4 Burst results for "Ford Andrew Ross Sorkin"

"ford andrew ross sorkin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:19 min | 3 years ago

"ford andrew ross sorkin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. Mary Louise Kelley President Trump says people should not leap to judgment and blame Saudi Arabia for the disappearance and suspected death of Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi in an interview with the Associated Press. Trump said quote here we go again with you're guilty until proven innocent a reference there to allegations of sexual assault against supreme court. Justice spread Kavanagh. Meanwhile, Secretary of state Mike Pompeo was in Saudi Arabia today to meet with the Saudi King and crown prince photo ops and handshakes and smiles even as kashogi has not been seen since he walked into the Saudi consulate. In stumble Turkey two weeks ago Turkey says the Saudis killed him. But after his meetings Pompeo said Saudi leaders told him they have no knowledge of what happened. And here's Michelle Kellerman is traveling with Pompeo which. Means she too is in Saudi Arabia's capital Riyadh. Hey, michelle. Hi there Mary Louise. So I'm going to get to the substance of these talks today in a minute but start with the optics. They are tricky. I I mentioned friendly handshakes. And smiles, meanwhile, the agenda is to discuss an alleged murder plot by the Saudis. Yeah. It was kind of striking because you know, on the face of it looked like this, very typical. Visit by secretary of state going to see the king at his palace, a brief stop at the foreign ministry and a lot of time with the crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, who's this young very powerful figure here. We're told that the conversations have been direct and candid, diplo speak for quite tough. But you wouldn't know it by watching these men, greedy niche other in front of the cameras and talking about how important this relationship is talk about the substance. What did they say to each other in these direct and candid talks? Well, they've the US officials have said. Very little about that. I mean, they say that Trump sent pump AO here to convey, the message that it's really important for the Saudis to conduct a thorough transparent investigation into the disappearance of this Washington Post columnist US officials haven't weighed in about all of these reports in the news at the Saudis are now portraying this is like an interrogation gone horribly wrong. We don't know exactly how this out have been spending this with Bombayo in private or if he believes them, but we do know that President Trump seems to at least according to his Twitter feed. Trump says he spoke by phone to the ground brands who was with Pompeo at the time. And he says that the crown prince, and this is a quote on Twitter, totally denied any knowledge of what took place in the consulate. I mean, it does seem as the Pompeo has been sent to walk this really fine line. President Trump has threatened severe punishment has words to whoever's responsible for Jamal kashogi disappearance, maybe murder, but but there's also a lot more at stake here in the in the wider US Saudi relationship. Yeah. In this country, Mary Louise is really key to the Mideast strategy of the Trump administration. There are big US arms deals at stake, these US policy on Iran is is vital here. The sanctions are going back into force and the the US needs the Saudis to keep the oil markets stable, and then on the other hand the administration is facing a lot of pressure from congress members of congress are outraged over this apparent murder in the consulate in Istanbul and over the Saudi conduct in the war in Yemen. So I think you're totally right there. The administration is trying to walk. This very fine line secretary Pompeo was headed next which made your headed next to the capital of Turkey. To anchor of what's the agenda there? Well, he's going to be meeting with the foreign minister there, obviously Turkey is also really important ally in a country that wants to get to the bottom of this to valise in Turkey today were searching the Saudi consulate and say they found evidence that this Audi journalists was killed there. So it's going to be to follow up on those investigations to MPR's. Michelle Kellerman reporting from Saudi Arabia. It's not just governments figuring out how to deal with Saudi Arabia's role and the suspected death of Jamal kashogi. Major corporations are distancing themselves from the kingdom. Top executives have pulled out of an investment conference scheduled to take place in Riyadh next week. They include leaders of J P Morgan and Ford Andrew Ross Sorkin of the New York Times also planned to attend and moderate panels. Not only did he pull out. He is also now reporting on how CEOs made the decision to withdraw from the Saudi conference and he joins us. Now. Welcome thank. If you're asking me, you say this incident is forcing business executives to become reluctant statesman. Why reluctant well, I think over the past year or two really under the Trump administration CEO's have been forced into these uncomfortable positions of having to speak out on moral issues. This conference in Riyadh known as Davos in. The desert has become a crucible of sorts for so many CEO's over the past week and all of being done without really direction from Washington. