35 Burst results for "Folio"

"folio" Discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

LeVar Burton Reads

03:44 min | 5 months ago

"folio" Discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

"So it's you. The house can tell he wants to say, he doesn't believe that. He says, what we need is somewhere to start fresh. This is wise, offers him a folio of data on the house, and gestures to the basement. Care for another look around? Yeah. Thank you. He.

Microsoft unveils four Surface computers and a new folding phone

The Vergecast

02:05 min | 9 months ago

Microsoft unveils four Surface computers and a new folding phone

"Big surface event panos pumped mega pumped screens folding cameras. Improved walk straight yet. So there was eight devices into an update to the so basically the context of this is mike. Smith has a bunch of new surface devices for windows eleven so they will drop in on october fifth and they also have an android successor for the surfaced u as a substitute so got surfaced. Pyrite which. I think. I wrote before they still announced but this is the kind of one. We've been waiting for years. Kind of minas ov- redesign but some Screen changes and internal changes. Fundable this stuff. So that was kind of expected and then really minor change. The surface pro acts as a wifi modal. That was kind of like okay. Cool that's happening. Then the surface go free again. Might changes Prices up upgrades this stuff. So yeah k- cool. We kind of expected that. As well. And i guess the surprise Surprise we were expecting a new surface book. But it's the surface laptop studio so replace but team that sort of name and like the way they did it but basically it's a complete redesign at the surface book. So gone is the detachable display. Which i guess i didn't like pessina and a faint everyone Questioned is it full. I don't think the surfaced laptops g necessarily has a good answer to who is it for either but the the actual design is essentially if you remember the odor acer laptops with the the screen folds for almost pulls food or hatred. Folio they post on. It is kind of that design. So it's not really like the unique design that you would expect from the surface of us. That's kind of like myself really focused. Previous who has been very unique hinges and stuff is like a kind of unique hinge in that sense for the overall designers. Yeah it's like one of those crazy eight laptops that we saw many years ago just looks a lot better and more refined

Pessina Smith Mike Acer
"folio" Discussed on Gun Talk

Gun Talk

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"folio" Discussed on Gun Talk

"They can't move it like they just you know. They can't get that first round in there for it to work so You know it could be both kind of activism down to practice and knowing your gun so and knowing that you're comfortable with operating it and and how to operated so you have to treat the gun like you know you're treating wild animal. You're not gonna hurt the gun right for grab it hard racket hard. Don't don't baby this thing be aggressive with it. Yeah not and that's something that when most of them have to learn because they do they were they handle it. It's very gentle and Which causes functions. The you know so it's like no this. This is a a tool and you need to use it as such so it will work properly so yeah absolutely i i i play drums and people would Sometimes i'm playing a gig or like at a break or something. There might be like a kid who wants to come up and they think the drums are super cool. And i've been asked before like oh is is the kids. It okay fee hits the drama. Get real. He's gonna break them like their drums like they're designed to be hit. You just hit them. You're not gonna do. I promised your ear role does not going to hurt these drums yet so okay. Let's just talk favorites here. Favorite guns favorites know pollsters loads belt sawyer. You'll your gear set. Okay so my year that i use is mainly safari land. My favorite bell is the or eli felt Running their socks three holster which It's my defiant sock master and So yeah mainly euro around backpack Is safari land my favorite ground. So far that. I've shots Italian firearms group. Sponsors may and they are an importer for tam folio. The new models. And so i- shoot a defiant dock master in production and then i also have a defiant dot master that we've tricked out for carry optics division and then i have their defiant limited master or for the limited or three gun and forty the other two were nine millimeters and those by far have been my favorite guns Be defiant stop. Master is basically an upgraded stock to the stock to is a four and a half inch barrel..

tam folio sawyer eli
The Mechanics of Marketing for a Destination Organization

Social Pros Podcast

02:24 min | 11 months ago

The Mechanics of Marketing for a Destination Organization

"I want you to tell our audience if you would please a little bit about the mechanics of a destination marketing organization. It's different than a corporation in some cases. Talk a little bit about how your funded and and who. Your constituencies are just saw the social security kind of understand unique nature of that work. Yeah definitely so. We represent a pretty much more than eleven hundred businesses within or throughout the orlando area. We are funded by tourism development taxes. So basically if someone stays in orlando's hotel you get the bed tax on your folio Contributes to how we get funded We actually serve a board as well so there's a lot of decisions get. There's a lot of city and county inclusion in all of the decision making a for organization. If you are a restaurant and attraction in orlando are you automatically part of the visit orlando collective or do you have to sort of opt in or add some funds on your own. How does how does that part. Yeah you do have to become a member within visceral though so you know we as you can imagine where big city we've got tons and tons of businesses here and range from the very big theme parks that everyone knows laws to small mom and pop shop down the street in all of them need representation in services so they opted to become a member of israel. There's different tiers of membership. And based on that we we. We do our best to support and promote all the different venues and businesses that we have aired the destination. I always find that to be one of the most interesting and challenging elements of this kind of work atkins convert we service strategist for a number of destination marketing organizations in different cities and states around the us. And and you're right. The the small independent restaurant is a member and they have needs as does universal studios or anybody else in talk about two very different audiences. It's a real challenge and you think about most businesses having much tighter target audience or target constituents than you do so i know it's got to be exciting challenging at the same time absolutely i mean each one of them has a unique story to tell though so we focus on that theme park stories is very different In the story of lake local shops is very different. But there's a unique element in each of. We do our best to provide support to both to the right audience to help them get this

Orlando Atkins Israel United States
The Road Ahead for Photography Businesses, with Zenfolio

This Week in Photo

01:57 min | 1 year ago

The Road Ahead for Photography Businesses, with Zenfolio

"Today we're going to give you guys some insight. You got a player that is smack. Dab in the middle of the photography industry has decided and agreed to join me on the show to talk about some of their findings with regard to what the heck is happening as has happened in the photography industry. how has it evolved. Hasn't gone lebed isn't gonna write going up and down whatever we're gonna talk about that and here to talk about. It are some senior executives from a little company. You may have heard of called zinn. Folio john and pamela. Welcome to the show. guys frederick. Thanks great to be here. Yeah you're you're a completely welcome. Thank you for doing this. I know time is short. And i want to make sure we maximize all your time on this show Let's let's do some introduction before we dive in tamil. Let's start with you. what what is your major function. Ads in folio absolutely so. I'm in charge of all things. Customer customer support customer success. I lead an amazing team who are primarily the tigers themselves which really makes us unique in that when we're talking the and helping them with their business we have a really unique point of view of completely understanding what it's like to be a small business owner and to be a photographer with clients Having certain expectations. yeah yeah. Those expectations change a lot right as the industry shifts changes. I've been in it for several a couple of decades now and a lot of things changed with. We're gonna talk about in this interview. So absolutely i mean i think about when i got married and how long it was to get my wedding photos back and now it's very common in wedding wedding photography to even have pictures of the ceremony showing during the reception on as a slide show. So it's kinda like that's gone from an eight week. Lead time to you need to be ready

Folio John Zinn Pamela Frederick Tigers
JPMorgan's Bitcoin Journey

CoinDesk Podcast Network

02:10 min | 1 year ago

JPMorgan's Bitcoin Journey

"What's going on guys. It is monday april twenty six and today we're talking about j. p. morgan's bitcoin journey from worse than tulips to not my cup of tea to a new client product first. Let's do the brief. I on the brief today. Sports in crypto are definitely coming together in this cycle a couple of years ago. Nfl offensive tackle russell. Kun made a now famous declaration. Pay me in bitcoin. He currently takes half of his thirteen million dollar salary and btc and half in fiat. Kansas city chiefs. Tight end sean. Culkin is taking it to the next level. And we'll be converting the entirety of his twenty twenty one base salary. Nine hundred and twenty thousand dollars into btc. Culkin is going to convert his fiat to bitcoin. Salary conversion service. This is the same service that russell uses and it means that the paychecks are automatically converted which detaches them from market movements and allows coke in his own words to stay focused on the game for their part. The kansas city chiefs are aware but their contract is still denominated in. Us dollars about the deal. Culkin said quote for me it makes sense to get paid in the hardest form of currency. And it's something that's resistant. Inflationary pressures that. I think is very relevant in this current economic environment. That wasn't the only. Nfl crypto news today as the presumptive number one draft pick from later this week. Trevor lawrence announced a sponsorship deal with block folio the bonus of which will be paid entirely incredible out clearly. There is a mainstreaming momentum. Going on all right next up on the brief w is going on in turkey. I've been keeping you posted on everything happening in turkey but it's just gotten crazier on april sixteenth. The central bank announced that crypto would be banned as a means of payment. Effective april thirtieth. Two days later turkish exchange codex went off line on april eighteenth. The ceo of that company has gone missing and there are claims of massive fraud. Sixty two people with ties to the platform have been detained now for people have been detained as part of an investigation into verbal coin. Which is another turkish exchange. But none of this has stopped. Turkish crypto usage. In fact it's gone up sharply.

Culkin Russell KUN NFL Trevor Lawrence Morgan Kansas City Kansas City Chiefs Sean Coke Turkey United States
Mark Morris: Buying a Home as Investment Can Become a Heavy Burden

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

07:18 min | 1 year ago

Mark Morris: Buying a Home as Investment Can Become a Heavy Burden

"When you hear the name mark morris. I want you to high cashflow. Portfolios mark is an expert at building developer relationships and helping house builders achieve discrete volume sales at speed alongside in. It freelance career. He has been a property investor for the past twenty years building a portfolio of biden alette apartments and houses across greater manchester. He is also built a solid income generating portfolio in the mid west of the us. Including ohio. where. I grew up outside of cleveland. So mark take a minute in philly for tidbits about your life. Sanju sheddings absorption. So yes she switched on. I was was in icu. Freelance i was employed full sudafed mid twenties and then when we came to the what would what you may remember the Units thousand mobile. Everybody believed that when the clocks when the diet changed nine thousand nine hundred ninety two thousand. Who's going to be magadan. None of the computers worse on in those sort of times. You know companies. I work for finance initials. Just paying ridiculous amounts only for contracts is just to get bums on tested and as we all know now it was a complete dump squib in the wall a really lights the freelance world. All the who wants to two thousand dollars over loss of come shots. As if finished the assignments finish they could find new signings and allow people became employed or went back to just the danger. I was really really adamant levels. Gonna do the fumes out an illness you know it. Nearly money was tight. And i was struggling on a realized needed some way of raising faceting to government with these to kuwait for these breaks in between science. And that's really started looking at property. I was really keen on. I started building very small. Folio parents were involved in property. And i really realized that was chain to enable mix to continue a freelance career. And that's really where stars interesting and you said your parents what experience today they were places or yeah they were they were actually renting holiday homes and a cold the lake district which is about an hour an hour and a half wave on. When i was very young i used to go. There needs to clean and they used to take book in. So i could see how the property the property business. Words open cell becoming a freelancer. Never at any sort of money at the anger means so i needed started actually finding the walls. A cash should the under the move on a bit of fox together. That's all yeah let's start invested in bronson. It's an interesting story because sometimes what we learned in our youth comes back later to help us so well. Now it's time share your worst investment ever since no one ever goes into their worst investment thinking we'll be tell us a bit about the circumstance leading up to tell us your story. She'll so probably around the year. Two thousand five prophecy prices about point very boyens. No you went down to the pulp. Everybody was talking about. Everybody was getting surprise. You not taxi. Drivers rids tropic is getting closer with you know with all the height how to threaten to was an estate agent and he said look you know i two or three approaches but i got gotta cashcall together wanted to try and create more cash to give me this sort of space for when i was out the contracts so he suggested. Why don't we go. This loss of new build new built developments in a place called wales. Which is you know in the uk on marinas. And let's go and have a look. And i was quite impressed by him because he owns his own business. Not saying yeah yeah. Let's show enough with when which sold round the few places. In wales armed with came on warm marina development was being sold off clump so all the walls literally we went to the agents. All the world's a big model booth this arena development was going to sell useful the ashtray by the marina. The guy that wo- he was selling like a dream was these properties are selling. Those should off planet two hundred k. You know within his twelve pro build within eighty. They'll give you two fifty six day boy. Was i just call in the height within ten minutes of full a deposit down you know never really saw that was it. You know how solta. I was gonna make quick this quick book. Wow brilliant advocacy was gonna to go so well how was i. Think he's probably hounds with all developments with side gets in delays so twelve months into eighteen months eighteen months tune into years. All this time it was thinking. She's great of a to k reservation. Fee doubt on this property is increasing crease in talk about gray leverage on a suitcase investment and then after about two years start completing development lit chalet within me completing in two thousand seven with about two months. The crash happened know would so can big time. Us england every you know suddenly. Wow a suddenly realize on this fifty sixty k though is gonna make was gonna become essentially a fifty sixty k loss because very quickly. Nobody was buying. These apartments wasn't gonna turn. I wasn't going to turn over the thing. So many i mean it was. It was a castle varis. Now only because i felt was though a wasn't to be keeping old at the time used finance put a small deposit down and offensively but not finished. I couldn't i couldn't remortgage because i was in negative atwood said just couldn't evaluation would have been sixty k. Down i would have thought another eight just to get another

