37 Burst results for "Ford"

Fresh update on "ford" discussed on Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:31 sec | 5 min ago

Fresh update on "ford" discussed on Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

"Lineup. Ford unveiled the new SUV's last night with two bass two door model to go for about $30,000 a four door big Ben diversion for just under 34,500 the revived brand positioned as a competitor to Fiat, Chrysler's Jeep Wrangler. The full size. Broncos won't be out until next spring, but a smaller $27,000 Broncos sport is expected in showrooms this fall. Four chairs rose nearly 5%. Today, stocks powered higher, with the blue chip Dow industrial soaring to 50.1% 556 points. The S and P 500 gained 42 in the NASDAQ Recouped 97. That's your money now. And coming up on CO Moh in just about seven minutes. Children and covert 19 I'm her weisbaum with what we know. And Maurren Porton tely what remains a mystery..

Broncos Co Moh Maurren Porton Wrangler Fiat Chrysler Ford BEN
The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 16 hrs ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
Fresh "Ford" from Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 8 min ago

Fresh "Ford" from Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

"Price could vary depending on your health issue in company. Another factor is not available in all states. W W J News Times 6 48 traffic and weather together on this Tuesday evening. Quite busy out there. Katie. Yeah, we're red's really heavy on the Southfield Freeway. South Bonnet Ford Road reported crash as you very heavy behind it, as far as I can see through the Triple A damn camps now tipsters are reporting. Of that it looks like the end 39 south on service drive is blocked it for road So you can't re enter there. But through the Tripoli Jam cams. I can see that you can exit it bored and then ride the service drive down to after Michigan Avenue to rejoin M 39 in Flint. All lanes are blocked with a vehicle fire with traffic sponsored by California closets. This is I 75 south on after I 4 75 Exit 1 25 which is Pearson Road, You will be forced off it Pearson Road with this fire. Otherwise you are moving with no delays in.

Southfield Freeway Tripoli Jam Katie Flint California
Ford Reveals New Bronco After 24 Years Off the Market

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 1 d ago

Ford Reveals New Bronco After 24 Years Off the Market

"Well, the competition is about to heat up in a new niche of the market, Rugged off road vehicles. Ford unveiling a new version of a Bronco tonight, now their biggest competitors Jeep, and they're not standing still either. Just hours before Ford's unveiling of the Bronco Jeep announced a concept version of a Wrangler with a V eight that it hints could go into production. Tonight, We'll see three Broncos, a two door or four door and a Broncos for these three nameplates that we don't have. Today. There'll be new customers and growth of the brand for chief operating officer Jim Farley sees demand growing for off Roaders and says the Bronco name has a lot of appeal, especially among the young, some of whom weren't even born when the previous version was around.

Broncos Ford Bronco Chief Operating Officer Jeep Jim Farley Roaders
SEC athletic directors working on plan in Birmingham for fall sports

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:12 sec | 1 d ago

SEC athletic directors working on plan in Birmingham for fall sports

"Southeastern Conference athletic director scheduled to meet in person today to discuss fall sports scheduling. Ford Illustrated reports at least one of them, saying quote spring is more viable than fall for football and he'd

Ford Illustrated Director Football
Federal Funding For Dallas, Houston COVID-19 Testing Sites Extended To End Of July

Texas Home Improvement Show

00:41 sec | 2 d ago

Federal Funding For Dallas, Houston COVID-19 Testing Sites Extended To End Of July

"Up in a few minutes Governor Greg Abbott today announcing that the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services has extended federal support. Ford Community based testing site in Dallas and Houston right on through the end of this month. Governor Rabbit Previously security and extension of these sites back in June, he said, had continued collaboration with federal partners is essential to the state's efforts. The extension of the program in Dallas and used him will help secure more testing for Texans in these communities said the governor said that they're over 900 testing sides across the state of Texas and in his statement, he's hurting Texans in need of a test of beina

Governor Rabbit Greg Abbott Dallas U. S. Department Of Health And Ford Community Houston Texas
Chicago Officials ask Gov. Pritzker to crack down on Indiana ‘gun pirates’

Dave Plier

00:33 sec | 2 d ago

Chicago Officials ask Gov. Pritzker to crack down on Indiana ‘gun pirates’

"And and west west sides sides of of the the city, city, calling calling on on Governor Governor Pritzker Pritzker to to form form a a Midwest Midwest compact compact among among other other governors governors in in order order to to share share gun gun sale sale information information with with each each other other in in order order to to track track guns guns used used in crimes, with more than 22 people wounded by gunfire this weekend, Pastor Anthony Williams says it's time to take action. Innocent Children are dying in the streets of Chicago. Babies are dying in the streets of Chicago, Williams and state represent Of LaShawn Ford say one out of every five guns used in a crime in Chicago came from Indiana Saturdays,

Governor Governor Pritzker Pri Chicago Pastor Anthony Williams Indiana Ford
NCAA: Pac-12 will play only conference football games

Glenn Beck

00:37 sec | 3 d ago

NCAA: Pac-12 will play only conference football games

"Will only play conference games this fall because the Koven 19 they have also delayed the start of the seasons because of rising cove in 19 cases in many states OS you, athletic director Scott Barnes says. It's the right thing to do. But collectively, I speak. The athletic directors were saying We like the decision of the CEOs made we endorse. It will ardently. We think it's our best path for you. Warren says discussions are still underway on a schedule for games. It'll depend on how the covert 19 virus plays out. This decision affects all Pac 12 fall sports, Barnes says. They're hoping to play nine or 10 football games whenever this season begins. I'm brand Ford News

Scott Barnes Director Ford News Warren Football
Ford employees ask the company to stop making police cars

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

05:47 min | 3 d ago

Ford employees ask the company to stop making police cars

"Motor Company is out with a Ah, process that they're going through about 100 employees have gone public with their request to the automaker to stop selling police vehicles because Police are brutal and they're racist. Ford executives are weighing the request and have not yet made an announcement. But there's a lot of pressure on social media for Ford to tell police departments they will no longer sell. The vehicles to them. So what is Toyota get vehicles them selling, you know, picking up the slack market share because right now serious, San Diego has Toyota four runners the SUVs. So I mean, thie employees air urging the cut that their boss the company do not make and sell. Ah police units. Ah, police cruisers to city so that Some other. There's still gonna be police cars. Why would you not want to get your fair share of that market place? If your employees of Ford apparently, these people don't want their jobs, I mean, I would put them on the top of the list of fire. All right, somebody safe and your name to the layoff list If we lose the contract, you know, with the Tuscaloosa, Alabama Police Department that you're the 1st 1 to relinquish your well, why don't you just quit forward then? I mean, why? Why? Why does four have to stop making the product? That's what they're in the business of doing is making automobiles. Yeah. Bia Social Justice warrior full time. You don't need to work out. Ford, you know, support is not consistent with your values. So be a social justice warrior. Put your money where your mouth is and quit your job, mate. This This is absurd. I've decided. I don't like it. Don't don't want to give Ah police Cruiser to Ah! Ah, car to the police. But does that mean that you also are going to use 901? I'd love to get the name of the 100 people and block their ability from their cell phone to dial 911 is apparently where they don't need no police and there's their community. They don't need cars. They don't need police. So no. 911 for you. I mean, this is where you start pointing out the Um, the bankruptcy of some of these folks in terms of what they're saying, their advocate and and the absolute absolute juvenile nature of these causes. I mean, this is child's play, right? I mean, this's not thoughtful. This isn't academic. This isn't deep. This isn't even You know, argumentative. I mean, this is this is just this is foolishness. This is this is child's play. The head of Ford has sent a letter to employees and it it reads in part, quote as we meet weekly in our global team huddles. Invariably there are questions that don't get answered, given the short time we have together. Or simply would be better addressed off line. On it goes on to talk about. Ah Ah, you know the fact that quote Bill Ford, and I believe deeply that there is no room for systemic repression and racism that have been exhibited by law enforcement encounters gone wrong. Um Your your product had nothing to do with it. Why are you taking ownership of part of the problem? You made the car. You didn't make the police officer or even the police officer's equipment or the rule book and I go back to having a CEO of a company. Come out with a statement like that. That that somehow they've made the judgment that racism was driving. Ah, ah, the inappropriate use of force. Again. I don't think we can say that. I think it's nice to say Well, if the cop is white, and the suspect was black, the victim was black. So therefore it must be racism. That's a pretty lousy assumption to be making. And to have a CEO of one of our largest companies come out and basically validate that and then go on in a what is a nine paragraph letter explaining how they're wrestling with this decision about literally saying we're not gonna sell cars to a pretty significant portion. You know, we had at least I think 600 800 cars. Andi. I know that these are not cheap cars. So let's say that there because they're there outfitted with a bunch of special equipment and stuff. So let's say that these cars are 50 grand each for the city of San Diego. Alone. That's a $40 million hit for Ford. For just a cycle of vehicles $40 million. That's just for San Diego Police department, then multiply that by all the police departments across the country. Your shareholder and Ford. Relatively ticked. Out on the opposite end of the spectrum. I'm not a shareholder in Ford. I'm relatively ticked. I'm just relatively tick that the company is taking this kind of stance. Whether they're toward with their emotions. It's the car. It isn't the attitude of the law enforcement official. It isn't It isn't anybody. It's it's the inanimate object, but yet they feel like that. Somehow they're contributing to systemic racism by manufacturing, a police unit. Now on the other end of the spectrum. A CEO of a food company paid a small compliment to President Trump. A Rose Garden ceremony yesterday. And now he is facing calls for resignation, and even members of Congress have urged people to boycott the food manufacturer.

Ford Bill Ford Motor Company San Diego Police Department CEO Alabama Police Department San Diego Toyota President Trump Tuscaloosa Officer Wrestling Congress Official
Electric vehicle startup Rivian gets $2.5B in added funding

WBBM Late Morning News

00:18 sec | 4 d ago

Electric vehicle startup Rivian gets $2.5B in added funding

"The electric truck startup backed by Amazon, and Ford, has lined up additional funding and a lot of it. Investors led by T. Rowe Price have put in 2.5 $1,000,000,000 in Caribbean, bringing the total raised for the battery powered truck venture to $5.3 billion.

T. Rowe Price Amazon Caribbean Ford
Ford debates whether to continue producing police vehicles

Tony and Dwight

00:17 sec | 4 d ago

Ford debates whether to continue producing police vehicles

"Hackett pushing back against the call from some employees to stop making vehicles for police departments, Hackett said. The issues plaguing police credibility have nothing to do with the vehicle there driving. Ford said recently that it accounts for nearly 2/3 of police vehicle sales. And starting in about a

Hackett Ford
Tom Hanks goes to war (again) in the World War II drama

Roe Conn

04:03 min | 4 d ago

Tom Hanks goes to war (again) in the World War II drama

"19. So many of these big blockbuster movies are now going to be available on your TV as opposed to the movie theater, and this one was for the movie. Industry for the movie studios. This one must have been right on the line. Richard Roper, the new Tom Hanks movie Greyhound Big budget, lots of special effects. It's a World War two. Venture film right and they chose. They chose to go with Apple TV plus to release it. Exactly right. In fact, you know the beginning of this year way back in the day when we were going to movies in theatres I talked about this is one of the most highly anticipated films of the year because, as you mentioned it's a Tom Hanks film. And who has Dunmore in terms of entertainment movies and miniseries for World War two that Tom Hanks of her Saving Private Ryan and then band of brothers in the Pacific and Greyhound. He wrote this and actually stars in this row. And although it's not based on a true story, it's actually based on a novel. It's inspired by the very real events of the Battle of the Battle of Atlanta. Sick, which you know was waged on the Atlantic Ocean was longest running battle in all of World War two. And it was all about convoys of allied ships trying to get supplies across the pond, while German u boats were attacking from all ends. That's what this movie is all about. Now. The invention. Tom Hanks connection to war, too. And the press junket for the release of this film, So the people obviously they go out. They publicized All They want to talk to you about its Corona virus, right? Yeah, it's just tell your side of the times. Well and, of course, because Tom Hanks and his wife, Rita Wilson, were among the very, very first public figures to test positive. I believe you could correctly. I believe they're in Australia make making a movie. So, you know, I understand that and Tom Hanks has got such a no, he has. He has earned a role as more than just an actor, writer director producer. He's someone who's been around for a long time, but involved in a lot of things very intelligent and Educated guy when it comes to current events, so people do want to hear from him Now. The unfortunate part about all of this row is that Greyhound is not a great movie. In fact, I'm giving it to and 1/2 stars for the biggest disappointment. And I'll tell you why you remember. A few months ago we talked to Harrison Ford, who had done a movie called Call of the Wild or the Procedure. I he talked about how in a lot of these battle movies, war movies. They overdo it with the CG, and he actually said member, he actually said there are too many bleeping planes in the sky in a lot of these movies, and that's exactly unfortunately, what happens here. They did film some of this aboard a ship, I believe was the Canadian ship. But mostly it's CG Iroh, and it's very obvious that it is because you know the swooping cameras. It's almost like a Michael Bay movie. And so many planes in the sky and so many ships, etc. And so great special effects and then a lot of technical jargon. The problem is, we don't get to know any of the other characters other than the Tom Hanks character, and we got Haven't we don't know what we talked about the great War movies and you and I have talked about a lot of them. We did a podcast around Memorial Day about some of the great American War films. We get to know the characters first, we're emotionally invested in them, and then if something happens to one of them, or there's heroics or tragedy, it has an impact in this movie. All the characters are so superficially drawn that at one point, but Tom Hankscharacter asked a guy on the ship. He gets his name wrong and goes. I'm sorry, I'm still learning who everybody else's. And I'm like we are, too and that's never a good thing in a movie like this. Wow. Oh, that's That is so disappointing. When does it I'm still gonna watch. When does it premiere tonight? Or tomorrow? Tomorrow? And I will say this, too. I do think it might look better on the big screen. You know, maybe those special effects on a giant screen they either could've been magnified or they would have played better. He watching it in a home viewing environment. It just took me out of the film like I'm saying, Well, they clearly did this with computer generated stuff, and I think they just fell in love with the

