war ended and a wizard was on the ground as a as an oasis operative and just watch the strong arm tactics did really a matter of weeks led the Soviets to take control the country he and he was sending cables back to Washington telling telling them what are so good allies doing he sees the say he has the same experience in eastern Germany at the end of. The war in watching the way the Soviets for taking over, he goes back to his law from for couple of years for the complete unhappy, and then when the CIA starts up in nineteen forty seven, they have this idea that they wanna start a covert operations branch of of the CIA called the Office of Policy Coordination and frank listeners chosen to head that the name was deliberately chosen to be really boring. That's right and in fact, the name itself, the Office of policy coordination was was so top secret that even you can't even say the name out loud for twenty five years. So in that role wizner e created, what what he called the mighty world, which was this vast covert operations umbrella of a operating throughout the world and everything from hard power aspects of it like dropping dropping partisans behind the iron curtain to everything to cultural stuff voice. Of America. Radio Free Europe that was all came out of the Office of Policy Coordination.

CIA Office Of Policy Coordination Lawrence Frank Wizner Office Of Policy America Taiwan Scott Anderson Times Magazine New York Agency For International Devel Writer Middle East Washington Radio Free Europe Asia State Department Germany
"foresee" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

07:46 min | 3 months ago

"foresee" Discussed on Here & Now

"But right to those numbers into the old ones. That is here now transportation analysts Seth Kaplan said thanks as always. Thanks Jeremy. On any given day, you're probably thinking to yourself or to others what will my life and the chances for immunity against Corona virus look like in the future well in her latest piece four scenarios on how we might develop immunity to covert nineteen stat reporter. Helen brands well spoke with experts on what they predict for the next few months and years, and she joins us now. Hi Helen Hi Tania. Well, you number of experts to map out scenarios of how we might come to coexist with this threat and you wanted to make a point that these are educated guesses but they are broken down in four parts sterilizing immunity, functional immunity waning immunity and lost immunity. Let's start with the first scenario and that's sterilizing immunity. What is it? So that's the kind of immunity. That is what we associated with diseases that are kind of one and done. You can't catch some second time. If, you have that kind of immunity. You can't be reinfected with something and so I wanted to find out for you know for starters whether that is a scenario we might be looking at in terms of covert nineteen. Unfortunately. Viruses that infect through mucous membranes of the nose and throat typically don't induce sterilizing immunity. You know when you think about all the different kinds of viruses that cause colds we or influenza for that matter I mean we can contract these things multiple times over our lifetime, and so the experts I spoke to felt that that really is not likely to be the scenario for most people although one of the one of the experts I spoke to sit, he thought that some people might have sterilizing immunity That's interesting that some people might actually have this. There's so much to learn about this and how our individual bodies and make-up's work when faced with the virus like this. But there's one observation about sterling immunity as well that if an infection doesn't trigger it, then a vaccine may not either. Can you explain that? Right. So you know they're multiple vaccines in development right now as you just said I mean the thinking is that if our immune systems can't learn to develop complete immunity to respiratory viruses, then probably vaccines can't deliver that either that doesn't mean the vaccines won't be useful. You know as long as they are safe and effective, they could be very useful. But what they might do is turn disease that can cause severe pneumonia or death into something that causes a cold. So you know. Even. After were vaccinated this potential that we could still contract the virus but that our immune systems would kick into gear. So quickly that the symptoms would be very mild or almost you know in perceivable and you know the question would be would we have? Virus in our upper airways and would we spread it to other people? That's that's still unclear. But you know the notion that you could have a vaccine that would protect you know one hundred percent of the time is unlikely in this circumstance. Okay. The next case scenario is functional immunity and this is a more realistic scenario what could that look like? So I think we're actually starting to see that now as you will have heard this week, there are reports of Out of Hong Kong a out of a couple of places in Europe where where research groups are saying we have definitively confirmed a second infection in somebody who was previously infected the Hong Kong cases a is a good example. there was a man who had cove nineteen in March. He had very mild disease only three days of symptoms and he wasn't he was hospitalized because they were hospitalizing p all patients there to observe them but he was not you know severely sick He recently traveled to Europe and on his way back to Hong Kong he was tested. He was t he tested positive. He had no symptoms and that's what people think. Functional immunity might be like that. You could contract the virus again but that your immune system would remember it really rapidly and produce enough of an immune response very quickly that you would either have almost no symptoms or you know very very mild symptons and that you might not even produce enough virus to transmit to other people so. Functional immunity actually does exist it. There's a possibility that as more of US acquire it either through infection or vaccination that there might not be as much cove in nineteen spreading because you know the fewer people contributing to the spread The third is waning immunity, which which is very similar. It's a variation of what you're just talking about a functional immunity. Can you explain the distinction between this possibility right? So the way that one was described to me is effectively similar. You know you you would have your response might Wayne you know they'd measure they've been measuring antibodies to try to see how long antibodies are lasting, and you might get into a scenario where there was a measurable decline of antibodies but that on re exposure again, your. Your your immune system would remember this threat and would kick into gear. Again, you might have some illness mild illness and you might be able to transmit, and that's really where the big differences there than there might be more transmission going on from these mild cases, but they would be mild. I. Mean One of the points that several people made to me is they don't think people will be as severely ill on a second time a second infection as they would be on a first said really. You know if these predictions are right, you know your first bout of of Covid nineteen might be your worst out of Color Nineteen The last scenario is lost immunity. How probable is this scenario that we lose all IMMUNITY OVER TIME? you know the good news was that none of the people I spoke to thought that that was likely at all That that doesn't happen they don't think and everything they've seen so far about the way the immune system responds to this This pathogen makes it look like lots of other pathogens that you know. We do develop immune responses to it and and they do not think that you know the most healthy people would you know run the risk of having sort of their? Blackboard wiped clean a at a point. I mean I conceivably somebody who becomes immuno-compromised might be an vivid difficult situation. But in general terms for the for most people isn't a scenario I? Think we would face. I mean over time then does this kind of speak to almost to the first one about sterilizing immunity? It's not the same, but our systems might know how to deal with it..

Helen Hong Kong Seth Kaplan reporter Jeremy influenza pneumonia Europe US Covid Wayne
Verizon's CTO Discusses Their Nationwide 5G Deployment

The 3:59

04:46 min | 3 months ago

Verizon's CTO Discusses Their Nationwide 5G Deployment

"Of rising chief technology officer Kyle Milady on in the first of a three part interview to discuss the state of five G.. So just to kick things off what is the state of Verizon's five day deployment Oh man good question we have a real a lot going on at the moment you know we started this journey you know years ago frankly actually coming up with their own five G. SPEC. So we could bring that five G. SPEC along with submillimeter wave spectrum that we purchased and all the idea of trying to really leapfrog the current generation. Of Technology Knob, it's been a few years We're really happy with the progress we launched our first commercial five G. on last last April, and send them a the two two major things we've been doing one is optimizing technology. For use in the the wider network and deploying more and more notes and so on both on both fronts, we've been really making a lot of a lot of good progress on the technology side. Don't WanNA. Get Too Geeky. But you know we started off with our deployments at something called foresee on what that is for chunks of Trim Gang together, and with that we're able to. Get close to or over sometimes two gigabits a second on in on a cell phone But we've been working on something called HCC, which actually gangs up eight chunks of spectrum together, and we're going to be able to get over four gigabits a second. We've been doing the labs and in some of our field trial. So we continue to work on the technology on the. Dial link, we're working on an our technology on the uplink. So you can get much faster speeds coming from the device up to the network, and so that's coming along well, and then finally we've really ramped up our deployment in terms of small cell deployment throughout the country were we're GONNA put five to six times more nodes on we did last year and you know, right Now we're on target. We're doing really well in terms of getting the the equipment out there. Yeah I know you just hit San Jose recently hitting your thirsty market. I know you have a target for sixty markets with five G. by the years that's still an achievable target something yourself shooting for absolutely absolutely continue the momentum we've we have those markets that we launched in. The Bay area, we didn't conjunction with our MECH. Announcement but we have a whole bunch of other studies that were working really hard and right now, and you'll start seeing those rollout the towards the. Towards the second half year and you know we're we're right on track and we're really excited to start building momentum and launching new markets and allow people to really experience great you the great the servicing capabilities of ban has offer. Time Baltra white band because that's also known as millimeter way spectrum. It is it's got a rep for being extremely fast talking about one to get to speed up the rage limited and it it's. Often compared to. A hot spot on steroids right and so. T mobile likes to the bash guys know your customers only connect to five g. a fraction of the time. What do you say that it's especially at you as you're broadening your deployment and your positioning this consumers is something that they wanna have How do you reconcile that the fact that like the range continues to be pretty limited for this that service great can get it, but it is hard to get. Yes. Oh, the here's a say that we started like I said, we started the journey years ago. And the hardest thing to do is five G. With millimeter wave. But that's also where the greatest prizes that is where you can really fundamentally changed the way wireless works and it was wasn't lost on us that the Rangers certainly limited compared to a seven hundred. Network eight fifty network in the in the low band, a spectrum that we had before. It'll be honest years ago we weren't even sure you could use millimeter wave in a wireless commercial network. We've proven that to be the case. Now it's a matter of we gotta keep building out and we gotta keep getting the nodes out there, but the technology is working as as we'd expect. So there hasn't been any surprises in terms of how much coverage now, it's the to to get it out there get more deeply deployed and also what you'll start seeing from us. In the rest of the year here, we're going to be putting out what we call five G. Nationwide. which uses technology called DSS, which allows us five G. and four G. to share a low ban spectrum.

