24 Burst results for "Foods Co."

What the Heck Is Seitan? Is It Healthy?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

01:57 min | 1 d ago

What the Heck Is Seitan? Is It Healthy?

"My editor. Who is way cooler than me has been hanging out on tiktok lately. And she says she's seen lots and lots of videos about cooking with satan. Apparently this meat substitute is having a bit of a moment. But i think there are still plenty of people who are still unfamiliar with this ingredient. And what the heck is it. How does it stack up nutritionally. And how do you eat it. Satan spelled s. e. I. t. a. n. is not a new thing. The word is japanese and it was coined about fifty years ago by one of the proponents of the macrobiotic diet. But the food that it refers to has been a staple in asian cultures for at least fifteen centuries. I remember seeing it but not buying it at the food cop that i belong to as an undergraduate at boston university now. That wasn't quite fifteen centuries ago but it was still long before the days of whole foods stores and yoga studios on every corner back then food co-ops and health food in general occupied sort of a fringe culture leftover from the age of aquarius. Today of course it's another story. Plant based in plant. Forward diets have become relatively mainstream. And you're much more likely to run across satan at your local grocery store. It's often next to the tofu or the plant based meat alternatives. If your local grocery doesn't carry it you might need to seek out a health food store a food co-op and yes. They still exist or an asian grocer. You can even make your own and have more about that in just a minute. Is most frequently used as a meat substitute in vegetarian diets. It has sort of a stringy chewy texture that makes it a fairly good substitute for meat. Unlike some meat substitutes however it's a decent source of protein but the source of the protein may surprise you because satan is made from wheat gluten.

Satan Boston University
What the Heck is Seitan?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

01:58 min | 1 d ago

What the Heck is Seitan?

"My editor. Who is way cooler than me has been hanging out on tiktok lately. And she says she's seen lots and lots of videos about cooking with satan. Apparently this meat substitute is having a bit of a moment. But i think there are still plenty of people who are still unfamiliar with this ingredient. And what the heck is it. How does it stack up nutritionally. And how do you eat it. Satan spelled s. e. I. t. a. n. is not a new thing. The word is japanese and it was coined about fifty years ago by one of the proponents of the macrobiotic diet. But the food that it refers to has been a staple in asian cultures for at least fifteen centuries. I remember seeing it but not buying it at the food cop that i belong to as an undergraduate at boston university now. That wasn't quite fifteen centuries ago but it was still long before the days of whole foods stores and yoga studios on every corner back then food co-ops and health food in general occupied sort of a fringe culture leftover from the age of aquarius. Today of course it's another story. Plant based in plant. Forward diets have become relatively mainstream. And you're much more likely to run across satan at your local grocery store. It's often next to the tofu or the plant based meat alternatives. If your local grocery doesn't carry it you might need to seek out a health food store a food co-op and yes. They still exist or an asian grocer. You can even make your own and have more about that in just a minute. Is most frequently used as a meat substitute in vegetarian diets. It has sort of a stringy chewy texture that makes it a fairly good substitute for meat. Unlike some meat substitutes however it's a decent source of protein but the source of the protein may surprise you because satan is made from wheat

Satan Boston University
"foods co." Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:58 min | 4 months ago

"foods co." Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Later this hour. We'll hear from Whole Foods co founder and CEO job Mackey on the company's merger with Amazon. But first the race for a cure or vaccine for covered. 19 is one of the biggest stories we've been covering Harriet Bloomberg and Johnson and Johnson is one of the drug makers involved. David Rubenstein spoke to the chairman and CEO of Johnson and Johnson. Alex Gorsky on the David Rubenstein show Peer to peer conversations here, David begins by asking Gorski about efforts to beat the pandemic. I think it's in the public's best interest that we're seeing this kind of public private partnership. I mean, there were. It would be very difficult for us to make the kind of advancements and accelerate the timelines that we're doing right now. Were it not for the partnership that we're seeing? Not only in terms of funds being provided but in terms of literally the day to day interactions that are taking place between regulators and scientists across many of these platforms, you know, in our case from the very beginning, we made a pledge that we would do this on a not for profit basis. And yes, we are working with the government. We've except the government funds. But we also recognize that is Johnson and Johnson, the world's largest healthcare company. That's important for us at this very unique time to do it on a not for profit basis so that we can give as many people access around the world as possible S O. That's the approach that we're taking. Now there's a fear in some circles that wealthy people will get the vaccine quicker than people that are not wealthy and you have with other CEOs and other health care officials and the bill mill in the Gates Foundation, signed the letter essentially saying, You're committed to making certain that it doesn't go only to wealthy people and only the people in the United States. Can you explain why you wanted to have that letter and how you're gonna make sure that happens? Look, we're the only way we're going to beat this virus is if we have global distribution, and no one is safe. Frankly, if The entire world is not provided access. And so we are absolutely committed to doing this in a very ethical in a very just weigh on Do. We worked very hard to make agreements clearly with governments like the United States and Europe, Japan, the developed countries We're also working hand in hand with other pharmaceutical companies, the Bill Melinda Gates Foundation to ensure the developing countries also have got access. So you as the CEO of the largest healthcare company in the United States. I think it's the 10th largest company by market cap in the entire United States market value of about almost $400 billion. You have to be very careful because I think it would look bad, wouldn't it? If the CEO of the largest health care company got the virus, So what do you do to protect yourself? Well, David, look. Yeah, I think all of us have a huge responsibility to take care of ourselves and Certainly those of us like myself fortunate to be in this kind of a position where we have responsibility for others have got to make sure that we put the safety of our employees are friends of our family's first and everything that we do. And look that starts with the simple things and I think one of the things that we've learned most through this pandemic is by making sure that we're using social distancing that were wearing masks that were washing our hands that we're doing. Everything we can to prevent the spread of the virus are the most important steps that we can take to actually bring an end of this pandemic. And dealing with it for the long term. Now vaccines of what everybody has been focused on. But there's also therapeutics. So for people might have already contracting the disease or already have the virus eyes there any progress being made on therapeutics that might help people who already have the the disease? David. That zah great point. There is no one silver bullet here, and I think what is really important for everyone understand? It's going to take a holistic approach is likely we're gonna be dealing with this. Not only is a pandemic, but it's going to be endemic. For several years going forward. So in all likelihood is going to take a combination of therapeutics for patients who are actually sick back scenes to present it, prevent it from happening in the first place, and Last but not least the hospital protocols. I think you've done a great job still much more work to do in terms of reducing actual mortality and morbidity. Hindsight is always, 2022 said. But looking back. What would you say that the CDC or the FDA or the White House or HHS should have done differently? Is there anything that you would recommend that with somebody in the future that they do differently if they were overseeing this kind of pandemic response? Well, you know, you're right. We look backwards. Things always seem clear. And, you know, I think there's a few lessons and I would also say that almost all of us have underestimated the dramatic impact of this outbreak. I mean, if you would've asked most people eight or nine months ago if you would ever see The kind of impact that were, you know, seeing around the world right now, if you would have gotten it right, But I think there are lessons to be learned. First and foremost, I think is the important statement of global public health and I think going forward we're gonna understand much better that you know if we don't have global public health security We don't have national security. We don't have economic security and we will not have security a society. So I think the importance of being prepared making sure that you know we've got the kind of protocols in place that we have certain products preposition. And frankly also move from a maniacal focus on efficiency and effectiveness in certain cases to one more of resiliency and sustainability, particularly for these kind of situations. You've been listening to Alex Gorsky Johnson and Johnson, chairman and CEO on the David Rubenstein show, Peer to peer conversations and coming up. Why being CEO of Change A is the best job in the world most days. Onto the spell. A greedy this.