Tom Hanks Tom Hankscharacter Harrison Ford Richard Roper Atlantic Ocean Apple Rita Wilson Atlanta Dunmore Australia Michael Bay Writer Producer Director
Hanging death of Black man in California ruled a suicide by police after investigation

All Things Considered

00:45 sec | 4 d ago

Hanging death of Black man in California ruled a suicide by police after investigation

"Has confirmed suicide was the cause of death of a black man found hanging from a tree in Palmdale last month. The body of 24 year old Robert Ford was found early on June 10th in a park near City Hall in in the city Deputies say they found no evidence of a crime in autopsy conducted the next day produced an initial finding. They say off suicide that outrage Fuller's family who said he wouldn't have taken his own life, The department also referenced prior mental health treatment as evidence Fuller thought about taking his own life. I said Fuller bought rope a month before his death, and that that was similar to rope found at the scene. Officials said they did not pursue any investigation into well documented white supremacist activities in the Antelope Valley. Sure if Alex Beeen a waiver said those ideas were being pushed by people with an agenda. The California Department of Justice has released a

Fuller California Department Of Justi Palmdale City Hall Robert Ford Antelope Valley Alex Beeen
Infant Dies After Accidentally Being Left In Hot Car in Los Angeles, Say Fullerton Police

KNX Evening News

00:29 sec | 5 d ago

Infant Dies After Accidentally Being Left In Hot Car in Los Angeles, Say Fullerton Police

"Police are investigating a baby's death. Police Sergeant Eric Bridges tells K attacks The infant may have been left in a hot car that is part of the investigation right now. Within the initial calls that we received one of the colors did mention that the child was in the vehicle were told that one police officer has gone to the scene. The baby was out of the car but was pronounced dead. It all happened on West Bullshit Avenue by Ford Avenue. Sergeant Bridges says the infants relatives are on the scene and are cooperating with detectives.

Sergeant Bridges Officer
Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Talks Basketball, the National Anthem, BLM and more

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

07:22 min | 6 d ago

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Talks Basketball, the National Anthem, BLM and more

"Welcome to episode Ninety Four. Congruence, the American Muslim experience we are very excited to have Mahmoud Abbas the roof on the show today and when I say we it's Preveza and and Myself Omar and sorry co host of the show. But we're super excited. We've been waiting for this episode for for a while. Now as you all know. My who roof is a NBA veteran. and he's got a lot to a lot of great things to to talk to us about. His experiences in the NBA his departure from the NBA. His experience as an American Muslim. And everything all the cool things. He's doing right now on the circuit and the big three and and helping out young kids get healthy and fit, and so on, so we're going to learn all about that. We're going to hear a little about his youth. His NBA experience his life after the NBA in the US abroad all these things I want to cover, and I am excited because my mood of the roof was a childhood hero of mine. I grew up in small town. Watching Washington play? And this is really exciting for me personally so welcome to the show brother Mahmoud. We are really excited. An Omer sorta wasted no time bearing the lead as it were It's been a minute since we've actually been on this show. We had a little bit of a hiatus. as I imagine most of. Most content providers out there just trying to sort of make the most of these sort of. Challenging Times of trying to secure people in trying to find the time in the space to record, so we are really excited and and especially grateful that ma'am. Louis was able to take the time out of his demanding busy schedule to be with us on, so thank you again as an I. Echo, everything, immerse, said not growing up in a small town so much, but you were also sort of NBA hero of mine. I came of age in the nineties when I came of age I. Mean Terms of sort of my My my my obsession with the NBA was back in the nineties I lived in Houston Texas. Texas, so you can imagine memo Ta I. Was Huge Rockets Fan huge Chemo Lodge Fan and was fortunate enough to be there when they want those back to back. Championships way back in the nineties, so certainly your era of the NBA, and as closely as we looked at looked up to a Hakeem, being a local on sort of hero of you're sort of the the other Muslim in the League and so is equally exciting, so but like I said we have a lot to sort of unpack as we like to see on the show but where we like to often like to begin is kind of your origin story so. Maybe tell us about you know Chris Jackson and his life, and you know in and you growing up in the south, and in those experiences were like yeah, and I'm really really interested in hearing first time you touch the basketball, and when you really felt at home with the ball in your hand, and all those things I'm going gonNA. I'm going to be jumping in and asking questions because as you can see, I'm pretty exciting go. Numb note will your Ford. Remind me of missing anything Actually I. Can you want to? Start with that verse. First Time. Just the basketball really was. I was nineteen years old Nights to play Vassallo. My brothers Some reason always ended up playing with. Older older guys in now. When I look back I, said you know that's that was a huge plus for me, because those are the guys issue are fast strong when you finally get to your age group. It becomes easy play. John Age because you've been playing with older gasps. But I remember one day I was outside. Central Elementary. In I was playing game twenty one and this lady. Her real name is miss. Cookie or miss asa letter. What we call him is cooking and she was strong African American women like she. She didn't man screaming at you getting on your back in those days, even spanky. At all be playing and she said listen, she said come in Chris come in. Of course you go over there and I went over there, she said listen try out. I didn't even know that right next to me in the gym. It would try elementary. Right. Of Fourth Great in. I said Miss you'RE GONNA have to ask my mother, she said. Don't worry about it just going out. And because she saw something in me when I was playing I win in. Playing Street Ball I didn't know anything about organized while I. Mean I'm taking it driven through people and I'm making my shots. Coach added me listed son. You, gotTa pass the ball. And make a long story short. My first game in elementary school I remember. This guy named Aaron Ross. I'm nervous. Right man would i. do you follow me? By the end of the game. Of the game coach was giving me ISOS telling him get out my way. I ended up with twenty one points, my first game, and just to see the crowd, and the excitement man I was like man I love this atmosphere. is feels especially a little. You a black kid coming out of the ghetto. You know, mother you. Know File Right A. Grown up in poverty surrounded by drug addiction, mother had an eighth grade education. So you're looking at something, and you get this attention from a skill that you have. And now it's dawning on you the May. This could be something. Right. This could be a way out and so that was like really for me the beginning. That moment when they were screaming and yelling. And it wasn't it wasn't. It wasn't like pure. Not like. Your College College Teammate Shaquille. It wasn't like you were this massive. You know massive Guy Hulking Guy. You're probably based. There probably saw your quickness in your your agility new shooting right that that they that they liked yeah. I was I was born with. Vast which muscles being quick and explosive, but until you meant after that moment. I began to wake up. My regimen was four o'clock in the morning. Then I would wake up at five and for years. My Mother did know this was happening. Because I'm not about down a mother her to cut it off. Work to I mean at. And so I would wait until she left I. Heard the call. Crank the not get up. Get myself written. It's still dark outset at the attack. And I decided at that age of of Nanan Jianye said man. This is what I want to become. Be The best. and. I knew that I'd have to come up with a strategy because I'm small to give myself the best opportunity to do that something. What can you do that? Nobody else or not, too. Many people don't dawn at this aid. And I, just decided man. You GotTa Get Earth.

NBA Basketball Chris Jackson Mahmoud Abbas Texas Omar United States John Age Aaron Ross Nanan Jianye Central Elementary Ford Vassallo Washington Houston Louis Hakeem ASA Shaquille
Over 400 Advertisers Hit Pause On Facebook, Threatening $70 Billion Juggernaut

Hey, It's Cory Hepola

02:25 min | Last week

Over 400 Advertisers Hit Pause On Facebook, Threatening $70 Billion Juggernaut

"Burns not happy. It's gotten issue. Stop Hate for profit campaign just started up a couple weeks ago. Now more than 400 companies. Coca Cola Adidas Ford Lego have evolved, have vowed to halt advertising on Facebook. It's AH growing protest over how Facebook handles hate speech, another harmful content. And so this campaign takes aim at the most important thing to Facebook. Which is money. Facebook's advertising juggernaut, which accounted for more than 98% of the company's nearly $70 billion in revenue last year. The goal of this campaign stop paid for campaign to force Mark Zuckerberg to address the effect that Facebook has had on our society. Mark Zuckerberg, finally this morning and said, You know what? I'm going to be with him. Why Because money talks Right money talks didn't need to pay attention. Never need to pay attention until Oh, Now you got 98%. Going after my 98% of my revenue. My advertising. All right, Alison. gotta hire more moderators. And then who decides what is hate speech like we all know. Don't know. Some hate speech. We all know. Okay, way over here. That's that's hate speech. And then there's some stuff in the middle. Where I mean, I I would consider that hateful. Disgusting speech. But what would a moderator Feel it the same way. To say Well, is that Who's Who's that directed at Is that borderline like there's a lot of borderline. Hate speech is a lot of underlying code that gets through to I suppose if you were to clean out just Is other the He really The garbage. That gets through That would help. And so it's to stop a for profit campaign. And now, Zuckerberg what you talking about my revenue. You know who else

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Burns Alison.
Los Angeles, OC Among 19 Calif. Counties Ordered To Close Indoor Operations For Restaurants, Cardrooms, Other Businesses For Three Weeks

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:22 sec | Last week

Los Angeles, OC Among 19 Calif. Counties Ordered To Close Indoor Operations For Restaurants, Cardrooms, Other Businesses For Three Weeks

"California Governor Gavin Newsom is closing indoor operations of restaurants and other businesses for three weeks, 15 counties that we had originally Mandated or recommended bar closure with the addition of Ford County is now in that three day watch list. We're just moving forward to close the operation of all of those bars and all of the 19

