35 Burst results for "Foreign Service"

President Biden to make remarks at State Department

Morning Edition

00:35 sec | Last month

President Biden to make remarks at State Department

"President Biden will be at the State Department today to deliver remarks on foreign policy. NPR's Frank or Donets has a preview. Part of this is to thank career foreign service officers for sticking through the Trump area. These are people who Trump viewed with really great suspicion what he called the deep state of people who didn't share his views. There's a lot of anticipation about the speech. What will he say about China, for example? You've not seen him have a call with President XI yet, But press secretary Jen Psaki told us yesterday that we should expect this speech to be broad and not lay out his vision for every burning foreign policy issue.

President Biden Donets State Department NPR Frank Donald Trump Jen Psaki China
TV Dinners

Gastropod

08:38 min | Last month

TV Dinners

"How has food. Tv changed over time. And how has it changed us. All not just us gastropod. That's right. you're listening to gastropod the podcast. That looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm cynthia graber. And i'm nicola twilley and this episode. We're taking a spin around the dial which sounds medieval but believe us when we say. Tv's used to not have remotes. You had to literally spin odile. Even i barely remember those wild and wonderful days. This episode is supported in part by cabot. Creamery cabot is a co-op of new england and new york dairy farmers who make award winning cheeses with pure rich milk straight from family farms their specialty cheeses include unique flavors like roasted garlic cheddar and their team of cheese graders indirect with every batch to ensure award-winning quality. Go to cabinet. She's dot com to find out where to buy cabot near you there. You'll also find pairings how to videos and delicious comfort food recipes like the best mac and cheese and more the first thing to know about the very earliest food. Tv wasn't actually on tv. It was on the radio almost as soon as a radio came into being in the nineteen twenties in the us food radio came into being. It was a really easy way for programs to be created because they were easy and cheap. They were obvious outlets for advertising for sponsorship for food products and appliances. So that's where we saw food before. Tv was even a twinkle in the eye. Kathleen collins is a librarian and professor at john jay college of criminal justice and she's the author of the book watching what we eat. The evolution of television cooking shows the stars of these very first food shows. Were hardly stars in today's cents. These radio shows were unglamorous. It was all teaching housewives. How to economize and optimize and generally do all their chores. Better one of the not remotely. Glamorous stars was a woman named and sammy who we can only imagine was supposed to be the wife of uncle sam which is kind of disturbing. She wasn't actually a person. It was a program delivered by an arm of the. Usda and the she was not just one person but several different actors around the country. Adopting regional accents similarly a figure. That's much more well known was betty crocker. She actually started on the radio and like aunt. Sammy was played by many different actresses and she was one of the first we. Could i guess call her one of the first cooking teachers in broadcasting And we have some fun you one for. You are cooking lessons. This week is on some new christmas cookies. And besides that with sending seven ethically recipes to order numbers of schools who had indicated that they want the wednesday menu ambassador. I hope you'll be sure to watch for them on. Sammy's show was called housekeepers. Chat and betty crocker's was the slightly more enticing cooking school of the air. That sounds as though it was all about meringues and souffles and all things fluffy which it decidedly was not and then the very first television station came into being in the nineteen twenties though at the time the technology was still super experimental and people did not have. Tv's in their homes yet. Even as late as nineteen fifty only nine percent of american homes had a tv set. Foot made the jump to tv before. Tv even made the jump to people's living rooms so more megan was thirst. Tv shafran her snapple titled Tv show was called suggestions for dishes to be prepared and cooked in fifteen minutes and that demonstrated single ring. Cookery back in hundred thirty six. This is julie smith. She's a food writer. And podcast and the author of a new book called taste and the tv chef and she's british so i will translate for her single ring. Cookery means the kind of thing you can make on just one burner in your bed. Sit which is british for a studio apartment. Thanks for the cross pen translation of my uses as well as my bizarre accident. True also interesting. Megan was doing this. Fifteen minute meal about eighty years. Before jamie oliver's tv show and book of the same title. We have a picture of her filming her show dressed in. What looks like a raincoat on our website. Glamour personified where was i but by the nineteen forties food. Tv show started showing up for real in the us to the shows were cheap to produce and they were sponsored by kitchen and food companies and they were pretty boring. It was a very practical probably rather dry and yet a lot of the airtime was filled with these programs in different markets around the country. These shows obviously targeted at women most. Tv's at the time. Were actually in public places rather than homes especially bars where there weren't a lot of housewives. There was a show actually the first national televised. Tv show was james beard and it started in the mid nineteen forties and despite everything i just said about how most of the tv shows and the radio shows were led by home. Economists james beard was not a home economist. He was a gourmet and he was really all about the food and so it was a little strange to have this show on. Tv in a bar being watched by men james beard was kind of a one off for a long time but still here we go right off the bat you can see a gender divide in food tv women were the ones who were proper and teaching viewers had cook the man a ormond. Just appreciate food for food. Food was a chore for women and a pleasure for men until the only lucas came along. So diani lucas. Like james beard was a bit of an anachronism. She was a cordon bleu trained chef. Who was born in. Britain came from a very artistically oriented family. Do you only had a restaurant and cooking school in new york and she treated the kitchen as her art studio. it was her serious creative outlet. Her recipes were complex and mostly french. And they took a lot of time to make she was also kind of a taskmaster her british accent and her scraped back hair and she did not cut corners. But kathleen says the. Tony did occasionally have a little sparkle in her eye. Like when she told viewers to use as much rama's they liked or needed in their cribs. Suzanne that show was on the evening and prime time and it ran from nineteen forty seven until nineteen fifty-six but she was kind of ahead of her time. I would not be surprised if many of your listeners have never heard of the oni lucas. She just came along at the wrong time for the public. Viewing audience at diani did have a big influence on one particularly important person. Julia child the french chef. I'm doolittle she was a california girl. She was not a spy for the cia before being cooking show guru as many people think she was a research assistant at the oh s the precursor to the cia but she was really one of these happy accidents. She married paul child who had a foreign service assignment. in france. They moved to france and she fell in love with food. And she got herself trained. You know at the core blows school which was really challenging as a woman and she just became. You know a master in nineteen sixty one. Julia published a book with two other. Women called mastering the art of french. Cooking it is eight home and that seven hundred fifty. Two page book provided the kick. That landed julia in front of millions of viewers happen was. Julia was doing the rounds promoting her book and she'd been invited onto a book show hosted by a local professor on w. g. b. h. Which is the boston public. Tv station and she decided she didn't want to just talk with the professor. She wanted to cook. She wanted to teach him how to make a proper french omelette. The professor wasn't a particularly skilled cook in this live tv cooking class but people wrote into the show after it aired. They called julia a hoot and the producer thought. Julia was incredibly well-spoken so gbh gave her her own show. It would eventually become the french chef. The show was a huge hit. It was on national. Tv for three decades and it not only made julia household name but it also kind of launched the modern era of food

Cynthia Graber Nicola Twilley Odile Creamery Cabot James Beard Kathleen Collins Betty Crocker Sammy Shafran John Jay College Of Criminal J Cabot Julie Smith New England New York Cabinet Usda Diani Lucas Jamie Oliver
Diplomats Return To State Department As Biden Administration Begins

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:48 min | Last month

Diplomats Return To State Department As Biden Administration Begins

"The new administration is also promising to rebuild the State Department. They've brought back some diplomats who were forced out in the early days of the Trump administration to help But there are big gaps to fill as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports and Morita tourist served for a decade in the foreign service until she quit just over a year ago. She says she was just too frustrated with the Trump administration, pulling out of international organizations and sidelining career diplomats. At the time I was serving at the U. S mission to the U. N So had a front row seat to this isolation. So you know from the Paris accords, so leaving the Human Rights Council and also just the day to day sort of instructions. We were getting really to treat. Many of our allies like anniversaries were engaging with them and dialogue. We were bullying our way through for Chris Richardson. His concern started when Trump ran for president talking about banning Muslims from coming to the U. S. Have been horrified by that, and then he got elected and you know we did this to send cable against it. But my issue was is that after the dissent cable came out, we all kind of just moved on to the next outrage. But I never got over that outrage. Richardson and immigration lawyer left the foreign service in 2018 and got involved in lawsuits against Trump's travel ban. He even wrote in affidavit that made its way to the Supreme Court. So for me I felt that I needed to get out there. I needed Teofilo and I needed to stand up for American principles because I thought that then President Trump had gone so dangerously astray. From what our values and what our character is. As a country that I needed to make a stand. Biden has reversed the ban and has talked about the need to rebuild the State Department. Richardson, who's black. Says the problems that state are deeper than trump. He's worried about the lack of diversity. Tourists whose Puerto Rican agrees. We're facing a huge diversity deficit and a brain drain at the State Department. So I do think it's important that we look back and see and try and recruit those who have left to come back to show that, you know. Actually, this is not how the State Department typically runs President Biden has brought back some divers, former foreign service officers tapping Linda Thomas Greenfield to be the next U. S ambassador to the U. S. And as Rose, a A to be an undersecretary of state. Those are political appointees. There are stricter rules about bringing career diplomats back into the foreign service and 35 year. Veteran diplomat Tom Countryman says the secretary of state has to be judicious in combining Promotions for those who have labored in the vineyard under very difficult circumstances the last four years. As well as bringing back those of exceptional quality. It's gotta be a mixture of both countrymen was among those forced to retire at the start of the Trump administration. He encouraged other career foreign service officers to stay saying a foreign policy without professionals is an amateur one. I'm happy that their hard work and their patriotism will again be respected. Rather than denigrated by the White House. At his confirmation hearing, senators question Tony Blinken on how he will overcome the partisanship of Mike Pompeo is 10 Year at the department. It's not simply a matter of bringing people back filling the slots there no empty Is making sure that the best of our ability we're building a workforce that has skill said To deal with the incredibly complex challenges we're facing that are very different. Then the challenges we faced in previous generations. That means experts and global health and climate and technology, he said. He also vowed to focus on the department's diversity deficit and get back to its non partisan tradition. Michele Kelemen NPR news, the State

Trump Administration State Department U. Michele Kelemen Human Rights Council Donald Trump Teofilo President Trump Morita Chris Richardson Richardson NPR President Biden Linda Thomas Greenfield Foreign Service Tom Countryman Paris Biden Puerto Rican Supreme Court
Senate holds hearings for five Biden nominees

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last month

Senate holds hearings for five Biden nominees

"Antony Blinken was among five of Biden's Cabinet picks facing Senate confirmation hearings today more from CBS News correspondent Allison Keyes, Lincoln told before Relations Committee. He will work to reinvigorate the State Department's foreign service officers, build a diverse diplomatic corps and revitalize American democracy, he says. When America isn't leading the world, either, some other country tries to take our place, but not in a way that's that's the to advance our interests and values or Maybe just this bad. No one does blink and also says America's commitment to Israel's security is sacrosanct. Allison Keyes. CBS NEWS Washington Treasury secretary nominee,

Antony Blinken Allison Keyes Relations Committee Biden Cbs News Cabinet Senate State Department Lincoln America Israel Washington Treasury CBS
Senate holds confirmation hearing for Biden's picks

NPR News Now

01:11 min | Last month

Senate holds confirmation hearing for Biden's picks

"Biden is going to nominate. Dr rachel levine as assistant. Us health secretary she has led pennsylvania's response to the pandemic and is a professor of pediatrics. And psychiatry at penn state levin is also openly transgender several biden nominees will have confirmation hearings today including his choices to lead the department of treasury defense homeland security and the director of national intelligence. And npr's michele keleman reports the senate foreign relations committee meets to consider the nominee for secretary of state. Tony blinken a former. Deputy secretary of state blinken goes way back with biden. He was a staffer on the senate foreign relations committee. When biden was chairman. And he says he wants to help the new administration restore america's place in the world because america at its best still has a greater ability than any other country on earth to bring others together to meet the challenges of our time. And that's where the men and women of the state department foreign service officers civil servants. That's where they come in. Lincoln is a french speaker who went to high school in paris. His father was an ambassador to hungary and his stepfather was a holocaust survivor who was rescued by african american. Gi michele

Biden Senate Foreign Relations Commi Dr Rachel Levine Department Of Treasury National Intelligence Michele Keleman Tony Blinken Blinken Levin Penn State America Pennsylvania NPR Lincoln Paris Hungary Gi Michele
CIA pick William Burns signals a turn to diplomacy for the nation’s spy agency

PRI's The World

00:38 sec | Last month

CIA pick William Burns signals a turn to diplomacy for the nation’s spy agency

"William burns never worked in an intelligence agency. He's a career foreign service officer known for his diplomatic record so it came as a bit of a surprise to many this week when president elect biden tap burns as his pick to be the next director of the cia former cia director. John brennan was not surprised. He says biden has good reasons for choosing an experienced diplomat as america's spy chief prison biden wants to have a national security team that has worked together before so that they can hit the ground running. Bill brings a combination of experiences as well as the right temperament to deal with these very very challenging issues.