Rangers Chief Technology Officer Verizon Kyle Milady HCC San Jose DSS
Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

Marketplace

05:18 min | 3 months ago

Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

"Exactly 15 minutes past eight in the morning on August 6th, 1945 Japanese time at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshi MMA Miss Yoshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia, 10 Works had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk. That rather ordinary sentence is the opening to the extraordinary August 1946 New Yorker article titled Oshima. It was published a year after the United States dropped the first nuclear bomb on that city, a year in which the U. S government had gone to great lengths to conceal the human devastation caused And to depict the bomb as a conventional humane weapon. The writer of the Peace John Hursey, uncovered a very different story reporting on the ground in Japan, author and journalist Leslie Bloome chronicles foresees work and the reaction to it in her new book, Fallout. She joins me now from Los Angeles. Leslie Bloome. Welcome. Thank you. Start with Who? John Hursey Wass and how he came to be the one to tell this story. Oh, John. Her see was a young World War two correspondent who had covered action in different theaters throughout the war for Time magazine. And like many war correspondents, then he was pretty supportive of the U. S military. And he even wrote an almost overly complimentary wartime bio of General Douglas MacArthur and That the U. S military knew him entrusted him would be an important factor in my story and how he eventually got his story about Hiroshi MMA, and I don't want to give away too much. But I will say that how he got in was by being the perfect Trojan horse reporter, The perfect Trojan horse reporter. You've hooked us where we're intrigued when I got there. He didn't report this out as a war correspondent. He focused very much on ordinary people on he picked six of them. Why did he want to tell the story in that way? Well, I mean, the fact of the matter is is that the bombing of Hiroshima was widely reported when it happened, and it was reported as a very big end of days. Story mean there were pictures of the mushroom clouds that were released in pictures, the landscape devastation. But there were no pictures that were released or no stories that were released about the human toll that it happened on the ground there, and the government was really going to enormous lengths to cover up the reality of theater. Tomic aftermath in Hiroshima, Nagasaki They were very concerned with as the former secretary of war, put it, not being seen as having outdone, Hitler and atrocities. So her C and his editors at the New Yorker magazine became determined to tell the story from the point of view of survivors. You know, these are among the on ly humans who have ever experience what it's like to be on the receiving end of nuclear attack. He ultimately picked a widow with young kids, a young female clerk to medics, a priest and a minister with with a young family, and his idea was to create a sense of empathy. In his readers with these individuals, because, after all, not everybody could understand the physics of how the bombs works or visualized. You know, an all out nuclear attack that anyone could relate to being a mother or a father or colleague or doctor who's going about their everyday business. One catastrophe strikes I wonder if you would give us a sense of just one telling story of what he did find when he was there What it was that so shocked American readers who had no idea what was unfolding in Japan. One story that particularly resonated with him. He interviewed a young female clerk who was in her company when the bomb was detonated. This's the clerk I mentioned in the intro exactly one of the most famous introductions in journalistic history, and when the bomb exploded over her factory bookshelves fell upon her, and she was nearly crushed to death by books. And he thought How ironic it was to have somebody nearly crushed by books within the first moments of the atomic age, and literally when he was leaving here, Oshima and standing on the surprisingly intact train station platform, he thought that he was going to have to write about that line. And that's one of the incidents that most resonated with readers. So August 1946 The New Yorker publishes. What was the reaction? Both in the United States and around the world to this story. Well in her sees own words. The reaction was quote explosive mean, I try not to use that word in my book for obvious reasons. But he did, And the article was simply titled here, Oshima, and it comprised nearly the entire contents of the August 31st 1946 issue of The New Yorker. It's sold out immediately. You're even black market copies of it going for, you know, astronomical sums. It was syndicated in its entirety, and this is a 30,000 word story in newspapers across the country and around the world. And editors and reporters and readers were enraged. They were horrified by the testimonies in her sees here, Oshima, and they also began demanding to know what else was the U. S government withholding from the US public And then, when President Truman was asked by a reporter if he had personally read it, he retorted. I never read the New York ER. It just makes me bad. But the fact is, is that the government had been put very much on the defensive. That said, You know, they didn't want to look like they were on the defensive, but they were and they had to scramble to try to reclaim the narrative.

New Yorker Magazine Oshima Leslie Bloome United States Hiroshi Mma Reporter Hiroshima Japan U. S Los Angeles John Hursey Wass East Asia John Hursey Miss Yoshiko Sasaki Douglas Macarthur Time Magazine Writer
Reading the New Testament Letters: Q & A

The Bible Project

05:47 min | 4 months ago

Reading the New Testament Letters: Q & A

"How to read the New Testament Letters. Let's start with a question from Damian in Minnesota Hey. Tim and John. My name is Damian. Leverett and I live. Live in Saint Paul. Minnesota I'm a classically trained theater actor and performer, and listening to these episodes has made me wonder if it could be a fruitful practice for churches to have people like me. Trained in speaking complex texts in an active embodied way, read the letters in their entirety in live gatherings. What do you think about this idea is? It's stupid. Are there any pitfalls or problems that you'd foresee? I'd love your advice. Thanks for all you do all right. I'll respond first Damian your idea is the opposite of stupid. It's actually brilliant and so important, and yes, you should do it. No questions asked. All Right? That's my first response. was here's John for sure? Yeah, you. We talked about how these letters were originally heard. Read Aloud. Yeah, that's right and that there is something about. Hearing it all in one sitting that helps you Kinda feel the shape of it in a different way. I noticed when I read. I get really stuck like what did that sentence mean? I don't keep moving. But, if you're in a situation, where just being read aloud in listening to an audio version of the Bible, that's really powerful, so so if you have a vision for using your experience in theater. That's awesome. Yes, John and I. Both knew a guy named Jason Nightingale. Who had just ministry nonprofit, he called word sewer ministries, but essentially he memorized all the books of the New Testament. Did he do all of them well? I don't know that for certain, but the sampling that I. Know that I've heard him. Recite before makes me think he's for sure got. From the gospel of Mark to the book of revelation Romans, Hebrews. Fijian's so we back when we were in our twenties, heard him. Yeah back in the nineties. Nineties Nightingale. But Man. This guy traveled all over the US and the world reciting books of the New Testament and then sometimes he would give short little homily. Reflection afterwards, but his main thing was to recite whole books the New Testament in one go for groups of people with such a booming. Yes, wonderful destroy had a uniquely amazing voice yeah. So yes Damien I. It's a wonderful idea. It should be normal I. Think this kind of ministry should be normal in the life of a local church. Yeah, having somebody who's like the memorizer and reciter of books of the New Testament. So guts be Damian. Go forth and memorize and recite his question from Lauren in Indiana Hi John and Tim. This is Lauren and Fort Wayne Indiana I'm listening to your conversation on the New Testament letters with my usual rapt attention, and in episode three is John expressed some frustration that the theology. The New Testament isn't more thoroughly connected and expurgated. It made me wonder. Wonder whether Paul as a Hebrew scripture scholar, who understood that it was as you call it. He Meditation Literature. Do you think it's possible that he crafted his epistles in that same way so that people would need to hear them and read them over and over to really get the depth of meaning just curious. Thanks for all you do God bless. It's great question. I thought that was really insightful. Question. It is true especially Paul the his letters are hard to understand. There are or you could say there are many parts that are difficult to follow. And you remember at some point in the series. I mentioned passage in Second Peter where Peter felt the same way That's right. Yeah, yeah, he says there are some things of Paul's letters that are hard to understand. However the question is. Is that intentional? He could. Is it a bug? My hunch is that for Paul's letters that it was expensive to write. Letters can talk about this future episodes. How how letters were actually produced and how expensive it was and the process involved, but I think part of it was just the way he communicated through these letters and the way his mind work. was like a beautiful mind. In terms of. Is this guy crazy or is this guy brilliant? I think it seems you can just feel bursting out of sentences in Galicians that there's whole volumes. He could riot on what's underneath just a couple of sentences and so? I think you actually could. You. Do need to read them over and over at least I have for years, but I'm not sure it's necessarily because he crafted the way. The Hebrew literature is crafted I. Think it's he was raised on that literature, and so he certainly is shaped by it and talks things by, but I think it's also just the nature of him his unique personality, and then the letter medium. How would you think I hear what you're saying there? Yeah, he not designed with the same maybe. Maybe intention analogy that scroll in the Tanakh would have been designed potentially, but he had internalized that design, and that tradition, and that tradition so much that it undergirds everything. He sang by Medicare, eating on Hebrew Bible, and then meditating on what Paul's writing. Yes, as cool chemistry that happens totally which I've noticed. Yeah, yeah, working on this project with you so many things come pop a lot more when when I start to see the things that that Paul was seeing And which are things that you've been pointing out these patterns and themes inside?

Paul New Testament Letters John Damian Saint Paul Minnesota TIM Leverett Jason Nightingale United States Lauren Damien Indiana Mark Medicare Fort Wayne Indiana Peter Galicians
Trump Expands Federal Crackdown from Portland to Chicago

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:36 min | 4 months ago

Trump Expands Federal Crackdown from Portland to Chicago

"Tonight, CBS News has obtained an email showing President Trump is preparing to send federal officers to patrol the streets of Chicago in response to growing gun violence. Now. This follows fierce clashes in Portland, Oregon, between federal officers and protesters here. CBS's Carter Evans federal officers in Portland on orders from the White House, fire, gas and rubber bullets as they faced off with protesters. Clashes escalated after video showed federal officers in fatigues pulling people off the streets with no explanation. And then over the weekend, 53 year old Christopher David, a Naval Academy graduate, Said he asked officers about their oath to protect the Constitution and got thiss response. And I figured, OK, they could get me and they hit me with Tom's, but they're probably not killing. Probably not going to shoot me. The city officials in and state government is asking you to remove your federal officers. Why foresee issue? We're not forcing any issue. We're accomplishing our mission, which is to protect the federal facilities. Can you say once and for all that there is absolutely no political motivation behind this? Yes, absolutely. Look, This is us doing our job That job could spread to other communities. CBS News obtained a D. H s memo that says the first city identified was Chicago and we've been tasked to send 175 agents to assist reporting middle of next week. We'll organs Attorney general has filed a lawsuit against several federal agencies, accusing them of using unlawful tactics here. And violating civil

Cbs News Chicago Portland CBS President Trump TOM Carter Evans Naval Academy Oregon Christopher David White House Attorney
Republican convention planners now foresee limited attendance

Bloomberg Markets

00:28 sec | 4 months ago

Republican convention planners now foresee limited attendance

"To the Republican National Convention next month and it is due to the pandemic. First, the event moved from North Carolina to Florida over covert restrictions. Now. Party chairwoman Rana McDaniel says the 1st 3 days of the Jacksonville event will be limited to delegates to comply with Florida's rules. Then on the fourth day when President Trump attends guests and alternates will be allowed. Daniel says the convention will also utilize a mix of indoor and outdoor venues course.