Governor Gavin Newsom Ford County California
Time To Be Ready For What Comes

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

06:00 min | Last week

Time To Be Ready For What Comes

"Pretty cool to say a lot. More paid will now starting to say that huddling must not be the best way sure there's one thing to have a portfolio that you hold onto is another thing to be able to build up portfolio? Grow your amount of Bitcoin of time. A lot of the stuff I do is still spot trading, which is just buying into different projects under the races I. I don't know. Know, what the project actually do! I look at the charts and build sites. That's what I do now I. Do use leverage. Do Use Mahjong. I do try futures. I try to will these different things, but also do tried spot so whether or not you're actually came to be leveraged. Try to in the market out of the market frequently you can certainly use strategies just to manage your portfolio for example the weekly timeframe there are some epic weekly pullbacks at the moment weekly trade. I Ford I dialing that sort of thing try to be being for. Wake so possibly even months there's been some great all moves popping off left front and center against Bitcoin Antenna. This is what I do. It's not just Dallas futures contracts with tx watch. It is about getting people into the market, so they can manage their portfolio a lot better. You can try these strategies on any timeframe that you actually like it doesn't make a difference so welcome to the new members, and for all of you out there. This requires a huge amount of Tom. InFocus low talk frames at hectic. It's not. It's about managing a portfolio well and coming in and out of the mock as you say opportunities rows over here and over here for example link a couple of weeks back or look fantastic I bought link a manage my portfolio. I bought link. Link went up excellent when I hit. My target are sold out of link moved back to Bitcoin, fear him, and you can build your portfolio in that why it's not always crazy, leverage toxic and leverage a margin. It's not crazy. It's really easy. As a matter of fact, I've got a video on Youtube. How to go long using managing your risk and also. Yesterday about how to go short as well so it's not complicated. It does take some time to learn a tykes some focus. Because what's going on in the market right this second. Tell you. The biggest winnow the biggest moves on on Banco as far as trade's guy. We had a beautiful little cradle. Becker was the twenty eighth of June whether it's bank. Who Against Ted, A. Bank or against Bitcoin both have moved quite Nassir. Think it looks like maybe about one to one or close to. What's Beta? Fantastic trends threat. The months of June again high at timeframe tried. They're looking to build your sat's ability. Which of course you can invest how you'd like, but across the top ten. Gee, WHIZ! There's not a lot going on still still. We've been open for the last one. How many hours now? Six or seven hours tonight and Bitcoin is flat. It's pretty much exactly where it closed yesterday. More or less, there is a small bearish candle, and it is in that cradles on. A great daily downtrend, if we broke the lows of nine thousand and fifty well then show, we might see more of a downside full bitcoin. The big level may is getting through nine thousand, and then down through the most recent low, which is eighty, eight, hundred, Fifty, eight, thousand, eight, hundred fifteen. Until we break that level. We really have a good downtrend. There's really not too much certainty in the market at the moment volumes. Damn people are not as interested as there's less people. Acting as far as getting involved in Bitcoin but like I said a lot of clients now. During the courses and learning how to try perfect on a dope. When it does pop off, you'll have you'll have this strategies. You'll know what to do so is up nine dollars. Nine, thousand, one, hundred, forty, five in theory up twelve cents, two hundred and twenty five dollars, and sixty full sent Siamese bitcoin nays, bright yesterday's law, and then it needs to break down to seventeen thirty two for really have a bit more space as a matter of fact, he's of that to fourteen seventy three x out of being short of the last few days. Let's say what. It still below my entry point, but it is really sluggish is very very sluggish, indeed Adine, struggling to find any real strong momentum. Yesterday we did have good momentum. It did four quite nicely. hit a low of seventeen point three cents when trading at seventeen point five its up point two three. percent, but the simplicity's gone today. It's the market doesn't know what it wants to do. At this moment, Bitcoin cash big crazy candle a few hours ago. I was at three hours ago. We had a high of that candle sitting at. To. Order Twenty three, twenty, six and low, two hundred and twenty dollars and seventy, so basically like A. Candle that was a very crazy looking whip. Their third locked ice holds a candle. There have been walled that difficult to try, and it's really wrecked the structure there are on bitcoin cash that being said it easy in a down trend. More or less it easing that cradles, and if it does break down three yesterday's low of two hundred twenty dollars fifty, we might see further selling coming in here, but again it's not really join us at. Percent to twenty four thirty five base is one, and I'm looking at very closely for potential short tried the level of looking at his one, fifty, five eight. It's got to do more work for a short trade there for Bitcoin Brad yet, but as trying is working into that level, and it's consoling very very well as a matter of fact, spanking solar, adding for how many days at that point we've got three full days of that is a strong downtrend. It did have that big full on Sundays at one, fifty seven and fourteen cents down half a percent.

Youtube Dallas TOM Becker TED Adine Nassir A. Bank
A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

03:43 min | Last week

A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

"Hello and welcome to let's talk. A series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues that matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to Substance Abuse Prevention Research Treatment for addiction. Recovery Management Education and Advocacy I'm your host William Warriors and today we have a story of hope. brought to us by Nina Pillow Nina. How are you can cut? How are you great good to see you again I know you've done a number of a public events. If you will or stood up spoken out using your own story to help unmask the stigma of addiction and promote the reality of what we look like in the fact, that treatment works in cover is possible, and we're glad that you're with us today on, let's talk. Tell us a little bit about your first experience with substances Yeah thank you for having me So my first. Experience was really the one that. Ultimately brought me here For my own in my life, my dad was an alcoholic growing up for me I had an injury which ultimately ended up I ended up getting prescribe narcotics, opiates, and I enjoyed them. Well beyond using them for pain. There's about seven years ago so. Seven years yeah. And you know kind of before. I knew it I was. Enjoying them you know Kinda like my whole mind, body, Spirit, everything and It ended up becoming. You know full on addiction which I thought I was immune to for whatever reason I was not and I was physically addicted. It got to the point where I couldn't use them. I couldn't not use them without getting sick. And the irony of this is that you were working in the healthcare field at some point along the course of your diction nurse Yep talked to us about being a nurse who is struggling with substances. Yeah, it was It was really hard. I had I knew all of I knew about addiction. I knew about opiates. I knew I knew all of those things. and I continued using them anyways and. I think I think I. particularly felt a lot of shame because of that and I. Had access to them in my workplace and so Being just didn't want to be the nurse with an addiction and I think that was a huge denial piece for me, Until I ended up diverting narcotics from the hospital I worked at. ultimately ending, getting caught and resigning. That diversion was so that you could sustain your own addiction. Yes, very much. How did that make you feel when you were under the influence? When you knew what you were doing was not only wrong, but was actually illegal and yet you couldn't stop. Just the powerlessness of it, but also in active addiction. It wasn't. It wasn't a matter of right or wrong because for me. My morals and values have always included not stealing, but that wasn't. It was a matter of feeling, normal or not or So it, just it. I don't I don't know that it was ever I know I. Felt Guilt I knew. I knew at the end of the day. It was wrong, but in the moment it was just. What I needed to do and you know. That's what I did.

Nina Pillow Nina Betty Ford Foundation William Warriors Hazel
M.A.T. With Mike

Recovery Happy Hour

04:12 min | 2 weeks ago

M.A.T. With Mike

"All right, let's talk to Mike. He is a father of two an entrepreneur who lives in New Jersey and with as much serious stuff. As we covered, we also talked about how much fun it is to go out and party as a sober person. Let's get to it. Hi, Mike, how are you? I'm great. Thanks for having me yeah of course. I'm thrilled to get to know you a little bit. Bit Better and learn more about your story. I know that it's a topic. We haven't really touched on yet. So you're our first. I'm psyched to have you here. Wonderful. Glad to be the first well. I tell us your name and your sobriety date, and would you have described yourself as a high or a low functioning drinker? My name is Mike Russell my sobriety date is February two thousand eighteen I'm not a big day tracker, but I could look it up in my phone. Actually you know I don I would. Consider myself. like a high functioning person like not very. I wasn't a daily drinker. Drinks problem once every other week. And my challenge was been shrinking. Got It got it and tell us a little bit about you. Now you know what you do for a living where you live age family anything like that I'm happily married I have two wonderful kids I live in Hoboken New Jersey outside new, York City and currently relocated to our summer home. I would have been. I don't know how long I've been here. Because kind of all blurs together like we're, we're. We're living here. We're in time. So. You know in Margate. City New Jersey about a block from the beach. which is awesome, and then I have also my family and my sister, my sister in law, my brother law and their two kids. Here's while so we a lively wonderful home. Very lucky. Circumstances Nice Little Coruna OAC's. Yeah. Let's get into it. Let's let's about your story, and if you would tell us in ten minutes or less, you drink how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop High School I. Think I. I didn't drink a lot. I drank little bit It wasn't a big part of my life very much into sports, student, government and right between high school and college. I just out of nowhere. came down with a non Hodgkin's lymphoma and is very surprising to me. traumatic obviously, and I checked into hospital had wonderful doctors in went through chemotherapy at I, was very fortunate to. Be Able to go to college a semester late and come out in full recovery, but I think things kind of change for me there and when I did get to college, I started to drink pretty frequently and I would say that was like the point when. I started to drink a law you know throughout college pretty consistent. In then I graduated moved to Manhattan, and I had a job in banking, and I was trying to Ford my rent so I had a side hustle in Bayliss. Promotions, which again weeds bit more drinking within two years, I had the nightlife promotions business was actually producing more income from you than my job, so I left my job and I went into that industry time for about eight years, and that was eight years more shrinking, and towards the end I met my wife, and I wanted to kind of have a career change and I knew if I wanted to have a family and it was pretty clear she wanted. To Change? In order to have a family I did eventually I was thought. Hey, you know this is probably circumstantial. It'll go away, but I ended up moving into technology, which is eventually where I wanted to be I wasn't a simple transition, but I got there and the drinking go away, just kind of morphed in I from there was. A trigger drinker I wasn't drinking. Galley I didn't have cravings. I never thought about drinking but I'd hit a trigger. You know out with friends out to dinner on vacation and say I'm GonNa have one or two drinks. Inevitably, it was countless number of drinks, and that was my challenge.

Mike Russell New Jersey Hodgkin High School Margate Mike OAC Hoboken York City Manhattan Ford
"ford" Discussed on You're Wrong About...

You're Wrong About...

16:28 min | 3 months ago

"ford" Discussed on You're Wrong About...