President Elect Biden William Burns CIA Biden John Brennan Burns America Bill
What do we know about Joe Bidens cabinet?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:39 min | 3 months ago

What do we know about Joe Bidens cabinet?

"Us president donald trump was never going to react to losing the two thousand and twenty election gracefully us. President donald trump has never reacted to anything gracefully as we go to air trump continues to insist that he's crack. Legal team are going to unveil conclusive evidence of monstrous voter fraud any day. Now although on current form trump's personal attorney rudolph giuliani clearly. Clearly voter fraud easily. Provable seems just as likely to unveil the heron he has appointed his deputy however earlier this week trump or whoever priced his sweaty phone from his. Tony hands grudgingly tweeted that the us general services administration the body which oversees presidential transitions should do what needs to be done. This will make life somewhat. Easier for president elect joe biden. Who will now have access to government funding office space senior officials and intelligence briefings among other things. It also means that he can name his cabinet with increasing confidence. Very possibly because president-elect biden has wanted to emphasize legitimacy in the face of the incumbents ongoing tantrum vis-a-vis the election results. We've learned a lot quite early about the administration. He intends to lead from january twentieth. Is a team that will keep our country and our people safe and secure. It's a team that reflects the fact that america is back ready to lead the world not retreat from it once again. Sit at the head of the table. We will come presently to who. And what is in biden's cabinet but at least as significant things being as they recently have been is who and what is not biden has not at least as of this broadcast awarded any government position to any obvious crooks crepes clowns ding bats. Yahoos griffis spivs cracks. He's own ghastly children or they idiot husbands but wild president-elect biden does have the advantage of a low bar to climb over. It doesn't mean that he's choices are excused scrutiny especially those pertaining to foreign policy on the grounds that. Us foreign policy often has a way of becoming of the people's domestic reality president. Trump's first secretary of state was to put it charitably unorthodox unorthodox choice. I'm not here to represent the united states government's interest. I'm not here to to did norm. Norma here to criticize it. That's that's not what i do. I'm businessman. Rex tillerson a career oil. Baron wants personally awarded. Russia's order a friendship medal by president vladimir putin president-elect to biden could scarcely have made a moral docs pick as america's top diplomat. And that's where the men and women of the state department foreign service officers civil service. That's where they come in. I've witnessed their passion their energy their courage up close. Antony blinken is a career foreign policy. Boffin who served as deputy secretary of state and deputy national security adviser during the presidency of barack obama with national security advisor trump also tried to be a bit left field. He named lieutenant. General mcmaster a serving soldier and actually not a ridiculous choice. Mcmaster is a smart serious and sensible man and all of those reasons fell out with trump. who replaced him with incorrigible. Neo-con head banger. John bolton who only looksmart serious and sensible when standing next to donald trump but this arrangement proved unworkable. Good to everyone. I'm paul affairs. We are coming on the air right now with our breaking news just moments ago. President trump tweeting that he has asked his national security adviser. John bolton to resign. Joe biden has named jake sullivan. I pledge to you. And to the american people that i will work relentlessly in service of the mission you have given us to keep our country and our people safe to advance our national interests and to defend our values who was the president-elect's national security adviser when the president-elect was vice president he also helped negotiate the nuclear deal with iran from which trump famously flounced trump's first. Us ambassador to the united nations was not a completely absurd choice former south carolina governor nikki. Haley he's second ambassador to the. Un was a completely absurd choice. Prodigious republican donut kelly craft. It could actually have been worse. Trump wanted to appoint his daughter. Ivanka but griped that he would be accused of nepotism. I've heard i've already vodka. I've heard how good woody vodka the people that know. There's nothing to do with nepotism. But i want to tell you the people that know no that evacuate would be dynamite about You know then. Be accused of nepotism if you can believe it right. This was accurate in as much as demanding money from bank tellers. Gunpoint can lead one to be accused of armed robbery. I want to say to you. America is back. multi-lateralism is back. Diplomacy is back.

Biden Donald Trump Us General Services Administra United States Rudolph Giuliani Joe Biden Rex Tillerson Antony Blinken General Mcmaster John Bolton Tony Boffin Vladimir Putin Jake Sullivan Baron State Department Mcmaster Looksmart Russia
Joe Biden Cabinet picks: Who are the president-elect’s nominees?

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

03:34 min | 3 months ago

Joe Biden Cabinet picks: Who are the president-elect’s nominees?

"Day for reporters covering the Biden transition team is the president elect's Cabinet choices will be Reveal. Of course you heard from ABC a moment ago. The G S a is now releasing those transition funds. John Hudson is covering it all for the Washington Post intact with Cuomo's Taylor van sighs a lot of names that we're gonna have to learn over the next weeks or so. Nominees for some of the bigger jewels in that cabinet crown today. We're for secretaries of State in homeland Security. U. N. Ambassador director of National Intelligence Let's start with Antony Blinken. He's the nominee for secretary of state. What's his background? Well, he's been with fighting for a very long time. He has a sort of mind meld with the president elect, and they worked in Congress together in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Hey, worked at the state Department of Deputy secretary of State and Blinking also worked closely with Biden when he was vice president. A deputy national security advisor s O. They know each other. He's reputation is sort of a liberal internationalist does believe in a strong and large role for the United States. In some ways is a little bit more hawkish in interventionist than the president elect. Hey, support. Blinken supported the intervention in Libya something that Biden did not support. Blinking also supported Ah, large U. S intervention in Syria on so they are totally ideologically in the exact same place, but he's a very sort of faithful servant of the president elect. And the nominee for U. N Ambassador is Linda Thomas Greenfield has been described as a career foreign service officer. She's coming out of retirement, right? Yes, she did retire in the Trump era, didn't her last job in the Obama administration of is our top diplomat for Africa? She comes with, you know a lot you know, over two decades worth of experience in the foreign service, not a political type person per se. I'm not like a lifelong Democrat or anything like that. A career diplomat On, so looks to be someone who would be, um you know, a good soldier over at the U. N. For Biden not heavily ideological. But what has been helping the president elect, reform the State Department and promote diversity, And some of these names that we've seen come out aren't may be familiar to those of us outside of Washington, D C. Like Alejandro Mayorkas Tol head the Homeland Security Department. And Averil Haynes, for director of National intelligence are a lot of these intentionally a political picks or or lesser known names. Well, you're right that these they're not super bugs were the names, but there is a commonality in them in, but they all had, you know, fairly senior roles in the Obama administration, and so this really is sort of a revenge of the foreign policy establishment. And of course we're talking about. We're talking about foreign policy related jobs. So these are not like celebrity type folks. Uh, they are part of the sort of great suited bureaucracies that was often behind the scenes. But these people had sort of fairly senior roles in the Obama decision. Now they're going today be nominated for very, very senior positions in the defied an administration John Hudson with us on coma, news and more announcements to be made. I'm sure in the next 24 hours or so, John. Thank you very much. And that's

Biden Taylor Van U. N. Ambassador National Intelligence Antony Blinken Senate Foreign Relations Commi Department Of Deputy John Hudson Blinken Linda Thomas Greenfield Cuomo Washington Post ABC Cabinet D C. Like Alejandro Mayorkas T Homeland Security Department Libya Averil Haynes Congress
Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

Untangle

05:47 min | 4 months ago

Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

"Today I have the most amazing guest for you. He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how to disparate sides can come together. His name is Daryl Davis and he's a black man who is convinced over two hundred Klu Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. Today. We're GONNA hear Darrell Story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight in bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together learn from another become friends heal and grow welcome Daryl. Pleasure. To be here with you. Thank you for having me. It is such a pleasure. You're such an extraordinary human being sorry to embarrass you. I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. My pleasure and I hope you'll listeners will enjoy it. Thank you. Why don't you begin by telling us the back story to how and why you are able to penetrate the clan? Okay. I'm aged fifty, two currently and as a child, my parents were in the US foreign service. So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three. And on through elementary school traveling abroad living in various foreign countries, you go to a country for two years and you come back home here to the states, and then you're reassigned to another country. So back and forth back and forth during my formative years while overseas my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. Anybody who had an embassy in those countries all of their children went to the same school. So my classmates were Nigeria Italian Russian Japanese French you name it they had an embassy there I was in school with their kids and to me that was the norm that was my first exposure to school. and. So when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, I would either be in all black schools. Black and white schools meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones like. Well I left. CHICAGO. Shortly after I was born but we will come back and we would be like in Washington DC or be in Massachusetts different places for a short time before being reassigned every other two years. So I was back I know I was for part of Second Grade I was back for a fourth grade. I was back in sixth grade and I was back here in eighth grade when I would come back the schools were either all black or black and white meeting still segregated. Or newly integrated, and there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. So in one case, I was in fourth grade nine, hundred, sixty, eight, I was ten years old and I was one of two black children in the entire school myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. So consequently, all of my friends were white and many of my male friends were members of the local, Cub Scout Group and they invited me to join which I did. And during a March we had from Lexington Concord to commemorate the ride of a Paul Revere. Suddenly I was being pelted with soda pop bottles and cans and Rawson just debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk not everybody most people were cheering us in waving and all that kind of thing. But there were about maybe five people off to my right I remember there being a couple of kids or half a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who are throwing ends, and when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this my first thought was oh, those people over there don't like the scouts. That's how naive I was because I had never been to. Before and it wasn't until my scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, my den mother, my cub leader, my troop master, and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. And I realized I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection and I, asked him, I, said, why am I being hit why they're doing this? I didn't do anything and all they would do this kind of shush me and rushing along telling me everything would be okay. Just keep moving. and. So they never answered the question. At the end of the day when I returned home my mother and father who would not at the parade. were, fixing, cleaning the UP, putting bandaids on me and ask me how do I fall down and get scraped up I told him I didn't fall down into the mud happened. And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism they explained what racism was to me. And my opinion old brain could not process this definition. It made no sense to me whatsoever I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point and none of them whether they were my fellow Americans my French friends, my Swedish friends, my Australian friends, none of them treated me like this. So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. And they assured me that not all white people do this but there is an element of some they do and I just cannot wrap my head around it. So I didn't believe them well about almost two months later. That same year nineteen, Sixty, eight. On April the fourth Martin Luther King was assassinated. And every major city in this country burned to the ground. All in the name of this new word I had learned call racism.