Florida Rana Mcdaniel President Trump North Carolina Daniel Jacksonville
Singaporeans vote in snap election under coronavirus cloud

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:56 min | 4 months ago

Singaporeans vote in snap election under coronavirus cloud

"It's a little after two PM in Singapore reverted to taking part in a snap. General election announced a little over a fortnight ago. The ruling People's Action Party has ruled since independence in. In one thousand, nine, hundred, sixty five, and it is expected to win big again. Even the leader of the country's only elected opposition party in parliament has warned of a wipeout that could see the sitting government win every seat. Well, let's hear now. From Monaco's Asia, editor James Chambers will. The election is due by next year. but everybody knew in Singapore that the government would call an election this year. Year at some points so even before Kovic. Struck, the plan was to to call a general election but back then before the pandemic, the idea was to capitalize on Singapore's economy, because it was still doing well but they could foresee time because of the trade war without would no longer be the case that they were going to try and get the election in before the Economy Turns Sour. And as you mentioned you might, you might have thought that's given the pandemic, and and the fact that Singapore is facing its biggest recession. In decades they have postponed that and perhaps for for next year, but they've gone ahead with its and the strategy now is to I guess play up the crisis I mean the Prime Minister Lisa Lomas, calling this the crisis of generation, and I guess he's appealing to votes. His kind of stick with who you know, stick with the. Because, they've guided Singapore to got to so well since independence so take you know it's not time to gamble now. you know stick with the party that you can depend on? was there any chance that people would take a gamble on anybody else other than the People's Action Party? The People's Action Party as you mentioned, has won every election since independence and we're talking about. Huge majorities. Of the the worst ever done, it was getting sixty percent of the votes. And last year last, sorry, last time around in two thousand fifteen. It got sixty nine percents. So the only question we we're all waiting to see the answer to is how big the wind will be this year the prime minister has been calling on, Singaporean say to give. His party and him a strong mandate which would suggest that there for aiming for something you know above seventy or eighty percent. And that's because because of. The crisis face facing Singapore, but also the party is having this major generational transition the Prime Minister Lien Long. He's the eldest son of the founder of Singapore. Lee Kuan Yew and he's planning to step down. He's sixty eight now. He wants to retire by at least seventy. So this is his last election and he's he's. He wants to be able to hand over his party to this next generation, and you know with a with a good mandate. The I. Guess what the opposition is worried about is is they might get you know wiped out because. He's the prime minister's has made a lot about him. and voters may may rewarding for for the job that he's done since becoming premise in two thousand and four. the opposition in Singapore is is quite weak, even though there are ten opposition parties standing this election, the the major ones really running for about twenty seats out of about ninety three, so it's not as if even if they did well, they could take control of the parliament. But there's there is a quirky quirky system in Singapore. So even if the opposition lost all seats, and they only hold six in the current parliament, even if they lose all their seats, they would then be given some. Because the. Doesn't want to have. Total control. It feels like it needs to have at least some opposition to hold in account in parliament. Otherwise it it ends up in the ridiculous, and this opposition seems to have gotten a little bit personal. Let me talk about this sort of the legacy and the. Family almost family firm that seems to be established. The way that Singapore runs its government, but the strange brother of the prime minister has actually but. Li Yang joined the opposition progress Singapore Party and has openly criticized the way that Lee. Long has handled the coronavirus pandemic also has said that there's a natural aristocracy inside the People's Action Party and it's not great when members of your family decide to. Wash your laundry and public. You're you're exactly right? Mrs Definitely in a case of airing your dirty laundry in public this this kind of family feud in Singapore's first family. The lease in this is this is all come about from after the death of their father I and how they they deal with his his bungalow. legally wanted it to be demolished but it's still standing. Could because the prime minister wants to keep it as as a kind of a almost like a shrine. And the brothers have fallen out, so the younger brother has thrown his support behind this new party. The progressing party is only form last year by a former member of the People's Action Party. So there's a you know a former heavyweight from the people's action. Party is fronting it and it's been supported by younger brother of the prime minister so very very embarrassing for the prime minister. But. It's not expected to have a major impact on the the number of votes that the prime minister and his party gets. It's not something that. You Singaporeans a used to seeing. But. One thing's for sure this isn't going to. This isn't going to bring about the end of of the PAP the the the one question I mentioned that we're all waiting to see just how big the majority is that they get finally It's the news broke overnight. about the death of souls map park won soon I, mean he? He had been tipped as a as a very viable candidate for the twenty twenty two presidential elections. Yes this this news. We're following in Asia last night very closely. and the the police were tipped off to his disappearance by his daughter, because she received quite cryptic message from him on her phone which she then shutoff now he was You know he's been married since two thousand eleven, and he's one of the the big heavyweights in the Democratic Party that the the President Moon jae-in belongs to, and so he was you know. One of the heavy favorites to. To run for to become the next president when Moon Jae steps down. In a few years time so this. Caused a you know a big shot. And Even, though the the circumstances. And the facts are all still up in the air. It is looking like it's It's related to these. Allegations of sexual harassment that was against him the day before by his secretary, and these these allegations are doing the rounds of of social media in in in career. I have seen them myself, but is best not to speak about them right now, but it does feel like, and it just looked like The two are linked. He was a new. He billed himself as a kind of a male feminist and he he did a lot to. Promote women's rights in Korea. So if this turns out to be the case, it's going to be a big. Full, from graceful for him and. It just highlights the the extent of this. Problem in career I, mean the metoo movement of started in the US and it has I guess being overshadowed recently by the black lives matter one, but I mean in in create is a huge issue and if a man like mad park is embroiled in this then it just shows the the extent of the problem and I do hope that it has. The same kind of effect as the black lives, matter. Movement has in getting people to finally kind of talk about this and address it James, chambers. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle. Twenty four stay

Prime Minister Singapore People's Action Party Prime Minister Lisa Lomas Singapore Party Lee Kuan Yew James Chambers Asia Democratic Party Kovic Monaco Korea United States Editor President Trump Founder Mrs Definitely Long
The Infodemic

After The Fact

06:00 min | 5 months ago

The Infodemic

"Ellen Miller directs the news literacy project. You're just outside. Washington DC welcome. Good to be with. You hope you are staying safe of during all of these difficult times, so let's just take a moment for our listeners. Who maybe didn't join us the last time you and I spoke? Tell us what the news literacy project is. How you work with students and people can believe what you're telling them right now. The News Literacy project is a national educational nonprofit that produces resources and empowers. Eaters to teach middle and high school students how to know what news and information to trust, and to give them an appreciation of the vital role, the First Amendment and a free press in democracy. Our goal is to give students. The tools to be informed. Engage participants in the country civic life. We are rigorously nonpartisan. We have a commitment to. Forty transparency and accountability and. To, giving the next generation, the tools to fully and effectively participate in the country civic life so Allen. Misinformation is not something real new. It's always seemed to exist. Sometimes we call it propaganda Sometimes it's just plain misinformation or disinformation for a lot of different purposes. It feels like a bigger deal today in society. Why is that well? In fact, we're living in the most of complex information landscape in human history. We have more verifiable and credible information available to US literally at our fingertips than ever before, but it is being overwhelmed by a Sioux Nami of misinformation that seeks to mislead US exploited US and divide us, young people today are inheriting an information ecosystem created by another generation that did not fully foresee just how it would unfold. Therefore, we feel we have a responsibility to give them the tools to successfully navigate this landscape in a way that can bring us together around their fireable agreed upon facts. Why Teaching News Literacy is in an essential life skill today the World Health Organization has in addition to declaring this pandemic. Declare something called an Info democ problems with information. Can you talk a little bit about what what an Info Democ might be and how we can live through that, too? Yes, so the World Health Organization coined the term in for democ to refer to the overwhelming and rapidly evolving amount of information, including a torrent of misinformation about the corona virus outbreak fact more recently united, Nations Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez went further, and he called this dangerous epidemic. Epidemic of misinformation, a poison that is putting lives at risk full statement. How can we is consumers of news and sure we're reading real news and not looking at fake information or manipulated images video. The responsibility really is on the consumer to be vigilant in checking what we're seeing, and particularly what we're sharing to make sure it's credible. There are some really basic concepts that I think we can all apply The first thing is to pause. Pause to look at what we're seeing in to check our emotions. Is this something that is provoking anger or fear or amazement? When information causes that kind of response, it makes us particularly vulnerable to manipulation, then examined the source take a moment to do a quick search on the person or the organization to see what else they they have created, and whether they are credible. Check replies and comments anything. You're looking at to see if they confirm. Confirm or debunk what you're viewing. We generally would say find a wide variety of credible news sources with different points of view to consume and follow and follow a story over time don't take I source that you that you see and share it particularly. If you're uncertain, do not share it, and then finally used readily available online tools like Google reverse image, searching or fact, checking sites like fat, check, fact or slopes. If, there's something that you're uncertain about. You've talked a little bit about ways to sort of down and how people can try to determine what's what's true or false? Are there particular sources that people should be able to realize I? Mean I guess we should we be giving credence to government sources over private sources, or should we what are what are some of the more detailed nuances that people can look at to help them? Make up their mind well, certainly in the context of the pandemic there are sources that went to public health sources. The World Health Organization the CDC Of Public Health Agencies One can certainly look for you know fact, base credible news sources at the end of the day I mean it's incumbent upon all of us to not only search for credible sources, but to push back against those who are sharing things that misinform because the virus itself is a kind of hard and immutable truth, and it is impervious to spin or falsehoods or magical thinking. So I think the only effective way that we can combat. It is with science and fax and hard truths, and in this respect to we're all in this together.