"Recall what we find out later. Is that the traffic safety administration. Basically only decided that Ford had fucked up because they were getting all of these postcards. Yeah there's all this public pressure on them. They did the investigation. They rammed the Pinto in the rear at thirty miles an hour which was like that was the law back then that cars had to withstand a thirty mph impact so they rammed at a bunch of times at thirty miles an hour and it never caught fire and so they started ramming it at thirty five miles an hour and he created a special car to Ram. They waited down the hood of the car with so that it would pierce the gas tank so they essentially changed the rules midstream so that they could get the Pinto's to explode so that they could get forward to do this recall because they're like. Oh my God. People keep sending US postcard. Yes too many postcard and nobody at the time wanted to be like A. We looked into this and it's fine because it was in the article WanNa Pulitzer shows the public. Momentum is the only way to get anything done and also that the thing that you achieve will not necessarily be made valid by the fact that it has public momentum behind it. And it's just what they've said afterwards is just it was just easier to tell ricotta car dyke. Yeah I get it though I understand. There's this the the consumer is upset and it just shows what kind of power that we have as a collective in shame. We don't use it toward more accurate ends. Yeah and the final debunking is remember how the Mother Jones article said that between five hundred and nine hundred people had been killed by exploding. Pinto's Gary Schwartz. This researcher goes back through all of the State and national data on fatalities and car accidents. He finds that between nineteen seventy one and nineteen seventy six of the entire life of the car. He only found twenty seven deaths. Oh from fires and Pinto's and that comparable to like say death send fires and Volkswagens or is it like a little on the high side. This is the dark part is that the Ford Pinto is actually significantly safer VW beetle or the Toyota Corolla or the AMC Gremlin or Chevrolet Vega Pinto wrong about the Pinto. It was unfairly maligned. We really are a good little car and a good little bean one. The main lessons here. And this is Gary Schwartz. Points out is that only a tiny tiny tiny percent of Car. Crashes are rear impact and only a tiny percentage of those are actually fires so the fact is people who die in fires after car accidents only represent point six percent of people who die in car accidents total. Most people. Don't die in fires. Most people die in like normal car. Accidents like side impact car accidents front impact car accidents putting all of our efforts into preventing this one type. Totally ignores the fact that like all of the cars back then redact traps like these other. Beatles were deathtrap. It's not that people didn't die horribly inside the Pinto's at times it's because they died horribly in sight of all sorts of other kinds of cars and with as much frequency people were dying in Car Accidents. A lot back then. It's almost like this show has beams a so this how Gary Schwartz concludes his article from Nineteen ninety-one from what I've been able to learn. As for safety. Pinto was a car that was neither admirable nor despicable. It's overall fatality rate. Was roughly in the middle of the subcompact range. It's record was better than the subcompact average with respect to fatalities with fire yet for the quite small category of fatalities with Rear End Fire. Its design features apparently gave it a worse than average record. So it's like on this one thing. It's not great but in general when you look at the ninety nine percent of accidents that aren't rear end fires it's fine. It's not remarkable with an American car manufacturing like maybe it does suck in some like it is bad in some ways but not and they unique way and also I mean these institutional researchers also looked into this and they point out that a bunch of other subcompact cars also had the gas tanks behind the rear axle. Like even this design thing was not like a pinto jam like small cars want drunks base and so that's one of the gas tank. Then how did we get here like? Why was this article written ended? This guy did I mean how so I mean before we get to the debunking. The debunk stop here. I have literally no idea what's going to happen next. I feel uneasy my like lesson with this journalism because I think this really is a story of bad journalism and hasty journalism. My take away from this is the way that we prioritize. Secret things over well-known things What because what? The show is all about because everything we're talking about is in plain sight. It's not a scoop. It's like things that are already known are interesting because we can know something without paying sufficient attention to it and also things Lake Car. Crashes are just like hey lots of people dying in car crashes and that's bad it's pretty boring because everybody already knows it. You're not going to get a good headline out of ongoing situations. Yes and so this mother. Jones article is based on these secret documents and a whistle blower from inside for this. Probably the person who leaked documents to mark. Doughy got Mark Ruffalo. Movie written all over. It makes it seem like this is forbidden knowledge. Everyone wants a deep throat when nobody wants to just be like car. Accidents are bad. And they're easily preventable. Yeah a lot of bad. Journalism generally comes from a writer trying and good faith or at least partial. Good faith to draw attention to an issue that they sincerely believe needs to happen. And that generally does and then having to find a story that has like spectacular enough to hook the public and maybe it's so spectacularly you just don't want to question the plausibility of it because if you did then maybe wouldn't be able to write that story and then you couldn't get people to pay attention to this thing to me. I mean this leads into the debunking of the debunking which is basically all about. Why was the traffic safety administration asking for this analysis in the first place? Like why was a government agency? Doing the thing that we're accusing Ford of rain right literally. Balancing lives versus costs. And what you find is that what's happening in the nineteen seventies is. There's this huge push to rationalize government regulation. So there's all of these court decisions coming down saying that. It's an infringement on corporations rights to over-regulate them right. There's this huge fear of over-regulation even before Reagan crave. This is an excerpt of all these court. Rulings in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight court ruling force traffic safety administration to evaluate and respond to every industry objection before issuing a standard and nineteen seventy-two decision required that safety standards be practicable and provide an objective safety similarly in the executive branch in the Early Nineteen Seventy S. The traffic safety administration was told to justify the cost effectiveness of it standards because critics of all stripes worry. That overregulation was strangling the American economy. Okay so the government. The federal government is doing homework to turn into. Burma rations to be like. Don't worry this idea. We have will not be too costly. We promise and literally doing the growth thing that offends US meow. 'cause they're the Sally Field Parent in this. Mrs doubtfire called Les. They're the ones who have to figure out how much she human life is worth and dollars. Calculations can be done about rollover accidents exactly and so in one thousand nine hundred four Gerald Ford Issues. An executive order that requires all regulatory agencies to provide numerical estimates of the costs and benefits associated with any rules being propagated. Now so it's a tale of two fords and so I mean I think this is an important story to tell four a podcast that is like a capitalism. All along podcast. I I have no interest in defending forward. I don't give a shit like if if people wanna say that like Ford is awful and immoral and balances lives against its own legal costs. Like I don't care it's like yeah. Of course they do. Maybe not to a spectacular extent. I think it's really important that one of the mistakes that we made and I think this really foundational mistake with this story and other stories involving big corporations is we blamed Ford. It's very easy to turn this into a bad apple story of like how Gross Ford Is. Isn't it fascinating that Pinto becomes section known phenomenon and there are Pinto jokes into the nineties? And it's almost like we know that if we keep saying Pinto will be like yeah. Pinto Pinto's the unsafe Karpenko's linked well kind of all unsafe. Yeah once again. It's like we're focusing on the Pinto to avoid a whole system that facilitates unsafe vehicles. And also the author of this history of auto safety mentions. There's lots of designed decisions. That car makers have made that resulted in way. More than twenty seven deaths like that steering column probably like various very heavy duty steering columns that have killed more than twenty seven people in particular model car. But because we don't have secret documents because we don't have this great smoking gun thing and we've kind of heard this story enough now that it doesn't shock US anymore. It's like Friday the thirteenth three. We're like yeah. Yeah case and kill the teens exactly like I. It's difficult to write about things that don't have this. Unexpected counter. Intuitive aspect isn't a terrible that ability to be interested in our own safety is dependant on there being twists. I mean this is this to me is like the foundational error of this. Is that calling it a story of corporate malfeasance. It's not wrong it's just. It's bigger than that and worse than that like whenever I hear people talking about greedy corporations. I don't disagree but I'm also like we'll every corporation is greedy like that's what the Word Corporation means. Pray it's like this virus infecting people the way that you fix. These things isn't by making Ford less greedy. It's completely changing the way that we conceive of and the kinds of standards were setting for ourselves. Why are we allowing the corporations to have this much power over the way that they are regulated? Why have we created this moist area? Yeah and then periodically were like. Oh my God they smell do here. I can't and so this is how this organizational analysis ins the taken for granted nature of much sensible bloodshed for example a forty thousand annual traffic fatalities combined with the propensity of governments media and others to blame. Individual people or organizations for outcomes can cause us to ignore social problems that flow from the interconnectedness of organizations. Just by the argument that he consciously cynical decision did not produce an unsafe. Fuel tank are descriptions of the Pinto case probably implies an inflated level of rationality to what is better understood as institutionally embedded unreflective action. This is the same guys that gave their paper a terrible title. What they need is i. I was thinking. Oh that's really good. Institutionally embedded unreflective action on reflective action. That may see. I'm a refugee from academia. So I'm like yeah. Yeah I mean they conceive of this is that we're always looking for a decision like someone made the decision that like a bunch of people are going to die so that I don't have to spend more money but the fact is when you look through an organization in the history of cases like the Ford Pinto. No one makes a decision. There is no decision. We can't apply a kind of moral standard to the logic of organizations. We're looking for decisions and we're looking for these smoking gun memos. We're not gonNA find them. We're going to find is really bad outcomes that come from everybody acting on the incentives that we've created for them and so much more important. When we debunk this story to not like defend Ford or whatever I don't care it's all rotten. The entire sector is as rotten as we thought. Ford was right. Yes it's like. We're in the trash compactor and star wars. That snake guy. It's like. Oh Hey snake. I mean I'm not surprised to see the snake here. Yeah Yeah So. That's that's our story. We'll wait I wanNA know about this capitalist. What'S HIS DEAL. We never found out. Nobody knows it's kind of frustrating. Actually nobody has gone back and done a like. How did this happen thing because it usually I wanted like some sort of Kitty? Genovese style like had lunch with..

Pinto Pinto Ford Gerald Ford Gary Schwartz US Pinto Mother Jones Lake Car executive ricotta Pulitzer Ram Beatles federal government Burma researcher
"ford" Discussed on You're Wrong About...

You're Wrong About...

14:08 min | 3 months ago

"ford" Discussed on You're Wrong About...

"People want to not die but they also want to play golf and it's hard to balance those priorities. Welcome to your wrong about where every joke is revealed as a tragedy. Ooh That's quite good and on seem thank you. I didn't even know you knew about this one. I know what I've learned from. Vh1's I love the seventies. So I don't know if you can call that Sarah Marshall I'm working on a book about the Satanic Panic and Michael. Hobbs I'm a reporter for the Huffington Post and you can support us at Patriotair Dot com slash wrong about and things are feeling tight right now. And you're already supporting us there. You can unsupported us. Yes because this is an interesting time when you were a kid in the nineties over like I wish I could live in an interesting time and now do you want to go back and talk to that kid and be like listen. The boy meets world. Cast is going on the second of all no. You don't talk about another interesting time today. Which is the nineteen seventies. Yes and it's beautiful. Exploding automobiles what you remember about the exploding Ford Pinto. I just know that they exploded. This was a tactic of great murder. Yes or people. I don't know if people found it funny at the time but I remember it being discussed as a funny thing I encountered about it in two thousand yes. I think I was introduced to this by a joke. To there's a joke in Wayne's world or Wayne's world to where a car is following them and they slowdown in car runs into them like barely a tableau yeah and then the Pinto explodes. I don't know it's interesting because problems in American car manufacturer are sexual sore spot. Her Americans think especially during that period and I wonder if you like exploding. Pinto seemed funny at the time because it was like a gallows humor extreme version of maybe other problems that were happening and it also we will get into this more but also goes back to the way that we don't really take car accidents seriously as tragedies to rain to think of them as it's the fault of the people who are in the accident or something that we don't think of forty thousand auto accident deaths every year as a public health crisis the way that we do with a gun deaths and even with gun deaths were not doing great at the serious taking. Yeah but it's also I mean this was also the largest auto recall ever at the time. It was actually one of the biggest news stories of the late. Nineteen seventies was the way that this car had been designed to be really really easy to explode. But I've been looking forward to this episode because it's kind of a throwback to twenty eighteen. Ywca when we first started out when we were young and dewey and every wasn't about a woman's life being slowly destroyed. I know and back when our episodes were like short and they were like simple. This episode also has debunking then a debunking of the debunking which is very throwback for us. Oh Yeah you love doing that. Yes yeah I feel like do you remember in the ninety s when Gwyneth paltrow was doing some probably atrocious screwball comedy and they asked her why she was doing this like lightweight role and she said no accents? No corsets no crying this kind of version of that that like. I only read one book for this episode at my notes are like only fifty one pages long. This is not going to be like a two hour. Long episodes. It's like a little cute. Myth Debunk Debunk Outta here. Kind of episodes a cute little duckling of an episode. Yes so this is you Gwyneth. Paltrow taking a break from making authentic oven roasted vegan. Pizza just like. Have your one cigarette of the week and let loose this is. This is going to be easy and fun in Quarantine Company. This is what we're going for. Yes we'll get back to the human horror in the next couple of weeks. I don't worry because I work on this show. So it's so. We begin with the context of the auto industry in the late. One Thousand Nine Hundred Sixty S. I love what you're like. This is going to be a fun episode brain into like the auto industry amid sanctuary. America started its loom like decline. Well I mean I also think we're we're starting with carnage but not the kind of carnage that we're used to on this show. I mean basically the context for the Ford Pinto is that driving was extremely dangerous in the late nineteen seventies. One thing that we've discovered on this show is we've talked about how society had to discover the concept of child abuse and society had to discover the concept of domestic abuse. Like hey these things happen in their bed and like cyclically again and again yeah. It's exactly the same thing with car safety. So the idea that cars can kill you and the idea that auto crashes are like controllable by people and their responsibility of large corporations is not a natural idea. There was about four decades. There were basically the car. Companies successfully argued that they weren't responsible for car. Crashes the thing is we are supposed to keep the car driving like if the hubcap falls off when you're driving that's our problem but if you crash the car into a tree that's you so there's no reason for seatbelts. There's no reason for us to design cars to save you so it's very amid sanctuary. American personal responsibility. You're on your own now Jack. You bought it totally. And so the concept that car crashes should be reduced and can be reduced was a completely new concept and essentially. Didn't exist before. Ralph Nader wrote unsafe at any speed. And when was that nineteen sixty five? Okay so just before the. Pinto starts getting designed in nineteen sixty seven. We have silent spring and we have unsafe at any speed. Both of which are books that are basically saying like corporations are bad and a lot of people don't know that at the time the idea of sort of environmental risks and structural risks was something that people had to sort of have their hands held and taught very slowly. Can you talk about the kind of post war to nuclear a view of corporate and ovation in America? I mean I think it's so long ago that we can't fathom this. There was a time when corporations were seen as essentially benign. I mean one thing. That's really interesting about the about unsafe at any speed and about this sort of growing realization. That auto safety is a thing is the extent to which people didn't know that carmakers had control over this stuff. Har- crashes were seen as these sort of act of God personal responsibility. There's nothing anybody can do. But what starts coming out in? Nineteen sixty s is more and more of like wait a minute. These companies are acting really irresponsibly and they're selling products that are making more likely to die. And so the big thing in the auto industry at the time was of course planned obsolescence. Right that it's not than they make a car. And then they hit rate on it every year gets a little bit safer a little bit safer a little bit better. They're basically every three years they're just completely starting over there. Like let's add fins or like. Let's add a wooden steering wheel and safety is not playing into this. They're just adding all these weird bells and whistles and so one thing that the carmakers start doing is there's these dashboards that look cool. They're like they had like a shelf design with like this beat Amish way in it and they're really cool looking but this shelf design ends up decapitating people when they get no. Oh is it lake at neck level vehicle? Oh and another thing was the steering column used to just like pay. Oh people because the car makers were like well don't crash into stuff. If you don't want a big metal rod through your chest this is also linked. I I think I also learned this on. Vh One that in the seventies lawn darts were a popular toy in cold was at elect kits through dark city. Exactly Yeah like. Do you really think that people are going to not crash into stuff like ever. Is that your plan? Well this is. What's really interesting? So there's old because people try and suing the car companies over this old federal court decisions where the judges basically side with the car companies. So this is a quote from one of the judges in nineteen sixty six. The intended purpose of an automobile does not include its participation in collisions with other objects the defendant also knows that it's automobiles may be driven into bodies of water but it is not suggested that the defendant has a duty to equip them with pontoons which is like. I. This is a classic to me. Legal Argument Food Group of Lake. Yeah I'm going to compare this quite reasonable request to this other thing. That's allegedly a corollary. But really is like ludicrous and exaggurated in any reasonable person would be like well of course not and like that. That sort of false equivalences knew he. I think he sees that a lot and bad faith. Arguments in the court system to that judges often fall for these things that are very principled but in reality cars are not driving into the water a lot but they are crashing into each other a lot at the time fifty thousand people a year were dying in car accidents and the population of the US was thirty percent smaller than it is. Now so you were about twice as likely back then to die in a car crash as you are now This is a quote from an article that the history of auto safety that all linked to in the show notes. A culture of low expectations concerning auto safety was cultivated by the industry. The US people generally did not expect to survive serious accidents and accept her safety researchers they were not cognizant of the degree to which crash worthiness could be designed into cars. So it's basically just like well if I get a car crash I'm going to die. There's nothing like Ford and GM and Chrysler can actually do about it. Yeah it's amazing because even now I think of car companies as shirking responsibility at every turn but there are certain number of cultural norms that they've had to accept like I assume in my and I have assumed for my whole life as a car driving individual that the vehicle that I'm getting into and trying to move around a city is going to have been designed based on the assumption that it might crash into something at some point and that that's part of its life also that it has pontoons the period. So now we get to the design of the Ford Pinto. Let me send you a photo of this carring on. Pinto has a bearing current because it does not make me. Think I of a horse that makes me think of bean. We have a very spirited argument about which decade loves beans more. Aren't you yeah? It's cute right? Yeah I would drive that it is. I WANNA say a hatchback. It's tomato Red Blinking. Malian typewriter and it looks like you could have a car chase in like it. Looks like it will be fun to drive yet. Looks like it handles well. It looks like I'm imagining driving it. Data freeway with all these like boxy like buicks and Oldsmobiles i Mike zipping around between them. Because I'm a I'm on my way to a baby sitting emergency or I'm like I'm Charlie's angel pretending to be a babysitter like that's the energy of this car and so I just another one where Pinto in a field with horse next to it which is very literal. Yeah this is their ad where they're like no no. Don't think of the being. The the context of this car is that you can't really see this from the photo but it's very small. It's considered a subcompact really so it's like European style and so basically what's happening in the auto industry at the time is before the rise of the Japanese car companies. The American auto industry was basically a three-part monopoly. It had consolidated to the point where there are three companies according to David Halberstam the reckoning which I highly recommend. They're basically. There was kind of nominally competition between the car companies but not really like they all knew each other they were all in Detroit one year. Ford sells more cars one year. Gm sells more cars but like they have these product categories. Everyone sort of has their marketing stuff in place. It's not really a competitive industry. And it's only in the late nineteen sixties when Honda and Toyota and Nissan show up with better cars. They're very cheap. They drive well. They're more reliable and all the sudden. There's real competition and the big. Three automakers get scared. Oh because in Japan it's a cultural norm to not let drivers be killed by steering columns including people are into it for some and so in the late nineteen sixties Lee IACOCCA. Who's the head of Ford at the time? Basically goes to his engineers and says we need a car that competes with the VW beetle and the Toyota Corolla and all these little small cheap cars like the hip. Young kids are driving these days and so he basically gives them the order that no matter what the car has to be at the most two thousand pounds it has to be light and it has to cost less than two thousand dollars and what's two thousand dollars in today's money that's eight thousand bucks okay. Which is actually a good deal for a brand new car. That's a car of the people. Yes and so basically his marching orders are you need to get this car to market as fast as possible. So at the time the average car took about forty three months to design and build and whatever and get everything ready for the Pinto. They did it in twenty five months they just like rammed this thing through production. Just get it onto the market. Get it under this price. Yeah they did that with the too. I mean those have all been sent back to the nineteen fifties now and so one of the decisions that they make in this rush to get the car out. The door is most cars at the time. Had The gas tank above the rear axle. So basically if you're sitting in the backseat of a car you're essentially sitting over the gas tank. That's where it is in most cars and the Nice thing about that is..