Sanju Mark Morris Boyens Biden Manchester Cleveland Folio Kuwait Ohio Bronson Wales FOX United States UK England Atwood
"folio" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"folio" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"Really different things so understanding how growing business is not the same thing as being a commercial co founder. You have to understand how to recruit people to maintain them. There's lots of things ready to operations as well. Let also be someone in. The team has to like soon There's so many different aspects but of course it all depends on what kind of business you're running. But we about the completeness of the team and thinking about the the the skills that are lacking all day so crucial to the business that the co founder with the skill or is it enough to recruit someone who has more of a senior role than company. Would this game or could it be. An adviser even stopped already How much of that skill you need on a daily basis. And how much good advice. But i think you should probably understand that better. That's who is focused on the team with fifty company. That must be so many stories of trauma lot of successes and failures. You want to save some of the are Quite failures for sure someone to our sponsors. I'm not sure that i wanted to speak openly about. Maybe if you can do it on a new bodies had to learn and not repeat the mistakes and if you can sort of pick. The wisdom from i conducted do donate leveled against seen enough of them. I think A very very common mistake is to be way too focused on the product itself and not being in a focused on the value that you're actually creating for customer understanding the customer needs down. This is something that's been repeated quite a few times but i mean i have to stress it again seen so many times in my own companies and i guess that goes back to myself that i being to focus on their. You must teams that. Been good Good product myself. Haven't understood that the market needed so definitely say that it's the defaulted on preneurs Ministers blessed very very common thing. I've been pretty lucky. And not seeing. Too many co-founder dramas But i know that there are a few of those mike folio and they're quite some a friend of mine more.

fifty company mike folio
Are You Underweight Chinese Stocks? Pros and Cons of Investing in China

Money For the Rest of Us

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Are You Underweight Chinese Stocks? Pros and Cons of Investing in China

"Are you under weight chinese stocks. Should you be. I recently got an email from a member of money for the rest of us. Plus he lives in switzerland but grew up in asia. He mentioned that he has been a long term investor in china as he analyzed his chinese equity investments in two thousand twenty. He noticed that they didn't fall. As much as stocks in other countries and the currency held its value relative to the us dollar. He went to look at his overall exposure to chinese trying to calibrate it within his per folio he noticed that relative to the size of the chinese economy which is the second largest in the world that he was underweight chinese stocks in fact the major stock indices. Msci all country world index has five point two percent in china yet. China's gross domestic product the monetary value of their output is over sixteen percent of global. Gdp trying to figure out. Well what should his weight be. He's primarily getting his performance through an a-share etf china a-shares our stock shares that trade on mainland china and trade in the local chinese currency the lon new trade on the shanghai stock exchange and the shenzhen stock exchange historically these chinese a-shares are only available to domestic investors but since two thousand three china has allowed certain institutional investors to acquire license to be able to purchase some of these chinese a share stocks for example back in two thousand fifteen vanguard. Was i allowed to buy these chinese a-shares stocks up to one point five billion dollars. It was at that time. They added chinese. A shares to their emerging market stocks index fund and etf trading nature's has typically been dominated by local chinese investors and returns have been volatile in twenty twenty though they gained forty one percent incredible performance. It was the result of the chinese economy performing better than any developed or developing economy in the world in two thousand twenty in this episode. We're going to look at. What should our weight be in china in our stock portfolio. There's definitely some pros and cons to investing in china and that's what this member was trying to figure out what what what should his weight be in. China been twenty twenty. The chinese economy officially grew two point three percent some of its weakest annual rate of growth. But the best in the world. now there's always some controversy regarding how accurate are the official economic statistics in china. I subscribe to capital economics which produces something called the china activity proxy and it's an estimate of economic growth using different metrics that they have much more confidence in and they show that the economy grew close to seven percent in the fourth quarter from four point nine percent in the third quarter. This is on a basis chinese. gdp it's gross domestic product the measure of what it produces its output of goods and services has been growing faster than many areas around the world for over a decade and as a result. The chinese economy is getting to be a larger percentage of overall global gdp in china. And this is data from. Moody's referenced an article in the wall street journal. China in two thousand ten made up ten percent of world. Gdp us in two thousand. Ten was twenty three point two percent of global. Gdp at the end of two thousand twenty. China had grown to sixteen point eight percent of global gdp while the us has shrunk to twenty two point two percent so china at its six percentage points. The us lost one percent. As i mentioned the chinese economy grew in twenty twenty and one reason it grew was because of americans that were stuck in their homes. And we're able to travel and go out to eat. And instead bought goods off. Amazon and other stores and as a result exports from china surged in november chinese exports grew twenty one point one percent compared to the prior month and exports to the. Us grew forty six percent. Despite all the trade war rhetoric new tariffs individuals. Continue to purchase things that were made in china and many. Us companies continue to make a lot of their things in china. That growth in exports certainly helped the chinese economy. The other thing that helped the chinese economy cover is day to day. Life has generally returned to normal. The country was able to better control the coronavirus and as a result people are back driving their cars. They're taking public transportation china's not kobe. Free this past week on one day the recorded two hundred and ten new covert cases the highest since march but only two hundred and ten compared to the thousands and thousands of new covid cases confirmed each day in the us. The chinese economy has rebounded because all that manufacturing of those exports has allowed migrant workers which make up about a third of the workforce to take their jobs again. So incomes are growing in china and they're also benefiting because during the early months of the pandemic the chinese increase the amount that they're saving chinese households. Increase your savings rate. Now there appear more willing to spend that savings on buying goods and services and that has helped propel the chinese economy forward.

China Msci United States Switzerland Asia Shanghai Moody
"folio" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"folio" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I think they got these fires locked off. I like Pat Harvey, where she said, you know, the firefighters were out there to protect homes. And condominiums. I kind of an insult People own condos. Is that couldn't possibly be your home. My I mean, I understand that the house is different from a home, but a condo is a home my folio. You live in a condo, right? Don't you call it a home? Always this plane landing here with no means battered by wind gusts. Oh, no, It's just the wind belly. Oh, don't you live? You live in a condo? I live in a condo and it is my home and it's a home, right? Very homey. That's in that zone insult, right? I mean, I love Pat Harvey, but I think she just misspoke. Right? But you have a beautiful home. Thank you shouldn't be embarrassed. I didn't say I was. I know what I mean. I should are you saying I should be? Um, no Paris. I live in a condo just because I don't live in a house like you, or, like Mongo or Deborah lived in a condo before and I love comedy 18. Like when I was like broking and 18 19 years early, Okay, Okay, We're going there, huh? All busted out. Um, but you have a condo that's like an adult condo. I had a kid condo. What is the difference? There's no furniture. There's marks on the walls. There's like a basketball hoop, you know? That kind of conduct. You have upscale. I've appliances. You just read it a bathroom. I mean, you gotta going on. It's pretty nice. It's pretty nice. I'd like to see that condo at some point. I'd like for you to invite me over to your house and I could see you're gonna happen, but You're welcome to Irvine. Anytime. Thanks in the public area. Yes, the spectrum spectrum. I'll meet you there. How far do you live from the spectrum? 10 minutes. North. Um, We know what I could know where you are, By just the direction simple directions. Okay. Got my well, I know the Secret Service. Camille. Allow me to divulge that. I'm north of this spectrum. Okay. All right. I'm gonna play you the speech here of Joe Biden and you Couldn't tell when the writers goofed on him. All right, here we go. Early this evening. To hell way must remember. It's hard. Sometimes to remember, But that's how we heal. It's important.

Pat Harvey Joe Biden Mongo Camille basketball Paris Secret Service Deborah Irvine
"folio" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"folio" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Because if you let your emotions take over and you say okay, were down 5%. I'm gonna I'm gonna add to my position that was down 10%. And you're gonna have a little bit more division. Then before you know what it's down to 20% you like. Oh, gosh, You can't go any lower than this. That's that's all traders self destruct, and that's an emotion is It is the worst thing that any trader can let them be taken over by So by simply having the heart stopped and saying, OK, you know what? In this trade? I'm willing to risk maximum 3.5 45% of Michael Folio right once once That loss occurs If that occurs, you get stopped out and you move on and you learn and you and you look to see OK where the things go wrong. You have analyzed. Okay? This This approach is wrong because of such and such reason and then you look to regroup and try to prevent that mistake from occurring again. So so stops are very, very important. So obviously this strategy has risked a different kind of interest in this back market since inception. You know the portfolio is up 40% versus 23 for the S and P 500. So that's good. But you know, 220 again was a different story. You beat the S and P by little, but we got 20%. They got 18% and completely different ways. You know the buy and hold investor how to see their count, dropped 30, 35% or more and then wait and then hopefully not panic and bail out and then wait for it to come back and at the end of the year they want to getting back into positive territory. Whereas with your strategy, we were positive all year. We were never negative. I think, except maybe after February might have been a good like one or 2%. Right? And then the rest of the year we were in positive territory. So you never had to look at your counsel. Oh, I can't. I can't take this. It's down so much. No. In March when the market went down tremendously, Uh, this this portfolio went up, you know, because we actually doing some shorting and we were in cash. And so there was an opportunity to make money. Whether the market was going off. We're going down. Now the last few years in the last 12 years, I would say has been really, really good in the stock market. Okay? And if you're buying hold investor, you're probably doing just fine. However, if you look historically, this is why I think it's important to maybe have some allocations, tactical management and some other alternatives. If you look historically, the market tends have cycles, right. Has 10 12 good years than 10 12 Bad years, right if you recall to thousands From 3010. The market really was negative for 10. Years already mean and after that, then then it reverses and then we get to 2010 details 2021. It's been great. If we get another 10 or 11 years where the markets negative, right, Maybe it comes back to roost his debt that we're building that we're you know, maybe it just comes back to haunt us. And eventually, you know, whatever the Fed's doing doesn't work anymore, and we get a bad 10 years. Well, you're gonna want some other things besides the buy and hold. That's why we're talking to clients. But maybe you should allocate some of your money to a tactically managed portfolio that could go up whether the market's up or down, obviously as risk but different risk in the stock market. We compared to the S and P. 500. It's really nothing like the S and P 500. It's really not very correlated to the S and P 500, But that being said, you know, you have to compare it to something. So you know if anyone's interested in talking about how This type of portfolio could fit into what you're doing calls it 866 wealth He calls it 866 wealthy or again, if you want to get Pete's free updates for three weeks is the only market updates. They're people that are paying $1000 a month for these updates, and you could get him from free for three weeks. Text the word Spartan. The 474747. We'll get you on that list. You can see for yourself real time. The trades the analysis that goes with it. And you know, it might help you to diversify your portfolio even more than it is now..