David Rubenstein Alex Gorsky Johnson chairman and CEO CEO founder and CEO United States cure Gates Foundation Alex Gorsky Amazon Whole Foods co Harriet Bloomberg government Mackey Bill Melinda Gates Foundation Europe Gorski CDC
Seattle protesters create police-free "autonomous zone"

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:57 sec | 10 months ago

Seattle protesters create police-free "autonomous zone"

"In Washington state it's been nearly a week since Seattle police vacated their precinct in the city's Capitol Hill neighborhood after they used tear gas and flash bang grenades against protesters NPR's Hannah lamb reports activists are still occupying the site as well as several blocks around it the protesters have not only held their six black patch but have turned it into what they call the Capitol Hill at Thomas stone or chats for short they set up a food co op and sidewalks health clinics through open make speeches and film screenings they're raising awareness about racial inequality president trump along with right wing media outlets painted different picture they see a lawless enclave of quote domestic terrorists if local officials don't retake control trump has warned then he will but there's no sign of an imminent resolution Seattle police chief Carmen best has said she wants to work out a deal for her officers to return this is the police have no clear negotiating partner in the leader lists

NPR Thomas Stone Donald Trump Partner Washington Seattle Hannah Lamb President Trump Carmen Best
"foods co." Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"But he is a brattleboro. Food cO up foreign policy, right? Like, this guy is handing out the flyers. He wants to do, you know, he's talking about how Reagan's backing all of these, you know, murderous regimes across Latin and Central America. I'm sure that his feelings on Israel, much more complicated. Because you know, I again, I just frankly, I just give a generational pass that being said he endorsed Jesse Jackson. He noted there's videos of him in the eighties saying the Palestinians need rights that actually puts him well to the left of the dial. And then he gets into congress. And again, I think again, we got a credit where Credit's due. I mean, the basic dividing line e posed the invasion of Iraq. That's still is the most important, you know, may macro foreign policy decision last couple of decades, and he was one hundred percent right on it. And then I think in other areas, it was a combination of you know, his priorities really were domestic. That's also probably where he felt he could do some things and. And I think it in two thousand sixteen it was almost he got reawakened because I think that he kind of just put his head down, and even sometimes went along with and voted for some very bad foreign policy ideas, and then two thousand sixteen kinda started with like, well, hey, you know, I'm not a fan of Kissinger because I sort of don't like war criminals how about that. And then people were like, hey, that's great. What else you got? And he's like, well, you know, while we're at it. I don't think Palestinians are subhuman and she get hit with white phosphorus every other day people. Like, you know, what sounds pretty good, man? What else you got? And then you know in preparation for running for president Hebron, Matt dust and so on and he's been trying to synthesize. And I think you know, again, there is a global Thawra -tarian access. But that's you know, that's also the kind of outreach to sort of liberal view. But at the same time in the same speech where he's talking about Bolsonaro. And obviously, this would be something. I would notice he certainly the only presidential candidate who recognizes like, you know, in the phrase. Lula's in jail under very questionable circumstances. Whereas I think, you know, even just brand wise, Elizabeth Warren gonna take on the process of being like, oh, well, there's sometimes just like fake nonsense corruption investigations that are political projects not legal ones and the really dangerous, and it belies a certain deeper skepticism. So I think that you're writing to both sides of Bernie's nature here. And you know, what's your sense of the team around him of what way it breaks? And if it breaks the good way is America ready for that. Like, a real just kind of more fundamental sort of, you know, not anti-american not, you know, not not a guys giving just, you know, like anti foreign policy diatribes in the White House. But somebody who's really like fundamentally is about diplomacy. And also, I really knowledge just as a practical matter the ways in which the United States is a major problem world affairs. And I wanted the escalate those problems because ultimately, they aren't beneficial the American people. I think those are great questions. So I think fundamentally I trust the Bernie, I think he has good instincts. And I and I particularly as you lose trust people like Matt us who are around to who have been really thinking about these reductions as I have no doubt have basically agree with everything that we said, if I guess I would say bad just agrees with everything that we just said and that Bernie very quickly be convinced of it. And and if he did sort of reaffirm these types of Cold War frameworks, it's probably just because more out of habit than any conviction to fighting existential wars who with with these various global Tyrian, actually, I think he was a what I think ultimately that he was trying to draw attention to what is truly global problem, particularly as it relates to his major issue, which is at best inequality and how things like taxations and put Takeuchi abroad do affect American domestic politics. That's on. So I have no I've Bredesen's whatsoever about supporting Bernie a hundred and ten percent because I again, I trust the man, I think it ends things..

Jesse Jackson Bernie Matt dust brattleboro Reagan Kissinger Israel Central America congress Elizabeth Warren Iraq Lula Tyrian president United States America White House Bolsonaro
Southern governors declare emergencies ahead of winter storm

WBZ Midday News

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Southern governors declare emergencies ahead of winter storm

"Two southern states are declaring emergencies ahead of an anticipated intense. Winter storm Virginia governor Ralph Northam says he wants to help state agencies prepare for the storm that's expected to hit hard especially in the southern part of the state, North Carolina. Governor ROY Cooper issued the declaration yesterday saying the impacts of the weekend. Storm will vary across the state with forecasters calling for up to eighteen inches of snow in the mountains and possible flooding at the coast, Rob Jones is the manager at the French broad food co op in Asheville North Carolina. He says people packed up story packed the store yesterday. Stocking up on supply, we ordered up on all kinds of extra bread and milk. You know, the standards, and so there's definitely selling out of all that stuff. And most people were kind of staying in today. The national weather service says a prolonged period of. Snow is expected starting as early as tonight and lasting until Monday growing