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is still going CEO's have been left to make these hard decisions. What's on the line for the CEO's? Why is it such a hard decision the Saudis, look at attendance of something like this as a show of loyalty? And so the idea that somebody like Jimmy diamond jacomb working we'd decide not to attend really puts potentially the employee's the business at risk. Larry Fink is the CEO. Of blackrock. He's manages billions of dollars of the central bank's money from Saudi Arabia. You know, there's a big question about whether he will continue to be able to do that. You report on the actual phone calls where the CEO's were making these decisions over the weekend. What went into their ultimate decision to pull out of this conference? I think for most of them this reported murder was one step too far. Now, by the way, there are people who say that typical given what's happened in the east crisis. You're going to Saudi Arabia's role leading the war in Yemen, which has created a massive humanitarian crisis there. Absolutely. You have employees, you know, so much more about what's happening, and they are in real time reacting providing feedback to executives on these issues in a way that they didn't. So in the same way that consumers might expect executives to take a position on immigration are same sex marriage. You're saying there could be consequences. If they did not take a position on this issue. Absolutely. These executives have. Come out, so forcefully taking a moral position. Whether it was on Charlottesville, whether it was on immigration, whether it was on the Paris climate accord, they felt compelled to do those things as you know, the new cycle moves fast and memories are short. Do you think this will have long-term consequences or pretty quickly just gonna get washed downstream and things will go back to normal? I think for some of these companies, frankly, I think they're going to be real implications for their business. Richard Branson had announced last week that he was going to step away from Saudi Arabia literally this afternoon the Saudis are canceling the virgin hyperloop project that they put together in retaliation. And so memories in Saudi Arabia are long whether they're long in the United States. I don't know. We will see I suspect that they're much shorter. Andrew Ross Sorkin writes the deal book column for the New York Times. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me when I was a little girl. I spent hours poring over the Sears catalog. I had my on. Holly hobby oven and aside from the fact that you could bake cakes and what I loved about shopping from the Sears catalog was nobody knew I was a kid I could browse at my own pace. No, shop assistant ignoring me or talking over my head to my parents. It turns out that feeling the ability to shop without being judged resonated in a different more profound way for black Americans in the Jim crow era. Cornell historian, Louis Hyman argues, the Sears catalog was radical in its day because it allowed black Americans to have the same shopping experience as whites. He's been pondering that legacy in light of this week's news that Sears has filed for bankruptcy. Professor highland. Welcome to all things considered. Thank you so much for having me. Why was the Sears catalog such a game changer for lack shoppers in the Jim crow south in the area of Jim crow race was everything and for black Americans? Most of whom were rural farmers access to goods on equal basis as whites in faraway cities. At reasonable prices was a godsend, and that's what the catalog was. I mean from a practical point of view, what had happened previously was they would show up, and they would be asked to go to the back of the line behind the white customers. And if you're shopping by catalog, nobody knows what call your nobody knows who you are. And in the Arab Jim crow. There was a constant act deference. If you were black you had to wait until all the white customers were served, you had to wait until the white store owner, let you buy whatever you want it. And he may or may not have let you 'cause it was largely on credit. So the Sears catalog appears people could read it at home that could decide what they wanted to order, but there were still challenges right man, southern storeowners fought back. Oh, definitely. Because if you were an African American and he wanted to shop in some other way, you were contesting their power not just the power of the store owner in the power, the landlord, but basically the power of white supremacy of Jim crow itself. And so you had lots of stores pushing back, you know, burning catalogs in the street, very publicly Sears catalogs in Sears catalogs in bonfires in the streets, all kinds of incentives to destroy these catalogs. So what did she do to keep all their customers able to order their products? Well, he published instructions in the catalogue how to simply give the requirements to the postman. So you didn't have to go through the story in a lot of places. The post office was also the general store, so it was pretty complicated to even get your order submitted to the catalog, but they found lots of ways to do this for a rural African Americans as well as immigrants people who didn't even speak English. They had all kinds of clerks available to take your order in nearly any tongue. So your takeaway as wet that. This is a reflection on on buying power on retail as as resistance. Yeah. I think it's a story of the deep contradiction between Jim crow and consumer capitalism. They can see in lots of places, particularly in this moment in near around nineteen hundred but also later in the nineteen fifties and sixties as African Americans acquire more buying power. This is part of the demand for civil. Writes that African Americans could use buses and restaurants, and toilets and theaters and everything else that's part of consumer capitalism that this is one of the essential rights, very conservative right of American capitalism. Louis Hyman can teach us history at Cornell university's school of industrial and labor relations. Thanks, so much pleasure..

