32 Burst results for "Ford Foundation"

At COP26, over 100 countries pledge to end deforestation

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 7 months ago

At COP26, over 100 countries pledge to end deforestation

"A coalition of governments and private funders personals plans to invest one point seven billion dollars to aid indigenous communities are protected by a diverse tropical forests in the next four years governments from the US the UK Norway Germany and the Netherlands and seventeen other private phone does say the money will support activities to secure will strengthen and protect indigenous peoples and local communities land and resource rights I'm provide other kinds of aid including the group activities a spokesperson for the Ford Foundation one of the founders who told the AP the governments are providing approximately one billion while the rest will come from the philanthropies I'm Charles de Ledesma

Norway The Netherlands Germany UK Ford Foundation United States AP Charles De Ledesma
"ford foundation" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:55 min | 7 months ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news, I'm Antonio Gonzalez. Indigenous youth led a march to the capital Friday as part of weeklong people versus fossil fuels demonstrations in Washington, D.C., the week included demonstrations outside The White House and Army Corps office and a sit in at the Department of the Interior. According to the indigenous environmental network and organizer, more than 600 people were arrested during demonstrations last week, joy Braun with the indigenous environmental network was among those arrested. She told democracy now, their message is directed to President Biden. We wanted to bring the front lines to his doorstep to let him see that we are very serious about climate change and declaring a climate emergency. People versus fossil fuels came out of build back fossil free coalition of over 200 frontline organizations around the United States that came together and said, we're not being heard. We're not being listened to. And we have to unite. They're also calling on the administration and Congress to stop all new fossil fuel projects. The fort belknap Indian community is requesting an investigation after a mining company filed claims on an environmental reclamation area south of the reservation. Taylor stagner with Yellowstone public radio has more. The zortman dusky mine reclamation area has been under a mineral withdrawal for 20 years. That's an administrative process that keeps land exempt from new mining claims. The federal department of interior has been renewing the mineral withdrawal every 5 years, but earlier this month, the labs in that agreement opened up the reclamation area for 48 hours, allowing a mining company out of Minnesota to Lake claims on it. Tribal community members and environmental activists want answers about the lack of communication between the department of interior, the tribes and the environmental rights groups that have been working since the late 90s to clean up the zortman and land dusky mine. Bonnie gesturing is with the conservation group earthworks. She says the organization has been working to treat water at the old mine. So the extension of the mineral withdrawal is really crucial because not only do we need to protect the existing reclamation work, but there's ongoing reclamation work and water treatment that needs to be protected in order to provide a safe public resource for those private lands and for the people who live downstream, which is, of course, the fort belt up into a community. Gesturing says that the reclamation project has cost around 50 million of state and federal funds. The bell map Indian community and the environmental nonprofits on this project are still waiting a response from the department of interior, for national native news. I'm Taylor stagner. New data and maps show the pandemic's impact across American Indian and Alaska native communities, the mountain west news bureau's Maggie molin reports. When Navajo Nation saw its first cases of COVID-19 in March 2020, Jordan Bennett begay started a spreadsheet. She's the managing editor of Indian country today and the spreadsheet was a way to track coronavirus cases across indigenous communities. At the time, that data was incomplete. Today, that spreadsheet has evolved into an interactive and comprehensive set of maps and data that are available online. The project was a collaboration between the news outlet and the Johns Hopkins center for American Indian health. Alison Barlow directs the center. This is so important in terms of allocation of resources, whether it was PPE at the beginning of the pandemic or diagnostic testing antibody testing and so forth. How do you distribute these federal resources if you don't know really where the hotspots are? The maps are available to the public and are updated regularly using data from tribes for the mountain west news bureau. I'm Maggie.

department of interior Antonio Gonzalez Taylor stagner Washington, D.C. Army Corps office joy Braun President Biden fort belknap Indian community federal department of interior White House Yellowstone mountain west news bureau Maggie molin Congress Jordan Bennett begay United States Bonnie Minnesota Johns Hopkins center for Ameri Alison Barlow
Making Beautiful Music With Community-Driven Partnerships

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Making Beautiful Music With Community-Driven Partnerships

"Henry donahue is the executive director of save the music a national nonprofit that helps students schools and communities reach their full potential through the power of making music prior to save the music. Henry was the ceo and head of partnerships at purpose a digital strategy and creative agency that focuses on social impact projects. Notable clients included every town for gun safety the aclu oxfam international. The ford foundation nike. I- kia audi and liverpool f c. Henry has also worked as a media. Executive focused on digital product development is held senior positions at discover conde nast primedia and lendingtree dot com spent most of the nineteen nineties on the road across the usa as a fundraiser for political candidates including us senators. Jay rockefeller from west virginia. And ron wyden from oregon at the same time. He was playing guitar in an indie rock band and running into small independent record label. Henry has an abbey in american history from harvard college and an mba from darden graduate school of business at the university of virginia henry. Great to have you with us. Sharing the story of save the music and the lessons contained within the be here could see joe thanks. Hey i'm delighted to have you. So why don't we start sharing with our listeners. The origin story of save the music. What was the germ of its mission and tell us a little bit about the journey. Yeah i mean safe. The music's mission and vision are the same today as they were back. joni urine. John sykes aretha franklin one. Dvd's categories aretha flying sleep dion and Every student every public schools should be making music as part of their education. I think you had a great overview of why at the intro. We know for decades of research that when schools have music students do better. The school does better. The community does better In normal times. I travel all around the country even in the toughest schools when you get to that band room or that choir room. You know. it's that joy and inspiration and hope for the future and all those things. So i i love going to high schools middle schools elementary schools. I love interacting advanced features van kits. It's amazing the landscape out there. Is that most schools in the. Us do have music as part of their school day. there's a quote for geoffrey canada That i'm sure i'm angling but it's something to the effect of if you wanna see what a quality education looks like. Look what rich people do about. Eighty percent of american schools have music and art as part of their school day And the programs that caught over the years. And we're we do. Most of our work are in schools that serve black students immigrant students and in rural rural students as well. What do you love about your job. Henry donahue because you loved this i love so it you you mentioned. I mean i've worked in politics and advocacy and social impact in various ways for for a long time You know at purpose Which some of your listeners might be familiar with worked on gun safety. We worked on marriage. Equality we worked on A project involving immigrants and You know the fight for the fifteen dollars minimum wage. All of which were were were deeply deeply satisfying. But when chris mccarthy who's the guy runs. mtv now came to me in we had this conversation about the h. one. Save the music which five six years ago you know still had a very solid sort of core group of program team people working there doing amazing work but has sort of been what i call know an orphan corporate asset on. Cbs empire. You know. I was presented with the opportunity to do the thing that i did for my job. Which was you know corporate impact strategy advocacy and combined with the thing that i spent my whole life in love with which which is music. Which by the way you. You don't have the benefit of seeing henry. But i do. And i see a keyboard. And i see a guitar so yeah. This is a music guy. You're a. You're a an advocate Andrew musician and you get to do both in the same job. That's pretty awesome. Yeah i think this is sort of at the core of was eighth. music does Which is i remember myself as a pretty angry and somewhat directionless

Henry Donahue Henry Aclu Oxfam International Kia Audi Conde Nast Primedia Darden Graduate School Of Busi University Of Virginia Henry Joe Thanks John Sykes Aretha Franklin Lendingtree Jay Rockefeller Ford Foundation Ron Wyden Harvard College Liverpool West Virginia Joni Dion Oregon
"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ford Foundation daughter work And from the sustaining members of this NPR station. I'm Jenn White. This is one, eh? We're discussing President Biden's pushed to reopen American schools within a 100 days. Many of you are parents and teachers, and you had a lot to say. I have some grave concerns about that on Lee because of a profound lack of transparency with my own school system. And alerting us when there has been an exposure and the process that they go about it. My Children have been in school all year with no issues. And I feel that all Children, not just Certain groups of Children deserve the same right to be back in the classroom. I work in a school that has both middle school and high school age Children in it, and there has been too breakouts of covert 19. I am really in favor of getting our kids back to school. I think that our Children are actually more capable than we may give them credit for two adhere to these important hygiene practices. I don't feel safe sending my life back to school. Well, even though she is going to be vaccinated because she could bring it home and possibly pass it on to her elderly relatives and my elderly mother, Thanks to carry Ashley, Travis, Cara and Dr Sharing your thoughts with us here to help us answer some of these thorny questions is onion cabinets. She's an education reporter for NPR. She's also the author of the task. It's a book about standardized testing. Her upcoming book is about Children and covert 19. Anya Welcome back. Thanks for having me again also with us. Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, Randy, Thanks for being here today..

reporter President Biden Randi Weingarten Ford Foundation Jenn White American Federation of Teacher NPR Anya president Lee Randy Ashley Travis
"ford foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Learn more at Ford Foundation daughter work. It's 8 46 It's morning edition from NPR NEWS. I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon has exploded under president Gyroball Sonar. Oh, new data from the country's space agency shows the rate of deforestation. Is at a 12 year high. The rain forest is home to approximately one million indigenous people. So what's the impact on them? Gustavo Fella does is the founder of Info Amazonia, a data based journalism initiative. He says illegal logging, land grabs for farming and even gold mining has been encouraged by the Bulls in our government. It's threatening indigenous people. So you have a lot of land grabbing and invasions and territories, Indigenous territories by this illegal miners, while the discourse and in both marriages courses and I called this is our cat miners, you know these people need to survive and just find some gold in the river is not like that. It's real mining going on were like huge, expensive machines. We've done that need for Amazonia large investigations showing that this is a big business connected to Hamster done or Miami and as the pandemic evolves, and gold gets the highest price ever. There's no way of getting out of this because people won't Stop buying gold. The pressure is coming directly to the Amazon and fueling this legal activities asked me to Boston, hers doing something no, not at all. Also narrow has had an ally in President Trump in terms of supporting industry over the environment, But there has been a shift incoming President Joe Biden has threatened economic consequences if deforestation continues. Do you think more international pressure could impact both scenarios environmental approach one way It's clear that economic pressure trade barriers my change, but at the same time you see the recent Joe Biden mentioned kind of energized the base of both of our like that's what they want. They want our hands on, so he creates a kind of political environment that is prone for the kind of nationalistic discourse as well. Let me ask you this. If pressure from the United States government isn't going to do the trick, then I'm wondering how concerned you are about what is happening in the Amazon and and what you see in the short term as the future there. Look, My main concern is that while this is happening, and I'm like this back and forth and pressure, international pressure damage always get more and more illegal. We know about drug trafficking. Of the FARC in Colombia has operated for years in the Amazon and now be in guerilla group. Exactly so now that they're all mostly done in Colombia, all this trade routes of cocaine had moved to preserve all to Peru and the south part of Venezuela, and the war is pierced there. I don't know if you have looked at some point the home side. Rates of the Amazon cities right now, they just like the highest in Brazil, because all the you know, like the criminal activity off the big centers of the South have moved there because they're trying to control that. And this money is linked to a lot of other illegal activities, including the four station because it's a big way of laundering your money and getting land, and it's moving into illegal mining, legal mining off gold. It's huge. Now it's the highest level ever in the Amazon, all the Amazon countries, especially in south part of Venezuela. Which is controlled by the same Gabriel is that left London And so we have a regional security issue that is really building up. Co star file. A Rose is in Sao Paolo. He's the environment investigations editor at the Pulitzer Center and the founder of Info, Amazonia. Thank you very.