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper Rob Jones Snow Ralph Northam Virginia Asheville Eighteen Inches Milk
"foods co." Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"And that's really a simple way of putting it but isn't using. Favoring making who above making sex holman's. That's another thing too guy. And then all we having so much Suga that is being a lot of testosterone is converted into eastern another thing to consider and then these than east regions plastic for the wound. And are they having a knock on effect? This is what I've been seeing in the research and reading a lot about, because again, I think we, as you said, females begun think about his Australian. Sorry, guns, you don't monopolize that hormone and we really needed it. So important important phone, how it's important for skin in Stasi is important. Full nubrik -ation. It's important for a lot of things. So I would look at the starting point is always looking at all you getting the right building blocks in and use stressing fraught much. Can we do something to change those things as. The starting point. And I think that's always my starting point with holman's because although woman's extremely complicated enough, any simplified them here, the actually extremely complicated and into woven webs. But if we stopped ringing in the building blocks that we need, we start bringing in the lifestyle changes that we need. A lot of things can be rectified on knees that on that for you. It does. I think that something you said is something we should all have top of mind is understanding that the body prioritizes things that are needed for survival, and in the body's mind, we do actually need stress hormones, adrenalin cortisol in the right amounts because that keeps us alive. That's what activates our fight or flight when we need to actually run from something that's dangerous. And so those the body will prioritize those hormones over things like reproduction which are not vital. If you are starving being chased by something or in a life or death situation, or even digestion, which is it necessary if you need to run from something, you can turn. That offer a few minutes. And so I think the key is and you can probably speak to this better than I can. But even if we don't quote unquote, feel stressed, stress doesn't have to be just like mentally, like feeling very stressed out from the bodies perspective. If the body is feeling stressed, even if we think we're fine because I have, for instance, I'm recovering perfectionist. I'm very Taipei. I feel great when I'm under stress I thrive. I get stuff done. I'm on top of my game, but my body is suffering from that. And it took me a lot of years to realize that that the body stress as lack of sleep, too much exposure to blue light. Like you mentioned too many plastic chemicals that are in our lives. All of these factors, the body interprets as stress, even if we don't feel stressed. So this is perfect. We've come full circle back to the stress and cortisol equation and how busy we all are. So can you just go a little bit deeper on that and explaining some of the ways that we can kind of take that stress away from the body, even if we don't feel stressed. Esotique yesterday, the flooding clinic as well and unharmed. He said, you are recovering perfectionist. Exactly. Like I am as well. I, I see this a lot in connect with people, say fighter and feel stress. And then I might just dive a deeper than who some example. An example instances, if someone is trying haunted, lose weight in the Condie's weight that is on their mind continues today. If they are exercising excessively, ridiculing the gym all time that hasn't not negative effect on the body actually knocker event where it becomes a stressful Stresa for the buddy. Oh, if the easing a, that's pro inflammatory and this extra information about inflammation is renting potent. We need information. If we didn't have information about of heating would not happen. However, inflammation should be like a Campbell. And what we have in the Muslim world is a raging run fire. And so inflammation causes stress on the body, high sugar Foods Co..

holman cortisol Suga testosterone sugar Foods Co Taipei Stresa Condie Campbell
"foods co." Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"And that's really a simple way of putting it but isn't using. Favoring making who above making sex holman's. That's another thing too guy. And then all we having so much Suga that is being a lot of testosterone is converted into eastern another thing to consider and then these than east regions plastic for the wound. And are they having a knock on effect? This is what I've been seeing in the research and reading a lot about, because again, I think we, as you said, females begun think about his Australian. Sorry, guns, you don't monopolize that hormone and we really needed it. So important important phone, how it's important for skin in Stasi is important. Full nubrik -ation. It's important for a lot of things. So I would look at the starting point is always looking at all you getting the right building blocks in and use stressing fraught much. Can we do something to change those things as. The starting point. And I think that's always my starting point with holman's because although woman's extremely complicated enough, any simplified them here, the actually extremely complicated and into woven webs. But if we stopped ringing in the building blocks that we need, we start bringing in the lifestyle changes that we need. A lot of things can be rectified on knees that on that for you. It does. I think that something you said is something we should all have top of mind is understanding that the body prioritizes things that are needed for survival, and in the body's mind, we do actually need stress hormones, adrenalin cortisol in the right amounts because that keeps us alive. That's what activates our fight or flight when we need to actually run from something that's dangerous. And so those the body will prioritize those hormones over things like reproduction which are not vital. If you are starving being chased by something or in a life or death situation, or even digestion, which is it necessary if you need to run from something, you can turn. That offer a few minutes. And so I think the key is and you can probably speak to this better than I can. But even if we don't quote unquote, feel stressed, stress doesn't have to be just like mentally, like feeling very stressed out from the bodies perspective. If the body is feeling stressed, even if we think we're fine because I have, for instance, I'm recovering perfectionist. I'm very Taipei. I feel great when I'm under stress I thrive. I get stuff done. I'm on top of my game, but my body is suffering from that. And it took me a lot of years to realize that that the body stress as lack of sleep, too much exposure to blue light. Like you mentioned too many plastic chemicals that are in our lives. All of these factors, the body interprets as stress, even if we don't feel stressed. So this is perfect. We've come full circle back to the stress and cortisol equation and how busy we all are. So can you just go a little bit deeper on that and explaining some of the ways that we can kind of take that stress away from the body, even if we don't feel stressed. Esotique yesterday, the flooding clinic as well and unharmed. He said, you are recovering perfectionist. Exactly. Like I am as well. I, I see this a lot in connect with people, say fighter and feel stress. And then I might just dive a deeper than who some example. An example instances, if someone is trying haunted, lose weight in the Condie's weight that is on their mind continues today. If they are exercising excessively, ridiculing the gym all time that hasn't not negative effect on the body actually knocker event where it becomes a stressful Stresa for the buddy. Oh, if the easing a, that's pro inflammatory and this extra information about inflammation is renting potent. We need information. If we didn't have information about of heating would not happen. However, inflammation should be like a Campbell. And what we have in the Muslim world is a raging run fire. And so inflammation causes stress on the body, high sugar Foods Co..

holman cortisol Suga testosterone sugar Foods Co Taipei Stresa Condie Campbell
"foods co." Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"Well, you know, it puts everybody in a really tough situation because the merchants don't want to reduce the foot traffic or transactions. The banks, of course, don't want to ease up on the feast. Coming in in. Nobody wants to upset the consumer. It is a difficult situation and you know the two sides have their own sort of version two like why. What they are fighting for is the right thing. And they're, I mean as a reporter reporting on its, I can't say there's one right or one wrong side here. I mean, chances are that, yes, merchants are benefiting from cards sense at how many people shop with cards and spending more will. Yeah, I suppose if there's anybody who's not benefiting if you consider the fees of escalated over time, it's businesses with a lower margin as you pointed out in your story, like grocers, right. So we have seen in one example, a very recent example grocer take a pretty drastic step. So this summer Kroger announced that one. One of its subsidiaries supermarket in in California Foods Co. decided that it was not going to accept visa credit cards anymore. It would take a debit, but not visa credit and had a conversation with Kroger's with with with singer executive there. And he said that one of the big factors to making this decision will first of all, Kroger and visa have been trying to negotiate inserts BB's fees, interchange fees. They were trying that the be the supermarket chain was trying to bring those costs down and they're senior executive said that, you know what we have not been able to come to an agreement fine. But in addition to that, he pointed out that the growth of rewards cards, the fact that these cards are being used that are stores more often has become an issue as well because these cards are more expensive. So there are sort of different steps that that that merchants in the past have taken the currently. Taking that includes litigation that includes, you know what? I'm just going to cut off visa credit and let me see how my business is going to perform without that while say, something's gotta give, and we'll see what happens. And it's a good reason to stay tuned to the Wall Street Journal wsj.com and reporting by Anna, Maria Andreatta's who joins us here in our studio, Anna, Maria. Thanks for being here. Thank you. And that's your money. Briefing im JR Waylon in New York for the Wall Street Journal..