Saudi Arabia Mike Pompeo Mary Louise Kelley President T CEO Saudi consulate Jim crow US Riyadh Sears Jamal kashogi murder Turkey Michelle Kellerman Trump Mary Louise Andrew Ross Sorkin Yemen Ari Shapiro
"ford andrew ross sorkin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:38 min | 3 years ago

"ford andrew ross sorkin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. And Mary Louise Kelley secretary of state Mike Pompeo is in Saudi Arabia meeting with the Saudi King and crown prince hanging over all the handshakes, and smiles is the disappearance of a Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi who has not been seen since he walked into the Saudi consulate in stumbled Turkey two weeks ago. Turkey says the Saudis killed him NPR's. Michelle Kellerman is traveling with the secretary of state, which means she too is in Saudi Arabia's capital Riyadh. Hi, michelle. Hi there. Mary louise. So I'm going to get to the substance of these talks today in a minute but start with the optics. They are tricky. I I mentioned friendly handshakes. And smiles, meanwhile, the agenda is to discuss an alleged murder plot by the Saudis. Yeah. It was kind of striking because you know, on the face of it looked like this, very typical. Visit by secretary of state going to see the king at his palace. A brief stop at the foreign. Ministry and a lot of time with the crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, who's this young very powerful figure here. We're told that the conversations have been direct and candid, diplo speak for quite tough. But you wouldn't know it by watching these men, greedy niche other in front of the cameras and talking about how important this relationship is talk about the substance. What did they say to each other in these direct and candid talks? Well, they've the US officials have said very little about that. I mean, they say that Trump sent Pompeii oh here to convey, the message that it's really important for the Saudis to conduct a thorough transparent investigation into the disappearance of this Washington Post columnist US officials haven't weighed in about all of these reports in the news at the Saudis are now portraying this as like interrogation gone horribly wrong. We don't know exactly how the Saudis have been spending this with bump AO in private or. Or if he believes them, but we do know that President Trump seems to at least according to his Twitter feed. Trump says he spoke by phone to the ground prints who was with Pompeii or at the time. And he says that the crown prince, and this is a quote on Twitter, totally denied any knowledge of what took place in the consulate. It does seem as the pump AO has been sent to walk this really fine line. President Trump has threatened severe punishment has words to whoever's responsible for Jamal kashogi disappearance, maybe murder, but but there's also a lot more at stake here in the in the wider US Saudi relationship in this country. Mary Louise is is really key to the Mideast strategy of the Trump administration. There are big US arms deals at stake, the US policy on Iran is is vital here. The sanctions are going back into force and the the US needs the Saudis to keep the oil market stable. And then on the other hand the administration is facing a lot of pressure from congress members of congress are outraged over this apparent murder in the consulate in Istanbul and over the Saudi conduct in the war in Yemen. So I think you're totally right there. The administration is trying to walk. This very fine line secretary Pompeo is headed next which means you are headed next to the capital of Turkey. To anchor of what's the agenda there? Well, he's going to be meeting with the foreign minister there, obviously Turkey is also really important ally in a country that wants to get to the bottom of this to valise in Turkey today were searching the Saudi consulate and say they found evidence that the Saudi journalists was killed there. So it's going to be to follow up on those investigations. MPR's Michelle Kellerman. Reporting from Saudi Arabia is not just governments figuring out how to deal with Saudi Arabia's role and the suspected death of Jamal kashogi. Major corporations are sensing themselves from the kingdom top executives have pulled out of an investment conference scheduled to take place in Riyadh next week. They include leaders of J P Morgan and Ford Andrew Ross Sorkin of the New York Times also planned to attend and moderate panels. Not only did he pull out. He is also now reporting on how CEO's made the decision to withdraw from the Saudi conference and he joins us. Now. Welcome. Thank you for. Having me you say this incident is forcing business executives to become reluctant statesman. Why reluctant well, I think that over the past year or two really under the Trump administration CEO's have been forced into these uncomfortable positions of having to speak out on moral issues. This conference in Riyadh known as Davos in. The desert has become a crucible of sorts for so many CEO's over the past week. And all of the being done without really direction from Washington. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin is still going CEO's have been left to make these hard decisions. What's on the line for the CEO's? Why is it such a hard decision the Saudis, look at attendance of something like this as a show of loyalty? And so the idea that somebody like Jamie diamond JP, Morgan we'd decide not to attend really puts potentially the employee's the business at risk. Larry Fink is the CEO of BlackRock. He's manages billions of dollars of the central bank's money from Saudi Arabia. You know, there's a big question about whether he will continue to be able to do that. You report on the actual phone calls where the CEO's were making these decisions over the weekend. What went into their decision to pull out of this conference? I think for most of them this reported murder was one step too far. Now, by the way there. People who say that typical given what's happened in the crisis. You're afraid to Saudi Arabia's role leading the war in Yemen, which has created a massive humanitarian crisis there. Absolutely. You have employees who know so much more about what's happening, and they are in real time reacting providing feedback to executives on these issues in a way that they did. So in the same way that consumers might expect executives to take a position on immigration or same sex marriage. You're saying there could be consequences. If they did not take a position on this issue. Absolutely. These executives have come out so forcefully taking a moral position. Whether it was on Charlottesville, whether it was on immigration, whether it was on the Paris climate accord, they felt compelled to do those things as you know, the new cycle moves fast and memories are short. Do you think this will have long term consequences or pretty quickly just gonna get washed downstream and things will go back to normal? I think for some of these companies, frankly, I think they're going to be real implications for their business. We're Branson had a now. Ounce last week that he was going to step away from Saudi Arabia literally this afternoon the Saudis are canceling the virgin hyperloop project that they put together in retaliation. And so memories in Saudi Arabia are long whether they're long in the United States. I don't know. We will see I suspect that they're much shorter. Andrew Ross Sorkin writes the deal book column for the New York Times. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me when I was a little girl, I spent hours poring over the Sears catalog. I had my eye on a Holly hobby oven and aside from the fact that you could bake cakes and what I loved about shopping from the Sears catalog was nobody knew I was a kid I could browse at my own pace. No, shop assistant ignoring me or talking over my head to my parents. It turns out that feeling the ability to shop without being judged resonated in a different more profound way for black Americans in the Jim crow era. Cornell historian, Louis Hyman argues, the Sears. Catalogue was radical in its day because it allowed black Americans to have the same shopping experience as whites. He's been pondering that legacy in light of this week's news that Sears has filed for bankruptcy. Professor highland. Welcome to all things considered. Thank you so much for having me. Why was the Sears catalog such a game changer for relax shoppers in the Jim crow south in the Arab? Jim crow race was everything. And for black Americans. Most of whom were rural farmers access to goods on equal basis as whites in faraway cities at reasonable prices was a godsend, and that's what the catalog was from a practical point of view, what had happened previously was they would show up, and they would be asked to go to the back of the line behind the white customers. And if you're shopping by catalog, nobody knows what color your nobody knows who you are. And in the Arab Jim crow. There was a constant active difference, if you're black you had to wait until.