Amazon Joe Biden president Gustavo Fella founder of Info Amazonia Colombia Venezuela NPR NEWS Steve Inskeep Ford Foundation Amazonia Sao Paolo Lulu Garcia Navarro Gyroball Sonar Gabriel FARC United States Boston Bulls
"ford foundation" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"They've got sensors on them so they don't die and little sun shades and sprinklers. A cat very taken with that place. But it's super real and when you go there and they don't talk about being cyberpunk talk about whether they can make a budget without any any tourist traffic as the pandemic killing off the people who were supposed to be paying for the attractions of looking at all these little rare cacti. So yeah i. I read write some science fiction about them but instead i just go into like pay or price for a ticket and try and give them some beer money when i go to their public finance where they do stuff like that are reveal books about the local lizards so i went reviewed when of their lizard books. But but it's like big your character. Masha and hanging out with these left wing guys in the imaginary show. Stock ya though you could say. I look people think you're going to ever protect your plants. Don't you realize that lent their islands gonna go underwater. And the temperature's going to soar even if you get your tourists back terresa gonna trample all the rare plants and so forth but they have the same kind of well. We must do something kind of attitude that that activists always have and they're they are you know as an existence british. So it's it's it's kinda hard for me to glamorize them. Even though i read a badge of things like that happen. And i'm not even sure they can stay alive but you know that might be a little bit cynical and might be that in fact in five or six years. I got all kinds of european union funding and they might be a really big deal right. I mean be bigger than the ford foundation. Our or maybe maybe some mogul. Jeff bezos would take it interest in suddenly draw up a ton of long now money on them and suddenly have like laser drilled super green. Whatever right i mean writing off be a state and then they interested me a lot but they're not they're not solar punk. You don't go there and they're not did that they are. They are much more about blood and soil. You know spanish kind of.

Jeff bezos Masha ford foundation european union
"ford foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"And from the Ford Foundation, working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms Normal at Ford Foundation, Donald It's 6 46. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no Whale. King hears something that President Trump and Joe Biden agree on. Globalization has left some American workers behind. They do not agree on how to fix the problem. Cardiff Garcia and Stacy Vanek Smith, who host Planet Money's indicator, podcast, started wondering When and where did globalization start? The year is 9 86 and the North's August tell of a Viking named Bjarni Hair Jolson, who is sailing west from Norway. He wanted to spend the winter with his father that is Yale historian Valerie Hanson and his father he thought was in Iceland. So he went to Iceland but be Arnie's father had gone to Greenland with other Norse explorers. So Bjarni keeps sailing west until he spots a new land southwest of Greenland at that place is called Vineland, and we're not absolutely sure to this day where it was Bjarni and his men return to Greenland and tell the other Norse settlers what they've seen and around the year 1000 Leif Ericson follows that same path from Greenland. Back to Vineland, becoming the first European to set foot in the Americas, and the first encounter between the Norse and indigenous peoples in the Americas comes a few years later. When leaves brother Torvald brings his own crew to Vineland. When they arrive. The Vikings under Torvald come across nine indigenous men sleeping Then they do something horrible. The North's kill eight of the nine men and then the ninth man escapes and he comes back with some friends and they then attack the north and they shoot Torvald and he dies of an arrow wound. Torvalds men go back to Greenland. And several years after that, the Vikings returned again to Vinland under the command of Tor Finn, Carl Stephanie, and this time the Vikings not only make contact with the indigenous peoples, but they also trade goods with them. And this is the first recorded instance of Europeans trading with people in the Americas. Here is where we have to say that we don't actually know just how true these stories are, But we do know that the stories are at least based on actual history. Valerie says that this trading network was one of the many trading networks that were being established simultaneously. At that moment in history around the year 1000 to the west of the Atlantic Ocean, There were trading networks linking North and South America. There is a trading center call Cahokia Mounds in East ST Louis and Echo Kia. Archaeologists have found goods from the northeast from the Great Lakes from California. There's some evidence of ties to even the Maya and to the east of the Atlantic Ocean. Valerie says there are trade networks all through Europe. They're connected to Africa. There's a trade route from East Africa that goes up to Baghdad. And then that trade route goes around India and Southeast Asia and gets to China so by making it across the Atlantic and connecting east to West Vikings had closed. The global loop is, Valerie says, when they established that trade with indigenous peoples in North America, and even if it wasn't a huge amount of trade, it was the first time in history that hypothetically An item that was traded almost anywhere in the world could have made it to almost any other part of the world, and that is how the Vikings launched globalization. Or.

Vikings Valerie Hanson Greenland Bjarni Hair Jolson Atlantic Ocean Torvald Vineland Americas Ford Foundation Steve Inskeep Iceland NPR News East Africa Donald It Valerie North America Leif Ericson East ST Louis Cahokia Mounds Joe Biden
"ford foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Learn more Ed Ford Foundation Donald work It's 5 45 on Casey. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin Company is trying to make a vaccine for covert 19 are trying a variety of approaches most involved laboratories capable of sophisticated biotechnology. But NPR's Joe Palka has this report about one approach for creating a vaccine, which starts in a greenhouse vaccines essentially work by tricking the immune system into thinking It's seen a virus so it can fight it off if the real McCoy ever shows up. Bruce Clark is CEO of Medic OG O, a Canadian biotech company. He says his company put something called a virus like particle into its covert 19 vaccine. To all intents and purposes. It looks like a virus, so when it presents to the body, it looks and generates a response like a virus, but it has no Genetic material inside, so it's not infectious. But the curious thing about this genetic material free viral imposter is that it's made in a plant to be specific. Niko Tianna Bentham Iliana, a close relative of the tobacco plant, a plant they grow in a greenhouse. And medical ago isn't the only company trying to make a vaccine from plants. Hugh Hayden is president of Kentucky Bio processing, he says. To make their vaccine, they start with seeds and grow the tobacco plants in the greenhouse for approximately 25 days, and on that prescribed aid. We take the plant. And we dip it into an aggro bacterium. Aggro bacteria are microorganisms that infect plants, and in this case, they've been modified to contain instructions for making a protein from the Corona virus. The plants take up those instructions. On the same day we harvest the plants go through an extraction and purification process and at the end of the cycle, we have 99.9% pure protein. Hayden says. A separate set of plants produces a tiny particle for packaging the viral protein once each of those components has been manufacturing and purified separately. We chemically attached them to each other, Hayden says. The result is something that can be injected into a human as A vaccine and will prompt an immune response. That should, in theory, protect someone from dying from Cove in 19. The irony. That tobacco plant that has caused so much illness and death might be used to save lives in a pandemic isn't lost on Jim Fig Lor he's executive vice president for research and development for R. J. Reynolds Tobacco. The company that owns Kentucky. Bio Processing. Yes, There's obvious irony there, Joe. If you wanted to be cynical about it, you could think cynically about it. But we tend to think of it as Look at the end of the day. The tobacco plant in and of itself is still just the plan. Kentucky Bio Processing is covert 19 vaccine won't be ready for initial testing in humans for several weeks yet Company President Hayden knows there are many other vaccines further ahead and development. But he says covert 19 won't be the last pandemic. There are going to be other public health challenges. And more that we can learn as a company. The better prepared we are for what comes next. Plant biologist Kathleen Heffron agrees plants could play an important role in the future of medicine. There's lots of examples of plant made versions of therapeutic proteins. And so this is just another place where I think plants can make their mark out of the greenhouse and into the clinic. Joe Palka NPR news And tomorrow morning edition, a young Republican from Georgia on his struggle to find a place in today's GOP. Listen, ask your smart speaker to.

President Hayden Joe Palka Kentucky Bio Processing NPR News Rachel Martin Company Steve Inskeep NPR Niko Tianna Bentham Iliana executive vice president Ed Ford Foundation Bruce Clark tricking Kentucky Casey R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Kathleen Heffron McCoy GOP
"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The cause of our and Serbian leaders are to discuss economic matters today. I'm Corbett Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Ford Foundation, working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms. Learn more at Ford foundation dot org's And Americans for the arts. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. Seven Police officers in Rochester, New.

Betty Ford's Healing Legacy: A Conversation with Susan Ford Bales

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Betty Ford's Healing Legacy: A Conversation with Susan Ford Bales

"Today, we're joined by Susan Ford Welcome. Susan. You are aid author, photo journalist. The youngest of four children to President and Mrs Ford. We are appropriately here at the Betty Ford Center, where you're also on the board of trustees of the Hazel Betty. Ford Foundation. Your mother's legacy. was as a breast cancer survivor and advocate, and as a woman in recovery, and as an advocate for being a woman in recovery. How has the legacy of your mother? Affected your role here at the Betty, Ford? Center. Wow Her shoes were really big to fill your So when she stepped down from the board and I became chairman. I. Think it was harder than living in the White House actually because. We mother and I come from two different parts of recovery. She is a patient and the family member. So we have very different opinions of things than and what's important to us One of the things that she made me do, which was extremely painful with sit on every city every single committee. And participate on my witness finance. Finance. But I learned it. Sure. And so I feel like she did a great job of preparing me to be chairman. So it's it's just we come at it from a different angle in a different perspective family and children's services is extremely important to me because that's how I was affected by this disease. Did you come to the the role of being the chair here at Betty? Ford, did you come to that reluctantly? No because I had been on the board for cheese, probably fifteen years I'm it had just been a long process Mother was gracious and allowed me to raise my children before I came on the board because I was pregnant when the. Betty. Ford. Center open. So. I don't think I came on the board until my youngest was first grade or second grade, and so she gave me some time to get my children raised in at least in school because it required several days travel and all of that in childcare and all the complications that we go through to participate in something like that. Let's go back a little bit and talk about the history of the Betty, Ford Center there's a lot of people who think that when your mother found her own recovery in the late seventy s, she went to the Betty Ford Center. It wasn't even here now was, how did the Betty Ford Center come to be. Johnson from Eisenhower Medical Center decided that. They wanted to have a treatment and it had been in the plan at Eisenhower for some time, they wanted to have an alcoholic treatment center on the campus. and. So Leonard firestone mother's dear, friend was also on the board of Eisenhower. And so Johnson Leonard. Kinda. Tag. Team. Durham. and. She was really in a recovery about four years. But she agreed and I and I thought that was a very courageous step to be so early recovery. So she came to all of us children and she said. When I'm long gone. You're the ones that are going to have to live with the fact that your mother had A. Drug and alcohol treatment. Centre, named after you. How do you feel about that? Wow, and we also we don't care. I mean. It's what a great Lexi you know. She was one of the first to step out and and share her story So once we got past that it was just a matter of mother and Leonard Raising the money. To get this place started and of course. Way? Back, then in the early nineteen, Eighty S. The Hazel and foundation played a role also in the birthplace. Can you share just a little bit about that? Well, mother spent quite a bit a time when to Hazelton, because Hazelton had done it. So well, they were probably the leaders in the in the sense that they had been around the longest And it was successful There's lots of treatment centers that haven't been successful. Some other went back and spent probably close to a week there visiting with counselors visiting with a staff talking, how do you do this? What did you do? Right? What did you do on? Why? What makes Hazelton successful because we basically wanted to copy what they had done, but in a different location sure who would have ever imagined decades later. The two organizations would come together and I WANNA to come back to that in just a minute. But First Susan I want to address an issue that. Always bothers me and then set the the Betty Ford. Center is seen as a place for. The rich and famous for the exclusive for those who can pay out of pocket. But that's not at all what's happening here is no and less than one percent of the patients here are what we would think of as celebrities. Yes. We've had some celebrities, but so was Hazelton I mean. So as other places everybody needs treatment, it doesn't matter what you do that determines you need treatment. So, and they don't get treated any different than. My Mother didn't get treated any different Long Beach. The women, she shared a room with. So it's the same.