Michael Folio Fed Pete
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia

Science Friction

04:44 min | 1 year ago

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia

"Yes sir dra okay. All over the world spotted another one. Sorry wearies leash. She'll need gone. I have devoted much time to a class of plants that seem to have reversed the regular order of nature and like avengers of kingdom have turned upon animals incarcerating and finally killing them whether the plants are really hungry and entrapped the animals for food or whether it is only an example of the wanton destructiveness of nature. I leave the reader to judge. Mary treat eighteen eighty five throughout history. The gripe botanical artists have often been women but were many of them infect scientists to just without the endorsement of the botanical establishment which often shunned or ignored them. The paintbrush deemed more appropriate tool for a lady than a microscope. I guess botany has always been an interesting one. Because i suppose that the study of flowers and plants historically was maybe seen as a bit more of a suitable pursuit for the women feminine because of flowers and that sort of thing but still it still also quite mild eliminated. I guess in terms of the scholars in that field throughout history. Well one determined woman on a farm in weight belt western. Australia defied the odds and changed. How the world sore australia's incredible carnivorous plants and listen to artists. So with laura skates of botanical scientist doing her phd on carnivorous plants. Right now i am taking you down a bush trial in pursuit of his story. Oh is that it. Oh cute so this is actually one of the climbing ones. That i was just talking about so you sixty centimeters long and it's just spreading out of an embankment. He and a lot more of them seem to have caught prey on this one. I think it might be dresser. Menzies the i ultra ceramic grant though draw sarah makram throw or the bridal rainbow with its little sunlight sticky leaves hence the name sanju. It was a man. English naturalist biologist charles darwin n-i-l-l-a-s who is a first credited with helping us understand that coniferous plants lived off flesh. Here's particularly interested in dresser. There's a european species coatdress harare folio which he did a lot of his experiments on so he would put different things on the leaves like for example. He would put a piece of sand orbit of gloss and not really see any reaction. But if you put something like little piece of aig or some meat juices suddenly the plant would have reaction to that and the tentacles would start to wrap around. So what he basically showed is that these plants are reacting to substances that have not to general protein in them so so the plants i almost instantaneously they know not that'd be the descend concrete that Cheese like an eight that. Yeah exactly so you know. They don't waste any energy wrapping around something. That's not going to be nutritious. They instead wraparound when it's going to be something that will give them a good boost. Trajan i mean even in my phd. Thesis i go right back to dahlan's original studies and some of his original thoughts and ideas of things that with testing to this day and so he really liked the groundwork for the foundation. Full kind of verse plant research but one american woman was on the case of carnivorous plants. Around the same time as darwin. I will give you my observations on draw surra which seemed to have escaped the notice of botanists and she's struck up a correspondence with darwin in a series of letters from eighteen. Seventy one four years before he got to publishing his influential book on insect diverse plants. I had two or three species of these pretty plants growing for window ornaments and soon saw the deal on. The folio was a fly trap of considerable power when it comes to congress plants. One of the women that i kind of came across in my studies was married trait and i came across her. Because he in allen's book insectivores plants. There was a little footnote. That talked about what mary trait had done to contribute to that particular chapter and i thought wow. Who's mrs trait. I want to find out more about him.

Sir Dra Sarah Makram Australia Menzies Mary Charles Darwin Dahlan Laura Harare Bush AIG Trajan Darwin Mary Trait Congress Allen
The Traders Journey: Consequence

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:23 min | 1 year ago

The Traders Journey: Consequence

"Today i wanted to cover selling. I think is really really important. Which is consequence. He's a noise in the background. I'm actually dan by the coast. Doing my podcast on having a bit of a war. So that's the noise. Sa- consequence is the reality of being tried something that you need to be aware o-of talk constantly about being having perspective about following the rules and being strategic in what you do to make sure that your goals and your actions are perfectly so that you would shave one from the other now. They are going to be periods of time. When you don't full six there will be times where you don't folio plan flawlessly. They'll destroyed up might massive mistakes or you know one. Try which is fine. You know these things happen. These opportunities and experiences to learn from but the tom way you go through a period month. She's gonna be bay will depend on you but there will be a period of significant consequence. I want you to understand a couple of things here because when it does happen but when what used to be paid for you say with the consequence things it usually goes because you've broken your rules all because you've done something silly. Kobe won big. Try that you have a massive loss on. There's a number of things that can happen but one of those can be. You didn't follow your risk management if it's a series of trades again and it can be a lot of things some of these things are not negative. You know recently about a string of losing tries until just recently had a win again last night but the wins and losses. Usually they open your eyes to certain things if you're not doing the right thing for example if you have a series of losing trades how well does the full says you look at what you're doing now. Maybe doing nothing wrong at all so a consequence. Because you're doing the right thing. You're taking good trades your follow your rules and all is well in the world but losing string what could also do is it can really balk. You can send you backwards. It can make you question if you're doing what you should be doing. And if you're in the right path at all you gotta be ready for that. Not as a consequence of consequence of trading to be honest. You have a one way or the other when it comes to trades following the rules. That doesn't mean you're going to always have a lot of winning trades. I can tell you that right now. I've had recently a number of fantastic trades me out full speed to have a look at much writing and it's made me recognize that nothing wrong. It's fine so i cape plugging along last night with that prophet or at least the first target. Who haven't checked this morning. At least the first taga hit so it's really important to have that measure of self. The consequence comes off the periods. Where you break your rules and it's a reminder to stick to your guns it's it's not a bad thing because it what can do this again. The reason why would i take his. It's not just the trading strategy. It's not just a psychology but it's the capturing of beith in live screenshots when you take a tried to take a screenshot of that is because we have these periods where the consequences is you can go back and you can assess it and you can learn from it. I'm thinking like this. You've got two options one. You have a losing streak but decides to losing streak to making simple and you know everything spied change things and you don't have screenshots to back that up number two option is on the openings bad on losing losing losing limit. Shake my screen shots against my trading strategy checklists and see if i'm actually doing anything wrong at all. Okay will i am and it seems to be looking for. Try small candles in a cradle for example or the other side of that is these traits flawless. There's nothing wrong. It's just a losing streak. Okay co i can deal with it either way. You're equipped now to take positive steps forward to get your head back in their place and get your trading in their direction so you got to have these options in place you to have these screenshots. This accountability consequence comes. You know how to get out of it. I'm back into a positive mental monster.

DAN Kobe
"folio" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"folio" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Folio Escape was the dominant method of regulating the motion of mechanical clocks for a couple of centuries. But then an Italian smarty pants by the name of Galileo, Galileo made an interesting observation. He discovered that a pendulum takes the same amount of time to complete one full swing out and back. Over and over and over again. The time for one complete cycle is what we call a period, so the period of a swing remains the same even as the pendulums swing decreases in amplitude. So what do I mean by that? Well, if we were working with a pendulum mounted on a massless rod or a line on had a frictionless pivot, then the pendulum is always going to return to the same height as its initial release. But that's not how the real world works. So let's say you tie a rope to the limb of a tree. And on the other end of the rope, you tie a bowling ball and you go on a stepladder, and you're far enough back so that the line is taut between the limb and the bowling ball. And you're standing at a certain level. You're holding the bowling ball right up to your chin with the that line there you let go of the bowling ball. And by the way, I say, let go. You don't push the bowling ball. Just let go now, If you do that is going to swing back and knock your teeth out. No, it won't. And the reason for that is because elements like friction and drag are sapping some of the energy from the overall system. The returning bowling ball doesn't have the same amount of energy that the departing bowling ball had. So it doesn't rise up as high as when you dropped it, Which means you get to keep your chompers. Congratulations. Go brush your teeth. But even though the bowling ball isn't rising up to the starting height of its release, the journey of its swing, its period will remain the same. That time remains the same. At least for small amplitude is the story is different if you're swinging that sucker really hard. Or for simple pendulums at small amplitude is this is true. The ball isn't traveling as far in each swing because it's losing energy to friction and drag, but it's also not swinging quite as quickly. Her swing, so it's not going as far but it's also moving a little more slowly and the overall amount of time it takes to complete one period remains constant. Now That means if you make a pendulum of a precise length, you can create a swing of one second. The period of a pendulum swing can be expressed as an equation, and the period is equal to two times pi times the square root of the length of the pendulum divided by gravity's acceleration. Now, ignoring for a moment, the gravity's acceleration is not uniform everywhere on Earth due to several factors that really are too complicated for us to get into here. We can simplify this. To say that a pendulum of 990 millimeters or about 39 inches is the right length tohave a swing period of a second. Galileo recognised the potential for pendulums and timekeeping, but he never built a clock using one That honor goes to a Dutch scientist named Christian Huygens, who in the mid 17th century figured it out. He used the oscillation of a pendulum to regulate the motions of clockwork. In many ways it was similar to the Virgin Folio design. Except instead of relying upon awaited lever and inertia. Hye Jin's design relied on the natural oscillation of a pendulum oven appropriate length. So how does a pendulum escape meant work? The escaped men still engages a gear, preventing it from rotating freely, And as the pendulum swings, it rocks the escape mint so that it disengages with the gear, and the gear begins to rotate at the end of the pendulums period when it returns to its starting point. The escaped man is locked back into position, and the whole process starts again. But I'm sure you're all wondering how the pendulum keeps moving. I mean, if it's losing energy with each swing How does it continue for more than just a few seconds without adding more energy to the pendulum? It's eventually just going to slow down and stop swinging completely. I mean, I talked about this with friction and drag well, Hye Jin's got around this by designing a gear. It would give the pendulum a little nudge. Each time the escape mint disengaged. So would provide just enough force to counter act Dragon fiction friction. So it worked. Huygens initial design was accurate enough to keep time within about a minute per day, meaning you'd only lose 60 seconds during a day long operation of one of his clocks, which was incredible for the time, and he improved upon his design within his own lifetime. He cut it down to losing on Ly 10 seconds per day, which is not bad for an entirely new method. Of regulating gear rotation. Pendulums do come with a couple of complications, however, so it doesn't matter what the mass of the pendulum is, By the way, you don't whatever the Bob is at the end of your pendulum. That mast can be anything that's immaterial. It's the length of the pendulum. That's that's important, not the bob the Master Bob, except that you don't want something so massive, that's going to cause damage to the clock itself. But that pendulums length is incredibly important. And this is where we get into some trouble because of temperatures. Most pendulums are made of metal and metal has a tendency to expand in the presence of heat or contract when it gets colder, and since the pendulums period is dependent in part upon its length. This poses a problem. Precisely designed pendulum might swing at exactly one second per period, but or have a period of one second is the more appropriate way of saying that, But if the length of that pendulum where to change, it would no longer be true. The period would be slightly off from a second, and that would be enough to cause errors and timekeeping. Clock makers recognize that issue and they tried to fix it in different ways. The most common way was. Do you use alloy Sze of medals for pendulums, So an alloy is a combination of two or more medals, And one of the interesting features of alloy is is that you can mix together metals that have different coefficients of expansion. So if you do this carefully enough, you can cancel out the effects of temperature to Ah, great deal. So, for example, you could use zinc and iron or brass and steel and pair them together in this way, and that ends up reducing that effect so that the clock can be more accurate, No matter what the temperature happens to be. For a pendulum clock. To be really accurate. You have to reduce the impact the impulse of the impulse of the turning crown wheel. The Crown wheel is the element that the escape mint locks into So you have to reduce the impact of its motion on the bench. Lem itself. It needs to give just the right impulse to keep the pendulum from swinging and no more or less than that, Ideally. It would be uniform every single time, meaning you have very precise distances between pegs on the crown so that its impact on the escape mint would remain consistent, no matter where it is in the Crown Wheels rotation. It was a guy named Edward Beckett, who later on would be lorded and we'd be known as Lord Grimm Thorpe, which is possibly the coolest title I've ever seen. He invented what was called the double, three legged gravity escape mint, which honestly sounds like a routine. You see, it's Cirque du Soleil. But in fact it was a particular arrangement that allowed for extremely consistent operation. He used it to build an enormous clock. Over at Westminster. The clock is world famous, and actually, people generally call it by the name of the huge bell that is also in that clock tower. And people just call the whole thing by the Bell's name that Bell's name, by the way is Big Ben. I would describe to you how his escape mint works, but I'm pretty sure my brain would melt as I tried to do this without the use of visual AIDS. Fortunately, there are videos about the double, three legged gravity escape mint on YouTube that show exactly how this works, and it is fascinating. I It really drives home. The fact that.