Kroger Wall Street Journal Anna New York reporter senior executive California Foods Co. executive Maria Andreatta
Kroger may expand Visa credit-card ban to more stores

Scott Sloan

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Kroger may expand Visa credit-card ban to more stores

"No longer accept the charge cards at some of their stores and that policy eventually might expand to the, entire chain smoker is the owner of several grocery store, companies including Foods Co. which is announced that starting next month you won't be. Able to use your visa credit card to pay your groceries Kroger tells Bloomberg the parent. Company which operates twenty five hundred supermarkets nationwide might follow suit Kroger is angry at the, rates and fees visa charges companies when people use their cards ninety. Billion dollars worldwide, broker wants those fees lowered visa. Debit cards within the Kroger family will still be allowed Cheri Preston ABC news visa says his disappointed by the move. Says it's, working.

Kroger Cheri Preston Bloomberg Foods Co. Billion Dollars
Private payrolls boom in July, increasing by 219,000 vs 185,000 estimate: ADP

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

03:35 min | 2 years ago

Private payrolls boom in July, increasing by 219,000 vs 185,000 estimate: ADP

"Denver high temperature. Eighty seven degrees tonight down to sixty one now that. Chance for afternoon thunderstorms in the mountains is going to. Continue right on through the weekend and, again from time to time, storm may sneak east into the. Metro area but generally dry weather and warmer, highs in the nineties from tomorrow through every day next week from CBS four I'm Ashton. Altieri on KOA NewsRadio eight fifty AM. And ninety. Four one FM some clouds this morning and fifty degrees in Denver now on Colorado's morning news the blueprints for three d. printed guns, are on. Hold for now thanks to a temporary order by judge now the debates on these homemade weapons is heating up ABC's Jim Ryan joining us now with the latest on that good, morning Jim, morning to debate began really in two. Thousand thirteen, a guy named Cody Wilson founded a company called defense Attributed it was his goal with this nonprofit organization to distribute blueprints. For principal guns firearms it was us doing so on principle he said because he felt that he. Was simply, sharing information and what, people did with that information was up to, them before the prohibition came down yesterday from that federal judge in Washington about a. Thousand people in Pennsylvania at. All ready downloaded the blueprints for this this firearm now those plu those plans have been taken down off the internet so there's. No access to them at, this point at least Marty right but the blueprints are still. Floating, around Jim is your is it as. Simple as you got a three d. printer you can get a gun, more or less yeah I mean if you if you. And by the way three d. printers gopher only about. A thousand dollars now you can get them fairly cheaply And they're getting cheaper. All the time so if you have a computer and the software to run the three d. printer and you had, the blueprints for something like this then yes you could create anything from a handgun all the, way to an, assault style rifle I was reading it the president? He had questions about this and I think either he was going to or did. Already speak with the NRA on that. Anything of that that you're aware yes well we don't know if he got in touch with the NRA or the NRA got in touch with him but we do know that even as, early as nineteen eighty eight the NRA officially was opposed to guns that could not be. Detected by x Ray machines these guns they do have at least. A couple of metal components and so they might, in fact be, detectable? At TSA or the the airport checkpoint. But the the, other issue with them is that they're not treatable because they don't have a serial number of course and? They. Also don't, require a background check because you're simply making, the gun yourself so supporters you've got critics what are the real dangers of those three Eighty printed guns they can, just get in anybody's in yes I mean if there if. One happened to be used in a crime they use real amunition they put real holes in people and if you use one in, the commission, of a crime there's no real way to to trace the weapon that might have. Been used in it it's the. Sensually like a burner phone ABC's Jim Ryan reporting thank you Jim thanks six fifty five Financial Engines dot com providing list. Of your money news as we? Turn. Things, over while we could get it for another blockbuster jobs report the payroll processor ADP is out with its, own jobs report for July and it shows private sector hiring up, by two hundred nineteen thousand far higher than the one hundred seventy three thousand projected ADP's. Report covers, only private sector jobs and it comes on a few. Days ahead of the, government jobs report which includes both private and public sector hiring. And that report comes out on Friday the parent company of your neighborhood supermarket here in Colorado may kick your credit, card out of the store Kroger is the owner of several grocery store companies including Foods Co., which is announced, that starting next month you won't be able To, use your visa credit. Card to pay for your groceries..

Jim Ryan Denver NRA ABC Colorado ADP Cody Wilson Pennsylvania CBS Principal Marty Assault Kroger Gopher Washington TSA Foods Co. President Trump Eighty Seven Degrees
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"It be honey produce even like locally roasted coffee or locally made pasta sauces and sauces and things like that right so that's that portion and then as far as for for what we sell to the outside customers the restaurants and private schools and and businesses like that i'd i'd say about it's hard to say i'd say it's about forty maybe local sixty and forty percent the other stuff but it fluctuates in the winter is going to be a lot more of the non local stuff i'm core trying new we're more with taco food hub and see how we can do the inter hub transactions where actually but to the end customer affordable and acceptable all kinds of creative smart work going on 'cause i you know i know from working with you that you're always working on the bottom line too so if pay close attention to all of that with all with your distribution as well as your store yeah yeah i mean it's something is completely different business moving the in the retail grocery is doing the wholesale distribution on so we're definitely have a lot to learn in the seats in this area as well luckily i got to take the university of remond erm food hove's course to mac in that was extremely helpful i opening and in open a world to network with you know other food hubs in what they're going through and how they do things and to ask questions of you know anyone that having success and how they do it so right well and and you've got to come to boot camp to with the other people from california who you it's funny because they've kind of adopted you as as a as california dog tube right no yeah yeah well you sound like there's a lot of other things going on in vowed house so yeah and there's there's a lot going on in california so that's it's productive i'm sure for you yeah it could we hopefully ad have access only people in your courses yeah well it has been it's such a pleasure to work with you and to hear your story because as i said when we started i don't know very many people who have successfully started and grown up retail coop like you and your sister have and and and all of the support that you've gotten from the community i just i guess one question that remains with me as what what would you say to people who are trying to do this and who really need to build the level of community support that you have seen yeah i mean now starting say like we're going to start this now the a whole different ballgame because you know there's so many different variables and time play so i think yes really reaching out to community and seeing what their needs are co up exist to meet their members needs and luckily what we were really passionate about was what our community at the time and still is extremely passionate about in the everything ended up coming together and i'd say like reaching out to other co op really trying to reinvent the wheel because there's already so much work that's been done that can be replicated and duplicated but also fitting it to you know to the needs of your store is very very important 'cause if you don't you can get off track pretty quickly and so really honing in or what your purposes and why you're doing what you're doing and staying as true to.