Betty Ford Center Hazel Betty Ford Susan Ford Hazelton Ford Foundation Betty Ford Ford Center Mrs Ford Johnson Leonard Chairman Durham. Eisenhower Medical Center Lexi Leonard Firestone Eisenhower President Trump Long Beach White House A. Drug
Working, Making, Creating in Public and Private

a16z

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Working, Making, Creating in Public and Private

"Hi Everyone. Welcome to the. podcast I'M SUNOL and I'm super excited to do one of our special book launch episodes for the new book coming out just this week working in public the making and maintenance of open source software by Nadia Ball and published by Stripe Press. The topic actually applies to all kinds of communities and groups coming together whether it's an open source project, our initiative of Department in a company, a club or a special interest group even group of friends and family because it's all about how people come. Together to coordinate and collaborate around some shared interest or activity whether participatory or not whether code or content, and so one theme. We also pull the threads on in this episode is about how the learnings of open source communities do and don't apply to the passion economy and create our communities as well. Nadia has long been immersed in studying the health of communities including getting funding from the Ford Foundation to study open source then worked at hub in developer experience then did research at protocol labs. And is now focused on writer experience at sub stack for longtime listeners of the six and Z podcast I've actually had her on the show years ago along with Michael Rogers our protocol labs than of the No jazz foundation where we talked about the changing culture of open source, you can find that episode on our site, but in this wide ranging hallway style episode Nadia, and I cover everything from types of communities, social networks, and the evolution of being online and ironically while the book is. Called working in public we also talk about the emergence of private spaces as well as the tragedy of Big Public Commons and how to counter the tragedy of comments which is why I believe everyone should read this book because it's a dirt of literature out there for the era of President Online collaboration creation and consumption that we're in we end with some practical advice for community managers, platforms and leaders, but we begin by defining open source in this context with a really useful taxonomy for categorizing communities. Earlier early was like I really hate this term and I just wish we gotta have something else like public software whatever. Love that I love it too. Unfortunately, it's pretty hard to change terms that everyone. On so I know this firsthand. Yeah. I mean I personally find the term kind of intimidating and it doesn't sound exciting when I say the term open source but it really does just referred to the distribution side of cook the existence of open source licenses made it very easy for anyone to use and modify and re Polish someone else's coat and put it in their own software but it doesn't really say a whole lot about how it was actually produced and so I made this analogy in the book, which is actually an analogy I borrowed from a friend Devon Devon Zuko, she still apple podcast for me I. Love Her yes, and says something like the term open source doesn't mean anything anymore than the term company does it's like, yes, we kind of get what a company is but there are so many different kinds of business models for different types companies with open source saying something as open source tells you a little bit about how the code might be used. That doesn't really say anything about how they're actually being made someone has to continue taking care of it. One of my favorite parts of the book is you actually outline different types of communities you call it classifying project types, but it's really to me how people are. Essentially social networks. Really. So why don't you break down that taxonomy and by the way the reason I'm asking is because when I think of the ARC in history of open source, the concept that comes to mind for everybody is that classic book by Eric Raymond, which is a cathedral and the bazaar and I think that framing has two long framed our discussion of open source and frankly any online community yet everyone sort of has maybe like General Santa W-what community is like others a bunch of members and their and organized around some common interests or reason for spending time together. In that highest level definition of community, there's an underlying assumption that all members are sort of similar than just the term members washes over the underlying dynamics between those different numbers and so what I started doing was saying, okay. There is a difference between at minimum, an open source people who are contributing to open source and people who are using stars. So I try to sort of separate out users and contributors and say, okay in some open source projects or as you said, really communities and general, some communities have high trigger and some communities have high user growth and then there's sort of like. Different permutations of that it's like federations, clubs, stadiums, and I forgot the fourth but toys in me what are so I think it's really useful to start with your taxonomy, a federations and onward. So federations are like the really big projects we might be thinking of like Lennox or. Where you have a lot of people who are contributing to the project and you have a lot of people that are using their project. But there are enough people that are working on the creation of that project that it does form his own sort of contributor community. By contrast, clubs have a lot of people who are participating in Chretien but they don't have as many people that are using it and said a product that's kind of focused on a niche interest. The example to give his Astro Pie, which is a Python Library for astrophysicists right? It's high contributor incredibly interested in that but very low user growth because how many people in the world are really interested in That intersection exactly and toys I sort of mentioned in passing in their police. Interesting thing to talk about that's where you have both low user and Lok contributor growth. So that might just be like a personal project them thinking around no one else is really looking at it. They're sort of waiting in the wings before they become one of the other types of communities

Nadia Ball Devon Devon Zuko Stripe Press Ford Foundation President Trump Eric Raymond Apple No Jazz Foundation Writer ARC Developer Chretien Lennox Michael Rogers
"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To address inequality in all its forms. Learn more at Ford foundation dot or GE. And by the listeners of Cake Everyday. Tonight's temperatures in the fifties and this weekend it'll be a little bit warmer than today. Temperatures today mid sixties at the coast to the upper eighties inland. It's politics with Amy Walter on the takeaway. Good to have you with us. We are less than 100 days away from November's general election. Meanwhile, this week the U. S surpassed 150,000 deaths caused by the Corona virus. As many states continue to see a surge. We're talking aboutthe states that are starting to see a little bit curve upward. They've really got to jump all over that, because if they don't, then you might see the surge that we saw in some of the other sudden states. The president renewed his commitment to questioning the integrity of our election system, and they say the projected winner or the winner of the election. I don't want to see that take place in a week after November or a month or, frankly, with litigation and everything else that can happen years. Years or you never even know who won the election on the Senate left town on Thursday without reaching an agreement on a new stimulus bill, leaving millions of unemployed Americans economic limbo. Corona bars will not care if Washington Democrats decided suits they're partisans, souls. Let relief run dry. At this point. I'm beginning to wonder who does support the Republican proposal on covert. 19 Americans are weary and anxious. And we're isolated. The Corona virus has kept many of us separated from our families and the people in places that help center us give our lives a sense of meaning. Political reporters always self conscious about getting caught in the D C bubble. I've literally been unable to escape it. There are no more political rallies or conventions, No campaign bus tours, and all of this makes it hard for us to understand how voters are processing this moment and their choices for this November Help us untangle all of this. We have joining us, Tim, Alberta. He's the chief political correspondent for Politico. And Jane Causton, a senior politics reporter at box Hey, guys!.

Tim Ford foundation dot Amy Walter Senate Politico GE Jane Causton president Washington Alberta reporter
Deliberate flooding could recharge an Idaho river

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Deliberate flooding could recharge an Idaho river

"The Henry's Fork River in southeastern Idaho provides water to nearby farms and at the major fly fishing destination. But as the climate warms, water, levels in the river are becoming less predictable. Sometimes, water is plentiful. But earlier snow melt and more erratic rainfall can lead to shortages later in the summer when the water's needed most. Christina Morris is with the nonprofit Henry Ford. Foundation, she says one way to help. Balance out these highs and lows is to capture water when it's abundant and use it to recharge natural groundwater reserves, we flood, agricultural land, or like a pond or a lake, and allow that surface water to infiltrate and percolate down into the aquifer to raise the water table. Models of the Henry's fork show that if the returned location is close enough to the stream, much of that water will seep back into the river later in the season, where it will be available to farms and fish, we found not when you recharge within a mile of the river than we get ninety percent of that water back into the river, so she says it's one promising way to store water and maintain stream flows when water is needed most

Fork River Christina Morris Henry Ford Idaho
"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Protesters shouted Russia without Putin and held up signs saying Russia will be free. Demonstrators also express solidarity with protests in the far eastern city of Khabarovsk 4000 miles away. Listen. Kim NPR NEWS Moscow This is NPR news. Officials. With American Airlines air warning About 25,000 workers their jobs could be eliminated by October. It's due to the economic effects of the pandemic. Airline officials say the number of job losses could be lower if enough workers except buyouts or partially paid leave for a long as two years. In an interview with NPR's morning edition, President Trump's Knees says her uncle is psychologically unfit for office. Mary Trump also tells NPR's Rachel Martin that she will be voting for Democrat Joe Biden in the November election. The title of Mary Trumps book says a lot too much and never enough How my family created the world's most dangerous man. I asked her what makes Donald Trump dangerous his willingness to tear down everything. People institutions. Family in order to get what he wants. Mary Trump says that largely has to do what she calls the emotional child abuse that Donald Trump suffered at the hand of his father. She claims her extended family has propped up Trump's political career to protect their own financial interests. What I would say to people who would say I'm doing it for revenge is no, I'm to me, this is Justice Mary Trump and her brother ended up suing their family when they were written out of their grandfather's will. Rachel Martin. NPR NEWS Washington The Supreme Court says that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is home from the hospital in Baltimore. She's resting and doing well. Ginsberg was admitted and treated for a possible infection. U S Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was downplayed the possibility of another summit between President Trump and the North Korean leader. It's NPR. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Ford Foundation, working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms. Learn Maura at Ford foundation dot or GE and Americans for the Arts. If you're interested. Next hour is.