Ku Klux Klan Daryl Davis Darrell Story Cub Scout Group Martin Luther King United States Chicago Massachusetts Paul Revere Washington Nigeria Rawson Lexington Concord
Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | 5 months ago

Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. Thank you so much for doing this and I. so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. Really Apologize. No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. diminished. So here we are. We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. itself is very quiet, but there's just hammering as I walk in. For an audio yeah program. So good. Are you? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. Where where are you? Right now. Are, you talking to me? Yes. Yeah. I'm in North Gate Hall, which is in. The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. Three blocks from our home. Oh, what a what a wonderful place to live. I think we're pretty good here. I. Don't like to. I. Don't want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So yeah, I. Think we're fine. Good and where you KRISTA. Minneapolis. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. It's you'll. You'll understand this I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. It's Really important in life giving. So. Good Yeah So, you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. So you sound like you grew up all over the world. Well. Yes to to some degree. Yeah. Starting at age twelve. Yeah it was pivotal. Father was ambassador us. Ambassador to New Zealand. Ghana and Tunisia. Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. Yeah. But did you live where those places you lived in I lived in Israel? And from aged twelve to fourteen, very pivotal experience. And then New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. The university. there Victoria University so in New Zealand and then my folks were in Ghana and I spent a summer. Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. Actually spent five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. These French questionnaires. Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. So. yes. So I was very. Fortunate, really to get to experience all that. Yeah. Yeah was there a religious or spiritual background to your childhood in your family or in those places? Yeah. Yeah. I would say there there was And So. Are we starting your going? Yeah. All right okay. yeah my parents were very religious, unitarian? And So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. My brother and I would. Kind of. Wrestle with each other and tickle. In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and And Go. Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. At that point and. But if I look back on it what. the influence of that was is that. There's An important part of one's self to express and to learn to develop and that. For. UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. get to know and. Empathize with. People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. I think by the time I was. Sixteen. I had that message, but I felt something missing. And I got interested in quakers who? Be Much. More. Okay Gang. So what are we going to do about it? You know view terriers were very talky. Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. interesting. They were doers, and so I would say. That that. Connection for me. when I was in high school very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. But It led me to volunteer on weekends when I was in high school At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. Street. was in the middle of the. the back area of Washington

Tunisia New Zealand Berkeley New Zealand Wellington New Zea Washington Minneapolis Ghana Arley Oklahoma North Gate Hall Israel Neighbourhood House Grad School Victoria University Silver Spring Maryland Officer Foreign Service
Hurricane Laura: 400,000 without power in Louisiana

News, Traffic and Weather

00:20 sec | 6 months ago

Hurricane Laura: 400,000 without power in Louisiana

"Laura killed at least 14 people and wiped out power to almost a million customers. More than half a million in Louisiana are still in the dark. With no timetable. Foreign service could be restored Governor John Bell, Edwards says that was a strong storm ever. Like Louisiana. President Trump is in route to the affected areas. He'll told them today with the governor

Governor John Bell Louisiana President Trump Laura Edwards
US Secretary of State Pompeo defends arms sales to Saudi Arabia

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:20 sec | 7 months ago

US Secretary of State Pompeo defends arms sales to Saudi Arabia

"Today, today, Secretary Secretary of of State State Pompeo Pompeo defended defended an an administration administration arms arms sale sale to to Saudi Saudi Arabia Arabia that's that's been been criticized criticized in in an an inspector inspector general's general's report. report. We We had had United United States States senators impudent intended or foreign service officers suggestion they had done something unlawful. Whose outrageous then Outrageous for them to continue to make those claims. We did everything by the book, sometimes

Pompeo Pompeo Saudi Arabia Secretary Secretary United States
The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

On the Media

10:04 min | 7 months ago

The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

"Of Donald J. Trump. We in the United States have become accustomed to a degree of fabulous. Um I've done more for black Americans than anybody. With the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, the president, self aggrandizement provides the framework for his alternate reality. We have one of the lowest mortality rate way had 900 Deaths in a single day. You have the numbers place because I heard we had the best mortality number one low mortality, right? We are being given something I can't recall in my lifetime, a choice of realities. One that is mostly regarded as evidence based and one that you might call faith based that faith being in Mr Trump In either case, you have a sizable cohort to back you up. Truth has been displaced in many quarters by rage and fear. Over the past four months, we've had many opportunities to observe the impact of paranoia. When deployed by a fantasist in the White House in Arizona Man died after taking Clara Quien, his wife said that they heard about it from Trump's briefings. Are you gonna allow the government to tell you you have to wear a mask? Some believe these mask orders go against their freedoms will protect. All right, I will know asked me and I will not pay for antibiotics. Conspiracies of Sena numbers swell on Facebook and doctors warn, if left unchecked, they could undermine an effective vaccine. The death toll from the Corona virus pandemic has surpassed 150,000 in the United States. That's the highest number of fatalities in any nation by far. And accounts for nearly 1/4 of the recorded global. Told immediately after the 2016 election, I spoke with New York ER writer Masha Gessen, who, after having lived long under Vladimir Putin had some advice for anxious Americans trying to navigate the so called new normal. She explained that for the would be authoritarian, the lying is the point that the ability to create a reality flagrantly staring down conspicuous fact. Is a crucial component of building and sustaining power. And last fall boxes, David Roberts noted bluntly, where such a strategy left unchecked, could lead this sort of cultish, increasingly authoritarian movement takes over the country. In Russia and Turkey and Poland. Right's a disturbingly longer and longer list. We see countries that we thought were democracies devolve into this. In the U. S. So much has happened in the last few years that we thought would never happen. I think we should really loosen up our imaginations as to what can happen when a movement that is convinced that everything it knows and loves is in danger of falling apart movements that's thinking like that unconnected anymore to fax or reality. And got its hands on the power of the federal government is the basic recipe for democracy is falling apart. And so last fall on, the media producer Leia Feder reported on one of those places Poland, a young democracy teetering on unstable ground and where it's far right Nationalist government is intent on rewriting the nation's painful history. For almost a decade, Poland has been in the grip of a conspiracy theory what really happened when a plane crashed in a forest in western Russia, killing Poland's president and dozens of other government officials. The plane had been on route to commemorate another Polish tragedy, a massacre that had occurred in the very same location in 1940. 1973 documentary explored the mystery While the German army is advancing from the West, the Soviets crossed Poland's eastern front court in a method of Polish army collapsed, Um, surrendered. The victors, divided the country down the middle and imprisoned every soldier they captured. Russia took a 215,000 Poland officer Corps were never seen alive again. Many. What die near Smolensk, in a forest called catching after decades of opacity and suspicion on investigation in the early nineties, confirmed finally, that it was not Hitler. But Stalin, who had ordered the massacre. And so when, on April 10th 2010 a delegation of 96 Polish politicians and officials traveled from Warsaw to Smolensk. It was in service of remembrance and reconciliation. But what happened instead compounded the national pain. Poland's prime minister burst into tears when he heard the news today that his country's president was killed in a plane crash pilot tried to land in a thick fog at least twice missing the runway. And ignoring the control tower's direction to divert to another city. Not just losing the president of that country. The first lady, the ahead of the army chief of staff, the National Security Office head deputy Parliament speaker, the deputy foreign minister. It was a devastating national tragedy. What's more, the symbolic layering was undeniable. Ah, longstanding tragedy finally solved and a new one appears in its place. And yet, in the immediate moments and days after the crash, there was a kind of common shock. An Applebaum is a journalist and academic beast in Warsaw At the time of the 2010 crash, her husband was minister of foreign affairs in the Polish government, and there was pretty straightforward reporting. About what had happened. What was immediately clear There were people on the ground who saw the crash. So there was a kind of concensus initially about what had happened that it was a terrible Accident and that you know many people of value to the nation had died. But the story started to shift is the investigation into the crash proceeded. Investigators say pilot error was mostly to blame. It became clear that one of the causes of the crash was the fact that the pilots were under pressure to land. The president's delegation had arrived late for the plane. They were running behind schedule as they got closer to smell lens, which was even really an airport. It was a kind of airstrip in the forest. They began to be worried about the fog and the pilots weren't sure they could make the narrow landing. But according to black box recordings, Polish President Lech Kaczynski, head of the opposition party directed the pilots to do it was meant to be the launch of his reelection campaign. So there were cameras there which he knew, and he was very anxious to go under pressure, the pilots tried to make the landing. Instead, they hit a tree, killing all 96 people on board. The president's twin brother, the head of the nationalist right political party in Poland, same parties, the president He didn't like this story. It made the president look bad, more to the point. This is a terrible crash very near to a place where a Nurlita generation of poles were murdered by the Soviet state. Because of that eeriness. People immediately began to speculate that there was actually a different, deeper story that perhaps the Russians caused the crash. Perhaps there was a bomb on the plane. And conspiracy theories began to proliferate online. The president's brother, Nijinsky began openly alluding to them. Kaczynskis Law and Justice Party made unraveling the Smolensk conspiracy. It's key campaign promise once you had bought into their idea that there is a secret conspiracy, possibly involving the Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. Possibly involving the Russians, and that lots of people high up in the state were implicated in some great big secret plot to kill the president. If you believe that Then you can believe a lot of other things. The point was to get people to believe in a kind of alternative reality to doubt institutions to doubt that the government was telling them the truth, and that was absolutely an attempt to help win an election, But it did more than carve out a new electorate. It created new divides in Polish society. Where one's Polish politics were split between Communists and anti communists around economic policy. Now it was over a vision of history. It was how you see Poland's place in the world. And whether you think secret dark forces air trying to undermine your country and whether you know you need to elect a government of Patriots in order to make sure that doesn't happen. Where you fell on that dividing line affected how you would vote and how you would understand politics for the next several years, And so when line justice one in 2015 it spawned a new kind of power a power based on the willingness to embrace the myth. They fired large numbers of Polish civil servants. Polish members of the foreign service. All kinds of people who work for the government also leaders and board members of state companies and they replaced all of them with people whom they were sure we're loyal. And one element of the loyalty test was belief in this Molinski myth. Smolinski conspiracy implied that there were dark, mysterious forces continuing to try to manipulate and undermine the Polish nation. It also drawn the larger story of a Poland continually attacked by outsiders and the valiant Polish resistance to threats past and present line Justice Road that narrative electoral victory. And then wrote its electoral victory to further consolidation of that narrative in service of Polish nationalism.

President Trump Poland Russia Polish President Lech Kaczynsk Smolensk United States Donald J. Trump Warsaw Prime Minister Mr Trump Federal Government Poland Officer Corps Abraham Lincoln Facebook David Roberts Arizona Masha Gessen Vladimir Putin Deputy Foreign Minister
The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