forty percent
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"To get a looting dot com yeah almost two thousand will you'll get there yeah i think so and it's been it's been a good experience even though i thought i knew what i was doing is moving into this location after doing all the coop moves and right right really didn't note i was doing and it was a little harder than it needed to be but i definitely feel good about a next expansion which will be in the near future cool are you going to bring in different products or what are you gonna do well hopefully we just are working on building the local she's been by here bringing more local foods doing in the gases the crop or evenly throughout the year building up with our customers at the same time so hopefully it's just more local food or more produce we do local needs to our store we haven't done that through our hub yet and do on expand into that do little bit of it but not it's it's kind of a little side thing so we want to expand more into that too huge part of our local food access that we have in in this region especially i grad because people braise yeah yeah and and we want to i mean we already said earlier were different you know every few different we aggregate not just local food aggregate from our distributors for customers we are veritable vegetables which is actually well of the bay area and earlier ganic cronies united natural foods yager gate a re if a one of our customers to access distributor we have will help set that up and in though we can fill in the gaps through what we don't have locally in the mulqueen while we're building up our local food supplies and then yes so it's just a lot of a lot of data that we aggregate because it's not just the local stuff all these other distributors stuff that we're bringing in of course a what portion of you are what you're bringing in is locals now run will i mean us for the store goes it's it's a one hundred percent because that's all we do for the store is bringing local lately i'd say the past few weeks what we bring into the store is about five to six thousand dollars wool whether.

united natural foods six thousand dollars one hundred percent
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"Equivalent of going from a buying club to co op grocery store so and i think as i think been listening to you and i'm sort of reflecting on this said it did you have building your food local food system was that part of your vision from the getgo you know when i think about a lot of the retail caught upset i have interacted with over the years i mean that's been part of what they're doing but that wasn't really court or their mission and maybe the hour they it's part of what they do certainly on but it was more just getting access to good food wherever i mean from you know what i'm saying why yeah and it actually was it wasn't we definitely had to craft that down took us several years to get to that those words but it definitely was from the beginning because we're in this place where you know there it's a harsh environment and we saw that in order to have access pools of moving you to promote our local food system right right and you bet that sirkin that role was going to be it's it's differentiated for you in particular because of where you're yeah because of the harsh conditions yeah and i guess that is why you know we have not in the same level or vein as any photographs you store whole foods or natural and we have natural grocers and sprouts and yeah we're just in a different we're on a different tracks in all of and do you think that your average shopper in the store knows that i think so yeah i definitely think so i think they gotta be a little bit kinda brave to come into our store even though it said everyone's welcome it's like what is this place is pretty different than the feel of it and how it looks and any other grocery store go around town and yeah so do how do you communicate that in is it in science around the store do you have a you know i'm just i'm just wondering just tactically how you make sure that your members understand that that degree of commitment to building a sustainable food system locally is so intent integral integral let's face it our but what you do yeah i think a lot of it is we have a lot of core shoppers member owners that have been shopping for years going out of their way they've come to us first and got what they could from us when we didn't have you know selection and then they get their other stuff elsewhere but it's just over the years talking word of mouth members talking to each other none in your kind of finally starting to get on like where we can do a better marketing who got a pretty good following on social media and things like that but we are working on some actual paintings and our store and finance really saying like these this is who we are this is what our in in goals are ends are our goal and really telling putting that we ever food should painted big on the wall but route from still in the process of connecting the dots for everybody and i don't think that i think some people just doing too because they're like oh this is cool or you know or or somebody asked you and you're like okay so i don't think that everyone understands i think enough people have been shopping long enough to talk to people enough to really understand able to tell that stories stories others in the community but we are especially as we grow gotta get better and better and hone in on that so that anyone walking off the street could say oh this is why this grocery stores here this is why me buying this piece of food is going to contribute to this then really making that connection yeah yeah i think i think you got it as user all yeah so what inspiring i just find you guys so inspiring because you took on a very big challenge and you were you know at a at a young age took on this giant challenge and maybe it's maybe it's because you didn't know it was going to be hard that you did as right probably yeah i think we really had no clue what we're getting into no no anything about martin's or business or anything like that we just thought with her calculator deal little markup and and so we had to.

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"The stories of all the california food hubs that the trouble that farmers are having just having access to land in how that all living raise prices the food is well in those indistinct like all these people now they're all kind of spilling over here so that's happening here as well so as much as we can do to help farmers have you know the resources the the thing need to be able to be on land and have like some community ownership or farm ownership of land is really important to in yeah i think just having something like a kinda like regenerative agriculture where our models can renew itself and hope better the community around it by having access for people to food and for farmers to a market and as far as the suit hub goes we're not quite quite sure it's been up in the air for a long time as you know should it be separate business owned by the food co off and after seeing feed sonoma's really inspired by him in what what they're doing they're they're working towards a farmer employee owned food hub that they can promote community ownership of their bodies it might go bye bye heavy microbiome of bio region bayerische yeah i in yeah the i think that's that's what i'm gonna probably put on the table for as as the food hub goes i think it'll be really powerful it is owned and has voice of the farmers have insight into how it works and why you know we're prices need to be and things like that in quality and packaging and packing i'd say needs to be thinking will it'll really get a lot more oath left behind it if the farmers are more involved with it yeah and i think one of the things i've seen with the farmer cooperative hugs is that that having that heaven the hub you know vested interest in the hot work is held the hub itself is of business if it also seems to really help the farmer suppliers right that and i've seen the farms grow because the hub was there right so so that is kind of marginally profitable entity because they're very difficult to make anything better than that out of them but neck doesn't matter if the farm if it's owned by the farmers in their own farms growing you know what i mean that's kind of the benefits it sent here definitely messes kind of what we need to show people's like some of the older farms here they really on board with us but i'm like us nearly seventies right now i figure this out but they're in this is the first this past year that we seen the food had dropped is buying more food for the other businesses combined than our store and that's the first all time person ever happened with really making an impact in the some of the firms are really appreciative in noticing that in really wanting to work with us in see this work in so i and then there's some other new you know newer farms that are like okay we're going to do say in markets and and all these things and so it's just a matter of what works best for them and then as they mature as farms in organizations to up to route late i mean you can only scale so much direct marketing right so it's it's kind of a different beast right so it's kinda like the.

california
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"And by that time we found local food marketplace in in headline about other software platforms around the country and research them and decided with that one but chanelle or on the third one that we rent so are you still on running the hub as kind of a department within the overall co off yes it's the department of the graces coop or yeah and it's just it's it's growing really slowly with the infrastructure of the store of using you know the shaded hallway the fridges that we could squeeze things in a little bit of freezer space stuff like that and eventually we got our own started meeting or figueredo truck it'll be almost two years in july none the before everybody coming and picking up and basically still the farmers coming up morning and then all the customers coming right after that to make it work and this enabled us to have separate outer receiving day and in the delivery days after that the right or l ever restaurant business customers and then are member owners can order through and they'd pick up better store i see interesting so do all of your departments within the coop get financial results you know monitored and feedbacks of the managers of the department you know somebody like him had managed the financial life of your department yeah we do we have benchmarks for every labor benchmarks in sales budget benchmark for everything department that we set when we're doing our budgeting starts in november of the previous year into we check in on all of the department leaders need up once a week and we have on ego ver over numbers even though they're not really final looks yet or anything that we can we can monitor as we go and we send be responses to labor so then with that 'cause that's i mean weren't with you know and especially going from volunteer hybrid employees to all employees right that's a big shift in terms of the labor yes yeah in so we weren't really paying attention to it and it really got us one year movie it woke us up after that and so we we monitor weekly and then we do our monthly margin reports in check ins and quarter lean in that so we definitely keep a close finger on the pool home so do you have a controller kind of person in your organization or is that amber yeah i don't even know what that is but i know what the finance person so usually yeah yeah yeah it is it is her okay got the eye in the sky looking at everything and we we are you know working to for more sustainability in that area and so we're bringing up store managers that are were responsibility over just focusing on labor you know and increasing sales and things like that so so we're working on against the snaking it a little bit we're stable not all depending on you know one person of course yeah yeah well see more that growth so what do you guys see the cheaper for the co op and for the hub so let's see i mean we've done lots of visiting exercises our membership over the years and really what comes out of it is is having our purposes to promote our local food system in service dana bottle cooperative model for access to wholesome food men so just to keep keep on doing that and and really figure out good system so that we can replicate them in different neighborhoods grocery stores for their it's like i like how you said lamont's anita had the kind of smaller footprint store because i went there while back and win really big one and this fit to the the needs of that neighborhood read right right and able to spend the accesses that way and also help our farmers gang capacity in this region so that we have food you know that we have more food security and that we have who's access and after going to the last camp in the noma sonian seeing feeds to noma and just hearing.