United States World Health Organization Sioux Nami Democ Washington Ellen Miller DC Epidemic Google Allen Cdc Of Public Health Agencies Secretary General Antonio Guti
George Floyd’s brother testifies as House holds hearing on police violence

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

George Floyd’s brother testifies as House holds hearing on police violence

"The brother of George Floyd was on Capitol Hill today calling on lawmakers to institute changes so his brother will not have died in vain colonus Floyd testifying at a house Judiciary Committee hearing as lawmakers consider a package of reforms to the nation's police departments and racial bias and excessive use of force hold them accountable when they do something wrong Tuesday or what it means to treat people with empathy and respect tease them when necessary foresees tease them bed daily boys should be used rarely and only when life is at risk proposals include limits on legal protections for police creation of a national database of excessive force incidents and a ban on the use of chokeholds George Floydada Memorial Day video taken by a bystander shot a police officer kneeling on Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes

George Floyd Officer Colonus Floyd Judiciary Committee George Floydada Memorial Day
Cooking Up a Storm with Chef Del

Plant Strong

05:17 min | 6 months ago

Cooking Up a Storm with Chef Del

"I want to welcome chef del Shrove. To the plans drawn PODCAST DEL YOU and I. You know I I met you back in two thousand in nine believe it or not? Thousand Nine I got invited to the wellness forum. By Pam. To come talk about the the release of my first book. Engine two diet and that's when I first met you wonderful? Wonderful Gentle appreciative Dell and you're in the kitchen. If I'm not mistaken and I think you are sitting there with your crock saw. You're out. You're kind of your chef. Outfit on and you had. A some sort of a greater I think you are grading lemons, oranges, making dusting dusting and. I just remember the the minute I met. You I was like this very special man, and you got a special special attitude towards life as well and your profession. Remember. I have a picture of unit Pan mnay in that kitchen and the one I remember. Is I remember I made one of your recipes. I think your Mac and cheese. Yes yes yes, you accused me of changing your recipe because you said it tasted better than yours. Well it now knowing what I know about you now it doesn't surprise me not. Not In the least, but so before we get into some so what I want to do with you today, del is want to talk about some of the cookbooks that you've written some of the successes that you've had those then I'd love for our audience here about some of your kind of your your tips and tricks. When it comes to cooking techniques and I'll, I'll serve those up for you and not on the tail. End I'd love to talk them out. Personally You're the path that you've been on some of the struggles that you've had with with eating maybe with your health, and how other people that I'm sure that are out? There are going through the same struggles, and and what advice you might have for them by sharing your story. So. Let me. Launch Him I. Ask you this question, Dal, so you've written if I'm not mistaken for different cookbooks. Is that correct maybe more? I'M GONNA. Say Four. I'm GonNa let me listen off for you. You wrote the for forks over knives cookbook, the China Study Family Cookbook the China Study, quick and easy cookbook and better than Vegan cookbook does. Does. Just me saying those make you exhausted. It does and I am I. If you know the story about even the forks over knives, cookbook I had ninety days to write that manuscript. Maybe time contract to the time I turn it in three hundred recipes in ninety days. I find that hard to believe. But it explains a lot of we'll talk about later. but and I was writing. I was writing another I was writing better than Vegan when they approached me about forks over knives, so I set that aside and dove into that cookbook. So, it's. It's a lot. That's four cookbooks in four years. Well that's yeah. That's insane and. Of all those cookbooks I would imagine. The one that has done has probably sold. The best may not be your favorite, but the one that's sold the best. has been the forks over knives cookbook over three hundred recipes. I mean D- home I want to set this up. You've got over four thousand two hundred seventy six ratings. Right for that book. You wrote that thing August two, thousand twelve. It is consistently in the top hundred, two hundred of books on Amazon. How did that book and the success of that Book Change Your Life? Oak a completely. Imagine. I I never really thought about. The possibility that a book like that would be successful I can see selling cookbooks than using it as a platform for teaching, which I love doing, and all that, but never did I foresee that it would be this spring board for a career in public speaking. For the amount of teaching I get to do and for actually taking the time off eventually. To explore other possibilities. I mean it it still is my my my base in common allows me to do a lot of different things including checking this time now to work on my own house so I never who knew right? Brian I taught went down. Who? Is Co owner of forks over knives. We talk once a year like who knew we were both there sort of laugh about it.

DAL China Study Family Cookbook Dell PAM Brian I MAC Amazon China Study
Who Was Karl Marx, and What Were His Philosophies?

BrainStuff

08:55 min | 6 months ago

Who Was Karl Marx, and What Were His Philosophies?

"With glance at Karl. Marx's curriculum vitae says a lot economist philosopher journalist sociologist political theorist historian. Add to that socialist communist in the original meaning of the word and revolutionary and. That's just a start. Karl Heinrich Marx was one of the most respected minds of the nineteenth century. His meditations on how societies work and how they should work have informed and challenged humans for more than one hundred and fifty years. Yet to the uninitiated marks may be only a bushy mugged symbol of revolution the father of communism the hater of capitalism. He's considered by many especially in the West as the man whose ideas spurred authoritarian communist regimes in Russia China and beyond that again is selling the man short. Because it's not entirely right in his book Karl Marx. A nineteenth century life author. Jonathan Sperber wrote viewed positively. Marks is a far seeing profit social and economic developments an advocate of the emancipatory transformation of state and society from a negative point. Marks is one of those most responsible for the pernicious and features of the modern world. If nothing else marks was a keen observer of the human condition he was deep finger with bold ideas about how to make life better we spoke with Lawrence Talmon who teaches a course on marks and philosophy at the University of Chicago and is the CO author of a chapter on Marx and Marxism in the rootlets. Handbook of philosophy and Relativism domine said Marx himself was first and foremost kind of scientist. He was a student of reality but he himself struggled throughout the course of his career. How exactly to put his ideas to politics. It's important to note that despite his one time lofty standing in what was then the Soviet Union marks was born in tier in the Kingdom of Prussia in eighteen eighteen. That's what's now known. As the Rheinland area of western Germany. After the failed German Revolution of Eighteen. Forty eight marks fled to London where he eventually died in eighteen eighty three. He's buried beneath a large tomb in London's highgate cemetery. Inscribed with the words workers of all lands unite but marks grew up privileged the son of well off and liberal parents in an ancient town that had been racked for decades before his birth by Warren Revolution that upheaval cultural religious and political shaped his parents and was a big part of young. Marx's upbringing later marks attended universities studying law and philosophy where he became engaged to and later married a Prussian baroness it was well studied philosophy and law that marks introduced the works of German Philosopher Yard Ville Helm Friedrich. Hegel whose ideas he used to later. Form his take on Communism Marx began a career. As journalists early twenties writing for radical newspapers in Cologne and Paris the route he consorted with other liberal minded philosophers and by his mid twenties met and collaborated with one of the major influences in his life. Friedrich Engels it was angles who convinced marks that societies working class would be the instrument to fuel revolutions and bring about a more fair and just society in eighteen forty eight the to published a pamphlet. That would be the basis for a new political movement. The communist manifesto in eighteen eighty three after Marx's death engels summed up the main idea in the communist manifesto like this quote that economic production and the structure of society of every stoorikhel epoch necessarily arising therefrom constitute the foundation for the political and intellectual history of that epoch the consequently ever since the dissolution of the primeval communal ownership of land. All history has been a history of class struggles of struggles between exploited and exploiting between dominated and dominating classes at various stages of social evolution. That this struggle however has now reached a stage where the exploited and oppressed class. The proletariat can no longer emancipate itself from the class which exploits and oppresses it. The bourgeoisie without at the same time forever. Freeing the whole of society exploitation oppression and class struggles domine explained marks was always concerned to understand the real underlying causes of social phenomenon the events and institutions that kind of shape the social world marks wanted to kind of dig down beneath the appearances and see what was really going on early on in his career. He thought that the best arena to do that in was philosophy and then as time went on he transitioned more into the social sciences. What's most important about marks is that he very much had a kind of engineering mentality about society he wanted to know. What makes it work? And how if we want to change it do we change it. What are the levers that we have to pull? Marx's eighteen forty seven economics work capital a critique of political economy a takedown of capitalism that decried the exploitation of the working class crystallized debate one that continues today between the West's ruling social and economic theory capitalism and Marx's idea of communism too many. It's a fight that hits rich versus poor bourgeoisie versus proletariate ruling class versus workers. And it's even more than that to those who debate it. It's right versus wrong. An argument about the best path to a perfect society. But that of course is very simplistic and doesn't get Marx's thinking right the Allman said above all else the association the people have with marks is that he some Utopian Pie in the sky dreaming a perfect world that is free of all the nastiness we live in now really that couldn't be further from the truth. Marks had a kind of engineering mindset. He was probably of all the major figures in the history of political thought the most practical the most realistic he was the most concerned with what is really possible. In the real world what marks to find as communism boiled down society that produces goods only for human need not for profit and in which there is no master slave royalty peasants owner worker relationship and therefore no need to overthrow. Anybody certainly clashes with the materialism of capitalism. But it's a long way from what many today see is communism to after the Russian revolution of nineteen seventeen and later under Joseph Stalin's reign some of Marx's ideas along with those of Ladimir Lennon were used to build a new empire. Millions were killed along the way similarly millions died in China under the rule of Mao. Zedong's Communist Party domine acknowledged. It's hard to even talk about what marks out of communism without dragging in all the weight from Soviet Russia and Communist China and obviously a lot of people hold marks responsible for that or -tarian rules like Stalin's and malls were not what Marx had in. Mind it's important to note too. That Marx did not hate capitalism. He actually saw some virtue in the system. He saw it as a necessary precursor to communism and he envisioned some of the technological challenges automation unseating workers for example. That are true today. Domine explained marks was very impressed with the kind of progressive character of capitalism by forcing people from all different walks of life into the same workplaces capitalism. Kind of breaks down. The old divides between communities and so things like race and gender religion. Divide people less. The more people are forced to see each other as equals in the workplace. Marks recognized marveled at the economical and technical growth the capitalism begets and saw it as an improvement from previous societies. Later in life. Domin says mark suggested that a growth capitalism might be a way to move toward communism instead of all out revolution but he still saw communism with no master slave dynamic as the end goal in that way and in others. Marx's idea of communism was far from the atrocities that have been committed in the name of communism elsewhere and his ideas are still perhaps strangely many a beacon and a search for a better way of life in that this practical and deep thinker of the nineteenth century still has relevance in today's world. Dahlman said marks was so committed to giving a kind of rational criticism of everything not just the enemy but to himself in everything he was willing to criticize the old modes of life and show how capitalism kind of improved on them but he was also willing to criticize capitalism and show how we could foresee improvement coming in the future. That is still hopeful vision.