President Trump NPR Justice Mary Trump Kim NPR Rachel Martin Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Russia Mary Trumps Ford Foundation Khabarovsk Putin American Airlines Ford foundation dot Mike Pompeo Joe Biden Maura Supreme Court Ginsberg Arts
"ford foundation" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

"Hello and welcome to let's talk. A series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues that matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to Substance Abuse Prevention Research Treatment for addiction. Recovery Management Education and Advocacy I'm your host William Warriors and today we have a story of hope. brought to us by Nina Pillow Nina. How are you can cut? How are you great good to see you again I know you've done a number of a public events. If you will or stood up spoken out using your own story to help unmask the stigma of addiction and promote the reality of what we look like in the fact, that treatment works in cover is possible, and we're glad that you're with us today on, let's talk. Tell us a little bit about your first experience with substances Yeah thank you for having me <hes>. So my first. Experience was really the one that. Ultimately brought me here <hes>. For my own in my life, my dad was an alcoholic growing up <hes> for me I had an injury which ultimately ended up <hes>. I ended up getting prescribe narcotics, opiates, <hes> and I enjoyed them. Well beyond using them for pain. <hes>. There's about seven years ago so. Seven years yeah. <hes>. And you know kind of before. I knew it I was. Enjoying them you know Kinda like my whole mind, body, Spirit, everything and <hes>. It ended up becoming. You know full on addiction which I thought I was immune to for whatever reason I was not <hes> and I was physically addicted. It got to the point where I couldn't use them. I couldn't not use them without getting sick. And the irony of this is that you were working in the healthcare field at some point along the course of your diction nurse Yep talked to us about being a nurse who is struggling with substances. Yeah, it was <hes>. It was really hard. I had <hes> I knew all of I knew about addiction. I knew about opiates. I knew I knew all of those things. <hes> and I continued using them anyways <hes>. and. I think I think I. particularly felt a lot of shame because of that and I. Had access to them in my workplace and so <hes>. Being just didn't want to be the nurse with an addiction and I think that was a huge denial piece for me, <hes>. Until I ended up <hes> diverting narcotics from the hospital I worked at. <hes> ultimately ending, getting caught and resigning. That diversion was so that you could sustain your own addiction. Yes, very much. How did that make you feel when you were under the influence? When you knew what you were doing was not only wrong, but was actually illegal and yet you couldn't stop. Just the powerlessness of it, but also in active addiction. It wasn't. It wasn't a matter of right or wrong because for me. My morals and values have always included not stealing, but that wasn't. It was a matter of feeling, normal or not or <hes>. So it, just it. I don't I don't know that it was ever I know I. Felt Guilt I knew. I knew at the end of the day. It was wrong, but in the moment it was just. What I needed to do and you know. That's what I did.

Nina Pillow Nina Betty Ford Foundation William Warriors Hazel
A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

03:43 min | 2 years ago

A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

"Hello and welcome to let's talk. A series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues that matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to Substance Abuse Prevention Research Treatment for addiction. Recovery Management Education and Advocacy I'm your host William Warriors and today we have a story of hope. brought to us by Nina Pillow Nina. How are you can cut? How are you great good to see you again I know you've done a number of a public events. If you will or stood up spoken out using your own story to help unmask the stigma of addiction and promote the reality of what we look like in the fact, that treatment works in cover is possible, and we're glad that you're with us today on, let's talk. Tell us a little bit about your first experience with substances Yeah thank you for having me So my first. Experience was really the one that. Ultimately brought me here For my own in my life, my dad was an alcoholic growing up for me I had an injury which ultimately ended up I ended up getting prescribe narcotics, opiates, and I enjoyed them. Well beyond using them for pain. There's about seven years ago so. Seven years yeah. And you know kind of before. I knew it I was. Enjoying them you know Kinda like my whole mind, body, Spirit, everything and It ended up becoming. You know full on addiction which I thought I was immune to for whatever reason I was not and I was physically addicted. It got to the point where I couldn't use them. I couldn't not use them without getting sick. And the irony of this is that you were working in the healthcare field at some point along the course of your diction nurse Yep talked to us about being a nurse who is struggling with substances. Yeah, it was It was really hard. I had I knew all of I knew about addiction. I knew about opiates. I knew I knew all of those things. and I continued using them anyways and. I think I think I. particularly felt a lot of shame because of that and I. Had access to them in my workplace and so Being just didn't want to be the nurse with an addiction and I think that was a huge denial piece for me, Until I ended up diverting narcotics from the hospital I worked at. ultimately ending, getting caught and resigning. That diversion was so that you could sustain your own addiction. Yes, very much. How did that make you feel when you were under the influence? When you knew what you were doing was not only wrong, but was actually illegal and yet you couldn't stop. Just the powerlessness of it, but also in active addiction. It wasn't. It wasn't a matter of right or wrong because for me. My morals and values have always included not stealing, but that wasn't. It was a matter of feeling, normal or not or So it, just it. I don't I don't know that it was ever I know I. Felt Guilt I knew. I knew at the end of the day. It was wrong, but in the moment it was just. What I needed to do and you know. That's what I did.

Nina Pillow Nina Betty Ford Foundation William Warriors Hazel
Help for Children in Families with Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:54 min | 2 years ago

Help for Children in Families with Addiction

"My Name is William Moyers I. Am the host of our program here today joining me Cynthia Galaxies. Leave US welcome. Cynthia, thank you. You are the supervisor of the Children's program here at the Betty Ford Center Tell me about your personal passion for the subject of Children in Addiction. It was actually something that I didn't realize I had a passion foreign to. The first kid who allowed me to be a part of their world and start sharing how addiction had hurt them in their family that I realize the privileged. I was having about being there with them when they shared their story. With the Hazel. He's one Betty Ford Foundation for thirteen years working in the children's program since the beginning No, I've been with the Children's program. Almost seven years prior to that I was working in the admissions department at the Betty Ford Center for six and a half years, so I had to listen to the stories from incoming patients and their families. The opportunity to hear it from a kid's perspective really has made a difference in my life. What is that children's perspective that that that resonates with you? Think. It's just that they know more than what they're giving credit for. They might not know that there's a substance being news, but they know behaviors. Where maybe mom sleeping too much, so they can hang out with her. Dad's missing. You know left a couple of days and hasn't been back and just the impact that it causes them and at all times because they don't have the answers to what's going on, they can start to blame themselves or think that it's something wrong with them and that impact on children is really significant in this country. Right I think it's one in three. Families Suffer from addiction, and so the children do, too. Is that right? That's right that's correct. And I think there's a lot of programs out there for the patients, which is great There's family programs Alanon even teen, but it seems like we're really afraid of asking the younger ones what they know in how they feel, and yet they have just as many feelings as the adults do, and so tell me how the children's program here works. Children come into the program on that first day. So on the first day we have variety of emotions. There's some kids that are really excited to be here whether they're used to. Going to camp or their parents may be explained to them exactly what they were doing here. We have kids that you know. Don't even WANNA. Look at us Because maybe it's during summer break and they wish they were you know at home sleeping playing video games, things like that and within an hour, the magic of the program you can start seeing a difference as to how the kids are starting to feel more comfortable, and this is way before we even introduce each other and talk about how we're here to talk about action, and you use Use props like this I? Don't even want to say this is a prop. This is more of an icon. Tell us about. The Marine is a very special kid. He's here to my heart. special just like every kid that comes through our program he addiction and his family as well so both parents are trapped by addiction, and he has a series of books where he kind of explores along with the reader how he deals with it, so he learns that addiction has been a family secret for very long time. gets better. That doesn't even be more at ten years. old gets offered alcohol by kids, and so the kids get to explore that with him and relate because he is another kid and the kids start to understand that they really aren't alone. What about the children though that are? More significantly or adversely impacted, or who come here and a aren't certain what to do, and they have a nice warm person like you to talk to, and they've got a character like beamer, but they're still not coming out of their show. What do you do to to bring them into the process and bring them into the group I? Think the the magical part of the of the program is because we balanced our program between fun activities whether it's hide and seek tag going to the pool, watching fund movie and what? What we call sharing learning activities, so the kids really to get in tune with that inner kid obviously their kids, sometimes a little easier for them, but then they see grownups get in tune with that as well and so it helps them understand that you know I've had addiction in my family and okay, and I'm helping other kids, and so it Kinda brings comfort to them to know. Here's some adults that are freely talking to us and more importantly, they're listening to my story and not correcting the facts not. Letting US know that our feelings do matter. What are some stories that you hear when you when you talk to these children? Most of the stories revolve truly around just loving their parent regardless of what the parent has gone through whether they've seen the parent or not is just this unconditional love for that person and that hope that you know that they get better soon and so although you know they're. They're sad or sometimes angry about what's happened because of addiction, there's still that underlying love for that

Betty Ford Center United States Cynthia Galaxies Betty Ford Foundation William Moyers Supervisor Alanon DAD Beamer
New Frontiers in Addiction Medicine

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:59 min | 2 years ago

New Frontiers in Addiction Medicine

"Hello and welcome to let's talk an award. Winning series of podcast produced and delivered by the Hazelton. Betty Ford Foundation. Each podcast focuses on a topic related to addiction to alcohol and other drugs from prevention, research, treatment, current events, advocacy, and of course recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs. I'm your host William Lawyers and today, joining us is Dr. Martin Sepla the chief. Chief medical officer, the Hazel. Betty Ford Foundation Welcome MARV thinks in good to be here. Nice to have you with us again here at the Betty Ford. Center on this podcast, and it's rather appropriate that our topic for today is talking about the collaboration with the Mayo. Clinic on a couple of studies which I want you to talk about, but I think it's interesting that. This collaborations with Mayo Clinic and that's where a lot of your story comes from. It sure does I was I got sober. While was working at the Mayo Clinic after high school actually before I graduated from high school because I dropped out and I was working there. And and able to get my diploma once I got so. They didn't really I told her department. I haven't graduated, but. nobody else, really new in the lab work. So, somehow I, still get a job without a high school diploma while in was. Absolutely influenced to go into medicine while working there and addiction medicine. No. I wanted to be a cardiac surgeon because I worked with cardiovascular research lab, and the primary person who influenced me was a Brazilian cardiac surgeon and. He he? We would be doing surgery on these animals and he'd tell me all these stories of healing. From his work, and this is just want to be like. Was My goal. So. Cardiac surgeon than halfway through medical school back at mail. I still had that plan in doing clinical rotations and all these patients had. And or other type of diction, and I had identify that and bring it up with my attending the physician on staff, the residents and they would listen to me and then tell you we're not gonNA do anything about that Mar.. And we didn't put it in the chart. We didn't refer people for care for consultation. Nothing and it was often the cause of the hospitalization. We're doing nothing about it and I was complaining about this at A. Meeting ended weekly in after a few weeks, these two doctors in the meeting took me aside one night and said. Mark you've got to quit bitching about this and do something about it. Kind opened my eyes defensibility. His actually that discussion the. resulted in me, going into psychiatry and folk. Specializing in addiction, we're. We're glad that you did. Aged now it has. And did you ever think that the day would come? When the Hazel Betty Ford Foundation would be collaborating with male. you know I didn't I'd hoped so all along, but it just didn't have an didn't Evans I kinda lost. Hope about though here. We are doing it to studies. Tell us about him. Yeah, so we're doing. an NIH grant funded study that we partnered with Mayo clinic onto study of Medication for alcohol. Use Disorders, the medicines that camper sate. Hardly gets used because it only works for about ten percent of people, alcohol use disorder. So for me as attack. It's hard to convince myself to prescribe it to somebody and especially hard to convince him to take it because it works so infrequently you know and nine out of ten. It doesn't work for but. There's always this underlying thought that it must be a genetic sub type of alcoholics. So that respond to. So we've decided with. Mayo is to find out if that's true, because one of the main researchers there who I actually knew. Since I worked in that lab as a kid Dick, wind chill bomb, he helped develop technologies for examining genetic and metabolic biomarkers, which are just kind of. The human genome of testing that to see if an individual's going to respond to medicine or not, but also these metabolic biomarkers are just normal metabolic byproducts floating around our blood, so we can take simple blood test. And check it out to see who responsive medicine and who doesn't as a result of determining that. We put it into artificial intelligence computers to to examine the the characteristics of those bio markers, and those who respond versus those who