Ford Pinto Ford US America Gwyneth paltrow Gm Sarah Marshall Cast Huffington Post Ralph Nader Hobbs murder Wayne
"ford" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

16:07 min | 6 months ago

"ford" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Hi Glen and in our force chair today is belong Karachi below reports and produces cultural coverage for NPR halo. Everyone Wonderful to have you back. Room Broom So Stephen. I'm going to go to you first since you are the person that I associate associate with fast cars. That's not true. What did you think afford me? Ferrari you know we recently on the show talked about the movie. Nineteen seventeen and Glen. I think in particular described it as the ultimate dad movie. This is ultimate daddy movie. I did not realize I don't think of myself necessarily as the Dad movie type hypoc Dad Ford. V Ferrari proved that I am in fact that guy. This is some kind of old fashioned. CGI free cars zooming around in kind of movie making. It's fun. It's a sports movie. I mean I don't do. I think it breaks any kind of mold. I do not think it does do. I think it's effective active at capturing like the big race the big clash of personalities. All that stuff. I I think to use a phrase we sometimes use on the show this movie movies on rails but I think it's very effective for what it is. I think James Mangled the director. I think is a very skilled technician. You're in good hands throughout this thing. I don't I don't think it's amazing but I enjoyed it enormously. I do want to say in fairness if you're out there and you're thinking I like Ford before I like car movies but I'm not a dad or if you are now or thinking I did not like this movie. We are speaking generally. But I think it's fair to say it fits into a kind of a John Laura of movies that has adad movie feel to it in that it's very invested in kind of traditional American masculinity. Yeah that makes sense boil. Would you think this movie. I loved this movie actually and I saw at Toronto at the Film Festival a few months ago and I took my dad to see it and when it came out. It's the perfect and my ten year old nephew who also loved it Exactly so all of us were there in What I liked about it a lot and I don't want to? I think it's very easy to use a lot of bad driving puns in criticism of this film. So I'm not going to go there but I did feel like it knew how to slow down as a film which I liked the most about it. Is that in fact while it has has these large kind of racing sequences and all the room rooms that we've talked about. It has quite a lot of silence in it as a film as well and I think it has moments of being reflective and thoughtful and and the two central characters played by Christian. Bale and Matt Damon are have a really beautiful friendship. And and I think that for me really came through and I when I think of sports films in high I school classes when you have to be forced to watch them to be inspired or something by your gym teacher or something like they always ended with that great big game or or some kind of showdown. Oh down and I felt like in this film. It actually doesn't conclude in that way it has other ways of bringing you into these. These characters lives into the kind of human side of this of this film which I was not expecting from movie called Ford versus for which I think is the most poetic title and I think in a way Mrs some of the poetry of the film and Two who on the mechanical knows. Well that's true and I think you know if you're not familiar with what happened in this real life situation in nineteen sixty six you know. Ferrari very had been kind of more of a racing type of car and Ford was not and so they had had some business dealings and potentially some business alignment they were GonNa make a deal deal. And then they didn't and Henry Ford the second as we said plucky upstart that he was Wanted to essentially beat Ferrari at racing because he was mad. Add about kind of the way or or at least in part because he was mad. So goes the legend so he gets this character Carroll Shelby played by Matt Damon. WHO's a an American auto auto designer kind of guy to work with Ken? Miles played by Christian. Bale who's a British driver and kind of innovator of building cars they talk about how he's got a kind of a car that he put together himself that he's able to drive to great success and so and so these guys have a little bit of the odd couple friendship tip. They have a little bit of the trying to make the big company except are great ideas and of course. There's a lot of kind of the inherent danger and suspense of have racing. Glenn talked me about Ford. V Ferrari will this is essentially a historical drama but it's also essentially a bio pic right. And it's the kind of bio pic that I like because it's takes a very thin slice of the person's life instead of dramatizes that so I'm GonNa ask the subject of another oscar-nominated bio pic of the season To speak to my my my feelings about this film so ladies and gentlemen from the nineteen forty nine film in the good old summertime. Welcome to the stage. Miss Judy.

Henry Ford Ferrari Glen Matt Damon Bale Ford Film Festival Karachi NPR James Mangled Toronto technician John Laura Judy Glenn director Ken Miles Mrs Carroll Shelby
"ford" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

03:07 min | 7 months ago

"ford" Discussed on Business Wars

"Henry Ford the second is obsessed with one thing and that one thing is Chevrolet through his whole life. He has watched four lose ground at Cross town rival young Henry Ford. The second decides rides to bet everything on being the first to build an all new postwar car. We've got to work fast. We have to treat this new car. A wartime the program. Imagine all the publicity we will get he chooses a rallying cry two words that he has printed on signs they get plastered all over. The Ford Plants beat Chevrolet. The board has no choice but to follow young. Henry's lead Henry Ford. The second second succeeds in unveiling. The first post-war car but at a cost of nearly one hundred million dollars it is named simply simply the nineteen forty nine Ford and it streamlined design plus a roomy interior that leaves plenty of room to a man can drive with his Fedora on strikes strikes and immediate chord. One hundred thousand orders come in the very first month. It takes three years to get a car from the concept stage to the showroom room floor and so the reception can be somewhat unpredictable this reception. However by all accounts is off the charts and the nineteen forty-nine Ford Ford would later be remembered as a car that helps save an American empire in response Chevrolet Launches The all new deluxe I bel air in nineteen fifty? It comes full of nifty engineering. The two speed automatic transmission is called power glide while the independent front suspension and is named knee action gliding ride. But Ford has an answer to Chevy's Belair it hustles out the Chris Liner in nineteen fifty. The two tone paint chrome wheels fender skirts and even painted Ashtrays Ford and Chevrolet wage war in the pickup market to Ford Ford with its f-series and Chevy with its advanced design truck from dealerships across the nation Detroit executives here great news brisk risk sales smoke fuming from the stacks at Ford factories but Chevy while Chevrolet remains number one then in nineteen fifty. Three Chevrolet takes this hot competition to a whole new level. It's January seventeenth nineteen fifty three era achievement. In design the car a Chevrolet Bel Air Sedan. The guy on created by famed advice. Originator Nettie Rosenstein was inspired by the blowing lines of the car crowd. You're pouring through the doors of the Waldorf Astoria in New York City to see General Motors car. Extravaganza called Motorola.

Ford Ford Henry Ford Chevrolet Ford Nettie Rosenstein New York City Cross town Motorola General Motors Chris Liner Detroit
"ford" Discussed on The Filmcast