Karl Heinrich Marx Marks West London Soviet Union Friedrich Engels Jonathan Sperber Warren Revolution Germany University Of Chicago Cologne Russia Rheinland Lawrence Talmon Scientist Hegel Joseph Stalin Domine China Highgate Cemetery
The Kidneys Connection to Our Emotions

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

09:48 min | 6 months ago

The Kidneys Connection to Our Emotions

"Today. We're going to go off on a different subject here about kidneys. You guys haven't heard us discuss kidneys very much in the past episodes but we thought with everyone being a little bit on the fearful angry side we would address kidneys because they very much have to do with those emotions. So the name of this show today is called the kidneys connection to our emotions. And we're going to tell you a little bit about what to look for when you might suspect it your kidneys what you can take to help. Get them better and we also have a question at the end that we're going to answer. So Dr Lewis. Could you tell us why you have chosen to discuss the kidney connection today on our podcast? Well Yeah I'd love to. I chose to do this because Janet wanted to. That's right that is true. You know I think the main thing is is because the throughout this Kobe stuff that I think is you know crock. Crap but You know we. We've been told things so long so loud. You know you can tell a lie long enough and loud enough people begin to believe it and so saying stay safe Co home. Stay home be safe in. Its implying that US people like me. That think it's a crock that get out or sinful and where. The enemy were being brainwashed. Folks you've got to think past that and I'm absolutely amazed at the people that choose. It's a choice. They choose to cower down in fear and and we've noticed that people are more agitated more irritated and that's me because I can't believe that idiocy that's going on like trying to get into home depot and his lap. Geez there's one hundred and fifty feet between everybody but you're worried about how many people walking in the store and one of the reasons that we as a society besides the mental spiritual they're throwing at us is because we're eating incorrectly. We're drinking to excess with when it talks when you talk about alcohol. Excessive to me is very little but Done tight much and we get irritated because we're putting our her kidneys under stress. One of the worst things you can do is have high blood pressure that you don't take care of either medically or naturally or both because at high blood pressure can really calls all kinds of problems with the kidney so please please please take care your kidneys. It it's incredible is super important but kidneys are their damaged from all sorts of things like certain drugs are really really tough on the kidneys and you have to watch that and you know. Have your doctor that puts you on the medications to monitor that but heavy metals our society full of heavy metals. It's full of solvents. It's of a chemotherapy. Does that Different Benham's snake insect spider and I went through a lot of that after God only knows how many Brown recluse spider about gotten and it will wreak havoc on your kid. He's poisonous mushrooms. I don't know anything about that because I don't experiment with those mushrooms that grow on cow patties like some people. I know Do it because it's a psychedelic psychogenic psychotic or something Pesticides and we know we've got pesticides all over the. It's really really really common in our food. Which is a sad thing and herbicides and people say but I'm not around our besides York Janet. I was coming to work two days ago. And there's the Texas highway department spraying herbicides. Oh Good God but you know us a goat to eat but we have done that to ourselves with the poisons in our society and renal failure and not even failure but when you put your kidneys in stress it can add to things like congestive heart failure diabetes or diabetes slash Metabolic Syndrome. Can put pressure on your kidneys. It can go both ways and lock said before the chronic hypertension a bad thing liver disease liberal ever you got. The liber is like a woman. The Lib rain happy. Ain't nobody happy. And then you have diseases. The autoimmune diseases like Lupus and sickle cell. Things like that There are people that have genetic tendencies the have issues with Kidneys like poly cystic. Disease and kidneys. Are They Tennessee to have mineral accumulations that she usually calcium? And we see that into your analysis. It'll say crystals calcium oxalate. Now you know. We can't make any claims about supplements but if you're having calcium oxalate stones that usually means you have a lack of magnesium or potassium to offset because we get minerals that out of balance. And that's the problem with our society mentally and physically because we get out of balance we forget to laugh. We forget to you know have a good time and I just love people that come in here and I'll go hug their neck and watch them freak out or I'll shake their hand and it's like you know we've been doing this for tens of thousands of years and it's not an issue in. Don't you enjoy the HUG and s? You're actually I do I. I like the way you social distance dot because I don't social distance. That's one of the things we're missing. Now is the social interaction. That is way way more important than any other thing now again. I I said disappear. Podcast AGO that they're scripture somewhere to Bible. I forget probably proverbs but is a wiseman foresees danger and takes precautions K. And I think that's a smart thing to do but the Bible also says in Titus very plainly. God didn't give you a spirit of fear so quick fear crap You talk about stones oxalate downs in nineteen seventy four when you say stoned rattling talking about oxalate stones. The ones that are GONNA be urine. Just what would those manifest in normal? Layman's terms that someone might understand that. They may have a kidney problem. Kidney Stones you know very sharp pain in the back and you know This is because one sweetheart of a sweetheart patients or no the different parts of magnesium and we're getting people that say well. I have this symptom and they want me to diagnose Office set a symptoms everytime time Janet. I give a list I say. Be careful though because these same symptoms can go with a different organ. Be careful how you diagnose off of just symptoms but one of the things That you can bet your bottom dollar as you're deficient in magnesium so I had this sweetheart patients they can you explain the different types of magnesium. I'm saying that because there's plenty of research says if you take magnesium it buffers The bad side effects of calcium or calcium oxalate stones that that's research that and it says be six. Pp and potassium so let's talk about. Magnesium purchased a little while because magnesium can take the anxiety irritability that we are feeling and. I think is obvious in my voice. It's like oh good. God quit despair crap but if you take magnesium there's actually research says magnesium if it's the right form can work even better. I'll stress anxiety. Depression era ability and anger than many many many drugs and again we can't make claims that but the research says it so let's talk just briefly about the different types of magnesium if you poop once a day or less unietd magnesium citrate now. We have that for people. They say about once as normal permissiveness common. But it's not normal. He got three trains in three trains. Out Is Janet says about three meals and three meals out so citrate because it was bound citric acid. And that's a pretty large molecule. And that's why you don't get enough in a multi vitamin or multi-mineral. Because it's a large molecule. Takes up too much. Real Estate It's a mild laxative. And so it's it's a great choice. Then you've got magnesium oxide folks it. They're putting oxide in your multi-donor multi-mineral throw it away. Because that's the cheap crap that yes it works as a laxative. But you don't really absorb it where you can absorb more the cows of magnesium citrate then you got the magnesium glassy night and it's a pretty gentle form that's what I'd generally suggest for people that have hypertension It slower going through the system. It absorbs a little bit less water. So you end up. Absorbing more of it It glasses night. Actually it's Connected to an Amino. Acid glossing blessing is incredibly incredibly incredibly important amino acid to help form neurotransmitters and calms your nerves.

Janet Bible United States Dr Lewis Different Benham Liver Disease Metabolic Syndrome Lupus York Texas Kobe Disease Tennessee Layman Wiseman Titus
Grocery chains limit meat purchases to prevent hoarding

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

03:05 min | 7 months ago

Grocery chains limit meat purchases to prevent hoarding

"The ongoing pandemic has touched nearly all aspects of our lives including our food chain meat. Production is down substantially due to corona virus processing plants leading to growing concern over the nation's supply consumer reports just published information on where to get meet during this pandemic so joining us now is consumer reports investigative reporter. Rachel Peach Men Rachel. Thanks for being with us and so when we talk about the vulnerability of the meat supply chain. What does this mean for consumers? What can we expect to see? And at the Grocery Stores Short will consumers are experiencing limits on their meat purchasing options and perhaps some increases in price. Simply because there's a bottleneck at the meat processing plants where there have been severe. Cova nineteen outbreaks so while there is plenty of meat on the farm. Animals are there. There's this bottleneck at the processing plants. That isn't helping us get the meat to the grocery stores where people are trying to buy it now. Rachel we've heard a lot about beef. Being one of those meets specifically that may be difficult to find all meat products be affected at this point. All meat products seemed to be affected. Production in general of me is down about thirty five percent right now but I want to make clear that we also have supply in cold storage at this point. We've got hundreds of millions of pounds of pork poultry and beef. So it's not that won't be able to get any meat. It's just that your options may be limited all right and you have to limit how much you actually bring home to from the grocery store. How long do you foresee this meat? Supply being impacted like this. Well it really depends on what happens at the meat processing plants. Most important is to keep the workers. They're safe and healthy. If the meat processing plants don't have safety protocols in place then the meat production could slow even further so it's most important to open up safely and scale up in a way that allows workers to stay safe and produce meat and in a way that keeps production going. So it's hard to say how long this will last. But government officials are working. Very hard to divert supply places that need it so for example where there is excess on the farm or perhaps waste on the farm. They are working to divert that to food banks and nutrition assistant programs and consumers that that need that all right. How about just giving us some quick tips for those of us who may be having a hard time finding meet at the supermarket. I know it can vary. Based on the day of the week I go to the supermarket. What can we do as consumers absolutely well? This'll be a great time to seek out your local farmer. Smaller local farmers have been able to be really resilience and pivot and instead of selling wholesale to restaurants or other bigger institutions. They are now offering options to consumers. So you might want to look at the national