Saudi Arabia CEO Saudi consulate Turkey US Riyadh murder Jamal kashogi Michelle Kellerman Trump Mary louise Sears Mike Pompeo Andrew Ross Sorkin Jim crow Yemen Ari Shapiro NPR
Pompeo meets king as Saudis expected to say journalist killed accidentally

All Things Considered

04:45 min | 3 years ago

Pompeo meets king as Saudis expected to say journalist killed accidentally

"Is in Saudi Arabia meeting with the Saudi King and crown prince hanging over all the handshakes, and smiles is the disappearance of a Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi who has not been seen since he walked into the Saudi consulate in stumbled Turkey two weeks ago. Turkey says the Saudis killed him NPR's. Michelle Kellerman is traveling with the secretary of state, which means she too is in Saudi Arabia's capital Riyadh. Hi, michelle. Hi there. Mary louise. So I'm going to get to the substance of these talks today in a minute but start with the optics. They are tricky. I I mentioned friendly handshakes. And smiles, meanwhile, the agenda is to discuss an alleged murder plot by the Saudis. Yeah. It was kind of striking because you know, on the face of it looked like this, very typical. Visit by secretary of state going to see the king at his palace. A brief stop at the foreign. Ministry and a lot of time with the crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, who's this young very powerful figure here. We're told that the conversations have been direct and candid, diplo speak for quite tough. But you wouldn't know it by watching these men, greedy niche other in front of the cameras and talking about how important this relationship is talk about the substance. What did they say to each other in these direct and candid talks? Well, they've the US officials have said very little about that. I mean, they say that Trump sent Pompeii oh here to convey, the message that it's really important for the Saudis to conduct a thorough transparent investigation into the disappearance of this Washington Post columnist US officials haven't weighed in about all of these reports in the news at the Saudis are now portraying this as like interrogation gone horribly wrong. We don't know exactly how the Saudis have been spending this with bump AO in private or. Or if he believes them, but we do know that President Trump seems to at least according to his Twitter feed. Trump says he spoke by phone to the ground prints who was with Pompeii or at the time. And he says that the crown prince, and this is a quote on Twitter, totally denied any knowledge of what took place in the consulate. It does seem as the pump AO has been sent to walk this really fine line. President Trump has threatened severe punishment has words to whoever's responsible for Jamal kashogi disappearance, maybe murder, but but there's also a lot more at stake here in the in the wider US Saudi relationship in this country. Mary Louise is is really key to the Mideast strategy of the Trump administration. There are big US arms deals at stake, the US policy on Iran is is vital here. The sanctions are going back into force and the the US needs the Saudis to keep the oil market stable. And then on the other hand the administration is facing a lot of pressure from congress members of congress are outraged over this apparent murder in the consulate in Istanbul and over the Saudi conduct in the war in Yemen. So I think you're totally right there. The administration is trying to walk. This very fine line secretary Pompeo is headed next which means you are headed next to the capital of Turkey. To anchor of what's the agenda there? Well, he's going to be meeting with the foreign minister there, obviously Turkey is also really important ally in a country that wants to get to the bottom of this to valise in Turkey today were searching the Saudi consulate and say they found evidence that the Saudi journalists was killed there. So it's going to be to follow up on those investigations. MPR's Michelle Kellerman. Reporting from Saudi Arabia is not just governments figuring out how to deal with Saudi Arabia's role and the suspected death of Jamal kashogi. Major corporations are sensing themselves from the kingdom top executives have pulled out of an investment conference scheduled to take place in Riyadh next week. They include leaders of J P Morgan and Ford Andrew Ross Sorkin of the New York Times also planned to attend and moderate panels. Not only did he pull out. He is also now reporting on how CEO's made the decision to withdraw from the Saudi conference and he joins us. Now. Welcome. Thank you for. Having me you say this incident is forcing business executives to become reluctant statesman. Why reluctant well, I think that over the past year or two really under the Trump administration CEO's have been forced into these uncomfortable positions of having to speak out on moral issues. This conference in Riyadh known as Davos in. The desert has become a crucible of sorts for so many CEO's over the past week. And all of the being done without really direction from Washington. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin is still going CEO's have been