On the Media

10:04 min | 7 months ago

The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

"Election of Donald J. Trump. We in the United States have become accustomed to a degree of fabulous. Um I've done more for black Americans than anybody. With the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, the president, self aggrandizement provides the framework for his alternate reality. We have one of the lowest mortality rate way had 900 Deaths in a single day. You have the numbers place because I heard we had the best mortality number one low mortality, right? We are being given something I can't recall in my lifetime, a choice of realities. One that is mostly regarded as evidence based and one that you might call faith based that faith being in Mr Trump In either case, you have a sizable cohort to back you up. Truth has been displaced in many quarters by rage and fear. Over the past four months, we've had many opportunities to observe the impact of paranoia. When deployed by a fantasist in the White House in Arizona Man died after taking Clara Quien, his wife said that they heard about it from Trump's briefings. Are you gonna allow the government to tell you you have to wear a mask? Some believe these mask orders go against their freedoms will protect. All right, I will know asked me and I will not pay for antibiotics. Conspiracies of Sena numbers swell on Facebook and doctors warn, if left unchecked, they could undermine an effective vaccine. The death toll from the Corona virus pandemic has surpassed 150,000 in the United States. That's the highest number of fatalities in any nation by far. And accounts for nearly 1/4 of the recorded global. Told immediately after the 2016 election, I spoke with New York ER writer Masha Gessen, who, after having lived long under Vladimir Putin had some advice for anxious Americans trying to navigate the so called new normal. She explained that for the would be authoritarian, the lying is the point that the ability to create a reality flagrantly staring down conspicuous fact. Is a crucial component of building and sustaining power. And last fall boxes, David Roberts noted bluntly, where such a strategy left unchecked, could lead this sort of cultish, increasingly authoritarian movement takes over the country. In Russia and Turkey and Poland. Right's a disturbingly longer and longer list. We see countries that we thought were democracies devolve into this. In the U. S. So much has happened in the last few years that we thought would never happen. I think we should really loosen up our imaginations as to what can happen when a movement that is convinced that everything it knows and loves is in danger of falling apart movements that's thinking like that unconnected anymore to fax or reality. And got its hands on the power of the federal government is the basic recipe for democracy is falling apart. And so last fall on, the media producer Leia Feder reported on one of those places Poland, a young democracy teetering on unstable ground and where it's far right Nationalist government is intent on rewriting the nation's painful history. For almost a decade, Poland has been in the grip of a conspiracy theory what really happened when a plane crashed in a forest in western Russia, killing Poland's president and dozens of other government officials. The plane had been on route to commemorate another Polish tragedy, a massacre that had occurred in the very same location in 1940. 1973 documentary explored the mystery While the German army is advancing from the West, the Soviets crossed Poland's eastern front court in a method of Polish army collapsed, Um, surrendered. The victors, divided the country down the middle and imprisoned every soldier they captured. Russia took a 215,000 Poland officer Corps were never seen alive again. Many. What die near Smolensk, in a forest called catching after decades of opacity and suspicion on investigation in the early nineties, confirmed finally, that it was not Hitler. But Stalin, who had ordered the massacre. And so when, on April 10th 2010 a delegation of 96 Polish politicians and officials traveled from Warsaw to Smolensk. It was in service of remembrance and reconciliation. But what happened instead compounded the national pain. Poland's prime minister burst into tears when he heard the news today that his country's president was killed in a plane crash pilot tried to land in a thick fog at least twice missing the runway. And ignoring the control tower's direction to divert to another city. Not just losing the president of that country. The first lady, the ahead of the army chief of staff, the National Security Office head deputy Parliament speaker, the deputy foreign minister. It was a devastating national tragedy. What's more, the symbolic layering was undeniable. Ah, longstanding tragedy finally solved and a new one appears in its place. And yet, in the immediate moments and days after the crash, there was a kind of common shock. An Applebaum is a journalist and academic beast in Warsaw At the time of the 2010 crash, her husband was minister of foreign affairs in the Polish government, and there was pretty straightforward reporting. About what had happened. What was immediately clear There were people on the ground who saw the crash. So there was a kind of concensus initially about what had happened that it was a terrible Accident and that you know many people of value to the nation had died. But the story started to shift is the investigation into the crash proceeded. Investigators say pilot error was mostly to blame. It became clear that one of the causes of the crash was the fact that the pilots were under pressure to land. The president's delegation had arrived late for the plane. They were running behind schedule as they got closer to smell lens, which was even really an airport. It was a kind of airstrip in the forest. They began to be worried about the fog and the pilots weren't sure they could make the narrow landing. But according to black box recordings, Polish President Lech Kaczynski, head of the opposition party directed the pilots to do it was meant to be the launch of his reelection campaign. So there were cameras there which he knew, and he was very anxious to go under pressure, the pilots tried to make the landing. Instead, they hit a tree, killing all 96 people on board. The president's twin brother, the head of the nationalist right political party in Poland, same parties, the president He didn't like this story. It made the president look bad, more to the point. This is a terrible crash very near to a place where a Nurlita generation of poles were murdered by the Soviet state. Because of that eeriness. People immediately began to speculate that there was actually a different, deeper story that perhaps the Russians caused the crash. Perhaps there was a bomb on the plane. And conspiracy theories began to proliferate online. The president's brother, Nijinsky began openly alluding to them. Kaczynskis Law and Justice Party made unraveling the Smolensk conspiracy. It's key campaign promise once you had bought into their idea that there is a secret conspiracy, possibly involving the Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. Possibly involving the Russians, and that lots of people high up in the state were implicated in some great big secret plot to kill the president. If you believe that Then you can believe a lot of other things. The point was to get people to believe in a kind of alternative reality to doubt institutions to doubt that the government was telling them the truth, and that was absolutely an attempt to help win an election, But it did more than carve out a new electorate. It created new divides in Polish society. Where one's Polish politics were split between Communists and anti communists around economic policy. Now it was over a vision of history. It was how you see Poland's place in the world. And whether you think secret dark forces air trying to undermine your country and whether you know you need to elect a government of Patriots in order to make sure that doesn't happen. Where you fell on that dividing line affected how you would vote and how you would understand politics for the next several years, And so when line justice one in 2015 it spawned a new kind of power a power based on the willingness to embrace the myth. They fired large numbers of Polish civil servants. Polish members of the foreign service. All kinds of people who work for the government also leaders and board members of state companies and they replaced all of them with people whom they were sure we're loyal. And one element of the loyalty test was belief in this Molinski myth. Smolinski conspiracy implied that there were dark, mysterious forces continuing to try to manipulate and undermine the Polish nation. It also drawn the larger story of a Poland continually attacked by outsiders and the valiant Polish resistance to threats past and present line Justice Road that narrative electoral victory. And then wrote its electoral victory to further consolidation of that narrative in service of Polish nationalism.

President Trump Poland Russia Polish President Lech Kaczynsk Smolensk United States Donald J. Trump Warsaw Prime Minister Mr Trump Federal Government Poland Officer Corps Abraham Lincoln Facebook David Roberts Arizona Masha Gessen Vladimir Putin Deputy Foreign Minister
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 7 months ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

07:46 min | 8 months ago

Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

"I'm not by background attack person I come from a liberal arts background I studied politics in languages at university, and I was fascinated in international affairs I was always interested in history and politics. And that developed into a into a study of international relations, so I I studied. To universities in the UK Newcastle, which is in the north of England, and a Master's degree at Bristol University in the south and it was really. While? I was at Bristol that I developed. An interest in joining the foreign, Service Exams for the for the Foreign Service while I was at university there and I joined the British Foreign Office in in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight, and that took me on a fascinating professional journey, had the opportunity to study Arabic while I was in the Foreign Office and that took me to the Middle East. where I I had a couple of postings. Including some time spent his adviser to UK and US military forces during the war in two thousand and three, and over the course of my my government career over the course of my Foreign Office career I increasingly focused on national security issues. So you know things like counterproliferation, counterterrorism and Cybersecurity, and so that that really took me sort of further towards the the work that I now do but really my my leap into startup space, and and the work that we now do with with cybersecurity companies that was that was triggered towards the end of my government service, I spent a couple of years as an adviser. Downing, street a prime. Minister's Office that was two thousand ten eleven twelve, and around that time there were number of reviews taking place into UK national security, and that flowed some very interesting work around cybersecurity as a as a tier, one, a national security threat, and and you know I I was involved in some of that work. And after leaving, government decided to to make it one of the things that I would focus on. And so, what are you involved with today? What is your day to day like these days? Well since two thousand fifteen with my co-founder grace, cassie, who was another friend of mine from Foreign Service Days A. WE wanted to put in place. A way to support entrepreneurs. In the! Early days of establishing a cybersecurity company we had seen in our time. In government that the this was one of the most important. Challenges and opportunities of of the of the of the decade and we felt that weren't really any. Systems or structures in place to provide the support that was needed. This is fascinating complex area of technology and business, and while there were united some fantastic institutions in the UK there were already a number of significant companies operating this space. We couldn't see the number of innovative new companies emerging that we that we expected to say on the E. found in in somewhat more mature ecosystems like the US, and and to some extent Israel, so we started, Ceylon and Ceylon was A. In early days and experimental accelerator modeled to some extent on programs like Y combinator, but dedicated to Cybersecurity, so we initially Ranna three month program in London, and it's really grown from there and over the last five years we've. We've run ten programs in London and four programs in Singapore and we've had with one hundred companies come through those programs, and so we we spend our. We spend our day odd as in running those programs finding and supporting those entrepreneurs, and then, and then continuing that that support once they leave the program. Can you give us some insights on the state of Cybersecurity and entrepreneurship there in the UK? Yeah well I think it's developed. significantly certainly over the the ten years. That we've been really focusing on this and. Definitely we've seen that. Over the five years we've been running ceylon there really wasn't a a community of of of cybersecurity startups here in the UK back in in the first part of the last decade. We we've helped to capitalize that community here, and there is now a thriving startup ecosystem right across the range of technologies, but definitely in cybersecurity. And I think there are now there are some really quite successful companies that have been set up and developed here over the past five years, and it's now very much part of a a broader technology system here in the UK. And part part of the reason for that is that? The UK has a good reputation in this space, but it's also a a good place to to set up a business if you'll from somewhere else It's been a draw for talent. globally and we certainly saw that in in cybersecurity. We could see the talent. In cybersecurity was was very much distributed around the world. It wasn't just an isolated pockets, and and we found in. Many people wanted to come and. Join our program and get the business started in the UK, and as a result there now you know tens, if not hundreds of of interesting small companies in this field. Is there, even a geographic advantage of of being where you are. I'm thinking you're sort of you. Know equidistant to S- to some of the other important centers of cybersecurity. There's no question. I think you know. Greenwich Meantime has been a competitive advantage for the UK in many different areas of a of business and finance. Over the centuries I think it gives us a genuine advantages being as you say, in time term sort of equidistant between. The economies of the of the of the Americas and those of The Middle East Asia, and that definitely that definitely helps you know having the the economies of Europe on on our doorstep, and you know the last forty years at least strong connections to those economies has been helpful. London has been a melting pot for anybody trying to start a business seek finance and I. Think you know the world the world does come to London or at least it did until we were hit by the pandemic I. Think it will nonetheless emerge from the current crisis is one of the world's great global cities, and and so you know geography masters in Business and certainly been helpful to the development of the cyber ecosystem here.

UK British Foreign Office London Ceylon United States Foreign Service Bristol University Newcastle Greenwich Meantime Counterproliferation Co-Founder England Singapore Middle East Asia Europe Middle East. Israel Americas Grace
Government Accountability Office Says State Department Lacks Diversity

All Things Considered

02:05 min | 8 months ago

Government Accountability Office Says State Department Lacks Diversity

"Mail jail and pale that was the rap on the state department's diplomatic corps for years the department has worked to shed that image but the government accountability office says state is falling short of its diversity goals NPR's Michele Kelemen reports black diplomats are pointing to some systemic problems look kisha gone will never forget what her supervisor told her as she began her first assignment as a consular officer in Monterrey Mexico he says it verbatim that out to me African Americans have a hard time in the foreign service white women and animals in saying this have been able to crack the glass ceiling but black officers tend to disappear gun lasted five years a native of Alabama she was brought into the department on a fellowship designed to increase diversity but she found that personnel decisions work against women of color and it was getting harder to talk about democracy and justice abroad I left at about a half a year and a half after Donald Trump was elected and I just felt that has African American woman the current administration was not living up to the ideals that I want to promote in the service another former diplomat Chris Richardson wrote a damning op ed in The New York Times about the history of discrimination at the state department I can't tell you how many African American officers acting officers I've spoken to who have told me stories of of discrimination stories of weird micro aggressions that work on investigated that no one really asked about Richardson an immigration lawyer says the state department needs to take a hard look at itself and ask why these officers quit the state department set up a task force to work on plans to recruit and retain diverse talent a spokesperson says secretary of state Mike Pompeo is committed to building a diverse and inclusive work force representative of America's devotion to the principle of equal opportunity Richardson says that's been the mantra for years but each decade there are new

NPR Michele Kelemen Supervisor Officer Monterrey Mexico Alabama Donald Trump Chris Richardson The New York Times Mike Pompeo Representative America
Trump fires State Dept. watchdog critical of admin moves

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 10 months ago

Trump fires State Dept. watchdog critical of admin moves

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the state department watchdog has been fired Steve lytic the state department's inspector general an Obama administration appointee was fired Friday according to a senior state department official secretary of state Mike Pompeii removed clinic but no reason was given Linda could been in the position since twenty thirteen during the trump administration Lennix office had criticized the department's handling of personnel matters and said some of president Donald trump's appointees had retaliated against career officials limit will be replaced by Stephen Akers a former career foreign service officer who has close ties to vice president Mike pence Mike Crossey up Washington