Rachel Peach Investigative Reporter Cova
When Friendships Change

Therapy for Black Girls

04:20 min | 7 months ago

When Friendships Change

"Hey y'all thanks so much for joining me for session. One fifty four of the therapy for black girls podcast today. You WanNA spend some time chatting about what to do when we find ourselves in friendships. That are changing. When we're young and life is less complicated. Friendships are maintained by things. Like play dates sitting together at lunch and late night. Gav sessions until someone falls asleep as we get older and they're more demands on our time and energy friendships become a little more difficult to maintain we move get partnered. Become parents. Life continues to happen. I think that the thing that's most important to remember about the life cycle of a friendship is that it's normal for things to shift as we change so do the relationships where a part of but often when we send things changing instead of it alerting us that we need to shift with it. It results in US feeling like something is irreparably damaged and should be discarded. You heard Dr Oriole Woah. I discussed the importance of having difficult conversations on session. One fifty one of the podcast a couple of weeks ago and that's often the first step that needs to happen when we noticed a change in our friendships many times the changes in our friendships are ones. We can foresee things like moving becoming apparent etc. I'll give you a little bit of headway. So you know they're coming and you know that things are likely going to change if this is the case. It's a good idea to acknowledge that things will be different and to allow space for both of you to grief. I'd encourage you to have an honest conversation about your worries as you're both moving into this new phase of life carve out some time to just actually talk through your fears. That doesn't have to be a plan for alleviating them just yet. It's okay to just acknowledge that the exist at some point after the conversation has happened. Consider making a plan for how you'll be intentional about creating new experiences for your friendship. Now the time distance and other things will be different. What kinds of things can you do to make an effort to stay connected just like we schedule? Date nights for romantic relationships date nights for friendships are also really important. Consider building in your friend. Time around certain activities. You know. You're likely to participate in. So maybe you do something like scheduling a thirty minute chat on Thursday nights after you watch how to get away with murder or maybe you have a group me where you're popping in regularly about every day Monday in kinds of things the gestures that you make to stay connected don't have to be gray into effective but it's helpful if they're consistent and finally. I want you to get comfortable with asking specifically what you can do to support your friend in this new phase of life and be open to how this might change if they're moving for Grad school. Can you help them? Virtually search for places to live if they're becoming apparent perhaps you can help by organizing a baby shower. Sometimes it's easier to show up for others if we know exactly how we can be helpful in the moment so be sure to ask now. Please don't hear me say that. The brunt of maintaining their friendship is on the person not experiencing life change. That's not what I'm saying at all. It's absolutely also important for the fringe experiencing. The life changed to be sure that they are checking in and making efforts to connect as well. When we don't take these tips or at least make an effort we can see a real breakdown in the friendship in ways that might have been able to be avoided. It's also important to note however that even with the best of intentions sometimes friendships just in the doesn't have to be anyone at fault. There may not have been a big blow up. Sometimes they just in. And that's definitely a topic will exploring in another episode of the podcast soon to navigate when a friendship ends

United States Dr Oriole Woah Grad School Murder
"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

"We started this conversation would you saying that a series of predictions had come true and talking to it's clear that they didn't just come through they came through faster time that he had this phone call with Erdo on and just disregarded them basically decided that the outcomes wouldn't matter that much four if he genuinely thought the predictions were just wrong and that there'd be a different set of outcomes in each of these cases it's hard to know but certainly he word the predictions and he didn't just hear them in the past few weeks this was exactly the debate that took place in the White House last December when the president somewhat impetuously said we're pulling all our troops out of Syria and you'll remember that this is when General Mattis resigned as defense secretary right you'll remember this is when the joint chiefs came and said Sir you can't do this right so why did he do this Michael I think goes to a conflation in his mind between the concept of endless war phrase years as a lot a phrase he uses all the time in the Middle East and the concept of keeping a small number of essentially peacekeepers to keep bad forces in the bottle and the conflation here is particularly damaging we have a lot of places in the World Michael we're we keep troops or largely to keep the peace it's the reason we've got thousands along the border South Korea to keep the north from coming it's the reason that we keep troops in Japan to put at least some parameters around the Chinese it's the reason we still have troops in Germany and elsewhere in Europe to be able to contain Putin's aggressions elsewhere the concept is you keep Americans at strategic places around the world as a preventative for conflict in the end it costs you a whole lot less to keep a small force that prevents conflicts from erupting then to have to send in a big force and act after a huge terror attack some kind of calamity hitting an American ally but David would that mean keeping some kind of American force there in perpetuity basically forever well it might I don't think that's what anybody had in mind for the Turkish Syrian border but if you were gonNA pull them out you pull them out slowly in a coordinated way that does not allow the Russians and Bouchara Saad to fill the vacuum that doesn't benefit the Iranians and that you get something in return for the slow pullout it's not an endless war it's a persistent presence that enables you'd act hit as the world's policeman and that simply is not Donald Trump's vision of American power so you're saying that he was not unaware you're of all of these potential outcomes he in fact it sounds like because there was a debate in the White House was very aware of them he simply instead he just prioritized the return of US troops his vision of American foreign policy above any of those predictable not gic shifts human costs and the empowering of our enemies in the trump administration humanitarian intervention shen and peacekeeping is not what America I is all about but the cumulative impact of every outcome that we talked about in this conversation David feels like it has been bad for the United States in this moment so unless you believe that bringing being home. US troops is the highest possible value that it's the most important thing to do in a situation like this then it's hard to understand a decision that was made it's almost impossible to and you know Michael it's hard defined almost anyone in Washington other than the president Vice President Pence Mike Pompeo the national security adviser Robert O'Brien who will defend this decision this was a case where we had a system that was working we had a essentially an American protectorate going on in these Kurdish areas we were doing it at low cost and nearly zero casualties and in one week we undead what was essentially seven years of effort to try to make this work thank you David thank you.

Vice President Pence Mike Pomp US president Michael Robert O'Brien David Washington seven years one week
"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

18:39 min | 1 year ago

"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

"In check David sank unjust how quickly and predictable that has all unravel it's you've and you've seen the results on TV comb boy packed with civilians and journalists trying to enter a bold attempt are and in a bigger way than anybody even imagine I wonder if you think that president trump was aware of these predictions at the.

David trump president
"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

10:00 min | 1 year ago

"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

"Thing that could happen to be your enemy that people fighting you in your own country successfully with the help of the US they are now your allies and they're inviting you in to the rebel held territory and got it for free he didn't have to negotiate with the Kurtz negotiate with Washington he didn't have to make any concessions doc support for this podcast and the following message come from Uber Uber is committed to safety and to continuously raising the bar to help make safer journeys for everyone for starters all drivers are background checked before the first ride and screened on an ongoing basis and now uber has introduced a brand new safety feature called ride check which can detect if a trip goes unusually off course and check in to provide support to learn more we're about Uber's commitment to safety visit Uber Dot com slash safety okay so this one David you have ticked through three predictions involving three our greatest adversaries in the world and how they are benefiting from this decision by the president but you haven't brought up what maybe our greatest adversary in its impact on them which is Isis and the whole reason we were in Syria in the first place was to try to contain isis that's right and the prediction was if the United States pulled back we would re-empower Isis and give them another shot at survival and we have reports that hundreds of Isis prisoners are escaping as militias backed by Turkey push deeper into Syria looks like what's happening three isn't holding thousands of Isis members have come under attack in the last twenty four hours there were thousands of Isis fighters who were being kept in camps in this kurdish-controlled area of Syria and as the Kurds have spent their time fighting Turkey suddenly they don't have the time to go focus on keeping Isis contained in these camps we visited a prison packed with five thousand isis detainees Gordon told me if the guards need to leave and fight they'll just lock the cells and go either there was one case where there was a camp that had thousand as a family members of Isis fighters women children and about five hundred of them just walked away walked out of the camp earlier this week and that's basically because the Kurds under attack by Turkey just didn't have the bandwidth to guardless they had more important priorities so the reality ideas that the prediction has largely come true that Isis members are either out or on their way out or have a good prospect of getting out and that they have their best chance in a long time to go retake some territory or at least reestablished as their power and a base from which they could begin to plan attacks again on the West David of all the predictions and outcomes that you have talked about so far this one seems the hardest to comprehend because so what understandable that the US might not have a plan to deal with great powers like Russia and Iran and Syria and how they might be empowered by what president trump just did in northern Syria but when it comes to just making sure that a few prisons that whole uh-huh Group of people who are devoted to the destruction of the United States and Americans you would just have to think that the there's a plan to make sure that prisons keep people in prison I mean what you're talking about two different kinds of planning planning it contained Russia and divert or contain Iran that's grand strategy holding on to prisoners that's basic tactics and what's astounding about this particular presidential decision this action by President John is that it actually revealed that were bad at the strategy and were worst the tactics that we didn't have a plan B to go handle will these prisoners if we turned our backs on the Kurds who were acting essentially as the jail wardens here and of course not to take away your predictions here David but perhaps the most foreseeable prediction slash outcome was that this was going to be bad for the what's bad for the people occupying this part of northeastern Syria that president trump more or less invited Turkey to invest but I wonder just how bad has it actually been just how accurate was that prediction will hear the prediction was off because it turned out to be much worse than we there would be some troops on the ground but they wouldn't really go in that far and they wouldn't really engage it would be about flexing muscles more than really taking territory but it turned out that once the forces moved in it uncorked all of the worst demons that have been sitting around in this region struck by Turkish asteroid eleven killed moving seventy wounded talk long this video today appears to show Arab militias executing occurred by the roadside as they shout allow walk bar and proudly saying filming filming you see in horrible scenes of rape include being of a prominent politicians one leading Kurdish political leader apparently drag from a car and shot in the head you've seen stonings happening you've seen houses being burned this is a full primary verified you've seen people with I'm trying to flee nearly seventy thousand children have been displaced since hostilities in northeast Syria escalated nearly a week ago and they've got no go I'm so tired I left the house a week ago where should I go now and so the prediction was this he really bad for the Kurds but what it turned into it was carnage for the Kurtz.

US twenty four hours
"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

11:06 min | 1 year ago

"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

"Troops of the Assad regime with Russian help handed a victory without firing shush imagine there were some who said you know just going to bring his forces in sort of a photo invasion and that you know there'd be a big show of jets.