bowling Galileo Hye Jin Cirque du Soleil Bob Christian Huygens YouTube Bell Ly scientist AIDS Sze Edward Beckett Lord Grimm Thorpe
Proactive job strategies that work

Network Yourself to Success

05:00 min | 1 year ago

Proactive job strategies that work

"So good morning and welcome. Good morning how ya get to see you and So i mean as quick introduction and italian oil great lecture four volume about them to find a job in using sales sales method. What is the sales manager. Use it. Because i have the same background i really connected to your approach in them. I want to bring it to the world of how to network yourself and that more proactive approach ties also been successful as sales person for manager for science and now you're a startup called gay yelm you'll tell them more about it so no sorry go ahead. Yeah no welcome to the podcast. Go ahead while your thank you. So thank you for. The production. Name is time or no. I've been working in different. Different says and business development tools for the past seven years or so six seven is also a previous company. I was Walking as panther up in science. And we've been working on scientists fully and a heff lately joined. The averse will set up consists of seven people. It's called pm. A pam is spend management platform basically help companies Replace the old corporate bank credit cards with our platform where they can actually issue credit cards and men's joe expenses and spend according to different vendors or employs. So if you can if you want finger to configure to the subtle flake then you mattered for payments in saas companies for subscriptions and foreign player expenses. That aso in pm. Basically i says the rectal majoor obese now to build the entire department for the grand out on the ground up to lay down the infrastructure for the says flows for a set process to implement the tools and hopefully soon within the next few months. Also start hiring for my team. Great so we will be on alert for that for anyone who's looking for job as in sales is always interesting to be in a startup. You know you can really grow fast this quickly about that in so basically you're working on a large company is a science in how is it is not to move into stuff from more established corporate into startup. What is it. What were you looking for So say by the time. I size walking size since i thought about going inside of the company off from the business development all the way maybe even more than that but you know use a metaphor that is that is just sort of electrode. Say that life is what happens while you're busy making other plans right. So this the the indian founder. He is good friends of mine for now me and we started talking about possibly one day at john start up and everything just happened much faster than he anticipated and even did seem of walking in silence. Full folio to is more I wanted to just go ahead and jump right in and take. This opportunity was handed to me. So that's why. I basically chose to join. It wasn't like sort of like a plenty that they had in mind for a long time. I did hear about this company from other people as well. And i think the major change is that the company as big an structured assassins. You have the right set of tools to use. you have set of process. You're part of something. That's the second machine. Second machine people do calls the doing out linked animals. Everything is documented. There's a process. And all that. And when i joined the when you join like such a small startup like that there's there's just absolute chaos. Right you need to lay down the infrastructural in need to choose the tools you need to build up our the sales process and the deal flows and you need to start and understand. Basic metrics like pricing foil product for example. Like how long does one cell cycle take right. We shall metrics that you are having a company such science so these are some of the main differences and like my challenges coming in now says later in the company.

John
Dan Robinson, Research Partner at Paradigm.Xyz, on Starting at an Investment Fund

The Bitcoin Podcast

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Dan Robinson, Research Partner at Paradigm.Xyz, on Starting at an Investment Fund

"Our research partner. Paradigm Fund. Tesla Blue, paradigm and and what it means to be received partner at a fun. Yes. So I was lucky because I was close friends with math long who was one of the CO founders of paradigm since childhood and Qian. Fred. Essentially design this role for with with with me and mine and served with my health I'm trying to figure out what would be most effective for me to do and when I most enjoy doing. So I really get a kick out of that although it may not be for everyone. So a lot of what I do is. Normal parts of the investment. Team function and that includes Projects that are starting to be successful diligence potential new investments valuing with the rest of the investment to make decisions. Another big part of the job is helping portfolio companies and there I think one thing, one way paradigm maybe different from other funds as we get pretty hands on helping out with things like mechanism design. And zones technical. Issues with with early out. So I was out there on the UNICEF did your white paper. Just I just recently published White Paper with another portfolio company yield on new am that they're using. And just generally helping folio and then the third area is this kind of independent research and that's where I think. As really appreciated, having having a place where they would welcome me doing that and that's publishing publish. Sort of you can call them favors by really sort of a sketches of ideas for things that people could build and so I came up with one of them called Rainbow about a year ago and then another. Just, under a year ago called yields which. Eventually turned into a project that we're incubating. That's implementing these these y tokens, and so that was a case where I think we weren't sure exactly how publishing these papers would help the firm but we thought you know one of the one possible outcome would be that we end up incubating a company based on what happens here. I find that very interesting in in did see that progression happened over the last year. It looked like you you put out the White Paper a few people. Read it someone came in. Thank you said suggested improvements even. That led to. Basically handing the project them, SACRA. That's right. So so Allen, who's the CEO of yield now? Came to me and I think he he fixed one of the core problems in the protocol which was settlement and he had he figured out a way to settle it essentially directly to die or directly to make faults as opposed to. Acetylene using using an auction or oracle or something that was one of the big missing pieces, and the other was just we wanted somebody who could really own it as a as a founder CEO. And we think Allen's that person another former lawyer. For some reason. Yeah I. Think I get along with them for that reason? Okay makes sense. Yeah. I. I think it's just the power of putting your ideas out there and actually seeing it a comeback improved in better and. Without providing. Opportunities for Reunion in the fund makes sense. Yeah. It's it's extremely rewarding although. Sometimes. When so there's there's another project at least one other project implementing the protocol. and. Sometimes I think like this. Why do I do I do this to myself but honestly, none of this would have happened without publishing the paper. I'm sorry I can't actually regret it that much.

Paradigm Fund Qian Allen Partner Tesla Unicef Founder Ceo Fred CEO
Interview With Sue Bryce

The Candid Frame

04:27 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Sue Bryce

"Before. You came to California where you living in a New Zealander or Australia I is born and raised in New Zealand in threes and Sydney before Cava. Said kind of this kind of heat unusual or partly our regular. From. Okay. But. It seems like we've gotten acclimated because you've been down at least four years i. Usually, you down there. In annella. saw. One of your first presentations created live. That's I came on Komo raiders. Probably a lot of people did I buy? That's what two thousand twelve Goes by too quick. Oma Gone. But first off welcome to the show, it's good. It's good to have you. Ever. Wanted to talk to you for a long time. So this finally things are actually came together to finally your story is fascinating and Dive deep into that they can turn. I know that you started your your. Business out of your garage, but before that year during we touch. It's interesting to me that if that photographer for whom he will working for had been more of sort of mentor encouraged more than he did you probably will stay there. Ride. From the business for But those kind of interesting because I think there are a lot of people are in that in that place where they toil the idea. But because of water for whatever reason they never they don't make the leap until you do what you think was should holding you back from going out and trying to do it yourself. So let's be really clear. I was employed as a photographer. So the reason I said I would have never lived was simply because I didn't want to run the business like I wanted to the photographer. I didn't even care about sale managing money or people or drama, or decisions or responsibility. I just took the photos inlet. And I got paid four hundred dollars a week to do that and I built my folio and I hit this incredible job. But as I started to tuned city four, hundred dollars a week was just not getting more and might go friends at the time ten thirty or bought houses and I could not buy a house with four hundred dollars a week and I. Remember, just thinking well is not a rune for me to grow in this through TC toffee studio. I am by nature just WanNa be I would have just stayed employed, but I needed to make money. So I thought thing self-employed was the only way to do that to keep a big imagine and have more control over the work that I was getting and. That just took a long time that. I'd love to learn and the confidence realm and yeah, that took a really long time but I would never have to i. just wanted to be a photographer in to this day even though I build massive business, I, still think I just WanNa be a photographer man. Still come up. Yeah, everyday. Everyday, I think about it. It's story was that you gave a half your business to a friend who helps you by sort of doing heavy lifting the eating want to do with respect to the business end. When when that relationship ended, you went to Australia and he started again and again struggling because you are not able to you know you weren't on, you're unable to sit herself marketer yourself and press. It wasn't the MAC thing of my stop. It was the direct receiving money I had a block around being able to receive money for my craft, and that's what a hint to get through food because I keep putting people in front of me that would do the deals for me. But whenever I touched, it would go to bed because I felt so low and my values. So I started to myself value that twin at changed. Everything changed for me just the ability to tell somebody what I was with without the fear of them thinking I wasn't good enough. So that was that was a big journey from a bit out on my own.

Australia New Zealand Raiders Komo California Sydney Photos Inlet Cava
"folio" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"folio" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The Folio Police Department is investigating a possible kidnapping. It happened around 5 38 in the evening. Yesterday in the area of Rotary Way and Cab Lonnie Lane, multiple witnesses observed the victim, a black female around 17 to 20 years old. Get out of a silver infinity. With a temporary California license plate of eight D. M. And 284 victim ran towards an apartment rental office and witnesses say she was yelling. Help me! Don't let him take me! Suspect is described as a black male adult around 18 to 19 years old. The vehicle was last seen near Redwood Street and North Camino Alto. Just before it made a U turn and fled onto westbound 80 at a high rate of speed. If you have any information on this incident, please contact your local authorities immediately. And your traffic This time around, is sponsored by Mercury insurance, get back on the road and save money with mercury insurance Because mercury has you covered no matter where life takes you visit mercury insurance dot com today to get a fast free quote that's mercury insurance dot com. We have an accident on the Antioch Bridge, 1 60 in the South bound direction just before the ante up bridge mid span. It's two vehicle crash that has been moved to the shoulder. However couch France is on the way because they're going to pick up a truckload worth of debris from this wreck. Traffic is moving past the scene slowly, so prepare for a little bit of a delay. We also have a slowdown Etienne the westbound direction just before ninth Street, it is a stall that has been cleared over to the right shoulder. Traffic is trying to recover things. They're still a little bit slow Gnome eatery lights on the Bay Bridge at this time as well, Etienne the westbound direction. I'm also seeing you slow down. If you're travelling on 99 north bound just before Twin Cities Road, we have a blanket on fire. Okay, Jim, you're going to a little bit of an extreme this morning. So keep an eye out for that. And you're Bart ride so far so good Checking in problem free..

Mercury insurance Etienne Antioch Bridge Folio Police Department Lonnie Lane North Camino Alto kidnapping Bay Bridge California Jim France
"folio" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:53 min | 2 years ago