Saudi Arabia Jamal Kashogi Saudi Consulate United States Donald Trump Riyadh Michelle Kellerman Turkey CEO Murder Mary Louise Prince Mohammad Bin Salman President Trump Twitter NPR Secretary Ford Andrew Ross Sorkin
"ford andrew ross sorkin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

15:01 min | 3 years ago

"ford andrew ross sorkin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was revolutionary one in the Jim crow era because it allowed black Americans to have the same shopping experiences quite being able to buy guitars, and hats, and guns and all kinds of things through the catalog that otherwise they wouldn't have had access to a look back at Sears as the company declined, plus with the midterm elections less than a month away. Some Democrats are focusing on flipping state legislatures and a record number of openly. LGBTQ candidates are running for office a round table conversation with the candidates after news headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. Wall Street seeing a surge in US, stocks have all major market indices. Two percent. Two point eight percent higher before the close. We'll check back and just a moment on Wall Street in other news a search for evidence about the disappearance of a Saudi journalists in Istanbul continues this day with Turkish in Saudi teams preparing to search the residents of the Saudi consul general NPR's. Peter Kenyon says Turkish media report the top Saudi diplomat in Istanbul left. The country ahead of the search as police barricades were going up around his residence in Istanbul. Saudi consul-general Muhammed ELO, Taibbi boarded a plane and left earlier Turkey's foreign minister said he was free to go. The search of the consul-generals residents as with Monday night. Search of the Saudi consulate building is seeking evidence of what happened to journalists Jamal kashogi after he entered the consulate on a tow percent. And he hasn't been seen since president rigid type air to one says. Investigators from Turkey and Saudi Arabia found some materials in the consulate had been painted over. Saudi officials have not responded to media reports that can show G died in the consulate during questioning Peter Kenyon. NPR news is STAN Bill. President Trump says he'll go after stormy Daniels and her lawyer now that a federal court judge has dismissed the adult film actresses defamation claim and ordered her to pay Trump's attorney's fees today. Trump took a Twitter Jabba Daniels. Look Saint called her a total con- her lawyer Michael avenue, but he says the judge got it wrong in his appealing. The ruling stormy Daniels sued in April after Trump tweeted that she was a con job. He was reacting to Daniels claim that she was threatened by man for alleging that she had a fling with Trump years ago. The CDC is investigating a mystery illness that has sickened kids in twenty two states this year NPR's Alison Aubrey reports. It is a dramatic condition that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis of limbs the centers for disease control and prevention says some children recover quickly while others remain paralysed. The condition is known as acute flaccid, my elitest or a FM for short. It can come on quickly symptoms include droopy, eyelids difficulty swallowing the CDC says one hundred twenty seven patients are under investigation. And so far. There are sixty two confirmed cases mostly in children. The average age is about four years old. The oldness usually presents in late summer and fall the CDC has tracked an increase in the disease since two thousand fourteen but so far cannot identify the cause of the mystery illness some kids who get a FM have had enter a virus. But there's no common pathogen that links. All the cases the CDC says despite the increase, it's a very rare condition affecting. Fewer than one in a million kids Allison Aubrey NPR news strong earnings reported by US companies factor into a surge on Wall Street, the stay the Dow's up nearly five hundred fifty points more than two percent before the close NASDAQ's up two point eight percent SNP up more than two this is NPR. And you're listening to WNYC in New York at four zero four. I'm Jamie Floyd, locals are speaking out after an incident of flatbush Bodega where a white woman called nine one one after she apparently thought a black child had groped her almost one hundred people rallied outside the store yesterday. Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams, build the event as a community conversation. But Gotham is reporter benyak is said the tone was less than conversational. A large part of the crowd was dancing at some of the crowd was angry. And they wanted to see action from local politician the woman at I said the boy had quote sexually assaulted her. But later apology. After security camera footage showed the boy just brushing by her with his backpack. Video of the incident went viral new three one one data says there is a higher rate of noise. Complaints in neighborhoods that are gentrifying science journalist Wendy's occur man toll WNYC's Brian Lehrer show that she has some advice to residents talk to your neighbors. You'll moving into a space that you were not in before. So try as much as you can it can be difficult, but to be a part of that community and find out what are the community gnomes. So says that wealthier people are more comfortable calling the police and New York's highest court has removed a queens civil court judge for bad behavior. The New York law journal is reporting that judge Terence O'Connor was accused of insulting and chastising attorneys in court, he then declined to cooperate with an investigation by the state commission on judicial conduct O'Connor's behavior and his refusal to cooperate led the core. Of appeals to conclude that O'Connor does not have the appropriate demeanor to be a judge the state office of court administration says O'Connor salary and benefits ceased immediately Terence O'Connor was elected back in two thousand nine and was going to retire from the bench in December in may. He was suspended with pay while the state court of appeals considered whether to remove him tonight, mostly clear, low around forty seven degrees. Currently it's fifty five degrees in central park at four zero six. Support for NPR comes from Fidelity Investments taking a personalized approach to helping clients grow preserve and manage their wealth. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. The -delity brokerage services LLC. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. And Mary Louise Kelley secretary of state Mike Pompeo is in Saudi Arabia meeting with the Saudi King and crown prince hanging over all the handshakes, and smiles is the disappearance of a Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi who has not been seen since he walked into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul Turkey two weeks ago. Turkey says the Saudis killed him NPR's. Michelle Kellerman is traveling with the secretary of state, which means she too is in Saudi Arabia's capital Riyadh. Hi, michelle. Hi there Mary Louise. So I'm going to get to the substance of these talks today in a minute but start with the optics. They are tricky I mentioned friendly handshakes. And smiles, meanwhile, the agenda is to discuss an alleged murder plot by the Saudis. Yeah. It was kind of striking because you know, on the face of it looked like this very typical visit via secretary of state going to see the king at his palace, a brief stop at the foreign ministry and a lot of time with the crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, who's this young very powerful figure here. We're told that the conversations have been direct and candid diplomat speak for quite tough. But you wouldn't know it by watching these men, greedy niche other in front of the cameras and talking about how important this relationship is talk about the substance. What did they say to each other in these direct and candid talks? Well, they've the US officials have said very little about that. I mean, they say that Trump sent Pompeii oh here to convey, the message that it's really important for the Saudis to conduct a thorough transparent investigation into the disappearance of this Washington Post columnist US officials haven't weighed in about all of these reports in the news at the Saudis are now portraying this as like an interrogation gone horribly wrong. We don't know exactly how this Audis have been spinning this with bump AO in private or if he believes them, but we do know that President Trump seems to at least according to his Twitter feed. Trump says he spoke by phone to the ground prints who was with Pumpido at the time. And he says that the crown prince, and this is a quote on Twitter, totally denied any knowledge of what took place in the consulate. I mean, it does seem as though pump has been sent to walk this really fine line. President Trump has threatened severe punishment has words to whoever's responsible for Jamal kashogi disappearance, maybe murder, but but there's also a lot more at stake here in the in the wider US Saudi relationship. Yeah. And this country, Mary Louise is is really key to the Mideast strategy of the Trump administration. There are big US arms deals at stake, these US policy on Iran is is vital here. The sanctions are going back into force and the the US needs the Saudis to keep the oil markets stable, and then on the other hand the administration is facing a lot of pressure from congress members of congress are outraged over this apparent murder in the consulate in Istanbul and over the Saudi conduct in the war in Yemen. So I think you're totally right there. The administration is trying to walk. This very fine line secretary Pompeo was headed next which means you are headed next to the capital of Turkey to anchor of what's the agenda there. Well, he's going to be meeting with the foreign minister there, obviously Turkey is also really important ally in a country that wants to get to the bottom of this to valise. In Turkey today were searching the Saudi consulate and say they found evidence that the Saudi journalists was killed there. So it's going to be to follow up on those investigations. Michelle Kellerman reporting from Saudi