Assad
"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

"Res- Manager Committee Council Budget Right now the Russians are occupying as could just recap Russia literally walked into areas of Syria that the US was controlling and patrolling just a few days ago and they've now been we help take them over because Russia is so close with Sharla Saad of Syria and without the US being there anymore Russia has free rein over that area exactly right and that brings us to the second prediction which is that this would be really really good for Bishara Saad so Michael that Assad in twenty eleven thought he probably wouldn't get out of Syria live then for a long time people said well his country he's GonNa fracture he's going to hold onto those small parts of the country where his political party and his ethnic group basically controls all but the rest of the place is going to break away or wants the Russians came in in two thousand fifteen Assad actually was able to spread his wings region gained control except in this one area in this one part near critical oil supplies near lot of the other wealth that he needs for his regime that was being controlled by the Kurds and the Kurds were backed by the Americans and the only thing standing between Assad and controlling this area was the fact that he would have to go take on the American gins who were in the region even though it was a very small number so what exactly did Assad do once the US pulls back from this part of at the request of Turkey well he moved to get his country back he literally streams troops into the region rolling in to a hero's welcome on top and then because the courage realized they've got no one else to turn to they flip and join up with ASSADS forces in facing off with Turkey those Kurdish forces are going to partner with the Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad this was brokered by the Russians all day literally change dances within a few days so suddenly the force that he was fighting is on his side and Bachar Assad gets to make the rules it's about who's GonNa live there and where and when and who will control the oil so all of a sudden Assad has gone from having what is eventually been a rebel controlled region to having the rebels rely on him for support that's kind of astonishing it couldn't have worked out editor for Bashar Assad if he had called a national security meeting and said to his generals give me blue sky of what's the best the US just up and left and that of course turned what had been just a festering political issue in two his Great Opportunity Okay Stephen What's our next prediction that king drew well a lot of people in wash nineteen said this'll help the Iranians the one country that Donald Trump most despises the one he most wants to crush with sanctions the one who he's worried about the most gaining influence in the region yeah so how is it helping ron it's helping Iran because their ally Assad gains power and territory and the United States ends up pulling back so what was an opportunity to go keep an eye on the Iranians and perhaps push back on their influence inside Syria that leverage is all gone right the other thing it does for Ron of course is they use Syria as a pathway to get weapons to Hezbollah a terrorist group that's threatening Israel among others news now those weapons didn't run through the Kurdish territory but certainly if the United States is pulling back and is no longer going to be a presence in the country the Iranians have to take that as one less toll on the highway and so in that way president trump's decision here may mean in life more difficult and more dangerous for one of our allies Israel that's right the ally he talks the most about defending now let's not overestimate eight this because there were vast parts of Syria that Iran had free rein in before this happened but certainly the image of the the United States and not having the stomach to keep a really small investment inside Syria sends a message to Toronto rings lab unclear is a psychological element to this the Middle East is all about power and if you were detected to be weak others going to go make move so for all the United States has done to make life miserable for Iran sanctions sabotage side Robert Tax the one thing they do with a physical military presence is they pick up and they hold back from contested territory signal weakness they signal that they can be taken.

Res- Manager Committee Council Russia Syria
"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"foresee" Discussed on The Daily

"Thursday October seventeen David sanger good actually across from you in the studio it's good to see you down here so it's been a little more than a week since president trump is on the phone with Turkey's president reg type air to one and says if you want to conduct this big military Russian that you had been contemplating for awhile inside northern Syria I'm not going to stand in your way in fact I'm going to clear the way by removing some of the US troops there you've been tracking the aftermath of that phone call what has been your biggest takeaway I guess my biggest takeaway is sometimes the worst case scenario Correo is even worse than you can imagine and in this case there were a series of predictions by generals by ARN policy experts by Middle East experts by regional studies experts by diplomats by people surrounding the has the United States that if he removed the small force that was sitting on the border between Turkey and Syria that really bad things would happen it's going to destabilize the region once again it's going to reinvigorate a civil war and it's going to give strength to some of the most reactionary and chauvinistic forces in the region we will see everything from the release of Isis prisoners to humanitarian catastrophe it'll damage US relations with Turkey and it turns out those predictions were almost all right all this is playing out exactly as we predicted this was the predicted fallout after northern Syria or developing exactly as expected in this sort of worst case scenario for the US the only surprise so far has been they've happened much faster than we anticipate so let's talk about these predictions one by one where do you think we should start well how about with Russia the first prediction Michael was that if the United States disappeared from the border it would be very very good for Vladimir Putin and what it's turning out to be better than Putin could possibly imagine seem of today parts of Syria that the United States was in just a week ago suggests this week you saw some video surfaced on the web that appeared to be Russian soldiers walking around base that the United States had abandoned just a few the days ago that happens when you pull troops out but it certainly gives you a little bit of the chills when you see their country occupying space the United States had spent a lot of blood and frazier dot to take for its own so what's the back story of Russia's stake here in Syria and how this has helped them we will remember that back in twenty eleven during the Arab Spring Bazaar Assad the dictator who runs Syria was really on the ropes and we all thought he'd be gone but the Russians saw an opportunity after the collapse of the Soviet Union they had retrieved into the space that is now the Russian Federation and farmer Putin really wanted to see Russia begin to expand again and be a power at least in the Middle East he knew he couldn't compete with the US globally but he might be able to regionally and Syria was a great place for him to start because they already had a naval base the only Russian Navy will base that has survived outside of Russian territory on the Syrian coast so he provided more and more support Russia is now openly sending military aid to the Syrian government of Bashar Al Assad in two thousand fifteen the Russians swooped in Putin's deployed strike aircraft t ninety tanks howitzers are brought in all kinds of forces you'll remember that moment when Barack Obama's said good luck you know you'll get stuck in the Middle East the way we all have President Obama did last Friday afternoon good luck with that you will not have success in that part of the world and so suddenly once the Americans are gone it becomes an fraternity for the Russians to really establish a beachhead in the middle of something they really had not had since back in Nixon's here gives Putin the opportunity he needed and he didn't waste a second he moved his forces in right away he was clearly ready for the moment you have to think about global power struggles in the post Cold War era as a series of vacuums that someone's going to and for the Russians they're seeking opportunities to go into places where the United States seats field.

David sanger
"foresee" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"foresee" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And they blessed Pessac. Week to you all so do we have next time ninety one go ahead. Tom. Good morning. Third of Easter. I have some money from my dad who's living with me that I'm holding for him. And it's just sitting in a savings account. And I was wondering if there was someplace I could, but that would be a little bit more helpful rather than you know, in the Bank. Doing nothing, but also be available if he ever needed it. So he's nine one one. Okay. Now, if he was eighty one the answer would be different. And if he's seventy eight the answer would be different because there's different products for different circumstances. Okay. I if you think about this at ninety one a lot can happen. There's two ways and one's going to be counter conventional one does he need the money or not. No. Covered under his his health is all taking care of. And he's the living, you know, day to day. Everything's pretty much covered. Okay. That we have out of his name. So I'm holding it just in case of an emergency or something that comes up that we on foreseen that we needed for. But in his I wanted to just, you know, maybe it's sitting there doing nothing if there was something else that could be done with it. In the meantime, and still be available. Well, number one week. I would be conservative with the money. You could have you could have bonds that are insured. You could also look at having maybe twenty to thirty percent inequities seventy to eighty percent in fixed income or bonds, something like that. That way gives a little bit of potential. The other interesting thing is if you are not going to need the money. There is a thought to when you have an older person who doesn't need the money remaining inequities getting the step of in basis. Meaning if he's ninety one in puts the money inequities and dies at one hundred one you get ten years of tax for growth to the heirs. Now, if you gifted the money now, it's a new basis so that sort of changed that's philosophy. So I would I might do some bond ladders. To get you know, instead of getting zero percent, maybe get three percent certain bonds and four and others then equity see kind of stagger based upon what the cost of his care would be if he needed to hit that money. And let's say over the next ten years you envision him needing forty percent of that money than forty percents should be pretty conservative. If you envision him potentially needing sixty percent sixty percent should be conservative. But there are a lot of options for you. Now with a money market rates being higher. You know, we can show you different money markets. Even you know getting about up to two two two two point three percent. I've seen rates are subject to change and all that stuff. And there may be expensive issues in the funds and all that. But but generally you could put let's say year in a money market at two point three seven percent. Then you buy to your treasury. Then you buy three year on anybody four then a five and six, and we kind of make these ladders. To get the overall yield up a little more that's one potential -ality for the money that he's going to need. Money's not gonna need. You can put an equities and something like that. I I hope that helps any other questions. No. That was it. That sounds great. I couldn't I just couldn't stand sitting there in the Bank. That's doing, you know, absolutely nothing. People don't realize there are options, you could do and you could also look at treasuries you look at municipal bonds. And when I would do is have a ladder, you know, says the first year, so how much is the cost of his care. Twenty three hundred a month. This is all the money that what I'm talking about is is not touched. But the rest of it is about twenty three hundred a month. However, if he did need to go into an office. Then I, you know, I think this money I'm talking about. Now would then be unavailable. So, yeah, we'll have says so how much does he have total? Total that was it about one hundred and seventy okay, not much mean that could go pretty quick if there was an end of life issue. So that's why you want to be pretty conservative with it. That way, you know, when you're doing a bond ladder. The only risk would be like, okay. Say. You sell off. Right. If there's some spike in interest rate, you know, you might lose five or ten percent, dude. Interest rate volatility. That's why if you ladder it in hedges that risk a little bit. So no, certainly we could help you give us a call eight eight Josh the the one seventy number just changed things. Because it probably would mean you'd be about eighty percent treasuries, you know, or bonds and maybe twenty percent equities. You really wouldn't want to go too much in the stock market then with one seventy I thought I thought it was our number those are number. But no good question. Any other question before we go? Thanks for your help. I really appreciate.

Tom Bank Pessac Josh treasury eighty percent sixty percent three percent ten years three seven percent thirty percent twenty percent forty percent zero percent ten percent three year one week
"foresee" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Foresees. Gather to. May not. It's not. Isn't. Promise me. Ma'am. We. Yes. Standing. Only. If we should. The dog. Standings. Only. Ma'am.