Betty Ford Mayo Clinic Betty Ford Foundation Hazel Betty Ford Foundation Mayo Medical Officer Hazelton Dick William Lawyers Dr. Martin Sepla NIH Mark Evans
"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Privacy simplified and from the Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms learn more at Ford foundation dot org this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David Greene let's think for a moment about when a coronavirus vaccine becomes available which countries are going to be at the front of the line to receive it and which ones are going to be at the back global health organizations are working on plans for international cooperation but there are also signs of competition a battle between nations it's being described as a kind of vaccine nationalism let's talk about this with NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre hi Greg good morning David so there's certain countries we're talking about here that that are already showing signs of theirs they're competing yeah the really the main competition is between the US and China both president trump and Chinese president xi jin ping have been hurt politically by their handling of the virus and they would love to reverse that by handling the vaccine well at home now they're poachers have been a little bit different in the U. S. trump operation warp speed is designed to get a covert vaccine for Americans it's in line with his America first ideology in it could be a huge boost if it happens before the November election although that's very very optimistic and you've also seen trump become increasingly critical of China what is China's position all this so president she has taken a bit of a softer line at least publicly you could perhaps call it vaccine diplomacy China is offering two billion dollars to help developing countries that deal with the pandemic China also signed on to a World Health Organization resolution that calls the vaccine to be a a global public good in the U. S. has pointedly not joined in but China is pushing very hard for a vaccine it has several trials underway and you know what if China gets a vaccine first to get a very different priorities about how to distribute it to the rest of the world Greg I just think about this country's rushing to get it first but this is a global pandemic even if their politics playing some role here in leader's mind isn't a recognition that this all requires like a global solution yes absolutely just just consider this one example Oxford university in Britain is working on a vaccine trial that looks pretty promising they partnered with AstraZeneca which is a Swedish British multinational drug company in the U. S. government has announced it is providing more than a billion dollars to AstraZeneca to make vaccines so there's going to be a lot of international players but it does take time to ramp up production and I spoke about this with Nancy Casper Fetzer of bioethics and public health at Johns Hopkins university the challenge is going to come and what will be at noon the first year in terms of has he combined where disagreements about who should be first second and third in line when it comes to who should be first second and third grade I mean is is the wealth gap in the world can play a role I mean we can expect wealthy countries to be able to be at the front end and developing countries you know some of which have seen rising cases really really struggle well that's probably gonna happen it always does but global health organizations say this is a recurring challenge in dealing with western pharmaceutical companies which have tremendous leverage in the developing world and I spoke to about this with Kate elder of doctors without borders I think of the global community but ultimately the power pharmaceutical corporations hands to make those decisions it's up to them at once Gail they produce these backing and at what price they set than that as you were the first customer thirty that'll cater jail so there will be in school intense scrutiny on whoever gets a vaccine to share it widely fairly in a reasonable price we'll see if that happens Greg Myre great thanks so much my pleasure and this is NPR news or morning edition is just ahead we'll have the latest from NPR news.

Ford Foundation
Eliminating Stigma: The First Lady of North Dakota Speaks Out

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:05 min | 2 years ago

Eliminating Stigma: The First Lady of North Dakota Speaks Out

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of award winning podcast produced in brought to you by the Hazelton Betty Ford Foundation. Each podcast focuses on a topic related to addiction to alcohol and other drugs from prevention research treatment current events trends advocacy and of course recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs. I'm your host William Warriors and today our topic is personal stories public advocacy. I can't think of anyone who best represents this in our guest Catherine Burgum. Welcome Catherine thank you so much for having me here today. Well and as we as we are here at the Ford Center in February of Twenty Twenty. I want just recognize this moment. By giving you a medallion because yesterday was a big day for you. This is so cool. Thank you so much. How many numbers? So this is my eighteen. Sit My year eighteen of sobriety so my eighteenth sobriety birthday today yesterday. Actually so thank you. So much for this amazing medallion. I'm so grateful and that's thoughtful of you. Who team years ago. What what what. What was your bottom eighteen years ago. My bottom was you know not being able to look at myself in the Mirror. Complete loss of of self respect And I you know Decided I needed to make a change and And I was able to do that. Eighteen years ago and walk this path of recovery sobriety. I'm so grateful. How did you know that you have a problem? What what was that moment? That said I'm not doing this the right way. Well I could achieve almost any goal. I'd set for myself in my life but I could not stop drinking. You know no matter how many drunk episodes I would have or struggles or you know mornings Hong over I just. I just not stop drinking. And so that's how I knew. I knew I needed help. And I knew I needed to really make a change in my life And did you seek treatment or just walk into a recovery path? I went down a record both actually I. I did go to treatment but I also Went down the recovery path and found like minded people that I could take this journey with. And you've been on that journey for a long time but one of the fascinating dynamics of your recovery journey which. I'm sure you hadn't really anticipated back when you started at eighteen years ago. Was that Five years ago or so. Your husband was elected. The Governor of North Dakota. That's right that makes you diverse lady of North Dakota the First Lady of North Dakota and so there you are suddenly very public persona in the state of North Dakota and not long after that nationally but very quickly Catherine you recognize the unique opportunity you had to have the public platform and a personal experience and to combine that personal story with public advocacy. Talk about that for our audience. Well early on in my time as first lady Spent time trying to decide you know what would I do? What could I be really passionate about and you know? It didn't take me long like a hot second to decide you. You know because of my own recovery. I you know this was the path I needed to go down especially related to eliminating the stigma of addiction. And you know what I heard you speak a few months before that and you said the best way to eliminate the stigma of addiction is to just talk about very simple solution and I basically took up that idea and made it part of my platform. And that's what I'm doing and so early in my time first lady. I did an interview with the newspaper and You know they just wanted to get to know the first lady and five minutes for the interview. I told my husband. I was going to talk about my recovery which I had not done really publicly for fifteen years at that point. And how did that go that day? When you sat down with the reporter and really revealed the essence of who you are How did that go? It was a huge weight. Lifted off my shoulders. Yes you know because I have a disease you know I figured out. I have a brain disease and I shouldn't have to carry this burden on my shoulders of keeping keeping silent about it. You know but the stigma is what kept me there for most of my recovery and kept me from seeking treatment And getting help for over twenty years so It was such a huge relief to really be able to talk about it and You know my husband was super supportive. Rooney Talk Oh yeah. He's he's very supportive and he believes that the more we talk about it to more. We're able to eliminate the

Catherine Burgum North Dakota Twenty Twenty Hazelton Betty Ford Foundation Ford Center Brain Disease William Warriors Rooney Hong Reporter
Coronavirus is a totally different disaster for philanthropies to handle

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:16 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus is a totally different disaster for philanthropies to handle

"Darren Walker. Thank you very much for coming back to the PODCAST. I'm happy to back on them. So you're every year you send out a New Year's letter in this in this year's letter was entitled how we move forward during the year ahead and in it you decry how we're losing ground on a whole host of issues that democratic values and institutions remain in retreat as a quote from the letter. You also say in the letter quote. This is a time to step up not check out a time to reenlist. Re-engage and reconnect. And you ask a question that is pretty remarkable given where we are right now you wrote quote what new crisis needs to befall us before we together are spur to collective action is covert nineteen that new crisis that will spur collective action. I hope it is. I hope that out of this horrific calamity. We can emerge a stronger nation. A more empathetic people a society where we realize that we have a shared destiny that we realized that our future is one future a future that is dependent on our willingness to act as one our willingness to engage as one and our belief in the idea of equal status them. You know you have been either in your role at Ford or your previous role when you're at The Rockefeller Foundation. You've been a part of many calamities. Both Mother Nature created and manmade I seem to remember there was Detroit bankruptcy there was a new orleans rebuilding after Katrina up. Have you seen anything like this? That we're going through right now. There has never been anything like this virus to hit the world. There's never been a a calamity of this scale and scope and intensity and every crisis I've been involved in where there's been some terrible act of God or whatever you WanNa call it In in it usually place based in some part of the world there is some terrible thing ebola or so Nami in Southeast Asia and the rest of the world can rush to help because the rest of the world is stable prosperous and doing very well generally speaking and this case the entire planet is on edge the entire globe is impacted by this Kobe. Nineteen hours there is no place on earth where one can seek refuge from this and believe that you won't be impacted and so the question for us is. How do we respond in a circumstance that truly does require that we build a consensus that Necessitates a global response not just a response at the country level and particularly response that recognizes that the inequality that we see in the world and in our society will be exacerbated by this corona virus crisis. If we don't as we design how we get out of this and we work through this we are paying attention to the inequality that existed before this virus hit us. We're going to actually make things worse for the very people who are most vulnerable and most at risk. I WANNA get into a little bit deeper into that in a moment but as president of the Ford Foundation. Correct me if I'm if my memory is failing me here but you have a major presence in India and just recently. A India went on a national lockdown. We're talking about one point. Something Billion People on what? How does that impact the work? That Ford does while in a country like India. Our work is focused on civil society and strengthening civil society supporting the rights of women and Dulles Indigenous People until those communities are absolutely impacted because these lockdowns basically impact their ability to earn a living. And most of these folks earn a living As garbage pickers as day laborers people living off of cash and so they are absolutely impacted but on the other hand it's important that India as a nation have a uniform standard way of approaching. This and I think the prime minister has done that. Interestingly we also have an office in Beijing so our China office closed in January as a result of the virus hitting Beijing where we have an office and Within days our office closed. What's very interesting? Is that this week. Our office in Beijing opened. And so we've got a reopening of an office and the a ten offices of Ford in other parts of the world are all closed now so we have this almost this this reversal and so in some ways. What we've seen in our office in Beijing May Portend Our future in that. That office was closed for ten weeks before was able to be reopened and we'll see if We follow a similar pattern here in the US. So let's dive into what you said Just a moment ago about you know how we design the response to Covet. Nineteen will determine whether the societal issues that countries were dealing with before. Kovac's nineteen whether they're exacerbated and I don't mean this as as a partisan question but it is it is a question that has been lurking in my mind. I sort of troubled. By the fact that the United States is not in the forefront of leading in terms of responding to cope with nineteen can can the United States can nations get past this without concerted driven fact based Response from leadership leadership is essential here and the importance of leadership has never been more elevated And felt at at at at anytime in my lifetime than this moment. We're in most certainly the work of global organizations like the WHO is essential and working with them on global strategies and global approaches. Is the only way we're going to actually Get on the other side. If you will I I I don't think it's a secret to say that the US has not sought leadership in many global fora the traditional Seats at the head of the table that we assumed and that we championed global ideas The this is not a part of who we are today in terms of and I think something we have to really consider Do we want the United States to be a a global leader a global organizer a global. Convener I believe we do. I believe it is in our national interest for the US to be engaged in the world and to set a standard and an example of excellence of Democratic Participation Of OF COLLEAGUE SHIP.