Arabia. It's not just governments figuring out how to deal with Saudi Arabia's role and the suspected death of Jamal kashogi. Major corporations are distancing themselves from the kingdom. Top executives have pulled out of an investment conference scheduled to take place in Riyadh next week. They include leaders of J P Morgan and Ford Andrew Ross Sorkin of the New York Times also planned to attend and moderate panels. Not only did he pull out. He is also now reporting on how CEO's made the decision to withdraw from the Saudi conference and he joins us. Now. Welcome. Thank you for your acne. You say this incident is forcing business executives to become reluctant statesman. Why reluctant well, I think that over the past year or two really under the Trump administration CEO's have been forced into these uncomfortable positions of having to speak out on moral issues. This conference in Riyadh known as Davos in the desert has become a crucible of sorts for so many CEO's over the past week and all of it being done without really. Direction from Washington. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is still going CEO's have been left to make these hard decisions. What's on the line for these CEO's? Why is it such a hard decision the Saudis, look at attendance of something like this as a show of faith in their country as a show of loyalty? And so the idea that somebody like Jamie diamond Jacob Morgan we'd decide not to attend really puts potentially the employee's the business at risk. Real prophets. Do report on the actual phone calls where the CEO's were making these decisions over the weekend. What went into their ultimate decision to pull out of this conference? I think for most of them this reported murder was one step too far. You have customers know so much more about what's happening in real time reacting providing feedback to executives on these issues in a way that they did. So in the same way that consumers might expect executives to take. Position on immigration or same sex marriage. You're saying there could be consequences. If they did not take a position on this issue. Absolutely. In particular, the view is that over the past two years. And again, I do think it goes back to this particular administration. These executives have come out so forcefully taking a moral position. Whether it was on Charlottesville, whether it was on immigration, whether it was on the Paris climate accord, they felt compelled to do those things as you know, the new cycle moves fast and memories are short. Do you think this will have long-term consequences, or is it pretty quickly just gonna get washed downstream and things will go back to normal? I think for some of these companies, frankly, I think they're going to be real implications for their business. We're tired Branson had announced last week that he was going to step away from Saudi Arabia literally this afternoon the Saudis are canceling the virgin hyperloop infrastructure project that they put together in retaliation. You know after what might have been described as a skirmish between Canada and Saudi Arabia over the summer. The Saudis literally told their financial investment managers to sell all of their investments in stakes in Canadian companies as retribution for what they saw as a hostile act when the Canadians criticized the country for some human rights related issues. Andrew Ross Sorkin writes the deal book column for the New York Times, thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me when I was a little girl, I spent hours poring over the Sears catalog. I had my eye on Holly hobby oven and aside from the fact that you could make real cakes and what I loved about shopping from the Sears catalog was nobody knew I was a kid I could browse at my own pace. No, shop assistant ignoring me or talking over my head to my parents. It turns out that feeling the ability to shop without being judged resonated in a different more profound way for black. Americans in the Jim crow era. Cornell historian, Louis Hyman argues, the Sears catalog was radical in its day because it allowed black Americans to have the same shopping experience as whites. He's been pondering that legacy in light of this week's news that Sears has filed for bankruptcy. Professor. Welcome to all things considered. Thank you for having me. Why was the Sears catalog such a game changer for relax shoppers in the Jim crow south in the area of Jim crow race was everything and for black Americans? Most of whom were rural farmers access to goods on an equal basis as whites in faraway cities at reasonable prices was a godsend, and that's what the catalog was mean from a practical point of view, what had happened previously was they would show up, and they would be asked to go to the back of the line behind the white customers. And if you're shopping by catalog, nobody knows what call your nobody knows who you are. And in the Arab Jim crow. There was a constant active difference, if you're black you, wait until all. All the white customers were served you had to wait until the white store owner, let.

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