"foresee" Discussed on Motorsport Radio

Motorsport Radio

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on Motorsport Radio

"Garnish in twelfth, thirteenth, Joe fire fourteenth. Titus Djuric tumble Luca Hopkins, Clayton, Edmonds, Harrison McKay Jamie woodcock complete. The grid is nine lap race. The circuit is one coloma's along the no Llamas in total because nine times one, nine even I know that and this race is going to be a threat of, I feel I think Casey going going to have all his own way. I think we're gonna have a real big battle out the front between him and bearing these strict Campbell eight tenths separated after they're calling times. Also the leaders in this championship eighty strict Campbell ahead of case O'Gorman by five points, Amir, five points wipes off in this rights. Kidwell be wiped off. Indeed, ninety six points back though is manual Brinton and third. So. At Benedict up for the top three top two then is one certainty to enjoy menu. Only four points ahead of Ali war cast. So the number forty eight in fourth just behind menu. In the number. Johny Gonesse in the fifty seven v ahead of Hitchcock. In seventh Mason foster eighth with James Cook earned Joe Spanish, your top ten championships. I found Johnny Gonesse thirty four point gap behind only walk, but then behind him, enhanced goats, go nineteen behind Sola Mounsey for the point behind him Mason foster the two points behind him. So it does all even out in the midfield especially when they get. So very quick, the big battles we got eighteen of the scheduled to join us on the great in a few moments telling to enjoy the wonderful weather in Cambridge, if around five of championship and. So less. We very patiently waiting for the next race to the junior Elsie foresee elite vase one, and they will be followed. Then by the AC foresee rookies with the bike on foresee a motor team following them, the mini cheapie fifties when half the extremely hundreds of them, then the mini-van sidecars will use the slutty shortened version of the Lord circuits. And then the mini seventies will bring to an end to today's action that was GP around quarter past five. And we've had some great work by the Mets and the Marshall teams I knew organizes very big, thank you to all of them for waiting and working in search warm conditions. It is very difficult for everyone out there and as they've been doing a fantastic job. So not too long until the next LC forty elite race, which will be sworn for them of the weekend. So far it definitely your has been journey of the top two. And then everyone else. But nonetheless key. It has been a fantastic year all around. Junior Elsie Fourty elites. We've seen some thrilling racing in this. We have had all of the battles of we have saying, hey sake Gorman. It's been not as dominant as he has been in the fifties and seventies. He really has been something a little bit, especially in those classes. He is on the brink of championship lead, though I must tell you five points in between himself and Bailey Stuart Campbell. She looked to podiums in this eight Elsie forty elites boss Brady shirt. Caramel has been on the podium in every single. I say, FOX fall, twelve Gorman as ten Emmanuel Brinson seven only wall..

Bailey Stuart Campbell sake Gorman Elsie Fourty Jamie woodcock Mason Joe Spanish Joe fire Brinton coloma Johny Gonesse Edmonds Titus Djuric Mets Ali Kidwell Casey Sola Mounsey Johnny Gonesse Benedict Luca Hopkins
"foresee" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"There was the formation and complexities around the the government there there was increasing violence etc but doesn't impact public opinion and then the public had fatigue they had isn't a new study this week the public has fatigue about the news right now exactly but then late in two thousand six we see a sudden just sh collapse of support for iraq and and it so to me that argues that a i mean some specific things happened in two thousand six but there's not the the the specific news events i mean you're getting into the surge to get more and more people admitting that the war in iraq is not going well if you remember dick cheney basically playing the role of trump and just constantly denying what was obvious to to so many people in saying no it's going great we're doing wonderfully it had the same kind of bipartisan field that being i mean anti non partisan feel that being against the war in iraq was somehow disloyal to america or to whatever and so i do think that there is a pro trump is paying a hidden price and that's that i mean my you could call it leap buffet you could call it something you know the a gut sense based on experience but i think there is a psychic price i don't think you wanna be a president who day after day after day is screaming and yelling and and and his receiving such negative press so i don't when i say trump is winning i don't mean he's he's gleefully wonderfully winning obscuring he's tactically as a simple exactly but i think that story will come out i mean the the clearest way it would come out is some piece of tape some moment where.

iraq dick cheney president trump america
"foresee" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Point is his treatment of jeff sessions and his or mistreatment of just dozens has increased as well in the last few weeks absolutely i mean so they're the key question in collusion that whole bucket of issues is did it reach the president it now is feeling increasingly impossible to claim it didn't reach trump that that he didn't well you said earlier we know there was some degree of collusion make the case what is the collusion well the problem is collusion as an extremely vague term it's an untried term in the law and the word was never used in the special counsel charging documents right exactly yeah he wasn't told to find collusion right exactly so so what you see i mean just today paul ryan said there is no evidence of collusion that's not true i mean you know this this is part of the trump fog but donald trump junior saying i love it in response to hearing that the russian government might be able to provide dirt on his dad that to me is collusion as i read the definite do but we don't normally see national news outlets sane trump colluded they i should i think we now are the the trump campaign i i've now spent a fair bit of time looking up the definition of the word collusion which is something like you know secretly partnering with somebody to hide information to one's own benefit i forget the exact dictionary definition and they certainly did that did it violate the law that's an un that's an untried area of law did it did donald trump himself either agree to it or or know about it and not stop it it sure seems increasingly likely that he did now that we know that he rewrote done donald trump junior's response that that donald trump junior's answers about whether or not he told his father the day of the meeting are increasingly untenable but clearly his campaign repeatedly george popadopoulos carter page the michael cohen reaching out to divider.

Point president special counsel paul ryan donald trump russian government michael cohen george popadopoulos carter
"foresee" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Are you a fan of technology news than the tech name right home is a must subscribe for fifteen years tech name dot com has been the website silicon valley checks every day for the latest news at now every day at five pm there's a fifteen minute podcast that breaks down the latest news and tech the coolest gadgets the latest apps the biggest funding raises the most recent social media scandals the tech main ride home is like npr's marketplace but for tech news a daily easy to understand summation of the latest in the world of technology open up your podcast app right now and search ride home then subscribe and listened to the tech name ride home podcast again search your podcast app for ride home and subscribe to the tech name ride home are we getting to the big picture about president trump the really big dixon welcome to this week's reliable sources podcast on bind stelter and this week we podcast is our chance to go in depth with media leaders and looseness tone towing talk in depth about the story behind the story and this week i'm here with adam davidson staff writer for the new yorker who's been breaking ground writing about president trump michael cohen and what he says is the end stage of the trump presidency adam great to see you great to see your brian thanks for being here you also posted a tweet this week that lit my brain up and i want to get to that as well but you were a piece of the new yorker recently titled michael cohen and the end stage of the trump presidency you made the argument that this is not a prophecy it's a simple statement of the apparent truth that this is the last stage of his presidency how is that and why is it not being covered that way elsewhere in the media so in in that piece i talked about in in my career covering other events i covered the iraq war in iraq for the first year of the us occupation covered the financial crisis.

dot com npr president staff writer michael cohen iraq us adam davidson fifteen minute fifteen years
"foresee" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

WIMS AM 1420

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

"Three three diane lane dan more wound green sea door churn fooled i did not foresee this thing have names aw and the meaning of the law rian johnson no the girl the but as god the two two the land two the the.

rian johnson
"foresee" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To you by foresee iced tea and drink mix all right lorry north of town on route one northbound we've got a problem it's a left lane multicar crash out there right before copeland circle that's route sixty in revere and that sketches solid now back to route sixteen traffic just inching along trying to make it by this scene the police have arrived fired cetera and they have left lane blocked would again you are squeaking by in the right lane and it's going to take some time to get passed the scene leaving the city on ninety three northbound coming off the second bridge that's where you jim on the break then it's going to be a tough ride all the way up to spot pond you do slow down again after one twenty nine kind of a pocket he sort of ride as you make your way up through bylane drop once you hit about 133 you should be in better shape and work shake it up and you've got a delicious sugarfree zero calorie drank foresee sticks are available at shah's storm arkhan now.

revere shah jim zero calorie
"foresee" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on Bookworm

"And i think probably the other component of it which was in a way was explicit it got me thinking about the trajectory of american global power and nine eleven clearly was an event in that trajectory i think the ramifications of that event were still seeing now so i think those were the kind of intellectual thoughts and then viscerally which is often what it really comes down to for me i just had a kind of longing to be there uh and and especially to to use the new are in some way to get at that kind of the urban nece of that war experience in new york so you mention of mostly from dole and one of the first things we see the breathing character and doing is we knew from her interior the two luke russe mrs ago when foresee flirt made the scene than anna did not want anything more than a foresee flirt doll so much so the description is that her desire stuck inside her and now is still there floor see flirt is no longer played with by the little girl who anna visits in the first chapter i'll take it she says i don't play with it and a hall batallion of untrue res precede unto old for dolls is one of them she's nine the hum little friend is eight the woman who is cold their nurse says taken interior almost violently they have so many toys they don't know what to do with them they never play with them and.

new york dole anna luke russe
"foresee" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

NewsRadio1620

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"foresee" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

"Income during that time we started at seventy three thousand and ended at 85000 earned cool for the all do for a living island account majet foresee it robinson and i'm also an account manager for an advertising eight the gravitational marketing perfect good for you guys welldone so i'm guessing you got married about twenty seven months ago nope with tell malaysia in that time period actually tell me the story how this all go down actually to start we actually had three couples affected by what shared promoting and so we have a beckoned nick got our friends they actually do their debt free scream here and then you guys at a false story on them they got our friends john tori involved and joe and tori introduced us to the dave ramsey show okay and so three couples total i paid off two hundred eighty six thousand dollars hey cells lover okay so how long ago to this process start for you guys i would say it was actually twenty seven months ago guy how long i've been married then we will be celebrating our why near on sunday happy anniversary by hitler okay so about half the time was doing it a singles and about half the time was doing it as marriage right exactly out bread is actually the one who started the process and got really intense about it and then i'll let him tell that part of it yes so our first you're on tori we were at their house and they had a book on the shelf call total money makeover and add this guy's face on it and i said hey what's this about they told us about their processing going through it and so i jumped on i asked if i could read the book amount of book read it all that i read it word for word front the back while jumped on board and came back to her and i said hey yet i think we can do this so let's let's go about it okay and what did you say all rick well.

account manager malaysia nick joe hitler john tori dave ramsey rick twenty seven months two hundred eighty six thousan