Ford Beijing United States India Darren Walker Ford Foundation Rockefeller Foundation Southeast Asia Reenlist Ebola Detroit Dulles Prime Minister Katrina President Trump Kovac China
Sony Establishes $100 Million COVID-19 Global Relief Fund

The Breakfast Club

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Sony Establishes $100 Million COVID-19 Global Relief Fund

"It many Sony has announced a one hundred million dollar global relief fund in support of those who are affected by corona virus so other people Oprah Winfrey she's donating ten million dollars to help the corona virus pandemic and he's going to be donating to at Leonardo DiCaprio's fund that he started the America's food fun it was launched by Leonardo di Caprio and Lauren at palette jobs apple in the Ford Foundation so she donated one million to America's food fun and ten million over all is what you're trying to do what is that and I will go to the food fun and help healthcare workers get PP E. like what are the ten mango well so far as he's committed one million to America's food find she's donating ten million over also I guess she's going to be spreading it and and to ten million to mail to the food fun got you got you got you know one million to the food fun but ten million over awesome sure she's putting it in different funds he just hasn't announced all of their documentations right we

Sony Oprah Winfrey Leonardo Dicaprio America Ford Foundation Lauren
A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

09:02 min | 2 years ago

A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to substance use prevention research treatment of Addiction Recovery Management Advocacy and education. I'm your host oil moyers and today we have a story of hope brought to us by Holly S. Welcome Holly Thank you. Thanks for being here again. I'm so struck by the fact that as a young person in recovery. You've been so willing to stand up and speak out. You were on the stage at Hazelton BETTY FORD IN CENTER CITY MINNESOTA. When we had the drugs are there yet. You shared your story that they had that feel free to be up on that stage really awesome. I spent fifty six days. He's old and as a patient three times a day. I was sitting. And you know in the seats looking up the stage and so to be on the other side of that And even having the confidence to speak in front of a group of people as astounding. My my teachers would be proud. Come a long way so you tell us just a little bit about your your addiction journey. The first time you used you remember. Yeah I do I was fourteen. Bonfire my brother was four years or is four years older than me And so he had friends in his grade that were siblings of kids in my grade and so We went to von fire a night and drink and it tasted horrible. But it made me feel calm. Addy is and I was like okay. I hear often that this this is what I needed. That's it was. I kept drinking more looking for what you found it right. Exactly and and I never wanted to find that thought. I would have a problem with alcohol because my dad was suffered from substance use disorder. So that wasn't in my plan. So you knew a little bit of history you drank. It felt good even though it tasted lousy and alcohol was the drug that you continue to use correct. Yeah it was Up until I was twenty four years old in college I did use adderall and violence is prescribed that and and abused that after you know few months of having it And then it just any any mind altering substance it was you know zero to one hundred all the time. I didn't have turned off button. And then the day came when new. You couldn't do this anymore. Tell us about that day. Yeah so I actually when I was probably twenty one I knew I mean I had always had a bad gut feeling like my drinking is not normal. It's not that I would drink every single day but it was every single time. Major anchor would block out When someone told me they didn't lack cal. I was genuinely surprised like well it. That's not what you do and you drink And that was scary. Own and the waking up and not remembering But when I started drinking every day and when I started drinking by myself and when I started using it as a coping mechanism fats and I was like okay. This isn't right And that was around. Twenty twenty one to twenty four years old Brit just progressively about so much worse towards totally isolating and just drinking by myself in my room and Stang fire and just before you had your bottom. You had a family tragedy. Yeah so My Dad died from the disease of alcoholism and fat was a long time coming. I mean I grew up watching him drink as a you know as a young kid and and I didn't know what that silver and way read can was but I knew that the more that piled up next to his recliner the more he wasn't going to be my dad. You know he damore beer. He drank or whatever So that was a scary thing as a kid for my brother and I And then after my parents got a divorce when I was in fifth grade just progressively got worse and then it's really hard to ought somebody's slowly and then quickly wither away And a degree the loss of my dad twice The first time when alcoholism totally consumed him where the disease totally consumed to him and then once again when he was actually gone And I honestly think the first time was worse Because the staff that I loved so much wasn't the same and so for me when he passed away. I I was even deeper and might action right like you think that'd be a wake up call And it was to some extent but I did. I had no idea how to cope with and what to do and so I just kept drinking four more months for former months. Yeah said enough. Yeah and then I. I'm GonNa die can get help. And I started really experiencing the physical withdrawals you know not being able to go. X. Amount of hours without the shaking sweating meant I just. I watched my dad for so many years and to be experiencing that myself I was like I don't want to live that way. And My dad dying gave me a second chance at life because that brought me to his old buddy Ford and and that helped me get through sober living and IOP And counseling financially at. That's what money did for me and what that was Was that that you found recovery November for twenty seventeen. So here we come up on. It'll be soon two years in fall. Two Thousand Nineteen Been What's been the toughest part of your last two year journey and recovery? You know. I think it's really figuring out myself and figuring out my feelings and boundaries to to actually sit with discomfort isn't easy you know it takes a while to get to get used to and I would feel a little bit out of control of you know I'm like how am I supposed to handle this and And by just sitting with it I've and reaching out to peers and the sober community and I found that okay this shall pass and I can. I can do it Shortly you will be graduating from college yet. Your degree is in community health education. Where does that come from? What do you want to do with that Yeah so I. At first I wanted to do nursing. I wanted to go on for nursing and actually working IGNATIEVA I. I loved my nurse so much and I was. I WANNA be her but I am really looking forward to exploring the advocacy piece And that's a lot of what community? Health Education is health promotion intervention disease prevention in the arena of addiction. Yeah absolutely yeah So I'm I'm really excited about it. And your internship has been working in a sober for an organization that promotes sober living. Saint Paul's living and it's it's more of a structured sober living. But it's yeah but it's all about finding life in recovery life beyond treatment and and finding meaningful relationships and sober friends. Because that's that's hard. I I believe for me. Had I gone home to South Dakota? It would have been hard because in Saint Paul the twin cities. There's five hundred six hundred meetings a week. I mean recovery. People there are so many young Pe- ray. Yeah and it's I feel normal.

Betty Ford Betty Ford Foundation Moyers Twenty Twenty Holly S. Hazel Hazelton South Dakota Adderall Addy Center City Minnesota Saint Paul Ford
Youth at Risk: A Convergence of Concerning Trends

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

08:50 min | 2 years ago

Youth at Risk: A Convergence of Concerning Trends

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcasts produced by the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to US issues that we no matter to you to Substance Use Prevention Research Addiction Treatment Recovery Management Education and advocacy. I'm your host William Moyers and today we're joined by my colleague Dr Joseph Dr Lee. Welcome good talking to you again. I couldn't well. It's great to have you on. I always learn something from your every time that we get to sit down to talk. I'm amazed at your depth and breadth of experience as our medical director on youth and family issues across our continuum our mission in this country. There's so many things that we could talk about your so well versed in all of those but I thought I would talk. Start by talking about something serious. Which is the mental health of our youth. Today what are you see is happening given the proliferation of social media? And all the things that you know so well. Where is the mental health of our youth today? Well I see concerning trends across our country. Actually you know in the world of addiction and treating young people with substance use disorders. You see kind of psychology Things are magnified stresses magnified Stresses and conflicts in relationships are magnified loneliness and anger magnified Ucla of young people who have use disorders who become what I call very fatalistic that is significant other. Breaks up with them. If they're met with some adversity they go downhill very fast started become suicidal and we know this is the standard course in the world of Addiction. But the scary thing is in recent years. I'm seeing the same trend in the same kind of psychology in our general social dialogue and I'm seeing it through social media and I'm seeing signs that are concerning with increased mental health issues and suicides. Not just for young people for for older adults. It's almost like there's a part of society I don't WanNa say is become addicted but the psychology of Addiction. The loneliness the anger the magnification. The polarization that comes with addiction is now upon us all. We just don't see it. Do we blame it on social media? I don't think it's fair to just have a smoking gun and pointed at one direction. I think they're all facets of society. What you'll find that is that social media is a lot like substances. A lot of people go on facebook. Instagram snapchat used fine without any difficulties. But there's a certain subset of high risk people that when they get sucked in really hurts them affects their mental health and so social media has way of magnifying things. When you see a pretty picture of a kitten everyone goes on like your picture. It's magnified when you see humane act and someone's helping someone else everyone's tearing up it's magnified but when you see polarize discussions when someone makes a a comment that's politically incorrect. Or maybe discriminatory and young people make mistakes by the way that also gets plastered and it's indelible and there's a magnification in that that I think is very dangerous for high risk people and then of course what exacerbates are some of the substances that you are using today substances that didn't exist in my using days of old. Can you talk to us about what you're seeing at our youth facility in suburban? Minneapolis in terms of the dependencies. That you young people come in with a lot of the convergence between substance use and technology and social media so they're celebrating some of their use finding peers. Who are like minded through social media and instagram posting pictures. It's always pictures before the social event when everyone's happy and they look like they're having a good time using substances. They never posted pictures. After the event when people have vomited and there have been fights. But it's always the before but but there is a convergence in Know vaping cocaine culture other kinds of drug use promoting it through social media giving a false image to other people but you also see the flip side of it so a young person may have made a mistake. Maybe they got too intoxicated on something embarrassed themselves at a social event well that also gets plastered on videos and messages and that is very for those individuals because then they get bullied. They get ostracized. The looking at everybody's feeds and everybody seems to be going on vacation. Everybody else has a new significant other. Everyone else got a new car for their sixteenth birthday and the more friends they have the worst this becomes and by comparison their lives seem lonely and inadequate and so for young people who struggle with mental health and substance related issues sometimes social media and technology can be a bit of a curse. How does it work at our youth facility? You see day in and day out. Because they can't have their phones when the young people come in for treatment do they have withdrawal. They don't have withdrawal. In fact you'd be surprised. With how many people actually liked to unplug a bit even young people? That's right in fact. We'll have conversations. Where like you know you have some friends that are maybe not the healthiest for you? They may be good people. But they're not gonNA encourage you to be in recovery or live a healthy lifestyle and they know that and they actually dread going to the Rolodex of their contact list. They wonder if they should change their cell phone numbers. They actually like the time that they have away from that. Because I think that's a lot of temptation for them and it's a draw. It's almost like Some people describe it as like being on a leash. They feel like they can't get away when they wanna get away so I actually hear more dialogue that they don't know how to navigate being plugged into technology and being in recovery and we have to teach them new skills to do that. What has been the impact that the legalization of marijuana is having across this country with our youth. The important thing to remember about legalization is that the skies not gonNA fall okay. Society is not going to fall apart because the legalization of anyone substance what it does create though is it does create a regressive economy and what that means is that most people drink alcohol. Fine but ten percent of Americans consume half the alcohol in the entire country. So there's a Paredo distribution in eighty twenty rule. Which means if you legalize a substance if you legalized lottery tickets if you legalize gambling at a casino the curve you see for consumption is not a bell curve. It's not that the average Americans going to gamble a couple of times and then only the people on the tip we'll have problems which actually see as a distribution where most Americans do fine and so they have no issue illegals Asian but there's ten to twenty percent of a population that might really struggle and they consume too much. They go to the casino too. Many times they buy too many cigarettes they lie too many vape pens. They drink too much and so we have this debate about are we okay. With simply a utilitarian principle were half of America won't really care and some people are going to make money and maybe we will generate taxes or do we also have a dialogue where we look at the minority population. The people that might be affected who will also try to sing the same tune as everybody else. I can smoke just as much. I can drink just as much. I'm just like everybody else. But they're not and do we have a special dialogue and conversation inclusive of everyone or do we just run amok with capitalism and. I think that's the concern that I see is not necessarily do we legalize or not. But how is it done? And how do we cater for the marginalized? Because if you're a company selling a pen. If you're a company selling marijuana or alcohol you have to make the margin of the people who consume too much you have to and they know that they know their own data and are we okay with that as a democracy so is it just simply majority rules or do we have special conversations to say we also have to protect those people who are vulnerable and that include young people on social media on vaping on the legalization of marijuana. What's your to parents. And how they talk about these issues with their children or grandchildren. Well I think people know their families the best and I ask them to kind of look in their. Mir's look at the the families look what their risk factors are and if there's somebody who There's a lot of addiction in the family. They should message differently. It's definitely not a one size fits all there will be plenty of people in America who smoke marijuana or drink alcohol or use different substances and be okay. They will not develop a use disorder but their children will also try to replicate that but their genes are different. Their environment is different. Maybe they face different adversity. Maybe they have different mental health issues and can we have dialogue in our country that is nuanced and mature enough to be inclusive of those people and right now. We don't have that dialogue. We have a polarization in shutting down of anything that goes against majority rule and there's capitalism that's behind it which I think is a bit sinister and And victimizes certain people so our organization is not against any drug. People are surprised by that. You know when I let them know. We're not anti-marijuana. We're not anti alcohol. We are advocates for the minority. We speak for the minority population a significant minority of people who will not react the same as other people when they use substances because they need to have a voice because other people wander stand