"folio" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Virgin folio escapement was dominant method of regulating motion mechanical clocks for a couple of centuries but then an Italian Smarty pants by the name of Galileo Galilei made an interesting observation he discovered that a pendulum takes the same amount of time to complete one full swing out and back over and over and over again the time for one complete cycle is what we call a period so the period of the swing remains the same even as the pendulum swing decreases in amplitude so what do I mean by that well if we were working with the pendulum mounted on a massless broad or align and had a frictionless pivot then the pendulum is always going to return to the same height as its initial release but that's not how the real world works so let's say you tie a rope to the limb of a tree and on the other end of the rope you tie a bowling ball and you get on a stepladder and you're far enough back so that the deadline is taught between the lamb and the bowling ball and your whole standing at a certain level you're holding the bowling ball right up to your chin with the that line there you let go of the bowling ball and by the way I say let go you don't push the bowling ball but you just let go now if you do that is it going to swing back and knock your teeth out no it won't and the reason for that is because elements like friction and drag are sapping some of the energy from the overall system at the returning bowling ball doesn't have the same amount of energy that the departing the bowling ball had so it doesn't rise up as high as when you dropped it which means you get to keep your choppers congratulations go brush your teeth but even though the bowling ball isn't rising up to the starting height of its release the journey of it swing in its period will remain the same that time remains the same at least for small amplitudes the story is different if you're swinging that sucker really hard but for simple pendulums at small amplitudes this is true the ball is in traveling as far and each swing because it's losing that energy to friction and drag but it's also not swinging quite as quickly her swing so it's not going as far but it's also moving a little more slowly and the overall amount of time it takes to complete one period remains constant now that means if you make a pendulum of a precise length you can create a swing of one second the period of a pendulum swing can be expressed as an equation and the period is equal to two times pi times the square root of the length of the pendulum devided by gravity's acceleration now nor in for a moment the gravity's acceleration is not uniform everywhere on earth due to several factors that really are too complicated for us to get into here we can simplify this to say that a pendulum of nine hundred ninety millimeters or about thirty nine inches is the right length to have a swing period of the second leg LA a recognized the potential for pendulums in tying keeping but he never built a clock using one that honor goes to a Dutch scientist named Christian Huygens who in the mid seventeenth century figured it out he used the oscillation of a pendulum to regulate the motions of clockwork in many ways it was similar to the virgin folio design except instead of relying upon a weighted lever and inertia Huygens design relied on the natural oscillation of the pendulum of an appropriate length so how does a pendulum escapement work this game is still engages a gear preventing it from rotating freely and as the pendulum swings it rocks the escapement so that it disengages with the gear and the gear begins to rotate at the end of the pendulum's period when it returns to its starting point the escapement is locked back into position and the whole process starts again but I'm sure you're all wondering how the pendulum keeps moving I mean if it's losing energy with each swing how does it continue more for more than just a few seconds without adding more energy to the pendulum instead of actually just going to slow down and stop swinging completely I mean I talked about this with friction and drag will Huygens got around this by designing a gear that would give the pendulum a little nudge each time the escapement disengaged so it provide just enough force to counteract dragon fiction friction so it worked Huygens initial design was accurate enough to keep time within about a minute per day meaning you'd only lose sixty seconds during a day long operation of one of his clocks which was incredible for the time and he improved upon his design within his own lifetime he cut it down to losing only ten seconds per day which is not bad for an entirely new method of regulating gear rotation pendulums do come with a couple of complications however so it doesn't matter what the mass of the pendulum is by the way you don't whatever the Bob is at the end of your pendulum that mass can be anything it's that that's in material as the length of the pendulum that's my that's important not the Bob the mass of the bop except that you don't want something so massive that's going to cause damage to the clock itself but that pendulum's length is incredibly important and this is where we get into some trouble because of temperatures most pendulums are made of metal and metal has a tendency to expand in the presence of heat or contract when it gets colder and since the pendulum's period is dependent in part upon its length this poses a problem a precisely designed pendulum might swing at exactly one second per period but or have a period of one second is more appropriate way of saying that but if the length of that pendulum were to change it would no longer be true the period would be slightly off from a second and that would be enough to cause errors in time keeping clock makers recognize that issue and they try to fix it in different ways the most common way what do you use alloys and metals for pendulum so an alloy is a combination of two or more medals and one of the interesting features of alloys that you can mix together metals that have different coefficients of expansion so if you do this carefully enough you can cancel out the effects of temperature to a a great deal so for example you can use zinc and iron or brass and steel and pair them together in this way and that ends up reducing that affects so that the clock can be more accurate no matter what the temperature happens to be for pendulum clock to be really accurate you have to reduce the impact the impulse of the impulse of the turning crown wheel of the crown wheel is the element that the escapement locks into so you have to reduce the impact of its mo.

The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

Science Friction

06:25 min | 2 years ago

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

"They gleason gleason and and CREPE CREPE and and climb climb and and snap snap end. end. They They feed feed off off flesh. flesh. Flies Flies Matz Matz any any culinary culinary delight delight by intrepid? by intrepid? Natasha Natasha Mitchell Mitchell back back in the in world's the world's hotspot hotspot for for carnivorous carnivorous plants plants or Western or Western Australia Australia last last week. Show week. Show sit sit sane. sane. Well Well today. today. It's a It's tile a tile full full of twists of twists and and tendrils. tendrils. Yes Yes Trust Trust Sarah. Sarah. I can I all can over all the over world. the world. I just bought I just another bought another one. Sorry one. Sorry wearies wearies Navan. Navan. I I have devoted have devoted much much time time to a to class a class of plants of plants that seemed that seemed to have to reversed have reversed regular regular order order of nature of nature and and like avengers like avengers of of Kingdom Kingdom have turned have turned upon upon animals animals incarcerating incarcerating and finally and finally killing killing them them whether whether the plants the plants are really are really hungry hungry and entrapped and entrapped the animals the animals for food for food or whether or whether it is only it is only an example an example of the of wanton the wanton destructiveness destructiveness of nature. of nature. I leave I leave the Rita the Rita to judge. to judge. Mary Mary treat treat eighteen eighteen eighty eighty five five throughout throughout history. history. The great The great botanical botanical artists artists have have often often been been women women but but many many of them of them infect infect scientists scientists to to just just without without the endorsement the endorsement of of the botanical the botanical establishment establishment which which often often shunned shunned or or ignored ignored them. them. The pint The pint brush brush deemed deemed more more appropriate appropriate tool tool for for lady lady than a than microscope. a microscope. I guess I botany guess botany has always has always being being an interesting an interesting one one because because I suppose I suppose that that the study the study of of flowers flowers and plants and plants historically historically was was maybe maybe seen seen in a bit in more a bit more of a of a suitable suitable for for for women for women feminine feminine because because of flowers of flowers and that and sort that of sort thing of thing but still but still it it it was it still was still also also quite quite male dominated. male dominated. I guess I in guess terms in terms of the of the scholars scholars in that in field that field throughout throughout history. history. Well Well one one determined determined woman woman on a farm on a farm in in way way belt Western. belt Western. Australia Australia defied defied the the odds odds and changed and changed the world the world sore. sore. Australia's Australia's incredible incredible carnivorous carnivorous plants plants and and listened listened to artists to artists so so with Laura with Laura Skates Skates botanical botanical scientists scientists doing doing her PhD her PhD on canvas on canvas plants. plants. Right Right now now I am I taking am taking you down. you down. Bush Bush trial trial in in pursuit pursuit of her of story. her story. Oh Oh is that is that it. it. Yup Yup Oh Oh cute cute so this so is this actually is actually one of one the climbing of the climbing ones ones that I was that just I was talking just talking about about so so new new sixty sixty centimeters centimeters long long and it's and just it's just spreading spreading out of out embankment. of embankment. He He and a and lot more a lot of more them of them seem seem to have to caught have caught prey prey on this on one. this I one. think I think it might it be might dresser. be dresser. A Men's A Men's Eli Eli address address or or Krant Krant though. though. Draw Draw ceramic ceramic cram cram throw throw or or the bridal the bridal rainbow rainbow with its with little its little sunlight sunlight sticky sticky leaves leaves hence hence the name. the Sanju name. Sanju it it was a man was a man English English naturalist naturalist and Biologist and Biologist Charles Charles Darwin Darwin nonetheless nonetheless who is who a first is a first credited credited with helping with helping us understand us understand that that coniferous coniferous plants plants lived lived off off flesh. flesh. His His particularly particularly interested interested in in is a is a European European species. species. Coatdress Coatdress ERA ERA TON. Two TON. folio Two folio which which he did he a lot did of a lot his of experiments his experiments on on so he so would he put would different put different things things on the on leaves the leaves like like for example for example he would he put would put a a piece of piece sand of sand orbit orbit of gloss of gloss and not and really not really see see any any reaction reaction but if but you put if you something put something like like little little piece piece of EG of EG or or some some meat meat juices juices suddenly suddenly the plant the plant would have would reaction have reaction to that to that and and the tentacles the tentacles would start would start to wrap to around wrap around so so what he what basically he basically showed. showed. Is that Is these that plants these plants are reacting are reacting to to is that is that have have not not gene or gene protein or protein in in them them so so the plants. the plants. I I almost almost instantaneously. instantaneously. They know They know not. not. That's a That's be the a sand be the sand economy economy that that cheese. cheese. I I eight that eight that yeah yeah exactly exactly so so you know. you They know. don't They don't waste waste any energy any energy wrapping wrapping around around something. something. That's not That's going not to be going nutritious to be nutritious day instead. day instead. Wraparound Wraparound when when it's going it's to be going something to be something that will give that will give them them a good a good boost boost of nitrogen. of nitrogen. I mean I even mean in even my in my PhD PhD thesis. thesis. I I go go back back to to Dahlan's Dahlan's original original studies studies and and some of some his of original his original thoughts thoughts and ideas and ideas things things that that with with testing testing to this to day this day and and so he so really he really liked the liked groundwork the groundwork for for set the set foundation the foundation full full of Verse of Plant Verse Plant Research Research But one But American one American woman woman was on was the on case the case of carnivorous of carnivorous plants. plants. Around Around the same the time same time as Darwin. as Darwin. I will I give will you give my you observations my observations on draw. on draw. Sarah Sarah would would have escaped have escaped the notice the notice of botanists of botanists and she and she struck struck up a up correspondence a correspondence with Darwin with Darwin in a in series a series of letters of letters from from eighteen. eighteen. Seventy Seventy one one four four years years before before he got he to got publishing to publishing his his influential influential on on insect insect diverse diverse plants. plants. I had I two had two or three or three species species of of plants plants growing growing window window ornaments ornaments and soon and soon saw saw the deal the deal on the on folio the folio was a was flytrap a flytrap of considerable. of considerable. Palo Palo when it comes when it to comes to reverse reverse plants plants one of the one best of the women best women that I that I kind kind of came of came across across in my in my studies studies was was Mary Mary trait trait and I and came I across came across her her because because he he in Child in Child Allen's Allen's book book insectivores insectivores plants. plants. There was There a little was a foot little foot art art that talked that talked about about what what Mary Mary Trait Trait had done had done to to contribute contribute to to that particular that particular chapter chapter and I and thought I thought wow. wow. Who's Who's Mrs Mrs Trait? Trait? I WANNA I find WANNA find out more out about more about her her de Madame. de Madame. Your observations Your observations and experiments and experiments on the on sexes the sexes of butterflies. of butterflies. Far Far the best the best as far as far as known as known to me to me which which have have ever ever been been made made said. There's said. a great There's a great letter. letter. Where Where don don thanks? thanks? Mary Mary trait trait for some for some observations observations on dresser. on dresser. I am I glad am glad to hear to hear your observations. your observations. On Dresser On Dresser will will be be published. The unlucky fly a common housefly. Would no sooner be caught by the sticky? Glands of it would've once commenced to fold about its victims. It folded from the apex to the stem of the lake. After the manner of its nation closer and closer it held the poor flying embrace until it ceased its struggles when it soon became partly absorbed by the plant. Professor Gray will give my observations on this planned in his new edition of how plants grow was most respectfully Mrs Mary. Treat New Jersey December. Twenty eight hundred seventy one. I have attended to this subject during several years and have almost manuscript enough to make a volume but have never yet found time to publish. I am very much obliged. You'RE COURTEOUS LEGEND AND REMAIN DIM Adam yours faithfully. Charles Darwin January five eighteen seventy two.