Mike Rossi Mike Pompeii Linda President Trump Donald Trump Stephen Akers Officer Washington Steve Lytic Obama Administration State Department Official Lennix Vice President Mike Pence Mike Crossey
"foreign service" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"Awesome news tonight. NPR has learned that one of the key figures in the impeachment drama ambassador. Marie Ivanovich is retiring from the Foreign Service. She was the ambassador or to Ukraine until last spring when she was ousted following a disinformation campaign by the president's private lawyer. Ivanovich testify testified before Congress about out the moment that she got a call from Washington telling her come home they were concerned about my security and I needed to come home right away. Ivanovich remained on the State Department payroll teaching at Georgetown University. But sources say she's now retired. NPR diplomatic correspondent. Michelle Kellerman and. I have both been reporting porting out this story and Michelle is in the studio with us. Now hey there hi there all right so let's walk through the details. We know I have confirmed that. She retired so not resigned but this was months before her current assignment was set to end while she was at Georgetown. So this wasn't a an ambassadorship that she had and she. He has been telling colleagues that she would be retiring soon. She's been the ambassador and ambassador three times appointed by both democratic and Republican presidents residents. She was a very powerful voice in that impeachment hearing describing how her last post in Ukraine ended. When I returned to the United State's deputy secretary of State Sullivan told me? There had been a concerted campaign against me that the president no longer wished me to serve as ambassador to Ukraine and that in fact the president had been pushing for my removal since the prior summer and she felt that she was pushed out because of business interests of private individuals does it was a very powerful appearance. But perhaps not the way someone like that a non-partisan career Diplomat would've wanted to go out to exit. Yeah let me let me show up on that timeline. You've said she felt she had been under pressure since twenty eighteen and we have been learning earning more lately about that pressure campaign. Yeah right left Parnasse. He's the indicted associated trump's private lawyer has audio from dinner or in two thousand eighteen. You can hear him telling president trump that you ve Arnovitz was bad mouthing him saying he was going to be impeached and trump said he wanted her route. Pick her up. Take her out he said Parnasse has apologized. This is for spreading rumors about Ivanovich. He also said that trump tried to fire him tried to fire her four or five times which suggests that Secretary of state. Mike Pompeo you may have a quietly been fending off this campaign against her Her name is still very much in the news. Though it just on Wednesday of this week a a group of senators twenty two senators wrote a letter to Secretary Pompeo about her. What is it that they want secretary Pompeo to do well? I mean they're furious that pump. Ao has not publicly weakly supported. Her as as you know you spoke to him recently and you know there are texts also from a US citizen also given by earnest and this man was suggesting that he had Yuval Novic under surveillance and Kia of now that man said he was drunk and joking but the F. B. I. has raided his house and and diplomatic security agents did go to the. US Embassy in Kiev. To look into it. And I should note Mary. Louise as we're talking about. All of this secretary. pompeo was actually in in Kiev today. and he went to the. US Embassy there Reporters on the trip actually sent a picture that they saw hanging. On the wall of Yovetich Ivanovic there with a group of senators including the late John McCain. They had gone to visit the front lines between Ukrainian forces and russian-led troops awesome. Thank you Michelle. Thank you that is N._p._R.. Diplomatic correspondent Michelle Kellerman and the headline there again. N._p._R. has learned that ambassador. Marie Ivanovich one of the key. Figures in the impeachment of President Trump has retired from the foreign service..

trump Marie Ivanovich Michelle Kellerman Secretary Pompeo president State Sullivan NPR Ukraine Ivanovich Kiev Foreign Service deputy secretary secretary Parnasse US Congress United State Washington State Department
"foreign service" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Levin e Gore were near constant companions to president. Trump's personal lawyer Rudy. Giuliani who is now reportedly under federal investigation himself for a wide range of political crimes. Giuliani is of course. Trump's current personal lawyer the last guy to hold that title is serving time in prison in part for a raging hush cash money payments to two women right before the presidential election also behind bars. President the President's campaign manager Paul Manafort. He's currently serving seven and a a half years for charges stemming from the investigation that investigation also real in the president's deputy campaign manager Rick Gates as well was trump ally roger stone and the president's former national security advisor. Mike Flynn the last two men Roger Stone and Mike. Flynn are awaiting sentencing early next ear. And if the president's recent comments or any indication they may be in for some good news. Are you going to pardon him Sir. He's been convicted felonies. Well I hadn't thought I think it's very tough for yourself. Compared to what they do to other people on their airside. I've known Roger over the years. He's a nice guy a lot of people like and he got very got hit very hard as did. General Flynn has did did A lot of other people that got hit very very hard and now they're finding out it was all a big hoax was a big hoax. We already know. The president trump has demonstrated willingness to a uses. Pardon power on Unorthodox recipients. Joe Are Pyo anyone. Is this a sign that he's willing to do it again joining us now Joyce vans former. US Attorney Joyce what a pleasure to see you again. Thank you for joining us get to be with you. Joyce is there anything that you're looking for in the coming weeks. As a sign signed the president may be getting ready to pardon either Roger Stone or Mike Flynn both of whom are awaiting sentencing. You know he has the legal ability to pardon them. But I think what we're looking at here is more of a political question. Typically Presidents Issue Pardons late in their term off and on the last day to avoid any political fallout and these pardons would potentially be so explosive that I think that will see them in the last week or the last day of a trump term whenever that might be if he does go ahead with the pardons tub trump's deputy campaign chair whose whose evidence was used against Paul Manafort Rick Gates got sentenced to forty five days behind bars. Not much of a sentence but the prosecutors had said that he should face no jail time given his cooperation with the government. What do you read into that into the harsh ruling than prosecutors were even looking for as it relates to Roger Stone and Mike Flynn? Will you know one of the problems that judges have in. These cases is their sentencing guidelines. That set an advisory arrange that judges us when they calculate a sentence. There advisory binding and for white collar crimes particularly with first time offenders is not violent those guidelines can be very low but what judges will often try to do is to make sure that defendants who have committed similar crimes are sentenced uniformly. Maybe not exactly. But at least something that comports with their sense of justice so when you have people who've cooperated you you really do give them a lower sentence to signify the assistance that they've given the government but here the judge also wanted to make the point that gates deserve to spend at at least some time in prison because of his complicity As we mentioned at the beginning of this segment one of the lawyers for Parnes has asked to be withdrawn from the case. Talk to me about whether that. That hurts partners as he gets ready for his trial. I don't think that that really does. It's not unusual to see a lawyer. Withdraw Th- draw particularly the further. A defendant gets away from criminal behavior and maybe the gravy train dries up a little bit. He can't afford as much in the way of high priced. Legal Counsel here. Parnes has just gone through this effort to modify the terms of his bond and one of the things that the prosecution came in and said was that he had access to a lot of cash citing this million dollar loan that he had received from friends of one of the Russian oligarchs so I think maybe maybe this is an effort by partners to punch back a little bit thing. No I don't really have as much access to ready cashless. The government seems to think I do always great to see you. Thank thank you for joining us again this evening former. US Attorney Joyce fans up next tonight. The strange tale of Mr Banana gets a new twist. Stay with us. It's.

General Flynn roger stone President Paul Manafort Rick Gates Trump Joyce Giuliani Parnes US Attorney Paul Manafort Levin e Gore Joe Mr Banana Rudy Roger Mike Legal Counsel advisor
"foreign service" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Isn't it having a big holiday right smack in the middle of the week. It messes up your whole sense of time and if you are someone who has to work through the holidays were maybe a work today or two and then on a day off and then your back and your office weirdly really empty. It's odd I mean. Take a look at this. This was the United States Senate today. A handful of staffers and one single solitary senator right there right in the middle there to do the business of the day. A whole whopping thirty eight seconds of Senate business the Senate will come to order. The Clark. the communication to the Senate Washington. DC December twenty six two thousand nineteen to the Senate under the provisions of rule one paragraph three of the standing rules of the Senate. I hereby appoint the honorable John Kennedy a senator from the State of Louisiana to perform the duties of the chair. Sign Chuck Grassley president pro temporary under the previous sort of the Senate stands adjourned until two o'clock. PM on Monday December thirtieth two thousand and nineteen. Aw Boom and that was it. That was the entire Senate workday. Senator Kennedy gavels in orders. The reading of a letter that puts him in charge of the Senate for today and then use that power to immediately adjourn until next week bad for a day's work. I think my favorite part here. We're looking at this right at the beginning. The woman right in front of Senator Kennedy She's a staffer. She motions to Senator Kennedy exactly when he is supposed to bang the gavel gavel presumably so that the Senate is gaveled in at the correct appointed time watch closely she holds her hand up under the provisions of rule one paragraph breath. Lots of their go ends up. Wait for it wait for it okay. Banged the gavel. Senate will come to order the car. CORREAL Areso communication all right every workplace has its holiday traditions. Maybe you and your colleagues do a secret Santa in the Senate they make one member hoof it back to Washington occasionally only to bang a gavel so that presidents cannot sneak in any appointees while the Senate is out of town but one thing was slightly unusual today on Capitol Hill. Bill was that when Kennedy Senator Kennedy finished his duties and emerged from the Capitol building in his holiday Senate casual wear. Reporters are waiting to pepper brim with questions. Because even though the capital sleepy right now there is no pressing Senate business about to happen today or tomorrow or even next week all eyes are nevertheless on the Senate because as soon as it does reconvene. We're expecting to start learning the contours of the impeachment. Trial for the president of the United States. The biggest biggest unanswered question. The main point of contention between Senate Republican Majority Leader Mitch. McConnell and the Democratic Minority leader is whether there will be any witnesses called Democratic leader Chuck Schumer has named four top administration officials that he would like to call as witnesses in the Senate trial and the Democrats only you need four Republicans to join them to get what they want. We'll have more committed on the one. Republican senator who is signaling that she may not be in lockstep with Mitch McConnell on this but it's worth putting a spotlight for a second on one Republican. One reason that Republican senators may be so resistant to calling witnesses basis. The House took testimony from several witnesses. You'll recall in its impeachment hearings and that testimony even from senior trump appointed officials. Really really really did not go well for the White House even if you did not personally find the testimony from those witnesses compelling even if you didn't and watch much of the testimony at all just the fact of all these incredibly impressive impeccably credential public servants coming forward to tell the truth about what they witnessed was a powerful rebuke to a White House. That is often seemed allergic to truthfulness. Take Bill Taylor. He was tapped by The administration the trump administration to be the acting ambassador to Ukraine after the president fired the previous ambassador for extensively standing in the way of trump's scheme to pressure the Ukrainian government for political dirt. Once Bill Taylor took up his post in Ukraine and came to learn about the president scheme. He he famously. Texas diplomat his diplomatic colleagues quote. I think it's crazy to withhold security assistance for help with a political campaign now. Bill Taylor joined the Foreign Service under President Reagan. He has served every president since Republican and Democrat Democrat. He came out of retirement to take this post in Ukraine. Only only after the Secretary of State Mike Pompeo assured him that America GEICO would not falter in its strong support for Ukraine against Russia and again regardless of the details. Bill Taylor's testimony which was damning for the President Donald Trump. But you're trying not to get impeached. Bill Taylor is not the guy you want testifying against you..