Marijuana Instagram United States Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation William Moyers Psychology Of Addiction America Medical Director Dr Joseph Dr Lee Facebook Suburban Minneapolis Cocaine MIR
"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms learn more at Ford foundation dot org by the listeners and members of KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Rachel Martin tornadoes ripped through Nashville Tennessee and surrounding areas overnight at least seven residents are confirmed dead many more injured and authorities are still trying to map out the full scope of the damage Blake farmer from our member station WPLN in Nashville joins us now Blake I understand you're out about where exactly are you right now on what he's seen hi I am I'm in east Nashville not too far from where I grew up and there is just debris everywhere roofs that are gone windows have been blown out you know the good part of an old historic church that's laying in the street as rebel there's a few buildings that are basically collapsed it you know from power lines down looking down an alley their power lines just old netted over the alley and you know pieces of metal roofing and and all sorts of debris just hanging everywhere do you see is there any traffic or learning people he you know once the sun came out people started getting out and and trying to get going with their day if the if the storms really took a lot of people by surprise and so overnight there weren't a lot of people out I was going door to door with the a team of emergency crews just knocking on doors to make sure that people were O. K. E. and but so there hasn't been much activity until it until right now and people are sort of helped us with their phones you know taken pictures because nobody can believe what they're saying right now it's still early hours I mean we mentioned surrounding areas and not just national proper do you have any sense based on conversations with authorities about the extent of of the damage in the area affected who will I'm in east Nashville it in certainly further east of town we know there's damage out in part of town called Donaldson at an elementary school that that looks mostly flattened there's even member of our news room whose roof is gone he lives out there and then further east than that about an hour and a half east of Nashville we know there were storms that went through near Cooksville and so did the damage is not isolated to right here near downtown Nashville how well is Tennessee prepared for tornadoes we certainly used to having tornadoes infective even had some tornadoes around super Tuesday before so this time of year we know it's a possibility last night was not one of those times where you know the meteorologists are saying the stars have aligned in and you need to really watch out tonight it really took a lot of people by surprise myself included so there were warnings I will not say that weren't warnings in the moment but the the it wasn't like the people of meteorologists were warning that the that the atmosphere was you know sort of primed and we knew that there could be a lot of a start people just didn't go to bed thinking you know I need to keep keep the metal scratches right so as you mentioned I mean it's super Tuesday that's relevant because Tennessee is supposed to vote today it's one of the fourteen state states voting is voting going to happen well you know I think there's some questions about how that's going to go the the polls would open here in about ten minutes and a lot of places the that you know I believe that this many polling locations are going to at least have to open late but it no doubt about it it is going to cause problems because even if the polling location is okay people may just have trouble getting there right Blake farmer how with our member station W. P. L. and in Nashville Tennessee reporting on the aftermath the damage the lives lost in these tornadoes that ripped across the national area Blake thank you you're welcome and you can follow NPR dot org for updates to this developing story it's N. P. R. news coming up on eight fifty one let's go to Peter finch with a report of a crash in Oakland this who's westbound five eighty before the Mays day of at least two vehicles involved they're not sure which lanes are blocked but they say the.

Ford Foundation Ford
"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In all its forms more at Ford foundation dot work it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm David Greene stocks have opened lower in Europe this morning after a big rally in U. S. stock markets they also fell sharply in Japan the Dow Jones industrial average fell by more than a thousand points yesterday its worst performance in more than two years the markets tanked amid news that corona virus cases have been reported in Italy and Iran also in South Korea we're joined now by NPR's Jim zarroli hi Jim good morning David so this coronaviruses and spreading for weeks now I mean we we talk about it you know just about every day why are the markets suddenly reacting like this I think the reports about the cases in South Korea and Italy really scared everybody scared investors remember the the epidemic started relatively slowly in China and then it just mushroomed so there are fears that we might be seeing the same kind of progression starting in other places for instance Italy is part of a big continent where everybody moves around free Lee all the time so an outbreak there could really spread quickly all over Europe which is the second largest U. S. trading partner and that that would be an economic disaster too as well as a health disaster well let's talk about the the potential economic effects here what is it specifically that that might be spooking investors when it comes to health crisis like this you know we live in a global economy and SO what happens in one place affects people in other places China of course is a huge manufacturing country it has all the supply chains that are links to other economies all over the world now we have enormous quarantines taking place there no factories are shut down people can't go to work so if you're on a manufacturing or retailer in the US or other countries you depends on China Chinese or south Korean suppliers suddenly you don't know how you're going to get the parts you need to stay in business apple for instance has already said it expects to see a shortage of of parts for the iPhone because its factories in China are shut down so this this just has the potential to speak on the sideline a lot of other come companies when you mention apple and we've been reporting on on some of the impact on on the economy so far but what what what else is standing out to you well in a week we're hearing anecdotal evidence of this company a lot of companies say they're worried about inventories getting low or act we're starting to see some actual numbers to airlines for instance are among the companies that are getting hurt really badly I yesterday United Airlines said it had seen a seventy five percent drop in demand for flights to Asia so we can we can we can expect this will get worse before it gets better over the weekend Chinese president xi jin ping said the epidemic will have he called it a quote relatively big impact on the economy and society although he added it will be short term and controllable so should you worry if you have your money like in retirement funder you know that involve stocks yeah I mean that's that's always the question it's really hard to predict where this epidemic is going how big it's going to be so a lot of it will depend on that on the other hand we see the stock market deal with a lot of very troublesome developments lately like brexit in the trade war and it always seems to come back eventually so and you know it's it's resilient what the stuff there Jim NPR's Jim zarroli Jim thanks so much you're welcome.

Ford foundation NPR
Are You Prepared For Sponsorship?  The Career Big Game!

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

03:14 min | 2 years ago

Are You Prepared For Sponsorship? The Career Big Game!

"This week because it is the first week of black history. three-month I thought it would be a fitting time to highlight the first black woman. CEO of a fortune. Five hundred hundred company. I talk about her all time. She is one of the reasons for starting this podcast Ursula Burns. She has been the only black woman. The only there's only Orne just who and I don't even know how she dated. But let me tell you about Ursula. Woah Ursula Burns was appointed chairman and CEO of Veon in December. Two thousand eighteen. Now that is a company headquartered recorded in Amsterdam that focuses on telecommunications services so just think mobile phones fouling a period as executive -secutive chairman and previously chairman of the Board of directors. So she'd been in this thing for minute. Ursula has extensive international experience of large companies confronting technology change in their industries. She was chairman of the Board of of the Xerox Corporation from two thousand ten to two thousand seventeen and chief executive officer from two thousand nine to two thousand sixteen you up. So she was chairman of the board and the a former. US President Barack Obama are forever president and appointed her to help lead the White House national program on Science Technology Engineering and math and she served served as chair of the President's Export Council Ursula is the director of the Board of Exxon Mobil. Nestle and Uber Uber huge companies. She also counsels other community educational and nonprofit organizations including the Ford Foundation and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Corporation. Mit She is a member of of the US. National Academy of Engineers and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Ursula holes a master's degree in mechanical engineering. I'm from Columbia University and a Bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering From Polytechnic Institute of New York University. If you ever hear this I just want you to know that is a lot of us trying. We are here. Charm figured out. And we're trying not to let you be the only one that has been the CEO of a fortune five hundred company. Thank you for all of your contributions. Abusive fans thank you for being the first and letting US know that it is possible to hold the top spot at a fortune. Five hundred