two years one year
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"The world of co ops early mediumsized coa now graduated to like the small medium small media yeah yeah so and downtown still feeling like a good location or yeah it is feeling like there's a lot a lot of untapped potential a lot more that we can do or partitioning the city to turn our street into a one way street in have more parking alongside our parking and stuff like that so hopefully some dynamics of hoping the flow veteran easier for people to access 'cause there's there are people that come and they can't find any drive off right gory so yeah yeah it is and it's also what we've always hope for is that we can really get a good system down and things in place so that we can use it as a model and open up little satellites in different neighborhoods around interesting so so when did you get your board your first sport was that way way in the beginning j aboard or did you yeah we did we started out right away with worker rectors knowing all the process of figuring out how to do bylaws and set up a business like that right so yeah we started off with the board and it's definitely transformed immensely over the years so that the basically the boards just focuses on on policies and meeting our members schools and the purpose of our store and stay out of authorizations variety policy governance right right so when did implimented policy governance i wanna say that would probably around the time that we moved into our current location twelve right ernie 'cause they should been a lot of i think take a lot energy away from what the goal the actual goal is of the cooperative when it gets really muddled and missy that way allowing so of probably about that time you weren't members it had to say that im hired employees through becoming a more important part of this store i would guess right yeah that's true in was i think before we moved into the current location the most we had any time with five and they weren't even all you know fulltime employees have how many employees you have now now it's kind of fluctuates but it's like in between forty and fifty yeah that's great just think of all the employment you're generating yeah yeah it's really great to think about that it is it is it's a big economic impact i think so so back to two so policy governance you started did you train your board is that how you implimented that because that's a big difference right board members always wanna like tell you you know how to rearrange the is well you know right why don't you have some you know some products or something right yeah right yeah so we definitely had to do that and they can't take any credit my sister amber phone the resources she found the people to come train us and she's been really active with that over the years and this doing train basically training and retreats for our board every single year and or in and making that a priority because it makes a world of difference yeah i bet i bet because yeah because people don't come to now there aren't that many people who have experienced with being on a ford never mind being on a coop board right it's a different visa so yeah yeah okay well that's good and is your is your sister amber the gm yes he's the gm of the visit of the great basin snow yeah yeah that's what i thought so another thing you guys did was get clarity about leadership enrolls when that happened that happened around the same time i'd say it was it was marinating at the the last little five hundred square foot location us trying also the different things like okay let's be punching off of consensus and you got five five employees and it was extremely general mole that it was yeah just took a lot of times in your getting on the same page in learning these communication skills and learning you know it's not anything that we all grew up with or knew how to do and so.

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"And so for them to go even find our store know about it and then to walk walk around with their groceries i don't know how easy that is for them to do but right so what is the demographics of your shopper i mean what what are they i think i guess on the surveys when we do surveys probab different too because people take surveys but it is you know i guess middle age white men and when you come into our store you definitely see range of of people and ages and things like that but insure sent so so you think that your survey probably isn't representative of who really shopping i think it it's close it's not it's just like you know the people that are going to take time and do the survey or check their emails and stuff like that is a little bit of a different group but right but yeah i mean we do have a lot of i think we do have a lot of youth and younger and a good range of age of shoppers in our store so is grabbing go big thing in your store yeah yeah it is our we've been doing our our our garbage does stuff and many even though we didn't have like a cafe where you could order food for a while on this it down and eat but yeah it is i have the numbers in front of me but it is it starting to take over as like the top percentage of store mill yeah i think that's kind of when i talk to people in in the food cop world a lot of them are saying that yeah yeah talked about that too and it's interesting because it's like wanna reduce packaging we wanna you know when you were yeah and i joke that you know i i'm you know the volt dine out of the bulk bins but it's gone from that to people don't even wanna cook you know it's it's funny it's just very very different but if it's such a great opportunity to get healthy food from local ingredients and all of that if you don't wanna cook or you want a healthy lunch yeah exactly and i think that's one thing at the first after the first boot camp there was a i think it was the farmer skilled rumor we and davis here in davis and they had a guy from the grocery store in san francisco by right writer men he was talking and his their grocery stores really something that we've looked up to done field trip to go visit them and just as far as how they purchase and how they run their yeah base and just looking at what we can learn from them and and one thing that we really liked hearing that they did is they they do cooking school and they just because there's the ability of coke i know yeah yeah i'm so we you would like to do that to we we've always kinda jumped having like a nonprofit arm of the our grocery store that can do nutrition education farmer advocacy farmer resources and things like that but well gary thing in it's time you guys are amazing on to preneurs so i have no doubt that if you set your mind to it you would make that happen so okay so now you are kind of at the current state of the store in what are your sales now annual sales last year we did about five million in sales and you're going to do this year i think we're not growing as fast as we have been you know we had years where we had thirty percent growth for door and one of the fastest growing coops in the nation mum our gross isn't it's actually even this retied some negative growth so far they were not sure if it's because there's a huge road project right next to our store that's blocking off kind of like cut off this whole part of town yeah we'll sound with through it yes so i think that that's part of it but we're just not growing fast is looking more like than fifteen percent you know so i think eaker mentally this year and but i think once we get our cafe really dialed in and going it's going to make big big difference in it might make up for good right so so even five million is an impressive this is not a little co op anymore right i mean in.

fifteen percent thirty percent mill
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"Why did it gets work in as it because the they're so it's just such a great location for business is that why it works i don't know that's i guess it's a little bit of a mystery we are in a an area downtown whether say by the courthouse there's a lot of people were hanging around there that you know come get their lunches or snacks and things like that and the people that you know we don't have the best parking and reno it's not you know it's not anywhere the site you know like the bay area and easy breezy compared to that but for reno people there you know used to like big parking off right to pull right up and and so that i think that has heard some people from us but it's also like as you know more people come in move into the area it's going to get you know more and more congested and having access only fishy store now i think it definitely has filled in a little food desert down this only grocery store besides you know the corner mini marts and stuff that have chips and things like that for miles for miles while yeah there's i now that i'm thinking about it i think there's there is a little store that opened kind of corner stores dial are about maybe six bucks away now that has opened since we've opened and then there's the main grocery store of the closest probably two miles maybe mile and a half have to look it up are there more people living downtown now too i think it's it's changing but some like they converted a lot of the casinos into condos and things like that okay hanging but i think it's still a lot of people that live downtown immediate income is pretty low in a lot of elder people as well.