United States Senate Senator Kennedy Bill Taylor president senator Ukraine President Reagan Mitch McConnell trump Donald Trump Chuck Grassley Chuck Schumer White House Louisiana Washington Mike Pompeo GEICO United States
"foreign service" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Foreign service officers to corroborate what we now know that the president used his power to curse a foreign power into helping him for political gain a vote in the house on impeachment could happen before Christmas and you might remember the popular burger chain white castle if you're from up north or if you saw the Harold and Kumar movie where they make a journey to get there no matter what we are not ending this night without white castle my stomach so great we've learned of the first one in fifty years is coming to Florida you can find out more in the news ninety six point five W. D. B. O. act Daniel Vargas is ninety six point five W. D. B. L. Dr Saint Germain D. save with burn fat Orlando for our patients say it best for the last couple of years I tried to mother but nothing really work I decided to drive Landau and it really worked for in the thing that I liked about it was I haven't really been hungry on this program yeah you that be something weird or crazy or drink Hey Gayle and whatever you're you're gonna lose weight and they didn't take and they could see the scale change I feel great I am seeing and feeling myself coming back to life my energy level is just beautiful I can now go for a beautiful thirty minute walk I'm so happy to be on the program because I know what it does and I believe in it with all of my heart it's a new patients can get up to thirty five percent off our guarantee program call eight five five eight eight nine eight four four six.

president Florida Daniel Vargas Orlando Landau Harold Kumar W. D. B. O. Dr Saint Germain D. five W thirty five percent thirty minute fifty years
"foreign service" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Foreign service officer stationed at the embassy in Ukraine and Fiona hill a former senior adviser for the trump administration on Russian foreign policy who made clear any suggestions that Ukraine was somehow involved in election interference in two thousand sixteen are not true the owner hill took aim at Republicans who have argued president trump had legitimate concerns about Ukraine interference in the twenty sixteen election this is a fictional narrative that is being perpetrated in propagated by the Russian security services themselves hill president trump's former top adviser on Russia testified on the final day of impeachment hearings before the house intelligence committee and she employed members not to let the mystic politics get in the way of defending the United States from foreign adversaries Erin could Turkey ABC news those hearings are expected to wrap up shortly and is expected to be the final day of public testimony in the hearings today house speaker Nancy Pelosi says it's too soon to say if they will draft up articles of impeachment the Senate passed a short term funding bill today which will avert a government shutdown just ahead of a midnight deadline the house passing it earlier today bill now heading to the president he's expected to sign and will extend funding through December twentieth Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu indicted on fraud breach of trust and bribery charges more from A. B. C.'s Tom rivers of the foreign debt allegations against Netanyahu implode suspicion that exempted hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of champagne and cigars from billionaire friends that he was offered to trade favors with a newspaper publisher that he used his influence to help a wealthy telecom magnet in exchange for favorable coverage on a popular news site Netanyahu called the charges part of a quote on Wall Street the markets ending in negative territory due to concerns over whether the US and China can come up with a trade deal by the end of the year you're listening to ABC news Arizona's station Katie a our on air ninety two three FM online KTAR dot com and streaming live on the key T. A. R. news app your breaking news and traffic it's two oh two and Jackie Lynn and here's our top story it has been a soggy couple of days across the valley after.

prime minister Jackie Lynn T. A. R. Katie ABC bribery fraud Turkey ABC Fiona hill Arizona China publisher Tom rivers A. B. C. Benjamin Netanyahu officer president Senate
"foreign service" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Of change they want which is a five percent discount rate call for conservation commission's equal housing lender lessons other states analysts over thirty thirty nine forty three key CBS it's been back and forth now as members of the house intelligence committee have their crack at the witnesses appearing during the term impeachment inquiry hearing this morning those are career foreign service officer Jennifer Williams and career army lieutenant colonel Alexander then a cop and now he is being questioned it mostly right now by bay area congressman Eric Swalwell let's listen in less than a deposition that he stuck pretty faithfully to what president trump had said April twenty one call is that right I believe his remarks were consistent but he also spoke on other issues as well including anti corruption can you describe the prep the vice president is somebody who would make follow up calls to world leaders after the president had done so is that right he has on occasion it's not a normal practice it depends on the situation and in that case he stuck to president trump's talking points I would say that I provided talking points for the April twenty third call for the vice president which included a discussion of the president wants his inauguration which president trump had also discussed with presents lengthy but I would say the vice president discussed other issues with present funky as well and as as was stated earlier the president sets the foreign policy for United States is that right absolutely and you told us that after the July twenty five call between president trump and presidents Lynskey that you put the call transcript in vice president pence is intelligence briefing book is that right I am sure it was there my colleagues prepare the book but yes so let's flash forward to September one vice president pence meets with president once he is that right that's correct you're there yes and president so let's see what vice president pants they talk about a lot of things but you will agree that vice president pence did not bring up the bite and so is that correct that's correct he did not he did not bring up investigations no is one reasonable explanation that although vice president pence will do a lot of things for president trump that he was not willing to bring up investigations in Biden's because he thought it was wrong I'm not in a position to speculate we had not discussed those particular investigations in any of the preparatory sessions with the vice president but you didn't write it up with the Ukrainians after the July twenty five all right he did not and that meeting now and you did not either and with that kind of invented you ever ask the Ukrainian city what president trump was asking them to do after the July twenty five phone call I did not I didn't render any opinion on now what was asked I am a twenty five thank you for your time the start that was very Swalwell East Bay congressman a questioning for lieutenant colonel Alexander vin men who is career army officer attached to the National Security Council and of course of the female voice that you heard there was a was that of Jennifer Williams she's of career foreign service officer who has been there since this past spring the side of the staff of vice president Mike pence the hearing continues now each member getting five minutes to to question about halfway through that questioning I would think writer at this point so this is likely to wrap up sometime before noon bay area time there's an afternoon session as well today KCBS reporter Doug sovereign continuing to monitor this hearing and we have the the live.

conservation commission five minutes five percent
"foreign service" Discussed on Lives of the Mind

Lives of the Mind

15:49 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on Lives of the Mind

"Me a chance to work in logistics company. I enjoyed that a great company. Really we do have a lot of core values that are important and impressive. But I was living in New Jersey which I didn't love and my opportunities during the State Department was is time limited so I had the chance to work for Johnson Johnson. Try it out for a year and then I decided you know if I don't try the State Department always wonder and and I actually went to my boss my director at the time and said I'm I think I'm going to submit my resignation so I can take this opportunity to join the State Department and and she said if you don't resign and take that opportunity. I'm going to fire you and I was like. Oh she's like because you'll always wonder what would happen. What if if you don't don't do it? She's like and we'll always be here. You can always come back. We'd be happy to have you but you need to follow your dreams that you've had and see what happens and so yeah. It was a good a good lesson ascend from her to know number one that there are opportunities that you can go back to especially if you've left on the right path or with the right reason but yeah that was fifteen years ago and I have enjoyed most of my time since then no job is perfect. Of course. So where was your job offer with the State Department. During that time you worked at Johnston Anita reapply now. So actually it takes quite a bit of time from when you get your initial offer to when you can actually start working for for some people. It can take years because you have to actually do your security clearance and your medical clearance and those things and once you've lived overseas that clearance process takes quite a bit of time so I had lived overseas in Japan had also traveled a lot in Asia while I was living in Japan and then I had also lived in Ireland with the private sector so it took a a long time for my clearance to come through and then when it did come through at the time you had eighteen months to stay on the list and essentially you were on the list in rank order based on the score that you had and so I didn't know where I was on the list necessarily but at any point in time they would be calling calling for orientation classes and they would take the people in the rank order on the list and so when I did finally decide that it was time for me to try the State Department I called and they were able to fit me me into one of the next orientation classes it was also a time when we were hiring people quickly. There were a lot of a lot of shortfalls in staff from the late nineties when they weren't doing any hiring and they weren't even filling to attrition and so they were looking to not only fill those back fills but also to ramp up staff as we were looking at needing in larger staff numbers in places like Iraq and Afghanistan and other places that were more strategic so in case listeners. Don't know what is the mission mission of the State Department with us. Embassies and what do people go to embassies. Four wide is the. US need people to work in embassies in these different countries so the mission of the State Department is to advance US interests around the world and we do that in a lot of different ways. The the ways that most people would interact with an embassy when they're overseas sees is if they lose their passport or have any issues when they're overseas so the embassy is to provide a support network for Americans who are traveling in your living overseas. So that's one of the main missions. A lot of non Americans know the embassy because it's the place they come to get visas to come to the United States for work work travel. Study business reasons and so so that's a core mission that's the consular mission on what the work that I do. Right now is in the economic mission so the economic mission and my team specifically is to look at what are the industries of the future and how does the US collaborate with Japan on those was industries of the future in order to ensure that our shared values and are like minded interests are advanced around the world so for example. My team works on things like I five G. and cybersecurity space exploration Indo Pacific development. So how do the. US Japan collaborate in third countries in the Indo Pacific Nick to help develop infrastructure that will help countries develop their economies so that the world is more peaceful as economies develop the world becomes more peaceful at becomes uh-huh more effective global economy and that helps everybody around the world. So that's a lot of what we do in the economic mission so we're also helping American businesses who are working in Japan and Japanese businesses who want to invest in the United States In fact just recently the governor of the State of Minnesota and the deputy governor of the State of Illinois where both in Tokyo doing what's called the Midwest Governors Association tour. So it's a good opportunity. Unity for a Japanese businesses that invest in Illinois Minnesota and other parts of the US to meet with the heads of those organizations and meet with other companies companies that are interested in investing. I think something like eight hundred thousand. US jobs are basically sponsored by Japanese industry in the United States because because of the the investment that they have in the US so it's pretty significant investment. Do they do so actually if you look at much of the automotive industry in the US and not just the main companies but the Second and third tier suppliers. Many of them are Japanese origin in net Minnesota Specifically because I attended that reception just recently a lot of investment in medical devices in research and development Actually just as I was driving here today from Chicago. There's a building on the side of the road that's called Nippoin Shadow. which basically is is Japan train cars so I'm not sure if they are making train cars there? If it's a development line was just like I wonder what they're doing there But Yeah I think a lot of it is there. You just don't know it unless you know it. I'll actually a funny coincidence. I was talking to somebody at the Minnesota reception in and realize that the company that I worked for when I was in Minnesota was bought out a couple of years ago by a different company and that company was just recently bought by Japanese company. Me So It's sort of a weird coincidence of chain And so I think when I was a college kid you know in the late eighties early nineties. There was a lot of discussion about sort of Japan taking over. US Industry and interesting how that dynamic and that language has changed over time and and the partnership between the US. Japan has become really a partnership then so the investment from Japanese companies in the US viewed as a very positive opportunity and vice vice versa. US companies are doing a lot of investment in Japan as well so when you think about. US Japan think high-tech think anything that requires a lot of rnd because both the US and Japan. Japan do a lot of investment in our Indian intellectual property rights and we're both strong advocates for positive support for intellectual property rights. We're also curious. It's about what your day to day. Life looks like in your current position with the State Department semi day-today life as a supervisor. I spend a Lotta time. Actually just is making sure that my team has the tools and the information to do the job that they need to be doing so I have a team of fourteen people and we work like I said on a lot a very high tech topic. So there's a lot of new information. There's a lot of new. There's a lot of relationship building. There's a lot of understanding who's doing what and where her and how does that connect to US policy and US interests so a lot of my time is spent gathering information spent talking to people it spent helping to manage people and Resources on a day to day basis. I read a lot. I wish I got paid based on. How many emails I sent and received because that would really we be fascinating but but that's not how it works so yeah I actually going to be out of the Office for about three weeks time and the last time I was out of the Office for two weeks I came back to more than more than a thousand emails in the INBOX waiting for action? So I've been trying to keep up a little bit more this time but sometimes you just need to unplug. That's true now you've been to a lot of different places. Like Pakistan Nepal Jamaica has that day to day routine changed at all all over the course of your career if the State Department every country has different cultural norms and therefore those cultural norms become a part of the way the embassy operates when I was in Nepal which is my first first assignment. I was still figuring out what it meant to work for. The State Department and Nepal is a developing country had a lot of opportunities to figure out how to provide a professional national work environment in a country that was lacking infrastructure and my job in Nepal was actually to provide for the infrastructure that supported other diplomats homeadvisor doing their job so that was a definite interesting challenge and so I was responsible for providing all of the transportation that people needed and water to their homes. Because there there wasn't a functioning water supply making sure that they had safe housing. That was especially seismically safe because as you know a couple of years later there was a massive birth quake in Nepal and and we were grateful for the work that we did to ensure that our our diplomats said seismically safe housing. At the time I was also at the time helping coming to build a new embassy building because the old building had been there a long time with was no longer functional and the fact that that building was completed by the time there was a massive earthquake. Meant meant that we actually saved lives. We're able to have continue to have a functioning embassy despite the fact that there was a massive earthquake but it did have the right internal infrastructure. Her that allowed it to continue to operate effectively. So Nepal is developing country was a different experience than say Jamaica as a developed country but but also an island nation so a lot of really interesting history Kingston has a city which is where the embassy is located has some security challenges and so oh but different kinds of security challenges definitely different than Katmandu but definitely different than Pakistan which eventually went to serve it and actually served in Pakistan for four years. I who is two years in Lahore and two years in Islamabad and so different types of cities Lahore being the Cultural Capital of Pakistan and Islamabad Islamabad. Being a planned city you know plant as a capital still trying to kind of figure out its own culture and and have the culture of a nation. That's a combination combination of a lot of different cultures. That are Pakistanis. And so our Pakistani Punjabi like most Pakistanis are in the Lahore area. Or are they ashton or are they other parts of the culture and so it's a very interesting country and then there's Iraq in Iraq. I was in Iraq from two thousand eight to two thousand nine and the security situation Shen shifted while I was there in that we moved from working in a palace to working in the new embassy compound. So we'll probably never again have the opportunity ready to have an office. That is actually a bedroom in a palace And so that was fascinating but we also had to change from sort of the ad hoc way things were done in a palace to the more normalized way that things were done in a traditional embassy compound and on the other hand was also I. I did a lot of infrastructure there as well. It was making sure everybody has got fed that they got the transportation that they needed to do their jobs that the construction was completed that we had the right support. Networks in place for for supporting our diplomatic mission which in Iraq was not just economic not just consular but also primarily political helping helping the Iraqis form of government that was functional and continued to be functional across the different aspects of their society and then also developmental and how the different parts of the US government USA ID Department of Defense State Department programs that do development how they we're helping to redevelop the economy. The Education Hospital system anything that was needed in the country that really was destroyed in the war and so the infrastructure structure needing to be rebuilt and and reflect the history that change in history that needed to happen so that everybody who was an Iraqi was focused on rebuilding the country and supporting the nation in a way that they hadn't done in generations because of having having Saddam Hussein at the head of the government so it was it was a time of transition. And it'll be interesting to see over the course of time how that continues to progress today. Liberal Arts College prepare you for those different challenges and different cultures Liberal Arts College definitely prepared me for for all of those challenges and Cultures Alters You know I think one of the keys of course is lifelong learning. And you don't get everything that you need to know in four years of college or for or years of of high school and the way the.