Ursula Burns Chairman Chairman And Ceo CEO United States Ursula Mechanical Engineering From Po Barack Obama Orne President Trump Exxon Mobil Nestle Xerox Corporation American Academy Of Arts And S Chief Executive Officer Science Technology Engineering National Academy Of Engineers Massachusetts Institute Of Tec Columbia University Amsterdam
"ford foundation" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Ford Foundation says recreational pot is the wrong message for teens adolescents great a similar places where we were with nicotine if you look at nicotine used in the past ten to twenty years there's been a new perception of the health risks yet in this country physicians used to tell their patients to smoke cigarettes past ten to twenty years now we understand there's a lot of health risks associated with illinois' now the eleven state to legalize recreational marijuana Sierra Pickens family members water back friends and family of the twenty three year old chase she was last seen Christmas day the thirteen hundred block of west fifteenth street in university village as of the walls as her mother the only thing that I'm hoping and wishing for right now is that she comes back home safe and alas so if you have or or you seen her please call me or call the police please I'm begging you see a picture of zero pagans on our sister stations website WGN TV dot com if you've seen called on one water areas central detectives president drums on a low last week making legal a twenty one year age for smoking the FDA says the law is in effect immediately Wisconsin and Indiana you now have to be twenty one and that's got some retailers scrambling Brian Berman manages a car wash and got gas station outside Milwaukee ninety the last of the law enforcement here non role that they know nothing about it your little is smoking age was already twenty one video from the last few days showing the angry demonstrators of the US embassy in Baghdad because the deployment of American troops and inspired a flurry of tweets from president trump but ABC news military analyst and former state board official Steve Gaillard says the storming of the embassy was more theater designed to get attention you look at the way that the Iraqi police stepped aside and allow the Iraqi protesters to come in towards the compound this was fully coordinated with the government the government in Iraq had to do something to appease their masters in Toronto appease the protesters to appease those on the political side that they need so this was all quite carefully staged with the new year an impeachment proceeding still pending a big question lawmakers are asking is when a ribbon if there will be a trial of president trump in the Senate ABC's care of Phillips is traveling with the president in west Palm Beach Florida house speaker Nancy Pelosi still hanging on to those articles of impeachment and has given no indication of a timetable for sending them to the Senate and right now there's no meeting for Senate leaders of the schedule police in West Virginia is a seven people were wounded in a shooting at a bar in Huntington today the inability streams as it happened at a whole go bars so far no arrests have been made in Florida authorities say they've arrested a white nationalist to made a run for the U. S. Senate in Florida and was one of the featured speakers during the twenty seventeen unite the right rally in Charlottesville Augusta's Invictus was arrested on a South Carolina warrant charging him with kidnapping domestic violence in possession of a firearm during a crime of violence he's being held without bond Brittany jobs senator brothers Michael in Pierre got to see their new home today to new three bedroom apartment the three or nineteen fifteen and eleven about living apart with relatives since our mother Andreas student Myron Jen tell grant was shot to death on a Chicago street corner drive by back in July they were members of mask mothers against senseless killings Brittany will be in charge of the new home Michael Johnson says it's been a long time since he had anything to smile about I.

Ford Foundation
"ford foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We have to keep it going. It is our radio station include WNYC in your estate plan. Call six four six eight two nine four five eight seven or Email legacy giving at WNYC dot org. WNYC is supported by Carnegie Hall, presenting the nights performing works by Caroline Shaw. Doniger, Dennehy Thomas, Addis and Kanana's may Michael Watkins and envy. Vall Di April third at San Cal hall tickets at Carnegie Hall dot org. Hey WNYC. It's off your Eisenberg. Join us for a live. Taping of ask me and other at the bell house Wednesday April tenth from NBC's. Good, girls and parks and recreation. We have actress Reta info at AMA tickets dot org. This is WNYC ninety three point nine FM and AM eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. And the Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality it all its forms. Learn more at Ford Foundation dot org. No. Offering a personalized weight loss program that uses psychology and small goals to change habits with the goal of losing weight and keeping it off for good. Learn more at Neum an OEM dot com, and Jane and Gerald catcher supporting the children's movement of Florida dedicated to helping all children entered school with the social emotional and intellectual skills needed to succeed. Laura information is available that children's movement, Florida dot org. From NPR and WBZ Chicago. This is wait. Wait, don't tell me the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Curtis. We're playing this week with Brian Babylon Hari kondabolu, and Paula Poundstone. And here again is your host at the chase Bank auditorium downtown Chicago, Peter sago. Thank you. Right now. It's time for the way way down tell me the lesson again. Call one AAA wait wait to player game on the air. Hi, you are on. Wait..

WNYC NPR Ford Foundation dot Carnegie Hall Peter sago Eisenberg Ford Foundation San Cal hall Caroline Shaw Florida chase Bank auditorium Brian Babylon Hari kondabolu Michael Watkins Reta NBC Bill Curtis Paula Poundstone Kanana Addis
"ford foundation" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"That everyone be poor than some much wealthier than others. They they have rendered the left has rendered envy. A virtue. Get it. There is not I have not experienced in all of my life. A moment's resentment of people much wealthier than me. I resent what people do with that wealth. Like, the Ford Foundation giving a fortune of money to black lives matter and people like Tamika Mallory. That's a separate issue. How many people have become employed? Thanks to these people. Do you know how many people's lives have benefited because of these people? They produce something that people want. So they've made a fortune of money. So what? The Wall Street Journal last week printed some of the incredible good that that a lot of the the wealthiest people do with their money. What do you think they do with it? We'll Tom star wasted hatred of Donald Trump. That's true. Some billionaires. It would be better if they burn their money some people give it to colleges the true waste of money. Continue. Please. I think that part of it that is generational is that millennials and people gen Z. And all these folks that come after us are looking up, and we're like the world is going to end in twelve years if we don't address climate change and your biggest issue. Okay. So here's my question..

Tamika Mallory Donald Trump Ford Foundation The Wall Street Journal twelve years
"ford foundation" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"ford foundation" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"How does it property values because if you can say to other people who are, you know, wanna move into the district look at our amazing public schools where the foundation that raises all this additional money for these fantastic additional services than the real estate agents proclaimed this as one of the ways in which the public schools are basically sort of you know, a bit like a private school environment. But with the tax deduction forgiving available for anyone who wants to help out that is fascinating. What's it like, a nonprofit and a foundation are there differences there? Yeah. So American laws, really bizarre. I found out in defining a nonprofit sector, so we have something called a tax code which defines what public charity is. And in the tax code language. That's a five oh, one C three public charity, and there are five oh, one C four, social advocacy groups, and then a whole blizzard of other five, oh, one C sixty seven c ten c twelve all of these are nonprofit organizations the ones that were most familiar with called five one onc- threes public charities. Those are the museums and hospitals and PTA's or PTO's with attached to schools or foundation, the private foundations of the world the Gates Foundation the Rockefeller Foundation. The Ford Foundation are also classified as five oh one C three private foundations, but it's all part of the same tax code. And of course, what separates a foundation from nonprofit. Is that a nonprofit is is..

Ford Foundation Gates Foundation Rockefeller Foundation PTA
U.S. Treasury's Mnuchin says he sees at least 3 percent growth for next 4-5 years

All Things Considered

05:42 min | 4 years ago

U.S. Treasury's Mnuchin says he sees at least 3 percent growth for next 4-5 years

"Caused by the hurricanes last. Year he decided to help out and to sing about it this album isn't necessarily about the devastation or the destruction it's about the moving forward. That's all coming. Up but first this news Live from NPR news, in Washington I'm Janine. Herbst in northern California the massive wildfire around reading continues to. Burn zone Hudson for member station k. q. e. d. visited in evacuation zone for the car. Fire earlier today I've been driving around in an evacuation zone near. Reading and in that area the car fires. Burned entire hillsides landscapes completely blackened ashes flying around like snow flurries also in. That area there's a lot of homes, that have been completely burned to the ground by the fire they're, totally flattened there's lots of melted and twisted metal but the fires burned so randomly one house on a street could be totally fine and the other could be totally burned to the ground. At tens of thousands have been evacuated many are wondering when they'll be, able to go home are spokesman Chris Harvey says it could be a while your. Safety and the safety of the fire in law enforcement. Cruises number one and in order to ensure that safety. We have to make sure. All the roads continue. To be, closed and An, open only, to law enforcement and fire traffic and. That means that you're you're not. Likely to be allowed to go home anytime soon the fire is still only five percent contained Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says the economy will. Continue to see strong growth for the next several years of you, contrary to many economists, and peers mirror Kennedy reports figures released Friday show the economy grew four point one percent in the second, quarter the latest growth rate is the highest one in nearly four years and on Fox. News Sunday Treasury. Secretary Steven Mnuchin said to expect more, of the same we. Can only project a couple of years in the future but. I think we're well on this path for several years he predicted four or five years of. Sustained three percent growth many economists are sceptical that current rates will. Continue though Federal Reserve officials told congress this. Month that they project GDP growth rates of under three percent next year and. Lower in twenty twenty and the ongoing, trade fight also has potential to limit growth Mary Kennedy NPR news Washington Dave before Zimbabwe holds historic elections longtime former, ruler Robert Mugabe gave us a prize press conference at his. Mansion today supporting the opposition and fears ater Peralta has more. Mugabe's sits on a green office chair in Zibo in the middle of his vast estate he's been here since the military forced him to resign in November and he lets it be known. That he will not be voting for Emmerson Mnangagwa who staged. What he, calls a, coup We're That means Mugabe the man who ran the ruling party for almost four decades will be voting for the opposition Mugabe who violently squash dissent, says he now hopes Zimbabwe's will be able to return to quote constitutionality. People he, says should be able to vote freely and fairly in pure news Herati and you're listening to NPR news from, Washington and this is WNYC in New. York I'm Sean. Carlson each of the nearly six thousand apartments in the stare at, city complex lost. Power early this, morning the sprawling complex in east New York has its own power plant workers resolved the issue by late, morning but it would take another several hours for the power to be fully up and running in each building. Barrel Thomas a home health aide couldn't get one of her clients because the elevators were. Down so she sat on a bench outside and waited and my. Client she's oxygen does she can't get anything? On I can't go the. Abaci it's seventeen. Floor Thomas, says emergency, workers Climb the stairs to check on vulnerable residents workers also rescued six people from stalled elevators the battle between New York's public, service commission and charter communications is heating up on Friday the agency said. Charter which, operates in state as spectrum was failing to meet its timetable to expand broadband service into the state's rural areas, in order to the company find another. Provider for its. New York customers within sixty days John Campbell Albany correspondent for the USA today network. Says charter lawsuit, can be expected during that time I do expect for lawsuit to be filed before that so that'll probably, drag it on the short answer is customers are being polled no there won't be any interruption and the state. Says that Charterhouse to continue providing the same amount of service through this new battle charter. Said the spectrum has built out its broadband network to more than. Forty two thousand unserved or under serve home? Since it began its merger. With Time Warner. Cable two, years ago Health officials say the drinking water at the Jacobi medical center in the Bronx has tested positive for the bacteria that causes legionnaire's disease, a spokesman for New York City health, and hospitals says required testing of the water found quote very low levels. Of the legionella bacteria the Jacobi medical center. Says it's using only bottled water and is installing new water filters on showers officials say. The risk the patients, staff and visitors is very low in that this New York State Department of health is treating and monitoring the water supply for the rest of, this evening we're looking at mostly clear skies here in our area will. Have low about seventy degrees tonight. Tomorrow Monday, Partly sunny through the day the high could. Hit about eighty two sometime in the afternoon and then. Tomorrow night we could see some showers a slight chance of rain but a. Twenty, percent chance of that mostly. Before midnight otherwise mostly cloudy tomorrow night we'll have low about seventy degrees this is WNYC at five or six support for NPR comes from the Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms learn more at Ford Foundation Dot org.

New York Robert Mugabe Washington NPR New York State Department Of H Wnyc Steven Mnuchin Zimbabwe Mary Kennedy Jacobi Medical Center California Herbst Chris Harvey Emmerson Mnangagwa Hudson York Secretary