Mary Mary Australia Sarah Sarah Charles Charles Darwin Darwin Dresser On Dresser Mrs Mrs Trait Natasha Natasha Mitchell Mitch Charles Darwin Matz Matz Western Australia Australia Sanju Eli Eli Bush Bush Kingdom Kingdom Dahlan Krant Krant Palo Palo
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

Science Friction

05:35 min | 2 years ago

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

"They gleason and CREPE and climb and snap end. They feed off flesh. Flies Matz any culinary delight by intrepid? Natasha Mitchell back in the world's hotspot for carnivorous plants or Western Australia last week. Show sit sane. Well today. It's a tile full of twists and tendrils. Yes Trust Sarah. I can all over the world. I just bought another one. Sorry wearies Navan. I have devoted much time to a class of plants that seemed to have reversed regular order of nature and like avengers of Kingdom have turned upon animals incarcerating and finally killing them whether the plants are really hungry and entrapped the animals for food or whether it is only an example of the wanton destructiveness of nature. I leave the Rita to judge. Mary treat eighteen eighty five throughout history. The great botanical artists have often been women but many of them infect scientists to just without the endorsement of the botanical establishment which often shunned or ignored them. The pint brush deemed more appropriate tool for lady than a microscope. I guess botany has always being an interesting one because I suppose that the study of flowers and plants historically was maybe seen in a bit more of a suitable for for women feminine because of flowers and that sort of thing but still it it was still also quite male dominated. I guess in terms of the scholars in that field throughout history. Well one determined woman on a farm in way belt Western. Australia defied the odds and changed the world sore. Australia's incredible carnivorous plants and listened to artists so with Laura Skates botanical scientists doing her PhD on canvas plants. Right now I am taking you down. Bush trial in pursuit of her story. Oh is that it. Yup Oh cute so this is actually one of the climbing ones that I was just talking about so new sixty centimeters long and it's just spreading out of embankment. He and a lot more of them seem to have caught prey on this one. I think it might be dresser. A Men's Eli address or Krant though. Draw ceramic cram throw or the bridal rainbow with its little sunlight sticky leaves hence the name. Sanju it was a man English naturalist and Biologist Charles Darwin nonetheless who is a first credited with helping us understand that coniferous plants lived off flesh. His particularly interested in is a European species. Coatdress ERA TON. Two folio which he did a lot of his experiments on so he would put different things on the leaves like for example he would put a piece of sand orbit of gloss and not really see any reaction but if you put something like little piece of EG or some meat juices suddenly the plant would have reaction to that and the tentacles would start to wrap around so what he basically showed. Is that these plants are reacting to is that have not gene or protein in them so the plants. I almost instantaneously. They know not. That's a be the sand economy that cheese. I eight that yeah exactly so you know. They don't waste any energy wrapping around something. That's not going to be nutritious day instead. Wraparound when it's going to be something that will give them a good boost of nitrogen. I mean even in my PhD thesis. I go back to Dahlan's original studies and some of his original thoughts and ideas things that with testing to this day and so he really liked the groundwork for set the foundation full of Verse Plant Research But one American woman was on the case of carnivorous plants. Around the same time as Darwin. I will give you my observations on draw. Sarah would have escaped the notice of botanists and she struck up a correspondence with Darwin in a series of letters from eighteen. Seventy one four years before he got to publishing his influential on insect diverse plants. I had two or three species of plants growing window ornaments and soon saw the deal on the folio was a flytrap of considerable. Palo when it comes to reverse plants one of the best women that I kind of came across in my studies was Mary trait and I came across her because he in Child Allen's book insectivores plants. There was a little foot art that talked about what Mary Trait had done to contribute to that particular chapter and I thought wow. Who's Mrs Trait? I WANNA find out more about her de Madame. Your observations and experiments on the sexes of butterflies. Far the best as far as known to me which have ever been made said. There's a great letter. Where don thanks? Mary trait for some observations on dresser. I am glad to hear your observations. On Dresser will be

Mary Trait Charles Darwin Australia Sarah Western Australia Natasha Mitchell Gleason Matz Rita Bush ELI DON Dahlan Verse Plant Research Krant Palo Child Allen
"folio" Discussed on Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"folio" Discussed on Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

"Instagram. But instead of it being ephemeral you can use that mobile optimized content to send out an email to serve up as a story we also now through our APP had the ability customized that content. You can actually create from scratch so you could actually incorporate content that you've already created for your brand approved brochure or Homecourt Folio or magazine and then incorporate individual videos or images so you can actually go create a visual story. That takes the imagery from the home takes a video and photos of a potential buyer in the home in different parts of the home in the kitchen walking up the sidewalk into the home in the backyard..

Homecourt Folio Instagram.
The Seven Roles of Photography

LensWork

05:55 min | 2 years ago

The Seven Roles of Photography

"Let's start today with an obvious given. We all have cameras. We all take pictures but the question I WANNA ask today is why and there's one simple answer that probably accounts for ninety nine percent of what we do photographic -ly we make pictures because it's fun and it's entertaining and we enjoy it and we don't need any more excuses than that and so the rest of this podcast can be forgotten except for the fact that some of us. WanNa do something more with our photography. The just have fun. Some of US WANNA do something more with our photography than just capture memories. That is to say we're interested in using photography something beyond the snapshot and when that happens now. I think it may be more interesting to ask why. What is the purpose of making our artwork? We'll part of the reason to be an artist. Is that things. Like photography gives us a way to approach the world almost an excuse to approach the world as I've said for years. A camera is a fantastic. Excuse for going out and exploring and people will give permission to go places and see things that you wouldn't have if he just said. I'm curious and I WANNA go see it but if you say I want to take picture of it. Sometimes that opens doors and so a camera can be a handy tool for us to use in life as an excuse to go out exploring okay fine but that still doesn't give us a reason why we wanNA create artwork from the photographs that we capture with our cameras. Why do we WANNA make prints in math and frame them and put them on the wall or publish them or make folios chat or whatever? What is it that motivates us? What is our purpose for creating artwork for reasons? I can't explain it other than the fact photography's my life. I find this a fascinating question and so I spent considerable time in the last no sixty days or so thinking about this more critically trying to figure out. What is the purpose for being an art photographer other than fun? And an excuse to explore the world essentially what I came up with. This is just my own little brainstorm so I'm not pretending like this inclusive or exhaustive of all possibilities. But here's what my brain thought that. There are basically seven roles of photography and by that I mean things that we do with photography not rules Phil The seven roles of photography that is to say there are seven purposes of fine art photography that I find help clarify my thinking about what it is that I'm doing once. I had sort of concluded this brainstorm I applied retrospectively and I discovered that it was pretty useful. Sometimes I could use these seven ideas to clarify a project that I wasn't quite sure what I was doing. And where it was going and what the next step was etc how to conclude it or even how to make final decisions about editing and sequencing but once I had these seven roles of photography in mind I found I could go back and use this to clarify my thinking so that was a reason to explore why we make our work. The other thing is it tells me what the limits of my thinking our because I have no doubt there are more than seven ideas. That should be on this list but for some reason. I can only think of seven roles of photography. I'll get into them in here. Just a second but I can only think of seven which tells me the limits of my thinking and as a matter of fact when I went back and looked at the well at this point I have a hundred thirty seven small projects that have been published in cocoa and all hundred and thirty seven of them fit with one of these seven definitions of the roles of photography and not a single one was outside of this. So that tells me I need to push the envelope a little bit. Because they're probably some things that I missing that I've become so entrenched in my thinking that I need to expand so with that in mind. Let me share with you. What I am characterizing. As the seven roles of photography these are things. We want our fine art photography to do the purpose for making what we make and why we make it. The first is to take me there that is to say camera as transporter through space and time the classic examples of this are probably ansel. Adams in contemporary photographer Art Wolf. I'll use him as an example and there are lots and lots of others but the essence of this kind of photography is for us as viewers to go someplace through space and time to a place that we have not been or cannot go and see the world through the eyes of the photographer no question. That's probably the dominant use of photography in terms of fine art photography or as far as that goes with snapshots snapshots take us back in time to an event that happened so that we can remember it more clearly the snapshots that we make vacation pictures can take us to a place that we're not currently at but maybe we visited on vacation and we want to remember it and reminisce about it and so take me. There is the first and most dominant role of photography and lots and lots of projects fit that

Art Wolf Adams Phil The
Twelve Reasons Why I Still Make Prints

LensWork

07:08 min | 2 years ago

Twelve Reasons Why I Still Make Prints

"Last week. I released the most recent issue of cocoa personal. Pdf of my work. And I received a fascinating email which has sparked a discussion here. Let me read you. The e mail to begin with it says Brooks thanks for the latest issue of cocoa. I really like these. Pdf's but I was surprised in this one when you announce the printed chat books from cocoa as a photographer who's embraced digital imaging. The way you have I was wondering why you're still making prints. I think that's a valid question. I have embraced digital imaging and obviously the twenty seven now issues of cocoa that I've published and sent out into the world or an indication of my enthusiasm for digital distribution photography and to be quite honest if I never made another print. It's not like my photography would not get out into the world because I get far more distribution of my artwork via these. Pdf's than I would ever get. If I only made prints as my finished form of artwork I've always made prince of one kind or another. I've always been involved in printed photography and probably will be for the rest of my life but if for some reason it suddenly became whatever against the law to make photographic prints. It's not like I wouldn't have an outlet for my photography so there must be another reason why I make Prince and in fact I sat down fairly quickly in response to this fellow and came up with twelve wins why I still make Prince. There's probably more but these are the ones that came off the top of my head. I is that it's my first love. I started photography is a print maker as matter of fact when I picked up photography seriously in the seventies if you didn't make print they're literally was no photograph. That was the only method to get a photograph out into the world. Well perhaps other than slides but not very many people were seriously using slides as a means of distributing their fine art photography and so prince was sort of the default. I built dark rooms as a matter of fact every place I ever lived in my twenties thirties. And even into my forties the primary consideration of choosing where I was going to live was based on. Could I build a darkroom there? That's how serious my commitment was to prance and basically Intel. Oh roughly about two thousand five or so. My photography was all about what I could do in Prince. So because it's my first love because of where. I am relative to when I was born in the history of photography and all of that my roots are so deeply involved in printing that I I'll never be able to give it up because I just I have so much fun which is actually my second thing that I wrote down. I just plain have fun making prints that didn't always used to be the case. I enjoyed the scientific challenge of the wet darkroom and because I had pursued science in my youth I was very comfortable around mixing my own chemistry and measuring things and all of that knows fascinated by it and that aspect of it was fun but I didn't find print making to be much fun. It was frustrating to me to have to guess how much to dodge and burn or whatever adjusting imprint. And then wait for ten minutes before I could turn the lights on and see it. That was always a bit tedious. But now with the introduction of digital printing. I have all kinds of fun. In printing to me is an entertainment activity. It's pretty consistent these days. It's not fraught with much Difficulty OR FRUSTRATION. And so seeing a really terrific print. Come out of my printer is mostly. Ajoy every once in a while. I get frustrated but it's mostly just a whole lot of fun. So that's the second reason I still make Prince. The third reason is the physicality of Prince. I enjoy digital images. I enjoyed the computer. Work as a publisher. I spend all day on the computer so I'm comfortable with it etc but there is something lovely about the physicality of print particularly these days when the inkjet papers are so wonderful because of the textures involved and the heavyweight involved in the the fiber in the paper is lovely I just love the physicality of printing hence my interest in doing for example folios as well as chat books. There's a physical process of cutting trimming sewing folding. All of that Kinda stuff. Not so much these days cutting matt boards like I used to but all of that physicality of print making is still something that I find very rewarding and a reason to be involved it sort of the hands on production. May maybe that should be my fourth. Reason is the hands on production aspects of making prints in particularly. You know you start off with a blank piece of paper and maybe a blank folio cover and thirty or forty five minutes later. You've got a beautiful folio with Prince and the Nice physicality of all I I. I just enjoy that process. As a real sense of accomplishment in the hands on production for both folios and chat books to some degree in matted prints although I don't do that much anymore the fifth reason is I just love paper. There is something about just the commodity of paper that has always appealed to me. I even experimented for a while in my youth with things like Origami just somehow having this beautiful invention of mankind Paper and what what a fabulous substance. It is in all kinds and it's not just photographic paper but art paper and paper that you write on and draw on a I love paper so that's another reason that I'm involved in printing which is tied. I suppose to my sixth reason for printing which is that. There's no device required to see a print or folio or a chat book. And the fact that you can handle the paper and you have that physicality of it and did it doesn't require that you own a piece of equipment or have a piece of equipment with the battery charge or uploaded to it or whatever. There's a certain appeal to that.