US State Department Japan Minnesota Nepal Iraq Illinois New Jersey Department of Defense State De Johnston Anita Johnson Johnson Jamaica Lahore Asia Saddam Hussein Liberal Arts College Chicago Indo Pacific Nick Indo Pacific
"foreign service" Discussed on Lives of the Mind

Lives of the Mind

12:24 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on Lives of the Mind

"The lives of the mind explores the passions and pursuits of quad citizens. Who live their lives by their interests through meaningful conversations that cultivate curiosity and encourage ridged lifelong learning? Hello I'm Christine Elliott and I'm Charlie Navarra and joining us in the W K studio today. Is Melinda Pavic and August College Alumna. WHO's worked in the US embassies across the world for the United States Department of State currently? She's the director of Science Innovation and Development at the US embassy in in Tokyo. Japan Melinda. Thank you for joining us today. Thank you for having me. I appreciated the invitation being August College graduate. How do you feel that? Liberal Arts Education prepared you for the career year in. That's a really great question Being a liberal arts graduate has made a huge difference in my life I think doc not just at the State Department but no matter what you do in the world these days everything is cross disciplinary and multidisciplinary and so the ability to look at problems comes in the way the world works and think about not only the technology but also the people and the economics and the politics that go into everything Really does has shape a perspective that makes people very successful so I I think that's an important part of my career. I joined the State Department fifteen years ago but before that I worked in the corporate world I also worked as an English teacher in Japan and and so it gave me an opportunity to build the in my career on every one of the lessons. I've learned in August and gave me the foundation to do that. But I would say one of the key things that Augustina taught me how to do was That taught me how to travel one of my Foundational experiences at Augustino was the Asian Studies Program so I participated in the Asian program in nineteen eighty nine and going to Asia for the first time having my first passport learning how to travel as not just a tourist but but also an explorer of the world made a huge difference in opened my eyes to the opportunities both for my career and also For my personal interest. Where were you able all to travel to? In Asia as a student at Stanford so Asian term at that point You spent a month in Japan so that was two weeks in Tokyo in two weeks in Kyoto Koto with a little bit of time in Hiroshima Nara. And then you also went to Two weeks in Taiwan two weeks in Hong Kong and one month traveling around China and then we ended in Hawaii where we did our final exams so it was wonderful to be in Hawaii but it was also final exams. It sounds like an amazing trip. So Oh you graduated from Augustina in ninety two with degrees in political science economics and Asian Studies. What kinds of organizations and and things were involved with while you're on campus so I did a lot of different things? All I was on campus I was not a sportsperson. I wasn't a music person so I really kind of it just explored other interests and that included things like volunteering We had an original habitat for humanity type organization position where he did some volunteer work I also was paying my way through college On my own and so that was a big component of what I did I worked in the alumni office doing Telephone calling and that was a really interesting way to learn sort of the realities of Of Life and having to To Pay Your way through through school I also besides Asian term. I did a lot of things that were related to Asian term. Once I got back as well so I studied Mandarin for for three years while I was here and including my final year of Mandarin was one on one with a teacher who came from China and so that was an opportunity for me to help him acclimate eight And learn how to live in the quad cities and and that was interesting. I also did a lot of things to be involved in the community. I was an intern. Turn at Scott County Iowa. I was the assistant to the assistant to the county administrator For a year and that gave me a great chance to understand how local government worked. I also had the opportunity to work in the local newspapers and At the Blackhawk hotel before it was richie places Sir and so again a lot of opportunities to get to know the community in addition to actually just really enjoying the Augustina community I was very involved. Loved sort of the back office things of The fine arts so I did a lot of work as a house manager. An usher at Centennial Hall. which was fascinating fascinating way to understand? How fine arts fit together and at one point my freshman roommate and I had a short lived radio program? Oh cool so it was. It was fun. We tried to teach people to Juggle one time using the radio. What kind of stuff would you talk about on the program? She was a big music person and I was more into trying to think about how the music made us feel. So so. That's kind of what we did as she would play her favorite music ISIC. Then we would talk about how that fit into what we're what we're going through as a freshman students and then we would find you know things like the juggling and there's a long time ago great question though. Are there any other anecdotes or memories that you think back on when you're currently working in the State Department or when you're away deployed Poitou another embassy. Yeah actually I I really appreciate the The memories of sitting with friends and just talking talking about how the world works or how we thought the world worked One of my favorite memories was so we had to policy professors. Dr Jim Wind ship Doctor. Joan wind chip who were a married couple who were wonderful and during my senior year we went to war with Iraq and Came to class one day to a class. That should have been Dr Jim Wind chip and there was note on the board. That said Dr Wind ship is going going to be on the news today so He'll have to cancel class. And so we had the opportunity to turn on the news. Watch our policy. Professor giving political commentary commentary on what was going on and why we were at war which was a fascinating Memory and still today when My team or I are called on to prep the ambassador or are deputy chief of mission or for one of us to give a presentation. It's always useful to kind of remember Burger that being in awe of that professor who was considered an expert and think back and realize that now in some ways. I'm supposed to be the expert and it makes me feel a little bit like an impostor at times but then I realized the more we talk about it the more you realize you actually do know a lot about these things. You sure. Have the credentials. The job you're doing you've actually worked in Iraq since then what you're doing now. Is that something you saw yourself doing back when you were going into college. Or what. Were your hopes in your dream. Well I actually took the foreign service exam the first time while I was a senior doggy And I really really messed it up in that I was also. I didn't prioritize preparation for the exam and ended up failing by one point which which was one of those things where I got this letter that said this is the score you got and this is what you needed to pass? When there was a one point difference I was really frustrated with myself on the other hand? I think that taught me a good lesson about how if you have a dream you have a goal you really have to apply yourself and you have to do everything that it takes every day to get that done even if it's maybe not the fun thing to do at the time but actually it was Jim and Joan wind ship. who were the ones who said you know you should really look at the foreign service? We think you'd be really good at that. And I said well what's the foreign service and had a chance to learn from them and then while we were on the Asian Studies Program we had a chance to meet with some of the staff members from embassy Tokyo and it gave me a sense of what could be and so then when I failed the test I applied for the jet program at the same time. Which is the Japan Exchange Teaching Program? which is a chance for? Americans are native speakers of English to teach in the Japanese school system and it was a really good opportunity community for me to expand my travel to actually living in another country and so that was a natural progression. That to be honest if I hadn't done that I I. I'm not sure I would be as effective as successful in my career as I am today. I think that actual being immersed in another country without the safety net of the State Department gave me a lot of coping and success strategies that are really effective for me now. What sort of safety net did you have with the program? mm-hmm well with the jet program. We were hired by the Japanese government but we were assigned to small towns or villages or schools. That were responsible for us. So I didn't have a specific preference for where I wanted to go. And so they sent me to a little fishing village in the northern part of Japan had about three thousand people at the time and I had no Japanese and so I was really grateful for my supervisor. Who is a wonderful man named Mr Sato who I'm still in contact with today? And he really helped me because I didn't speak any Japanese and I needed him to give me sort of the path half in the right direction and encouraged me to make sure that I my Japanese progressed. So that I could help myself and that was great but again the support system was they gave gave you a visa. They gave you a home. They gave you a salary. They arranged for your work schedule. And then how you survived and thrived in. That was up to you and so I would say that that was still a very good support network but it's not quite as comprehensive a support network as I have with State Department so then after that you went back to take at the Foreign Service exam yes so Ali was in Japan teaching. I actually took the foreign service exam again at the embassy and I passed that time. But that's only the first stage of the process. The second stage is actually doing an interview and I didn't pass the interview and the feedback I got on the interview. That time was that I needed to have more of of a professional experience. I needed more More mid career level experienced and so that was really great feedback then went back and took the exam again and then it was about ninety six ninety seven. The State Department went through massive budget cuts and they didn't interview anybody that ear so even though I passed the exam I didn't get interviewed so that has like all right. The state government doesn't want me and I need to look at some other opportunity. I was back in Minnesota at the time. I'm where I grew up and I started working for a company and had a really good opportunity with them and did some traveling and lived in Ireland for Awhile with that company and it was good good and then I decided to get an MBA. And while I was in business school on my opened a magazine one day and Colin Powell's face was there he was the secretary of state at the time and he said we want you. NBA People. And I looked at that. And I know you haven't wanted me so far. Why do you want me now? But I decided take a chance and I took the exam again a past and then I found somebody else who was in my MBA program who also had taken the exam had passed and so we prep together in and worked on it and we both got accepted through the interview process so that was a great opportunity To recognize that this dream could be a possibility. I also however at the same time got a really great job offer with Johnson and Johnson so I accepted both and Actually ended up doing both which was a good story to where did career go from there with Johnson and Johnson so Johnson and Johnson moved me to New Jersey. I worked in one of their shared services. Companies so You know many people know Johnson Johnson and Johnson as the baby shampoo and sort of the personal care products but I actually worked in medical devices and Diagnostics and so we had a shared services company. I did my NBA and operation supply chain logistics and gives.