The Filmcast

11:23 min | 8 months ago

"ford" Discussed on The Filmcast

"From the trailer Ford v Ferrari and that is the title of the movie. It it just Ford. v Ferrari not versus just the Batman. V Superman Yup Yup and we all know how that turned out to be the plummeted from a plus from an the American car designer Carroll Shelby and driver Ken Miles Battle. Corporate interference the laws of physics and their own personal demons to build a revolutionary race car for Ford and Challenge Ferrari at the twenty four hour of twenty four hours of Lama in nineteen. Sixty six. All right your hardware. You and I are Big James Mangled fans and I remember him talking about. I think I was listening to his like interview. for the QA podcasts where he's talking about Logan and and he was referring to like this movie as like a movie. That is generally very difficult to get made. You know it's not based on anything. there's not much Action or fighting in it. It's not like a genre movie. Just strain to Michael Man was trying to tell the story to the competing waste. Approach it as well just a good old drama with to really talented actors at the top of their game. So I was really like for this. I assume you were as well. What did you think of Ford Ford? V Ferrari I absolutely adored it I don't think I've Seen James Mangold movie that I don't like in some way And this feels like him just working. Yeah at the top of his craft. Like yeah this is a movie about you know Two guys really trying to win very grueling race the twenty four hours commands And it's it's easy to look at this movie and just see it as like. Oh this is just like pure dad movie. This is just like a testosterone on filled bro. Fast where guys are talking about cars when men were tough been like they had great leathery faces and you know they did tough jobs they got dirty. They're always dirty after working in the garage. Things things were different back then. And I've seen some reviews say that and I didn't get that impression at all from this week It's definitely a brewery Phil Right. This is a movie. The central relationship is Matt Damon and Christian Bale's characters who have sort of like a work. Mark wife relationship basically. It's a work spouse relationship where they are just so close to each other working closely they go through highs and lows. They can hate each other while at the same time professing like having a deep love and respect for each other as well and I think that relationship kind of underpins this entire film this is also a movie about it's You know creative individual visionaries trying to exist under a crushing corporate system AOL Scott made a good point where you know there. There's clearly a parallel towards making movies towards making movies As director and using other people's money to make these he's million things and have a individualistic stamp. Yeah be creatively treated yourself while. Also you know being beholden to corporation. There's a lot going on here. I like how this movie juggles. All that and I don't think this may be tough to sell either right. You've got big stars but you also have like cars Carson. Movies cars just looks so great on screen There's a visceral feeling to it. And there's a ton of racing in this movie I think they're shot and edited really. Well I saw it in an Imax screen here in New York and the sound design was fantastic like the feeling of cars and tires squealing rubber and the roar of the engines dull very visceral and I think Mangold handled that all pretty well too but yeah for me. The real key to this is that you know this is a story about guys trying to achieve a vision In a way. Hey that you know at any creative you think of like The way steve jobs and Johnny. I've worked together to design things at apple and kind of how things changed. Maybe a little after Steve Jobs passed away This movie explores a lot around that I wish I wish there wasn't a stereotypical like put upon wife. I was she had a little more to do. But beyond that like this movie I adored it completely. Jeff Cannata your thoughts on Ford V. Ferrari I guess you could say my thoughts about four Ferrari. Our best summed up in the form of Olympic if the title so is what brought you on board no Ferrari is largely ignored and a lack of details is the reason it fails to even be Ford versus Ford. Wow how nice well then jeff thank you tell us what you mean by that Jeff. This movie is fine. It's fine I like the I think the actors are excellent. It's ordinary to see to see Christian. Bale literally transform his body into more. Like what this actual human being looked like. Somehow he did his face to be thinner and and longer than it usually is more leathery like. There's a great and sunburnt leather to his face. I really enjoy the real guy. Looked like that. Yeah Yeah I'm just GonNa be Matt Damon if that's but I mean it's extraordinary just like Z.. He does that. You didn't have to do that. Christian Bale. You didn't have to do that. It's fine but it's cool. That is normal face. I think it's normal face just with a bit of a Tan. Would it's longer and thinner and you're looking like he's posture is yeah yeah in a weird way cheekbones or a little higher yeah it. It's as transformative as as he ever is. I mean it's it's it's I was watching this movie. I'm like that dude played Batman like that. This character couldn't be drives a cool car to but couldn't be farther. Bamako Batman. I mean vice came out last year. He was Dick Dick Cheney a year. That's true it's so true it's crazy crazy crazy unhealthy wrong but cool. I guess anyway but he did say he did say his days of weight loss and gain are done he says like I can't keep doing wing. It really kept my mortality staring me in the face he said I think as Dr was like you had one more to do and you wasted on chaining so good luck with that. Anyway he and Damon are both very charming in this movie and they're always fun to watch onscreen but I just. I don't understand why this movie is. It doesn't feel like it answers any particularly interesting questions for me. I doesn't give me enough of an insight into how this happened or why this happened. It is a race where four people drive for twenty four hours this movie. You'd think there was one dude who did everything everything I it completely ignored the other three people. I mean it mentions that there are other people but I don't even think casts them like they don't exist in this world the details of building the car feel vague and sort of just I mean it really is. It's trying to be about the people and it's trying trying to convince you that if it wasn't for this particular driver then they would never have been able to do it. Accept the fact that they did it three more times. Ah Without Him and he also he also designed the car basically like hell to release design. He Co design the car. I'll take anything away from the dudes in the Racing Hall of fame is a major figure. It's just I didn't feel like the movie gave me any insight in ultimately it's a movie about a little Guy Ferrari who cares a lot about doing something beautifully and hand making things I mean. What is usually the protagonist tagged movie? This self made artist. Enzo Ferrari who wants to create something beautiful and immaculate an actually succeed that it this movie is about that dude. Going up someone who's just like all throw money at it. We'll keep throwing throwing money at it until you can't have all the money. Let's just by a win. It's not a good guy. Ford is not a good company here her either. I think I think you're completely right. Jeff like there. We could talk more about this than spoilers but Ferrari there is so much like that he they are the little guy it is sort of. Like if you made something talking about Disney trying to fight The criterion channel or something right like this artisan experience versus the content Monolithic Disney. I see what you're saying but it's and the title is Ford Versus Ferrari and you go. Oh my gosh. Yeah Ferrari is like is is synonymous with speed. And how could they ever do it. It's it's like what's the answer. They just spent more money. They just spent way more money. That's really the answer to this question. And I don't know I I would've I would've liked this movie to actually kind of give me more insight into this was more like a free solo in understanding the rigor and commitment it takes to do these endurance races the the precision and the I mean there's so little of that so much of that is just completely ignored. And you you know you talk a little bit of Inter about the wife character. Oh my gosh talk about failing. The Bechtel test will she is does not exist except to get sodas for her man It is it's a it's a it's a bit. She's the only female character in the whole movie. And Yeah Yeah you know. It's not great. It's not great. This is a man's man's movie as they as they say I will say the Jeff like there is there so this movie's two and a half hours long and it it didn't. It didn't quite feel like that to me because your internal intrigue at Ford like I guys I write about companies. I care a lot about corporate intrigue and things like that this stuff going going on in this like the whole idea is that yeah four. It spent more money but also Ford was kind of forced to because this is basically a Dick Measuring contest between you know Henry Ford the second and Enzo Ferrari in a way because Ferrari called their cars ugly And said Ford was not was just is the second and he's not the original Henry Ford like I actually like third. If I'm not mistaken. Yeah he every for the second but he's the grand third. Yes Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah but yeah that is that shows like how much innovation in this world you comes about. Just because of a rich guy felt offended or like he had an I dea The idea that you know Ford is a major company that builds these assembly line products. I basically cookie cutter cars. The movie lays out in a really really interesting madman fashion. You know at the time. They're just not cool. How do you how do you get cool? You get cold by doing something sexy and that that requires bringing in visionary Inari designers and I think that's that's the story is the idea of you know individual creativity visionary creativity trying to exist under a crushing and cynical corporate structure for Ford. Is the villain of this movie to even though it's forgery Ferrari. Yeah but then make that movie like I. I'm into that..

Ford Ferrari Jeff Cannata Matt Damon Enzo Ferrari Guy Ferrari Christian Bale Henry Ford James Mangold Two guys Carroll Shelby Dick Dick Cheney Michael Man steve jobs Logan Phil Right Ken Miles testosterone
"ford" Discussed on Classic Races

Classic Races

09:24 min | 8 months ago

"ford" Discussed on Classic Races

"But all the way back that far back we have to go to find a battle this. Close it to me comparing both drivers on what category you talk about whether it's racing ability whether it's equipment this that whatever. The only difference between these two drivers is Tony is an owner driver. And it's been a long time since an owner driver won the championship. Alan quickey last one to do that. Back in Nineteen ninety-two and since that time there's just fewer you were in fewer owner drivers out. There would be amazing to see that all come together and particularly when you look at hoc- racing you know what that was before Tony came in and and become a part owner. And what he's done since that time in three years has put both his cars in the chase each year and here. He is now contending for a championship. A lot of folks. You're saying you know what it it's great to see anybody win this title besides Jimmy Johnson. Because he's done that the last five years in a row others say well you know Tony's one at twice a four. It is kind of Nice to see somebody who's not been on that trophy and of course we're talking about Carl Edwards. The odds are fifty fifty that he'll do it here this afternoon and very shortly that Green Flags GonNa come out performance on the racetrack between these guys for me. It's a toss up. The only difference might need the crews. Both cruise for these two championship. Drivers are cool in the trenches. I guess is the best way to put it that. They couldn't be any better. They're the best in the business. They've been under under pressure like this many many times before Carl's Bennett Championship battles close ones like this. He has the experience of that to fall back on. And as we said Tony Stewart certainly been in the same situation after winning two championships in his career. So I think it's pretty evenly matched as far as the amount of pressure on these. Two guys certainly have a huge crowd on hand here at Homestead Miami speedway have a beautiful day to go racing. It Looks Nice here in south Florida. Did I tell you what the weather is absolutely gorgeous. We had a little rain couple days ago. But for the most part temperatures up in the eighty Grad to go back northwards going to be cold. Yeah it's Nice era. Lots of folks have come out to be a part of the end of this twenty eleven Nascar Sprint Cup series season here today at homestead Miami speedway. There'll be a lot to talk about throughout the course of this final. Oh four hundred miles of racing today. Most of the attention though on Carl Edwards and Tony Stewart now the command of fire engines joining us. Today's it's sergeant. Andrew Berry who bravely served our nation as a sniper with the US army in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sergeant Berry heroically survived two bullets in eight bomb blast while deployed in return to the US to his wife and four sons. Since retiring. In two thousand nine sergeant various found renewed purpose us by serving at the Orlando Vet Center where he is committed to supporting his fellow veterans. At this time we now ask that all servicemen and women veterans and military families. Stand to be recognized for your service to this country now and now. Please welcome our Grand Marshals Sergeant Andrew Berry and Family First Lady of the United States. Michelle Obama and Dr Jill Biden as they deliver the most famous words in motorsports. Then there's the command to start engines delivered by ups nobody logistics better than ups ups. We'd love logistics. Take time now for the starting line. Don't four today's Ford. Four hundred brought to you by Wrangler or unbeatable eatable comfort and value. You can count on Wrangler Wrangler. Real comfortable trees grow twenty two Mike List Milwaukee Oregon school media media for grow. twenty-one Jeff Hodi Shimon New York looking associates Chevrolet TJ Val Nevada Green Smoke Dot Com or road twenty. You traveled squabble. Janesville Wisconsin Long John. Silver's Ford Casey mears Bakersfield California Geico's Road Nineteen David Yowen Riverside California l. -Fornia Taco Bell. Joe Nemechek Lakeland Florida Toyota. Camry ro eight t David Streaming South Bend Indiana Inception motorsports I Chevrolet Bobby Labonte Corpus Christi Texas Restore Power Toyota. Rose Seventeen Dave Blaney Portland Ohio Tommy. Baldwin Racing Chevrolet Michael Doubt Glendale Arizona Toyota Camry Rose Sixteen Donald Middletown Connecticut on Jeff Burton South Boston. Virginia Caterpillar Chevrolet Eh Yo. Jj gaily Phoenix Arizona for Kollwitz Alpine California Tangaroa Express row. Fourteen David Reutemann Pills Florida. Aaron Green Machine Toyota Camry on Palo Alto Yacht Columbia target Chevrolet row. Thirteen Jamie mcmurray Joplin apple misery. Bass pro shops Chevy Impala mark. Martin Batesville Arkansas. Go Daddy Dot Com Chevrolet road twelve. Brian Vickers Fort Lauderdale L.. Florida Red Bull Toyota. All Menard Oakland Wisconsin menards Chevrolet row eleven land castle Cedar Rapids Iowa Security Benefits thanking teacher. Today's Chevy Kevin Harvick Bakersfield California. Budweiser Chevrolet rolled ten. Trevor Bayne Knoxville Tennessee Ford Motor craft. Or Kyle Busch Las Vegas Nevada interstate batteries. Camera Road Knives. Could I on my Cassandra's Tasmania Australia. Stanley Clip Boyer emporia Kansas Inches cheerios hamburger helper. Chevrolet row. Eight Regan. Smith paid on New York. Knicks arose. Chevy Tony Stewart Columbus Indiana office depot. Mobil one Chevrolet role seven button. Ryan Newman South Indiana. US Army Chevrolet. David Ragan Unit della Georgia. UPS Ford rose six AJ nigger Saturday. California California best buy four dylan are genius. Mooresville North Carolina amp energy. National Guards Silverlake. Now the top ten starters starting tents Denny Hamlin Chesterfield Virginia Fedex Toyota starting nine Jimmy Johnson Oklahoma California low Chevrolet starting eighth. Greg piffle Vancouver Washington three. Am Ford Fusion. Starting seventh. Jeff Gordon Allowed California. Drive to end hunger Chevrolet. Starting Sixth Matt Cambridge Wisconsin Anson thrown row. For Starting Fifth Brad Keselowski Rochester Hills Michigan collide dot starting fourth. Kurt Busch Las Vegas Nevada. Shell Pennzoil Dodge starting third. Casey CAIN enumclaw Washington Red Bull Toyota Starting Second Marci X.. Junior may add a New Jersey Napa auto parts and starting on the Pole Carl Edwards Columbia Missouri Half Black Port three starters for today's Ford four hundred brought to you by Wrangler for unbeatable comfort value. You can count on Wrangler Wrangler real comfortable gene deals now. Rolling fit road is L. began again several pace laps before we drop the grain and start the Ford four hundred this afternoon here at homestead Miami speedway are huge crowd on hand as separate four-party hall a perfect day to go racing. It is at a great day to close out the season. See what happens here who ends up in the championship this after. We'll talk a little bit about that later. In the you might get a fifty cent poo see which one does You you scare me when you say that money. Let's take a swing around the racetrack right now and bring in some other voices you'll hear in our coverage today at the Ford four hundred covering the accident turns one and two from Barre Vermont. Is Dave Moody ago or good afternoon. Everyone is the field rolls off pit VIP road at Miami speedway for the first time this afternoon. Let's give you the lay of the land at this end of the racetrack incremental banking eighteen degrees super bottom nineteen in the middle twenty degrees up top. And what that means is if you've got a fast race car and the will to use it. You can pass cars at homestead instead. We'll see these machines fan out to three and even four wide on this banking. Every inch of available asphalt will be used and used often. Then they'll spill bill out onto the back straight away at down the backstretch where they'll come to the attention of Mike. Bagley Atlanta Georgia. Thank you good afternoon. Everybody at this racetrack. Probably one of the most versatile all all the NASCAR landscape because of the variable banking eighteen nineteen and twenty degrees and that gives drivers options over the course of four hundred miles to not necessarily have to go to pit wrote for chassis adjustment to perhaps maybe readjust the line being used all the racetrack. We saw Friday night of the NASCAR camping world truck series race yesterday the NASCAR nationwide series race. He's we'll see it here again this afternoon in the Nascar Sprint Cup series season finale. We see drivers work at the bottom and then all of a sudden go topside. Get more grit more horsepower and more more speed and pick up positions one after another. No doubt we will see that here this afternoon. Exciting Day on tap at Homestead Miami speedway I position high atop turnover three to call all the action of the Ford four hundred. Today's broadcast of the Ford. Four hundred brought to you under exclusive radio rights granted by homestead Miami speedway to Marin radio solely for the private noncommercial use you are listening audience any publication reproduction or other use of the description of the counts of this event without the express written consent of the motoring network is prohibited. One unusual thing.