Prince PDF Brooks Intel Publisher
Special Guest Reveals Top 5 YouTube Traffic Secrets

Marketing Secrets

07:01 min | 2 years ago

Special Guest Reveals Top 5 YouTube Traffic Secrets

"Jomar Folio Joe. How're you doing what's happening? Hey glad to be here for that. Awesome intro man. This is the first time we live interview on the show before which is which is really exciting. I love comic'll boards in the back. So dead man just waiting for the two club exit. Come in the mail to even out the set so it's GonNa be awesome. Joe One last Last week he said he got one which is pretty cool so all right so obviously. We don't have a ton of time but a lot of questions for you. So inside of the Traffic Secrets Book is a whole chapter on Youtube traffic. And most of it I pull from you because you are. The Guy who on our team is doing stuff and And you've done such an amazing job and so most of the things are are there from you and so This is kind of to teach people about what's happening inside the book but also just get them to know you and understanding Youtube. So why do you think different than all the other platforms? That are that are out there. You instagram facebook twitter. Take all of a sudden like why is youtube like why are you so passionate about you too? You know so. It like a facebook instagram. And see a of people like it's very It's sometimes easier for them to build a big following on facebook or instagram. The kind of go to youtube and they struggle a little bit. And it's because you to isn't just a social media platform. It is a social media platform. It's also a search engine where people are searching for certain certain topics searching how to do something but you also have to do with you too is not only put up content that engaging that people wanNA watch that has value but you also have to add kind of a story element to it in the one thing that you don't want to do and I see people do. This is kind of repurpose. Your content like say you have constantly putting up facebook and instagram. Our podcast in you like you distribute to all these different channels. If you put on Youtube a lot of times you're going to find. It's not going to get that much traction and think about youtube like this like when you watch you to be set like you guys are out there and you're watching. Youtube. Why do you subscribe to a certain channel? You're going to subscribe right. Maybe you'll they're showing you how to make money online or how to grow your right. But there's a ton of videos on there that talk about like how to go to your instagram channel. But it's like what makes you subscribe. WanNa Watch somebody. It's going to be their personalities can be the way the engaged with you and it's going to be the way the content comes across so what. I would say for Youtube. The differences is treat you to like. It's its own thing. Make videos just for you to try to approach it not as a marketer but as a creator not you're gonNA sell anything but that you're going to like build your audience and you following. Yeah one of my favorite things about Youtube is talked about in the book a little bit like every every social platform. I'd say facebook live like we're doing right now. It's happening and then like it'll drop. It'll be here for next couple of days. It'll drop down the news feed and eventually disappears. Nobody'll ever siegen whereas youtube is like the only platform where you create something and then it grows over time because not just social social and it search and that's why it's so it's it's different 'cause you create something if you create the right way then it sits there and to grow throughout time as opposed to everything else was seems to diminish over time and so it gives at least for me. Who's WHO's creating stuff. It gives me more incentive craigslist. It's nice because it lasts beyond the moment whereas facebook live. Is there for a moment? Then it's gone where youtube it can last for for forever. I mean like. We talked about earlier. Overcome Nagasaki Videos overcoming pornography addiction? Like they still get hundreds and hundreds of US every single month. We don't even sell the product anymore which is probably sad. Because you're an affiliate making money when I know that video. I think I think you're screech out when you were doing. The bucket has hundreds of clicks on their in what it does the content builds on each other. So you put the video video out three years ago in if you keep putting contin out. It's like you're gonNA keep getting lead you're going to keep getting people subscribing watching your stuff like you said yet just doesn't disappear is built on up into the question. This is off the questions that you sent me as pre questions. I'm excited about this one. I hope that's okay. I'm GonNa put you on the spot a little bit but I think a lot of times. People think youtube strategies like okay. I've got to make the most perfect video in the world. And you look at companies like dollarshaveclub drive for example Where they made this video goes crazy viral and then built the company up and then he sells to whoever sold for a billion dollars right. And so we're like okay. I've got to make the perfect youtube video and my people stress about and because they never actually make something at all versus like you told me book example talked about the strategy like Gillette or or other things like that we talked about that because that's a strategy that more people like me can actually do of not like going to make the perfect video instead. It's looking at it a little bit differently. We talked about how how how led to their strategy. How we can use that as well. Yeah so so. Here's thing when you guys are starting your Youtube Channel. Think of it like in the first thing you WanNa do is really go deep in unique whatever you're doing like so for example. Gillette what they did was. They didn't go out there and say well they did. They try to make a viral video like dollar shave club in a flat rate. So what they did was they said. Listen we want to dominate for the keyword? How to shave because people that watch how to shave videos by our product right to the shave your head how to save your back at a shave your legs right needed. All these videos that got hundreds thousands millions of US and they were very targeted to their subscribers. So the thing I would tell people is figure out what your knee. Shas figure out. What you're you're going to go after and go deep in that niche handle like the way you explained the whole blue ocean strategy and expert secrets Because you know the one thing you don't WanNa do is go and look at someone has a million subscribers and then follow what they do right so like say you're doing because you know they've already been established they already have a huge audience. Say you're doing Amazon. So you WANNA do is go through. Amazon. Say Okay. Make videos on Amazon Amazon. Fbi on Amazon drop shipping on Amazon affiliate and they go through hit every every time anything that would searching for Amazon. You WanNa make a video on and it doesn't have to be a perfect video like you said it just has to be engaging enough to get to get retention but doesn't have to be this high production video but we don't want to do is you don't WanNa make a video on Amazon video on how to make money online. Then make a video on procrastination and then they video on the current right you you want. You wanted to. If you're just starting like you want to create like this this is traffic lean. That Youtube knows okay. When Joe put the video out it's going to be on Amazon and then the then they'll start showing your video for more to more and more people that search like the Amazon stuff and then you could expand out there

Youtube Facebook Amazon Instagram Joe One United States Gillette Craigslist FBI
Olof Palme assassinated - Feb. 28, 1986

This Day in History Class

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Olof Palme assassinated - Feb. 28, 1986

"The day was February. Twenty Eighth Nineteen eighty-six Swedish Prime Minister Olaf Palme was assassinated. The case remains unsolved though the investigation of the murder is still underway. Olaf Palme got his law degree from the University of Stockholm in one thousand nine hundred eighty one. He soon joined the Social Democratic Labour Party and got a job. In Sweden's Defense Ministry in Nineteen fifty. Three Palma was hired as the speechwriter. And Private Secretary of Tog Earl. Under the Prime Minister of Sweden from nineteen forty six to nineteen sixty nine palme was elected as a member of parliament in nineteen fifty seven and he continued to climb the political ladder in nineteen sixty three. He was appointed cabinet minister without port. Folio that title just means that he was elevated to the rank without being given responsibilities for a specific area of the government's activities from nineteen sixty five to nineteen sixty seven. Palme was minister of communication and in nineteen sixty seven. He was minister of Education and Culture AS MINISTER OF EDUCATION. He advocated for the inclusion of Marxist thought in curriculum and in nineteen sixty eight he marched against US involvement in the Vietnam War Homma morphed into an outspoken opponent of US foreign policy and as a result relations between Sweden and the US deteriorated in nineteen sixty nine. He was elected chairman of the Social Democratic Party and he became Prime Minister of Sweden. Pomme continue to be critical of the US's involvement in the war in Vietnam. He forged connections with cultural leaders and politicians around the world all the while gaining more international attention. He spoke out against apartheid in South Africa. He allied with Fidel Castro Prime Minister of Cuba at the same time Sweden with undergoing extensive social reforms. Some of the issues that these reforms affected were subsidized housing. Social Security Maternity leave and other family policies. This meant that taxes in Sweden or some of the highest in the World Palma's first term as prime minister lasted until nineteen seventy six when the lack of support for the Social Democrats led Palma to fall from power during this time. He acted as a mediator in the Iran hostage crisis as well as the Iran Iraq war but he was once again elected prime minister taking office in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. He continued to focus on international issues addressing wines like disarmament and security but he had evolved to become a little less politically controversial on February. Twenty Eighth Nineteen eighty-six Palmer and his wife least bit. We're walking home from the movies in Stockholm. He did not have bodyguards with him at the time just before midnight. Palme was shot from behind the first bullet which hit him in the back severed his spinal cord a second bullet Grace Lee bit. He was quickly transported to the hospital but he was declared dead mini conspiracy theories about who killed. Palme are merged a man named Chris. Dr pedder shown was arrested and convicted of his murder. But the conviction was overturned in Nineteen eighty-nine and pederson died in two thousand and four. Investigators have suspected the sweetest military. The South African Secret Service and the Kurdistan Workers Party though there were many witnesses to the shooting and thousands of people have been questioned. The murderer has not been solved.

Olaf Palme Prime Minister Prime Minister Of Sweden Sweden Social Democratic Labour Party Pomme United States Murder University Of Stockholm Palma Kurdistan Workers Party Stockholm Tog Earl Dr Pedder Iran Pederson Secretary
The Rise of Portuguese Gastronomy in Britain

Monocle 24: The Menu

11:14 min | 2 years ago

The Rise of Portuguese Gastronomy in Britain

"Opening of the Hawaiian Bar Restaurant Bar Dole rowing London. Three years ago was a milestone for Portuguese greasy and in the British capital both critics and the public loves to the place and also Monaco showed its approval by including Doro in our fifty best restaurants list now. The success story continues us the founder Max Graham and his team prepared to open their second and location. This timing London cece waterbed as I'm then to look back at the past three years to talk about the new location and the revival of Portuguese. Food Food in Brayson Max. Graham joins me here Madari House Studio One Abbey early. I actually opened a pop restaurant back in two thousand fourteen in in Greek street. I was walking my family business. which is Churchill's put company that makes wine imports in the valley? So the d'oro has always been very much in my blood in my upbringing childhoods but really walking for Churchill's when I opened the pool house which was really focused. It was more of a marketing stunt than anything else that was a pup restaurants pop up wind pool bar and we showcase folio of wines and ports in some very very simple produce driven sharing boards and yet during that period. I think I started eating out in London particularly in the Soho area and I just realized that Portuguese foods was very badly represented. I mean a lots of Portuguese restaurants in Stockwell and I absolutely love those restaurants but there are different Soda Portuguese restaurant and you know I was really at the time. I'm loving bar. Fina unloving Morita on these concepts. That were really showcasing. Spanish cuisine in such a contemporary outwards. Outwards way I'm really engaging with Londoners. I'm getting them excited about gastronomy from abroad and I just felt. Portugal wasn't doing that in in London at the time. So you decided to fix that. Yeah I mean I. I started the process of putting together. Ideas Footballer on that culminated in the the opening in two thousand sixteen in between then others opened up some Portuguese restaurants. Nunu Open Tabatha and you know a few years ago. It was great that was about three three of US laundry. No Tobacco really pushing Portuguese food and of course like I said. There's lots of restaurants in stockwell London that really lead. You backed Portugal Assad way which is a sort of nostalgic way. I think it's interesting that you mentioned that before. You launched Bhadra you. You felt that Portuguese food wasn't particularly well represented in London for example. What do you think that was? I don't know maybe London wasn't ready when I was much younger. That was a restaurant on the Kings road called Tuba. It was a Portuguese restaurant. And you know they were showcasing Portuguese food and I don't think think it just didn't engage with London's at the time you know this was about fifteen years ago and I just think potentially Londoners the appetites it's for new experiences. New Cuisines has just snowballed and London just hungry for new concepts particularly when they're showcasing acing cuisines that are less represented. I think that comes in tandem with the fact that Portugal has just been having such a surge in tourism such exposure over the last five years. I mean Portugal. Now the past five years it's just a completely different country. I mean when I grew up importer. It's just so far away from what it is. Today I think in Portugal there is such a wealth of culinary Marie on wine tradition. And I think that these experiences already being heightened and I just think London it is now more than ever probably quite excited to engage with Puccio before we talk about your second restaurants. You're about to launch. Let's still talk about well. Well the first module has been like how strong of a vision. Did you have in regards to the menu as you mentioned you. Spent your childhood impose import. So did you have very strong. Opinions on wall belongs to the menu. And what doesn't so. We actually run a pop up in Puto for the summer for two months with my head chef at the time and we really use thoughts time to brainstorm ideas to travel around you you know. I'm I grew up in the north of Portugal so I'm very familiar with the northern cuisine. But what's so special about Portugal. I'm what's been so special about. The last three is building Baltar is really engaging and learning about those other regions which also rich in culinary and gastronomy but yeah at the time that would favorites from childhood's that were also dishes that we thought had identity which was very reimposed since a lot of the Times a small plates Portuguese concept. You know that's not really traditional. You have petit scores which are sort of small plates. It's butts traditionally wouldn't eat like that in Portugal. It's more about largest sharing dishes and so so you know I was conscious that I didn't want it to just mimic another Spanish tapas restaurant. I really wanted those decisions. And those menu items to speak the identity of Portugal's Strana me which is very much Atlantic driven and you've done a good job. Let's remember that was just a couple of years ago when we ranked as one of the world's what's best restaurants here US monocle very very generous and wonderful knowledge. You're very welcome now. You're opening your your second restaurant in the city. How much could you tell us about that? How different or how simulates the second body raccoons be compared to the first one so I think at London Bridge we? He was slightly limited in a way. By what we wanted to keep the menu short to the point we rotated every every season. There are some dishes that just don't move because they become so popular. That can actually sometimes be quite limiting when you wanting to show off a another hundred dishes that you've come across crossing excited about. I think that's really what the policier in Hof has been. What's been great about that is that we have just really been exploring? During Portugal's different regions different Tad was different recipes. Different Cultures and I think that our menu in the city just gives us a really great opportunity to scratch a little bit deeper about what Portuguese food is. What are those star dishes? By the way that are very much in demand. People may find from both restaurants. Well I think the Buccleuch Bras is one that has been a bit of a heritage buckle. Er Brash is shoestring potatoes very very thin chips which is gently scrambled with eggs and the so-called which we rehydrate for forty eight hours Solved with some olives lovely dish it should be very creamy and it's it's a real comfort food dish and I hope that that will be something that people enjoy in the city as much as they have done in London Bridge. But we're also taking some really exciting new dishes working on this lovely ill dish from the IRA Rawda which will be Friday deals with a Byron source which is really traditionally used on suckling pig. So it's a a white pepper black pepper golic source but it's great on the Friday deals as well how much you still have to be discovered from Portugal. Something the world hasn't quite goes familiar with yet. Every time I go home I think the world has discovered it even more so than the last time. It's just every time there's more people. It's a great points at the alignment with this buzzer tourism but also the locals really embracing the tourism. I think as more and more people go to Portugal. It also drives the experimentation of the chefs impeachable. So there's a wealth of traditional food as a starting point. You've got this book which is all a Bible. Maria alluded Vest who literally has written down all of Portugal's star dishes but then you've also got this generation of chefs Jeffs that went away from Portugal. Who have started coming back on bringing with them? A huge amounts of technical expertise on the taking these very traditional recipes on expanding Portuguese food is expanding those boundaries and considering how reached the Portuguese culinary culture. Do you think there are many dishes and many ingredients. The world has been discovered yet. Something you struggled to find from outside of Portugal I think Portuguese food is obviously hugely driven by the Atlantic. One thing that is very very hard to compete with even though we're in Ireland is the rich miss of produce on fish that you got on the coast of Portugal. You got wonderful. CARBONARA is down in the all. Gov You get incredible perception. which is a goose? Bonna cool on the north coast particularly something like Incredibly Hard Oughta find elsewhere. Something I'd love to put on our menu but it's just one of these ingredients. That's better left for Portugal and better enjoyed when you go visit. I mean there's a lot of dishes that we thought about putting on which would definitely challenge. I think people's perceptions but I mean you've could be the which is made with chicken's blood and you know and there's a lot of tripe and offal dishes in the north of Portugal which I think maybe will hold off from on the next restaurant where probably gonNA play a little bit more safe than that but maybe As a special once in a while maybe one day as we mentioned already. You're just about to open. Open your sick and restaurants in the city. What about after that? Do you have any longer term plans. Walt may happen after that. Yeah I mean. We now imports about fifty percents of all winus. Direct from Boutique produces in Portugal. One thing I've really liked to develop more of a wine shop Pango and also we bring in a lot of cheeses and shall coutries would love to develop a mercer which is a deadly concept. I mean the sky's the limit. You've got punch bakeries. which would be great to get involved in but Baldur in its core concept I think I think it definitely has potential insult to grow to one team or sites off to this Max Graham Phone Giraffe Bar Douro and the new restaurant in London's broad gate opens later eighty two this month