reno
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"I i think it was opened by the time pretty sure it was i think it happened while we were at that five hundred square foot location right so even though whole foods had a store there and yet wild oats before you still had all these members who wanted to be members than the coop at yeah and why do you think that is i think just because it's different it's for one it's location for some people for some people are sort of that work for them because it's not in their neighborhood and but for them they wanted something that they like the idea of having a community owned grocery store having some input actually buying directly from the local farm being able to go to the farm meet the farmer done a lot of farm tours with people in the packed and membership and employees and things like that and you know you get a steam when they come a little deliver right that so they felt i think it was they felt connected to the food they felt like it was a good thing to be a part of in to have ownership over so us my guess i'm sure there's a lotteries ines on yeah but i it's i think it's really important you know 'cause i think that's one of the things that people grapple with when they're when they're thinking of doing it store like this how are you going to be different from what's there so and and the answer to that is probably different now than it was them but anyway okay so where did you go next then did hurt are searching around several different locations throughout reno and re ended up at a location even more downtown you know it's right by familiar truckee river runs right through reno those lake tahoe and pyramid lake in the right through downtown reno and so we're pretty much right next to it by park called wingfield park and near the courthouse and it's the three story building while not ideal say people would like they oh yeah three stores that's a great idea for grocery store so what yeah we we do if you're just using the first floor no you were using we started out starting out with the build out for everything you need to start our delhi so that we had like the grease traps and everything and eventually so the kitchen was in the basement so there's production down there and we did start out right away with some of that very small and then some offices have our offices down there as well so it wasn't an unused in our retails on the main floor and upstairs on the third floor where we did our like our wellness and body care and stuff like that affair yeah people get their cards shopping carts fair yeah we have an elevator elevator we haven't elevator but a lot of times i mean over the years people had been shocking there for years i didn't know those fears appear yeah so yeah i know you've actually just opened our cafe only on on the top level and so we wish all of the wellness embody tear onto the main floor with everything else so now is awesome pressed and some people are happy with the caffeine some are really miss that they had that little special place up there but it's thinks on sin development and i think the point where we were in our last store we have we have a lot we should work with as far as space even though it does feel a little bit we're filled up but we still have room to work with so how many square feet is the main floor i think it is about three thousand square feet so for grocery store that's not that big yeah it's not it's still a tiny i mean i think of our last doors tiny with nieces like writers allude right yes it is it's the tiny tiny grocery store in the world of of virtues and and it is amazing how much it can have an space big would yeah we were we were pulled warns i guess nothing to move into facility like this because the receiving like we have a ramp that goes up in getting up there and you know that it was how yeah yeah so it's definitely not ideal for that but when everything was wade out at the end of the day it was the one that was decided on by our board and in inner staff and in it is it's working it's working and and.

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"We had never owners that were designers and also you know there's just all sorts of trades that people had that came together that wanted the you know local food and healthy food and stuff like that until the at a really great team to help design everything efficiently as he could and in in move in there so we were i think that was in two thousand eight we opened up down there right right so that was three years till you were in probably what you could call your first official your you know like really a a shop space it sounds life and they get licensed to be a grocery store at that point when you yeah yeah we got all of our health department per mason near open to the public and and we open every single day of the league and we had enough staff in volunteers by that point we had just hired our first to employees just before we had moved and that was actually i guess at the end of two thousand eight and then and so and we were we were was it really just you and your sister doing this no not at all it was a lot of i mean there's been hundreds of people over the years put in a lot of time and energy and insights into eating to the next place you know then they're little landing pad in holding it on and tell somebody else could hold that piece definitely not it was a lot of people we are also in conjunction with the great basin basket which was a cs aid that was out a latin farms before mentioned earlier out in in in aggregating all that food in building the boxes and things like that so it's kind of birth of few different organizations happening interesting yeah okay so now you're in your own store and you have some employees than are open seven days a week and how long were you in out location and then we were there for about two years i guess it would be about two years a little over of and then we hit one million dollars and sales why we broke records for sales per square foot because we're in such a small face me just got really creative every day taking in our orders from the fire and unify and everything and just having it all fit in there either really great team of hands on owners you'd always have one eight employees on at all times pretty much and a whole view of everybody that would help that was really knew what they were doing because they had to figure out these systems pretty much so right right yeah so then once that happened yet are you'd started looking for new places around reno so that we could expand because we're getting pretty crushed by that point it also started renting an office next door and had a couple of fridges their bag right right do you remember what your sales were per square foot i don't know i guess a million and the retail space lose five hundred square feet goodness it's a lot of yeah yeah yeah it's a lot okay cool all right so he fridges in your office is next door and you're busting at the seams and then so how did you market at that point or was it really just your membership who did one it was just word of mouth we you know we would make some philly fires with stuff like that but we kind of laugh out known his like here's our early flyers for you know what we had locally in the store are feeling sale our events of the year but yeah that was that was pretty much it in fires in word of mouth flyers in word of mouth and was there so that that store that you were writing vice ical to before you started with that still in existence during this period i think i can't remember exactly when the change happen but whole foods had moved the i think it was a second largest one on the west coast had moved in to town and that in that ended while though they all right and ho few dope enough a little further south in that down virginia so little further away from downtown okay and.

two years one million dollars three years seven days
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"That they can use the water more efficiently i don't know the numbers have them front of me but and their abilities really impressive not only water use but also if they're it's all run off of pellets energy in toll complicated computer system that senses how much there is and how much you know win to pull the shades off and the pretty amazing system that out wow wow wow okay so that we're back in the hundred square feet behind the punk record shop of the punk thing on helps us imagine where we are in time it's great so all right so you are you're in your sister in your early twenties in you decide you're going to do this in your in a hundred square feet and then what happened like how did you grow so you had you said in six months you had six hundred members and were they actively shopping or it's sometimes when these cops are trying to get started they get members people sign up to be a member but they don't shop and then that kind of falls apart so yeah i should see that happening that these guys all came out of their way through the loud postings to the back of the store where we were and yes they were they were signing up and they were actively shopping until it just must have been the right place at the right time for all these people that really want to go out of the way and do it and i think one thing that did help which has changed since then is that we were all one hundred percent volunteer run into everybody all the owners were usually workers and they were we call them hands on owners and they're pretty invested so they'd be at their shifts they'd be saying you know what food we had and they tell their friends about it and they just were more involved with that i think that that really helping in the early in the initiating days or sure so okay so how long did you stay in that in your hundred square feet so i think it was about a little less than a year or there in the at the time you know digital music was coming up and into the records were kinda going out and so their business with shrinking ours was growing places with he did that for another year and we have like the larger storefronts area and just continue to grow that way and and then we we were actually private buying club because we didn't have the right facility that we need to okay 'cause drains and stuff to to the public so you had to be a member owner to come in stop and you wanted to be open to the public immune wanted to be able to take evt's and and things like that and be more accessible so so we got an offer from some people were in the downtown area reno and this little tiny five hundred square foot building but it had really good visibility on court on a corner kind of busy corner downtown and so they offered they offered us that space and so we took it on and.