Chevrolet Tony Stewart Ford Toyota Miami Carl Edwards California Wisconsin US Wrangler NASCAR Florida Budweiser Chevrolet Las Vegas Nevada Jimmy Johnson Alan quickey Andrew Berry Georgia
"ford" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

04:49 min | 9 months ago

"ford" Discussed on Front Burner

"Mike Welcome back to the pod Hey Jamie thanks for being here good to be always one of our favorites so in one of our favorite things to talk okay many months of what felt like in exile the Doug Ford exile he is back making headlines this week and there's been a lot said about Ford being essentially told or nudged to stay off the radar these months because of fears that he could hurt Conservative leader sure we've talked about that on this podcast many times his approval ratings have been dismal but what else have you been hearing about the purpose of this hiatus Doug Ford needed to do this for himself not just the fans year absolutely you know there's this idea that somehow you know the big folks are conservative headquarters in Ottawa old Doug Ford to do this that isn't how it works. He knew that he needed to have a reset and so since the beginning of June he's done a bunch of things things you know he he shuffled his cabinet means you're cabinet shuffle got rid of the Finance Minister who delivered the budget only a few weeks earlier right his chief of staff laugh Sousse the controversial Dean French who many blamed even within the Conservatives of creating kind of toxic environment at Queens Park for for staff offend for a MPP left in a amid a nepotism scandal right let's talk about that a little bit more as this Patriot scandal the premier rescinded to plummer point it's this morning after reports revealed two of the appointees are tied to his chief of Staff Dean French so dean French premiums top political adviser laughed shortly after it got revealed that people who are closely connected to him partly through relatives of his wife also through the Lacrosse movement but she's been involved in got some really plum appointments six figure salary jobs as trade representatives antero and so that was the final Straw for for Dean French now when he resigned Dean French didn't say that had anything to do with the nepotism see handle there was bring around him basically the announcement came out from the premiums office was that he was going to pursue other opportunities and that he had never intended to around as chief of staff for very long you really think I walked down the street and Berta people worry about being French do you think they worry about anything they worry about a job that the key thing is that he was in large part responsible for you talked about the moving fast and breaking things method of the Ford government could central figure yet so it was kind of a take no prisoners act as if you've got a really really big mandate to do whatever you want and I think one of the the changes that's happened over the past few months that permanently Ford is listening more to people who to who were saying to him you know we're making mistakes and just because you want a big majority doesn't mean that you know damn the torpedoes Usan just forge ahead and not worry about the consequences essentially that it was a mandate to do whatever you want necessarily what everything from cutting Toronto City Council in half to the attempt to appoint Doug Ford's friend Ron Governor as a the Commissioner of the we've talked about this on the podcasts before absolutely van controversy continues to swirl around the choice of a new provincial police chief on the heels of allegations of favoritism and political interference in the selection process Premier Doug Ford now faces a serious allegation that his office asked the forced to hide a questionable expense all of these things that were piling up and then the budget the budget the big problem with the budget for for Doug Ford was that there were all these cuts they're kind of hidden from so instead of a big rip the band aid off moment on budget day to say you know we've got to make some tough choices the the cuts were buried and we found out about them as reporters sort of day after day after day after day and it meant a whole bunch of bad publicity for the government and we talked about this with you before on the Kathy idea that it just felt like every day there was a headline yeah and that was because of the way they went they went about trying to make it seem as if the budget wasn't such should burn sorta thing so by the time June came and and for its polling numbers were had fallen off a cliff in he really needed to make this change so I think I think the cabinet shuffle the Dean French departure and the And just this time away from the spotlight has been a good thing the Ford government to try to pick itself up from the floor which it had fallen.

Doug Ford Ford Mike Jamie Ottawa
"ford" Discussed on Commons

Commons

02:37 min | 9 months ago

"ford" Discussed on Commons

"He was one of the oversize cartoonish personalities at Toronto City Hall Toronto City Council on certainly had wins and says he was first elected in two thousand he was a character out of fictions seems not generous enough ax conservative rub rail against counselor expenses bike lanes the cost of watering plants City Hall Arts and Culture Funding a whole host of other things if you allies and council and even fewer friends he would get into shouting matches with colleagues on the Council Floor Most City Hall watchers considered him route and he was best known for insulting just about every group of people in the city in a few years he had insulted gay people trade these people Chinese people homeless people drug users cyclists who were killed by cars people with AIDS and Italian and then there was the far more serious stuff the stuff that reminds you that he's a member of the same Ford family so surrounded by drugs and violence he was arrested for drunk driving and floor Oughta and was kicked out of a leafs game for getting hammered and screaming at a couple and I quote you right wing Communist bastards who the fuck do you think you are are you a Ti sure do you want your little wife to go over to Iran and get raped and shot in two thousand and six Doug Ford senior the Patriarch of the family died and though the public didn't note at the time it was around then that in addition to his heavy drinking rob Ford started using crack cocaine in two thousand eight he was charged with assaulting his wife or not though the charges were dropped here's Rob Ford publicly responding to the charges there's no secret to rise.

Toronto City Hall Toronto City City Hall Arts and Culture AIDS Iran crack cocaine Rob Ford City Hall Ford leafs Doug Ford
"ford" Discussed on Commons

Commons

18:59 min | 9 months ago

"ford" Discussed on Commons

"A. N. A. D. A. This episode of comments is brought to you in part by fresh books fresh books as the cloud accounting software that makes it simple to keep track of your invoices and payments it up and she moved in with her old high school boyfriend Michael Kick lists the former white supremacist but a few months later ennio would break into their home with a shot the next Ten Years Rob Ford became one of the city's most memorable politicians Arnaud Parties in Toronto City Council but more than almost anyone else rob Ford was a party of one outsider and I don't just mean an outsider of trying to count so all our political class even though he's very much the center of political class except for subways and Football Rob Ford opposed pretty much any government spending he wasn't just an anti families had some trials and tribulations in the weather the storm and keep moving on despite his many scandals rob Ford announced he would run for mayor in twenty ten and brother Doug would run to take over his city council seat in Togo few people took him seriously at first but right from the beginning rob Ford began.

Michael Kick ennio Rob Ford Toronto City Council Doug A. N. A. D. cloud Arnaud Parties Football Togo Ten Years
"ford" Discussed on Commons

Commons

03:24 min | 9 months ago

"ford" Discussed on Commons

"The street level dealer he was the one who I believe with organized supply of the street level dealers which means he is getting it from someone else who probably had other criminal conduct early age now Kathy Ford the oldest of the four had her own serious issues she flirted with white supremacy in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s mostly because of her pretty nice one but it had disappeared and Doug Senior was pissed so he did what any reasonable person would do he got all of his kids to take answered questions from a retired Toronto Police officer all of them denied taking the money but the polygraph said that Kathy and her husband had been lying caffeine back home there was only one of the strange tragic twists and Kathy's life leader on another romantic partner would accidentally shoot her in the face brothers rob and Doug Doug was considered to be the smart one and he was groomed to take over the family business deco labels and tags but rob my hero overall end of story he wants told a Toronto Life reporter and in Nineteen Ninety six he did try and failed to win a seat on Toronto City Council but four years later with his brother Doug acting as his campaign manager he won he even got an endorsement from the Toronto Star of all places.

Kathy Ford Doug Senior officer caffeine partner Doug Doug reporter Nineteen Ninety Toronto City Council Toronto Police rob Toronto Life Toronto four years
"ford" Discussed on Commons

Commons

03:35 min | 9 months ago

"ford" Discussed on Commons

"Jonathan Goolsbee kindle ends news editor was Night Rob Ford was elected in two thousand ten as expected it to be a close election modern Toronto is a city split between its downtown and the suburbs physically cycle ugly and politically former liberal cabinet minister George Smitherman was the man for the downtown elites but rob Ford had skyrocketed from out of nowhere to become the tribune of the suburbs so Jonathan a prototypical downtown man made his way into Fort Territory I took the to see out to the Charleston percenter she's my second time their first time taking transit there to Rob Ford's event I believe polls closed eight o'clock I got there I think maybe ten minutes ten fifteen minutes after eight and walking through the hall you know realizing that the election had already been declared and Ford was the winner that was I imagine I mean maybe not the same level of horror as people in the United States Edwin Donald trump was elected but there's still like Holy Shit were this is happening this is going to happen emotions and the Toronto Congress Centre running high that night it wasn't tense people were there people were angry people were amped and when Rob Ford came in to the Tiger which I will never forget it was the first physically intense experience having covering Ford I can't remember if there were bouncers or what but there was a lot of fucking shoving of people to make way for him and I remember getting jostled around in a way that I was not used to covering politics but would become used to in the coming ears rob Ford ascended to the stage beaming with pride draped around his neck was a Garland of flowers given to him by supporter of they are divided we are united we are united on that stage was the rest of the Ford family his wife or not I was beside him behind him his sister Kathy his nephew Michael and his older brother Randy wearing a black cowboys ahead to his right was Doug Ford draped in his own garland and who had just one rob Ford's pulled city council seat this was Rana's new first family most people didn't realize at the time is that almost all of them were harboring dark secrets that over the next decade the holes city the province the country even the world would find out about that wouldn't stop there rise by the end of the story the fords will be even more powerful than when they started but on that stage at that Moment Rob Ford was still savoring his victory that is not what people would be saying for years from that night many people predicted that the Ford mayoralty would end up being deranged circus but no one on Cellino one could have predicted the chaos to come but this wasn't the beginning of the Ford Dynasty when Rob Ford died in two thousand sixteen that wasn't even close to the end.

news editor Rob Ford Jonathan Goolsbee ten fifteen minutes ten minutes
"ford" Discussed on CarStuff