State Department Japan Johnson Johnson Tokyo Dr Jim Wind Asian Studies Program US Iraq China August College Melinda Pavic Christine Elliott Asia NBA Joan Asian Studies Blackhawk hotel Liberal Arts Education
"foreign service" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"foreign service" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Officer she would kind of rose to the ambassador level ranks under George W. bush years ago this is really kind of portrayed her as a an Obama lackey and he did that in the call he basically threatened he was on the verge saying she's going to go through some things okay ones on this call and went along with this kind of political smearing of a career diplomat and critics in that traditionally nonpartisan career diplomat the career foreign service these people that will go along with that and she quickly states in kind of a quarter where he does stand up he actually stood up Democrats this week and said don't believe my people with subpoenas but he stayed quiet on the bottom which issue and that's the rub some people the wrong way there were fifty former female U. S. ambassadors who wrote a letter to pretty much whipped pond pale and drawn up and and and a lot of of obamacare diplomatic career foreign service people who called him out and said Hey you know we have our back and not and and I think that that's the heart of it right now he's going to be returning from Italy to a kind of a political storm here in Washington right now all right so where does this leave Mr palm pale and say the broader state department because he came in as you mention sort of promising to restore the swagger of the state department after rex tellers was let go yeah I think a pretty big question in the back hallways of the state department headquarters who is going to get dragged through the mud by by the impeachment Polish how much damage to him politically in the long run remember he probably has presidential aspirations himself for twenty twenty four really also right now in the short run take the wind out of a you know I'm gonna get the department swagger back remember okay minutes secretary state after a year of really low morale at the state department a lot of resignations send me a publicly calling in and not and not a very watched way for major budget cuts and there are a lot of people really like Pompeii at the state department they feel like is is kind of internal propaganda push for morale was really much needed may feel that he was close he's very close to president trump it kind of reassert the state department into a more active role in the trump administration's foreign policy other people the rank and file level a good read personally rule all aspects of trump's foreign policy or his style they have really lined up behind Pompeii and the question is whether or not this is kind of political hysteria right now and those role in it could could kind of damage all of that and that that's that's really what we're looking at we're seeing with guy Taylor national security editor at The Washington Times has written a piece entitled swagger or stumble Mike Pompeii and state department under scrutiny in Ukraine fewer any suggestion here that there is legal hot water for Mister Pompey was not that's not what I'm reading yeah I know I mean I he is what I do in my story outline the few people who who raise issue mostly on the right argue that there is no legal basis there's no laws have been broken up close on the left people are saying there are huge constitutional questions about the extent to which president trump and legally ask foreign governments to spy on Americans that aside I think what we're looking at with with Pantera it's more of a political situation right now I continue to back president trump all indications are absolutely yes that's what he's going to do look at this and say look I I've I've given president trump two years I would see a director and then he was tapped one heavy weight in the administration has been there the whole time other than Mike pence at the cabinet level top cabinet level on the inauguration if you look at this and possibly back away thanks guy guy Taylor national security editor at The Washington Times fourteen minutes now after the hour.

Officer George W. bush fourteen minutes two years
"foreign service" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"foreign service" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"And the media people are on my team in your we both do that but the chin stroker's really hate being out argued and nobody out argues john bolton i think that's right and if you go back to some of the fights in the bush administration john did his homework gone was prepared and blazey opponents that he faced didn't like that at all you have a lot of poobah is coming over from the cia and the state department of foreign service interagency meeting or john was at state for that matter you know you just ask them simple questions you ask them why they're arguing something you provide a counterpoint and they really don't like that a lot of times that leads to a lot of leaking lot of phony accusations that john is professional which there's never really been any solid evidence doesn't all staff ones who were very committed say quite the opposite but you know it's it's just someone when they're outside the establishment doesn't get a lot of fans and you know you point out john reagan that that's what we rioted even though using favor of getting rid of saddam hussein nothing incidentally that even barack obama would later say was a good thing he didn't favor putting a foreign service officer paul bremmer in charge of the country are attempting to democracy project there he just thought we should get rid of the bad guy and go and go back necessary but you know that's i think the kind of foreign policy the american people can get behind christian went nuts weinberger doctrine classically stated and i believe i read memoirs if i believe they have been written by the principal and i don't if i don't believe it and the four best memoirs by longserving public servants our dick cheney's donald rumsfeld bob gates and john bolton's and john bolton surrender is not an option is a detailed exploration sometime numbing lee so of what it takes to stone but it through these.

cia john barack obama paul bremmer principal dick cheney bob gates john bolton department of foreign service john reagan saddam hussein officer donald rumsfeld lee
"foreign service" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"foreign service" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Department well i think first of all a defending his own department's budget he seemed to go along with these rather large cuts that were proposed in our budget he didn't defend the united states foreign service and really didn't make them feel like participants in the processes and the activities of the department of state oh i'm sure he did with with his extensive travels and the fact that he didn't known a lot of the leaders around the world from his prior experience so i don't doubt that he had a a world view i think his difficulty was more than one of meshing his own life experience with the challenge of directing an important government department and then relating all of that to his relationship with the white house the national security council staff and so forth and i think it's on the ladder in the latter area where he had particular difficulty ended just apparently never seemed to quite click with the president of the united states particular difficulty mean because he disagreed with president trump on matters ranging from the paris climate accord to the iran nuclear deal well there must have also been some kind of issue about how it was presented or how it was argued maybe it's extremely difficult in the current white house but somehow just didn't work out i've heard mr pompeo expresses views on some of these subjects for example whether or not the russians intervened in in our elections and he seems to believe that's the case and he seems to have had no difficulty or have not been frightened to say that publicly.

united states white house president mr pompeo paris iran
"foreign service" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"foreign service" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Department well i think first of all a defending his own department's budget he seemed to go along with these rather large cuts that were proposed in our budget he didn't defend the united states foreign service and really didn't make them feel like participants in the processes and the activities of the department of state those fifteen months he established any kind of a global outlook philosophy approach to diplomatic affairs oh i'm sure he did with with his extensive travels and the fact that he didn't known a lot of the leaders around the world from his prior experience so i don't doubt that he had a world view i think his difficulty was more than one of meshing his own life experience with the challenge of directing an important government department and then relating all of that to his relationship with the white house the national security council staff and so forth and i think it's on the ladder in the latter area where he had particular difficulty ended just apparently never seemed to quite click with the president of the united states particular difficulty mean because he disagreed with president trump on matters ranging from the paris climate accord to the iran nuclear deal well there must have also been some kind of issue about how it was presented or how it was argued maybe it's extremely difficult in the current white house but somehow it just didn't work out i've heard mr pompeo expresses views on some of these subjects for example whether or not the russians intervened in in our elections and he seems to believe that's the case and he seems to have had no difficulty or have not been frightened to say that publicly.

united states white house president mr pompeo paris iran fifteen months
"foreign service" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"foreign service" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Department well i think first of all defending his own department's budget he seemed to go along with these rather large cuts that were proposed in our budget he didn't defend the united states foreign service and really didn't make them feel like participants in the processes and the activities of the department of state on those fifteen months he established any kind of a global outlook philosophy approach to diplomatic affairs oh i'm sure he did with with his extensive travels and the fact that he didn't known a lot of the leaders around the world from his prior experience so i don't doubt that he had a world view i think his difficulty was more than one of meshing his own life experience with the challenge of directing an important government department and then relating all of that to his relationship with the white house the national security council staff and so forth and i think it's on the ladder in the latter area where he had particular difficulty ended just apparently never seemed to quite click with the president of the united states particular difficulty mean because he disagreed with president trump on matters ranging from the paris climate accord to the iran nuclear deal well there must have also been some kind of issue about how it was presented or how it was argued maybe it's extremely difficult in the current white house but somehow it just didn't work out i've heard mr pompeo expresses views on some of these subjects for example whether or not the russians intervened in in our elections and he seems to believe that's the case and he seems to have had no difficulty or have not been frightened to say that publicly.

united states white house president mr pompeo paris iran fifteen months
"foreign service" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"foreign service" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Online anytime at cspan dot org prime minister benjamin netanyahu speaking to the apec meeting here in washington the israeli leader took aim at iran claiming again the islamic republic is responsible for what he calls darkness descending on the middle east by building an anti israel empire his remarks one day after meeting with the president at the white house more from today's american israel public affairs committee meeting in washington no one are drawn when i joined the foreign service 100 and five years ago as the dc on to the city washington but number two in our embassy i think we had about eighty or ninety countries with whom we are diplomatic relations now the numbers 162 and they're very few countries left by the way what are we doing with greenland got to do something with greenland was migrants through go to greenland they must have some satellite needs or something could do but we have coloring the world blue i've been to africa three times in eighteen months to south america latin america can you imagine the seventy years of history of israel apply monster visible never went south of texas i mean i love texans but what we went to argentina we went to argentina to colombia to mexico and they said come back from back we want war that is changing all these countries are coming to us india china mongolia kazakhstan although azerbaijan muslim countries for some of his little stripper tremendous far away so we're colouring the willie new and you know what the numbers you remember people talked about israel's isolation israel's isolation pretty soon the countries that don't have relations with us they're going to be isolated.

colombia azerbaijan india china mongolia kazakhsta mexico texas africa iran apec prime minister israel benjamin netanyahu argentina america greenland white house president middle east washington
"foreign service" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"foreign service" Discussed on WJR 760

"Came out of this tragic sabotage so when you're estimation do you think we know any more today than we did in 1963 oh we get we certainly do um you know we know a great deal about what oswald was doing before the assassination we know a great deal about uh who some of kennedy's friends and enemies were uh in public in foreign service and and elsewhere uh both we it's hard to have a whole the whole story because what's your lease to us our fragments and the wave put the fragments together determines how we tell the story and we don't have all the all the pieces yet do you think will have all the pieces at some point that is a very who question and you know not not up to us um further release of these documents is expected within the next year or so uh but even those may and probably will continue to have reaction yet the the last bunch had a bunch of reductions to an i wish question gather going to release them again but i just wonder if the white out his going to flow on these documents when they release them about that that's certainly what we've seen so far infinite charm and down name emptied they make the case that there are still uh sources and methods fat and important national security considerations that requires the action of these documents at the same time it's hard to imagine that something that happened fifty four years ago that uh all of this theory information related to it is it's still so sensitive it was four fifty four years ago that four days in november stunned the nation and stops pretty much almost the entire world doctor live at get low from wayne state university thank you for joining us on the frank beckmann show here on wjr happy thanksgiving happy thanksgiving a better day starts with better coffee and better coffee starts with absopure we all know absolutely synonymous with the.

oswald kennedy wayne state university frank beckmann thanksgiving four fifty four years fifty four years four days
"foreign service" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"foreign service" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"You know what i can't under an secretary code doing richard that as several people have said like mon foreign service officers i now have an agenda about how they would like to change their institution and their professional and if it if you randomly picked one at these and put it into play you could do it quickly and you could do it in a way that improves the institution quite i cannot figure out um and lead fleet to wonder what the secretary is doing is this notion as he testified during his budget testimony a few weeks ago that the review will be contacted and not concluded until january of twenty eight t that is a recipe for institutional confusion as both are saying four institutional ineffectiveness in the policy arena and for the secretary to have a week base of support as he goes about trying to do his job like it makes no sense to me that he things the entire first year of his four years as the secretary of state are to be spent on this and only then will he nominate is senior staff that's just it makes no sense to me well of course the other question these rumors that have been slowing la floating lately of a rex it that hump tillerson may not actually last in certainly it's hard to predict the future but it does feel like they're aides around the president who are leaking these very negative stories about tillerson that can't be a good position for him um i do think that uh tillerson will last the you know the next couple of years or is that too hard to predict right now.

secretary senior staff president richard secretary of state four years
"foreign service" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"foreign service" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Money was partly my childhood my father was a government employee not a foreign service officer we lived in the philippines it was sort of a postcolonial life with a swimming pool tennis court five servants so i said well how can i continue to live this life now i wasn't actually able to because that kind of existence became increasingly rare but i think it was partially that and i was moving to washington where my father was reassigned and the mother of a friend told me that there was a foreign service school at georgetown at that time i think the only undergraduate program in international affairs and so one thing lead to the other you joined after serving a sentence navy yeah i took the foreign service exam and also the exam for officer candidate school in my between night junior and senior year and past both at that point the draft was still active so i chose to go navy first and foreign service agreed to delay my appointment until i completed my military service and as as during the vietnam war and you join the born service in nineteen sixty seven time as you point out was the up of hate ashbury is heightened san francisco's the riot turmoil in the country domestically summer of love can you described the life of a foreign service officer that time when he joined to your posted the paris initially took part in vietnam peace talks to yeah i mean that was kind of unusual i came in with a class of about fifty aspirin foreign service officers we spent a couple of months in a sort of foreign service kindergarten was called the a one hundred course after the room in the old executive office building that used to be the state department where the course was originally given about a third of the class were assigned to vietnam.

officer philippines georgetown vietnam war san francisco paris washington vietnam aspirin executive