one hundred percent six months
"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"foods co." Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"Point where we bought our first full phys and our jelly billy their old jelly billy book bins and what a friend and you put in your living room or where did you so by that time we had a this guy that owned a hardcore punk record stores he's joe ferguson a heart on the more record store and it it's called the sound and the fury he had about one hundred square feet in the back that he wasn't using and he was also part of the meet up is trying to start the buying clothes in the food co off and he said why don't we use this face and you guys can the coop containing rent once we have it and and so we opened up shop in a hundred square feet with both bids and three domestic for frigerator 's a couple shelves and what food yeah yeah six hundred member owners just by word of mouth within the six months that is amazing so at the time this happened how many people actually lived in reno reno is a pretty big place but it's a lot of tourists isn't it i'm not quite sure on those numbers i and i definitely like rough out i wanna say there like really three hundred fifty thousand people and now we're over five hundred inc and it's this whole conglomeration reno sparks kind of milled into each other so this whole greater area right right okay and and it's growing really fast now right yes growing super fast right now there's a lot of businesses moving in there's a lot of growth in the outer areas like more towards the rural areas where we get a good amount of our local food here and yes people are filling in filling up yeah so back when you start it though i my my sense about reno at the time was it wasn't growing as fast back then on and and aren't you in a desert like have you have farmers or a growing things around reno yeah we are in the desert some people think we shouldn't even be living here because there's you know there's we have a very short growing season it's cold nights hot days in the summer and then cold winters and it's very radic too so it can be really hot and the winters sometimes or can snow in danbury mum but yeah we do have people that have been farming here for i think one of our biggest farms that we work with latin firms they're out in fallon which is about an hour east of reno they've been farming since the early nineteen hundreds and they're pretty famous their for their milnes ming how the alkaline were alcohol right here right and isn't that isn't those tool nights doesn't bring out the sweetness melons yeah that's true in the berries as well so when we do get berries and good crops of them they're very sweeten can't really beat the ones that we get from over the mountains in california oh short yeah there's i mean there's a lot of people doing he's an extension who houses and greenhouses and all sorts of stuff we have we do have the capacity i'm not sure what it looks like for ratios of of land use and farmers having access to land especially as things still in water but we we do have people growing things we have a a new opera pontic civility in dayton which is about forty five minutes south of reno until they're doing this alaba and the greens and tomatoes and in edible flowers and things like that and they're doing it your round well that's kind of inspiring i mean it could be cause if you could develop a local food shed like that around reno you could do that pretty much anywhere i mean given given the harshness of the climate for growing agian yeah that's amazing it's amazing in an indoor growing it is more water officiant right for the most part yeah the that dating opponents i really proud of.

billy forty five minutes six months
EU, Canada And Mexico Threaten Tariffs To Retaliate Against US

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 3 years ago

EU, Canada And Mexico Threaten Tariffs To Retaliate Against US

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. Mexico is threatening its own terrorists in response to new US duties on imported steel and aluminum as NPR's. Carrie Kahn reports. Mexico's economy minister fired off a list of American goods to be taxed in retaliation. Just minutes after the us announcement, the list is long. There are US pork products, apples grapes, cranberries cheeses, as well as finished steel products. Mexico's economy minister says the Trump administration's justification for the tariff is improper and will damage strategic sectors in North America's integrated industries, including automotive, aerospace, in electron IX Mexico. The US and Canada are currently renegotiating the North American Free trade agreement president Enrica recap. And in yet dough and Canada's, Prime Minister. Justin Trudeau spoke the Afon pledging to continue the NAFTA talks and working together to defend international free trade. Based on rules. Carrie Kahn, NPR news, Mexico City, north and South Korea are holding senior level peace talks in a border village. They're focusing on reducing tensions on the peninsula and ending the North's nuclear weapons program. The meeting comes after two days of talks between US Secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, and senior North Korean voi-, Kim, Yong chill in New York, Pompeo and Kim discussed a potential summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN Trump cancelled a plan th summit in Singapore says the meetings still could happen. The diocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis has agreed to a two hundred and ten million dollars settlement with clergy. Sex abuse victims, Mets, epoch of Minnesota public radio reports that the settlement is one of the largest bankruptcy payouts by US Roman Catholic diocese. The archdiocese has filed for bankruptcy in two thousand fifteen. After the Minnesota legislature temporarily extended the statute of limitations for sex abuse suits the two hundred ten. We'll be split among four hundred fifty survivors including Jim Keenan who helped negotiate the deal after victims rejected an earlier offer. Never plan that exited. Pissed off Irishman and some other guys would say, you know what? We don't like their plan. We're gonna write another. It hadn't been done before. They have to listen to victims now wants a federal bankruptcy. Judge signs off the archdiocese, pandits parishes will pay about forty million dollars. The rest will come from insurers for NPR news. I'm Matt Sepik in Minneapolis, fourteen year old, Dallas area, eighth grader, car thick nemani is this year's champion of the Scripps national spelling bee as heard here, courtesy of ESPN nemani correctly spelled coin Aena Greek word for communion coin. Aena k. o I n o n I a that is correct. Numani bested a field of more than five hundred contestants to win the two thousand eighteen spelling bee title. You're listening to NPR news. Google self driving spinoff Waymo plans to launch in Arizona this year with up to sixty two thousand Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans. That's under a deal announced on Thursday. The technology will be deployed in a ride hailing service in the Phoenix area before the end of the year, and then expanded to other US markets Waymo plans to pick up people in cars that will not have a human in the driver seat, making it the first ride hailing service with the fleet of fully autonomous vehicles. The founder of Pittsburgh's innovative art museum. The mattress factory has died barber. Morales skiing was a champion for what's known as installation. Art NPR's. Bob Mondello has more. The mattress factory was an empty warehouse when Luder hausky bought it in nineteen seventy seven, installing a food co-op, partly so she wouldn't have to leave bored with what she called pedestal Archie devoted the institution to the notion of site specific installations where artists respond to the space. There. Even and visitors get to inhabit art, not just look at it to keep that notion close. She lived atop the building site specific works, filling the four floors below being even a peripheral part of the actual process. You know. So the thinking process and the flexibility and the problem solving and all of those things which to me are so important in terms of what art does mattress factory founder, Barbara Luder hausky was Eighty-eight. Bob Mondello NPR news on stock market shares are mixed higher in Tokyo. Following a down day on Wall Street, blue chips, plunged two hundred fifty. One points the NASDAQ lost twenty. I'm Shay Stevens NPR news in Washington.

United States NPR Mexico Carrie Kahn Shay Stevens Washington Bob Mondello Kim Jong Un Minneapolis President Donald Trump Founder Aena North America Us Roman Catholic Diocese Minnesota Mike Pompeo Justin Trudeau Mexico City