CarStuff

09:54 min | 9 months ago

"ford" Discussed on CarStuff

"It's for a smaller compact pickup truck like that it's pretty unusual for that to happen just found that kind of interesting and you know what we're going to have the rest the new ranger and we're GonNa get to that you know the specs and you know the information about it and you know what makes it different or unique or interesting I still want to talk about you know the nineteen eighty three to two thousand eleven Ford Rangers just to live a bit they were extremely popular here in the United States in a lot the leader in the in the market I guess for that size vehicle in as far as sales go a lot like the Ford F series which has been what decades of top-selling vehicle but the one thousand nine hundred eighty three to two thousand eleven ranger one of the most popular pickups on the road but it disappeared is the car companies started move toward oversize trucks and then you know of course SUV season you know we've heard this story many many times from different manufacturers they started to drop some of their smaller product you know those were the fuel-efficient smaller vehicles in the lightweight and head a feature that everybody really liked and enjoy their top sellers but they had to make room for the production of some of these bigger. SUV's bigger pickup trucks people wanted the bigger vehicles and this is back when fuel prices were at an all time low and you know just back to kind of that idea that excessive weight and size didn't matter at that time but then you know we kind of pulled that back a little bit a couple of times here and there and you know it's it's just going through these different fluctuations where people want different things at different times and for just kind of gave up on the Rangers Certain in two thousand eleven but not entirely as I said you know they they started those exports that went to South America Argentina. You know the Latin American The Latin American ranger which was around for don't sometime th the global ranger I guess is what they call it but you know the thing is once they did that in two thousand and eleven there were still a lot of people that really wanted the ranger to return percents and you know we're talking about a good seventy eight years now so there's a lot of people that are pretty excited about seeing a return now it is coming back as a a slightly larger vehicle it's going she be a mid sized truck is going to be in the mid size market they're basing this on the idea that the success of other models that our competitors to this you know the trying to think of what other one is there are there's the Shetty Colorado with a bigger one like the crew cab that has four wheel drive there's the Honda Ridgeline which again all wheel drive. There's the Toyota Tacoma same thing you know the double cab to a Tacoma 'cause we'll talk about you know vehicles in this class that are closely matched to what the Ford Ranger you're going to see on the streets is going to look like and behave like but the Colorado's really kind of the barometer for these mid size truck sales and I guess the sales on those are up something like eighty three percents two thousand fourteen so there's definitely a market for this vehicle and forces bringing the ranger back hoping that they can cashing on some of that success and that it can be a a smaller but still solid alternative to its f one fifty line that it's such a popular seller the pricing laid out here right now with the with the pricing on this because it's it's actually more affordable than you might thinker might have thought it would start at and the X. There's three model lines here that we are trim levels rather for the Ford Ranger at least in his first year and twenty nineteen and this is coming right from four comma the XL model which is kind of the base level Ford Ranger is starting right around twenty four thousand three hundred dollars the xl tea which is the mid range is right around Twenty eight thousand one hundred and twenty dollars and then there's the the top level which is the Larry it and Larry addition is right around thirty two three hundred ninety thousand so it does go up significantly from that point now also want to point out that I'm reading a few articles here from current driver road and track places like that that review these vehicles and they say that you know of course you can get one for twenty four three but it's not going to have many bells and whistles it's going to be pretty plain the ones that they tend to send to these These automobile magazines are a little bit more decked out with some of the the fancy bells and whistles and some of the fun stuff on them you know all the options so you get real fancy with the options the cost can go up to something like forty five thousand dollars so you're talking about forty five grand for a mid size pickup and when you see the size of it forty five grand might seem like an awful awful lot for a pickup truck I mean it's long little truck though I mean we we can talk about some of the features that make it desirable you know like why you might want to buy one and and honestly maybe the number one thing that you should consider is the you know over looking at if you're looking at a Ford F one fifty if you don't need something quite that large if you want some just a little bit smaller it does provide better fuel economy A and of course it has handling and maneuverability that is is better than the F one fifty just due to its size I mean that's inherently in part of the design is just going to that way it has a high strength steel frame which is actually pretty nice it supports a mostly steel body which is was really good because there's a big push to move to aluminum for these pickup trucks. Now in its ED courses high strength aluminum or military grade or however they want to market the stuff but the steel frame again mostly mostly steel body that's used there are some elements of the vehicle that our aluminum and that would be the hood the front fenders and the tailgate which are really the only areas we're aluminum issues right now they're saying they're saying that you know there's a chance that eventually this thing might go the same way as the F. One fifty with you know the more aluminum used as far as the the power plant goes they have used the ecoboost engine again so it's the two point three liter ecoboost engine it's right around two hundred and seventy horsepower which has a at three hundred and ten pound feet of Torque so it's pretty strong I think it's a decent little work truck again like my friend Steve's truck was you'd be surprised how much how much you can do with a small truck like that US seven thousand five hundred pounds of is the the towing limit that's if you have the trailer towing package which of course an add on which costs you more money so weigh the pros and cons so that if you need the trailer join package and has a ten speed automatic transmission which all right we've I need to pause here from talk about the ten speed automatic transmission because this I have in the past talked about the transmission I believe it's an eight speed transmission that was on my wife's jeep product she had a a jeep renegade it could just be a difference in manufacturers it could just be this one was not working right or whatever but I had a heck of a time with that eight speed transmission the automatic searching for gears it was like it never could find the right gear to be in whether it was going uphill downhill flat road whatever it was the thing was constantly searching for gears and it just didn't ever feel right to me maybe it wasn't smoothness issue maybe it was a you know software issue I don't know maybe it was the manufacturer could have just been flawed to begin with but I'm hoping that this ten speed automatic is a little bit smoother in the in the Ford Ranger and the only way to find that out I guess would be to get some seat time in this thing and and to be able to drive which I haven't done yet but I would love to so maybe someday I'll take one for a test drive in Suss it out for a little bit and see if you know I can report back you anything positive or negative on that 'cause I don't know I I would love to hear from somebody who maybe we already owns one of these and if you do have an issue with that transmission or actually any transmission that has you know upwards of six years when when you get up to you know the eight ten speed transmissions I think find a lot of problems sort of like what I have and and a maybe that's not the case in every situation but again I I'd love to hear from listeners about that automatic options as well it's not just adding different engine transmission combinations or you know whatever the case may be you're starting to add things like the chrome packages and the appearance or the FX offroad appearance packages or you know things like that so look carefully into that and right now you know this is another thing that we should talk about Ford has its raptor line of the F. One fifty the that whole F- line product outstanding vehicle performance vehicle I guess if you can call it off road performance really but right now as far as is the raptor package goes for the ranger they're saying that right now they don't have any plan to do anything like that but I can just about guaranteed in the next couple of years they're going to come out with Raptor version of this whole thing and maybe we can do another podcast about that because that will be an exciting one to drive I'm sure a a mid range or I'm sorry mid size pickup that has perform comments on level with you know some of the year the raptor line I think that'll be exciting to report on but you know before we get too much further into this we're going to have the rest in just a moment the debris you know earlier I mentioned that autozone provides a free service it's really quite helpful it's called the free autozone fixed under service now the free autozone fit finder services something where they analyze.

Ford Rangers Rangers United States South America Tacoma Toyota Latin American The Latin Ameri Honda Shetty Colorado Ridgeline twenty four thousand three hun seven thousand five hundred po forty five thousand dollars seventy eight years seventy horsepower twenty dollars three liter six years
"ford" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"ford" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Ford Motor Company is revamping its operations in Europe, restructuring plans include plant closures and cutting thousands of jobs as the company tries to turn around its global business. Joining us now with more details via Skype from Berlin is Wall Street Journal reporter William Boston. William Ford has been suffering from losses in its European business. Can you tell us more about what led to this decision? And what the company is planning exactly will think the pressure on Ford now is is not just from the market. But also from CEO Jim Hackett whose basically saying to his his chiefs around the world if you money allocated to invest in your business, then you have to be profitable. And so the Ford Europe team is looking at their at their business. It's chronically loss-making. This has been a problem that American auto makers have had in Europe since the nineteen eighties for is occasionally. Awful. And then it tips back into losses again. And so what Ford is now deciding to do is to streamline the business to cut and ministry costs by combining functions wherever possible and they're getting out of low profit margin vehicle businesses, such as the the niche products the C max, which they're they're going to stop producing because they just don't make money with those vehicles. William investors have pressed CEO Jim Hackett for more details on his plans for the company. How does the recent announcement about what's going on in Europe fit into his overall plans, and how does it differ from what's happening with Ford in the United States? Will this is the first part of that that plan if you will this is this is how the details come out because these regional businesses are like corporations unto themselves. These are self contained businesses. There's they factory here that employees. They have sales up. Ration-? So each each one has to be dealt with differently in order to address the issues in the market. Other automakers have also announced cost saving measures in recent months GM is closing plants in the United States and Canada. And the automotive industry is facing challenges from electric vehicles and ongoing trade tensions are the changes. We're seeing at Ford reflective of these new challenges the industry as a whole is facing. And should we expect to see similar moves from other automakers? Yeah, we'll we have seen. We have seen moves from from other automakers over the past couple of years, the push oh in France has made a lot of cost cuts shut down plants GM decided it simply wasn't worthwhile being in Europe anymore that the the outlook for profit in Europe was going to cost them too much money in order to invest in modernizing narrow up rations in investing in new technology. In investing in technology to meet regulatory targets that are becoming harder and harder to me the investment in electric vehicles. So Ford is kind of now beginning to also take that step. It's a little bit late to the game. But it's you know, it's there's still time to to turn things around. And what's happening is that the industry is under a whole. It's it's kind of like a perfect storm of pressures that are coming from different different. Sources you have the trade issues with the US and Europe, and and China trade disputes who have problems that have arisen because the United Kingdom has decided to leave the European Union. So that caused a sharp drop in the value of Britney, sterling, which is cost for a lot of money through currency transactions and through basically repatriating profits to its German operations and losing money on the exchange rate's. There's also the investments in technology, and that is probably. The biggest challenge that automakers. Have today is that the family car is being transformed from a vehicle to get from point a to point b into a smartphone on wheels. It's an entertainment center. It's a data center that's becoming like a small computer or a big computer. If you will. And this is costing the industry billions of billions of dollars in our Indian in research and development investment in order to make those cars competitive and in order to develop the technology that auto companies don't have today. Sounds like a lot of challenges automakers will continue to face this year. Wall Street Journal reporter William Boston joining us via Skype from Berlin. Thanks so much. William thanks for having me. And that's what's news. I'm Anne Marie for totally New York for the Wall Street Journal.

Ford Motor Company Europe William Ford Wall Street Journal William Boston United States Jim Hackett William Skype CEO Berlin reporter GM Anne Marie European Union New York France Britney United Kingdom
"ford" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"ford" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

"And and then on top of that, you have her testify that she's in no basic information about what the committee wanted to do in terms of questioning her privately rather than making her go through this that that hearing that really never needed to take place if that had been done properly germs allowing the committee to talk to her privately and having judge cabinet time address, the allegations privately, but instead her lawyers, evidently didn't enterprise her of what the committee offered to do in terms of having her questioning, you're at home in California. And I remember thinking of time that's a real problem for her lawyers. And that's why we. It up in the end with ethics complaint with the DC are here in Washington DC. Now, you know, how political he's bar associations. Are do you expect to get anywhere? You know, I think it will take a long time to get anywhere. Get Amar experience with the bar. But I think in the least they're going to have to answer a to the bar about what they did in response to our complaint, which puts extensively from the testimony. We we don't do the we we don't file a bar complaint against the lawyer lightly. Bill we looked at the transcript. It was pretty clear that she was not aware of this. The ski offer to go out have her give information to the committee staff directly, California. And that's a real problem for a lawyer's either. She wasn't telling the truth or they have to kind of explain why it is. He was under this missing impression from the committee. And why they didn't correct. That missing impression is definitely a problem there in in Ford camp. Now, if Dr Ford was truthful in saying she never wanted to go public. She wanted to handle this in a way that the information got to the judiciary committee, certainly the solution would have been for the committee to interview her privately at least at first, but they never did that because his doctor Ford told congress under oath, she didn't know about the offer. So you seems to me the Judicial Watch very. Very very firm ground. But again, I will go back to the fact that this is Washington DC. This is a very well known law firm. I'm sure you know, it, okay? With a lot of juice, and it would be shocking. If they got sanctioned at all, wouldn't it? It'd be a pleasant surprise. That's for sure. I think the problem. The her lawyers have is that it looked like they might have been advocating for Democrats on the committee has posed to the interest of their client. And you know, You know, the. they they obviously don't like the fact without the bar complaint. They're upset they're saying. There was her client was their client was confused, but I can't map how the client be confused. I mean, you know, you're either know about the offer to interview in private and your home or you don't and that's a bunch of bull. What do you know about cats Marshall in banks? I mean is this. This is a very activist. Liberal progressive politically involved firm is it not. It is. But on the other hand Bill, you can't be politically activists firm. And you know, I mean you've been doing this a long time. You know, there are a lot of good lawyers who are democratic operatives in the sense that you would go to them for legal advice. Even though they're very active in politics or on behalf of their public policy. So it's not necessarily a bar to having a good legal representation. But it looks to me, and I was sitting in the hearing room. I heard testified I thought oh my gosh. Her lawyers did something wrong here and a review of the testimony close review the testimony confirmed that so. You know, it's not about politics. It's about whether or not they follow the rules in keeping their client apprise of kiosk. But it is about the politics so little bit because it was represented to the country that Dr Ford was a victim of an assault. When she was fifteen years old by a man who is being considered for the supreme court, the.

judiciary committee Bill Washington DC Dr Ford California Ford camp Ford Amar assault Marshall fifteen years
"ford" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"ford" Discussed on Pod Save America

Mark Sanford Republican Brad Kavanagh Trump Dr. Ford t. Eighty Cavanaugh Obama congressman assault Eddie Haskell America Washington Tobias McConnell Lindsey Graham
"ford" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

Sex is Not For Sissies

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"ford" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

Amer diabetes Valda fort dot com Noah Hartfield Facebook two hundred fifty calories two hundred fifty calorie eight hundred calorie thousand calories thirty minutes two minutes seven days two hours
"ford" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"ford" Discussed on Business Wars

"A model t and many make that dream come true as they do one thing becomes crystal clear ford is gonna need a bigger factory it's nineteen twenty and a crowd is gathering inside the belly of a new ford factory called the rouge and it is huge it's a factory so big well it's like something out of science fiction machines are everywhere but it is totally silent this is a crowning moment for the ford family henry stands with his only son twenty six year old who's holding his son three year old henry ford the second young henry is too young to understand that some day he will command all of this the toddler is handed a lit match and he likes coke in a furnace almost instantly the gigantic machines roar to life the clatter and thunder filling the air the factory sits on the rouge river endeavor michigan it has its own docs and one hundred miles of interior railroad it even has its own electric plant enough to light up chicago and a steel mill at one end railroad cars hall roy ingredients like rubber sand in iron ore and model ts roll out the other side eventually this plant will employ one hundred thousand workers henry ford appears.

ford michigan chicago henry ford rouge river twenty six year three year mill