Portugal London Max Graham London Bridge United States Brayson Max Stockwell Stockwell London Churchill Madari House Studio One Abbey Founder Monaco Doro Soho New Cuisines Puto Pango Buccleuch Bras Walt
"folio" Discussed on The Basement Diaries

The Basement Diaries

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"folio" Discussed on The Basement Diaries

"You. Did you want to grab your soda before we start missing so so every episode I made. This is just literally a recent thing. We've been at the start of that. We've been sipping dipping beer straight into the Mike year I listen to the most recent one on the drive to work too nice. I I bet you. You're limiting playing Khushi over kiss and nine in the morning. Oh God and that was also what I wasn't even expecting to go on. Yeah so it was just like okay. day before all right. Let's do this. And then you move to tabled. Yeah a week in a week. Yeah it's a very Spur of the moment. I don't know whatever whenever that comes up. Like whatever I you have to do a part just like that for some reason. It's easier for me because I don't have to like lament over it. macos kind of so. That play is written in the structure of a comedy. Yes and it's so he's the only character that seems to be in the comedy comedy. I exactly it's it's so weird and it. It does seem like very disjointed and that because all the stuff with like Mercutio Jio and Ben Folio is very light and find and and then it just takes a turn. When once spoiler alert Req- she owed is my favorite things? Have you ever seen a production just called the donkey play. Now I am at its midsummer night's dream Only with the mechanical 's putting on the play. Yeah so it's just about these guys out in the woods and that's they cut everything else out of the play way in these poor saps trying to rehearse a play. Well all this weird shit just keeps coming and going. Oh were you a donkey a minute ago. God that would be it. Sounds like a very surreal experience. I mean if you didn't have the watching an acid trip without getting any of the visuals which would be the worst are right so we've started. Now that's.

Mercutio Jio Ben Folio
"folio" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:38 min | 3 years ago

"folio" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"New so the Virgin folio statement was the dominant method of regulating the motion mechanical clocks for a couple of centuries but then an Italian Smarty pants by the name of Galileo Galilei made an interesting observation he discovered that a pendulum takes the same amount of time to complete one full swing out and back over and over and over again the time for one complete cycle is what we call a period so the period of the swing remains the same even as the pendulum's swing decreases in amplitude so what do I mean by that well if we were working with the pendulum mounted on a master list rod or a line and had a frictionless pivot then the pendulum is always going to return to the same height as its initial release but that's not how the real world works so let's say you tie a rope to the limb of a tree and on the other end of the rope you tie a bowling ball and you get on a stepladder and you're far enough back so that the deadline is taught between the lamb and the bowling ball and your whole standing at a certain level you're holding the bowling ball right up to your chin with the that line there you let go of the bowling ball and by the way I say let go you don't push the bowling ball but you just let go now if you do that is it going to swing back and knock your teeth out now it won't and the reason for that is because elements like friction and drag are sapping some of the energy from the overall system the returning bowling ball doesn't have the same amount of energy that the departing bowling ball had so it doesn't rise up as high as when you dropped it which means you get to keep your choppers congradulations go brush your teeth but even though the bowling ball isn't rising up to the starting the height of its release the journey of its swing it's period will remain the same that Tyne remains the same at least for small amplitudes the story is different if your swing that sucker really hard but for simple pendulums at small amplitudes this is true the ball is in traveling as far and each swing because it's losing that energy to friction and drag but it's also not swinging quite as quickly her swing so it's not going as far but it's also moving a little more slowly and the overall amount of time it takes to complete one period remains constant that means if you make a pendulum over precise length you can create a swing of one second the period of a pendulum swing can be expressed as an equation and the period is equal to two times pi times the square root of the length of the pendulum divided by gravity's acceleration now ignoring for a moment the gravity's acceleration is not uniform everywhere on earth due to several factors that really are too complicated for us to get into here we can simplify this to say that a pendulum of nine hundred ninety millimeters or about thirty nine inches is the right length to have a swing period of a second I Galileo recognize the potential for pendulums untying keeping but he never built a clock using one that honor goes to a Dutch scientist named Christian Huygens who in the mid seventeenth century figured it out he used the oscillation of a pendulum to regulate the motions of clockwork in many ways it was similar to the virgin folio design except instead of relying upon a weighted lever and inertia Huygens design relied on the natural oscillation of a pendulum of an appropriate length so how does a pendulum escapement work this game and still engages the gear preventing it from rotating freely and as the pendulum swings it rocks the escapement so that it disengages with the gear and the gear begins to rotate at the end of the pendulum's period when it returns to its starting point the escapement is locked back into position and the whole process starts again I'm sure you're all wondering how the pendulum keeps moving I mean if it's losing energy with each swing how does it continue more for more than just a few seconds without adding more energy to the pendulum is conventionally just going to slow down and stop swinging completely I mean I talked about this with friction and drag will Huygens got around this by designing a gear that would give the pendulum a little nudge each time the escapement disengaged so it provides just enough force to counteract dragon fiction friction so it worked hi gives initial design was accurate enough to keep time within about a minute per day meeting it only lose sixty seconds during a day long operation of one of his clocks which was incredible for the time and he improved upon his design within his own lifetime he cut it down to losing only ten seconds per day which is not bad for an entirely new method of regulating gear rotation pendulums do come with a couple of complications however so it doesn't matter what the mass of the pendulum is by the way you don't whatever the Bob is at the end of your pendulum that mass can be anything it's that that's in material is the length of the pendulum that's my that's important not the Bob the mass of the Bob except that you don't want something so massive that's going to cause damage to the clock itself but that pendulums length is incredibly important and this is where we get into some trouble because of temperatures most pendulums are made of metal and metal has a tendency to expand in the presence of heat or contract when it gets colder and since the pendulum's period is dependent in part upon its length this poses a problem a precisely design pendulum might swing at exactly one second per period but or have a period of one second is more appropriate way of saying that but if the length of that pendulum were to change it would no longer be true the period would be slightly off from a second and that would be enough to cause errors in time keeping clock makers recognize that issue and they try to fix it in different ways the most common way what do you use alloys of metals for pendulum so an alloy is a combination of two or more metals and one of the interesting features of alloys is that you can mix together metals that have different coefficients of expansion so if you do this carefully enough you can cancel out the effects of temperature to a a great deal so for example you can use zinc and iron or brass and steel and pair them together in this way and that ends up reducing that affects so that the clock can be more accurate no matter what the temperature happens to be for visual clock to be really accurate you have to reduce the impact the impulse of the impulse of the turning crown wheel of the crown wheel is the element that the statement locks into so you have to reduce the impact of its mo ocean on the pendulum itself it needs to give us the right impulse to keep the pendulum from swinging and no more or less than that ideally it would be uniform every single time meaning you did a very precise distances between pegs on the ground so that its impact on the escapement would remain quick consistent no matter where it is in the crown wheels rotation there was a guy named Edward Beckett who later on would be lower did and would be known as lord Grimthorpe which is possibly the coolest title I've ever seen he invented what was called the double three legged gravity escapement which honestly sounds like a routine you'd see at cirque de soleil but in fact it was a particular arrangement that allowed for extremely consistent operation he used it to build an enormous clock over at Westminster but the clock is world famous and actually people generally call it by the name of the huge bell that is also in that clock tower and people just call the whole thing by the bells name that bells name by the way is Big Ben I would describe to you how his escapement works but I'm pretty sure my brain would melt as I tried to do this without the use of visual aids fortunately there are videos about the double three leg and gravity escapement on you too that show exactly how this works and it is fascinating I I I it really drives home the fact the engineers are remarkable people were wasted martyr than I am and I highly recommend you go and check these videos out to get an appreciation for the actual clockwork that makes the regulation possible and that pretty much wraps up this episode of tax stuff but there's a lot more to talk about with watches and clocks I'm sure in a future episode I'll tackle things like quartz watches which rely upon the peculiar peas electric qualities of chords and I'll talk about other types of time keeping things like atomic clocks in hell those work but for now I'm going to say it's time to conclude this episode and remind you the next time you look at the clock think about all the amazing work it took to make it all work out properly from physics to mathematics to engineering the craftsmanship o'clock represents lifetimes of genius so take some time to appreciate it if you guys have suggestions for something I should cover in a future episode of tax stuff or maybe there's a guest you would like me to try and book on the show for an interview or a guest host to talk about a specific topic let me know send me a message the email for the show is tax stuff at howstuffworks dot com or you can always drop me a line on Twitter or Facebook the handle for both of those is text of H. as W. remember we've got an Instagram account you can see all sorts of cool and interesting tech related images that crystal has been posting to that so check that out and of course I record this show on Wednesdays and Fridays and typically I live stream it if I am doing it on my own it's it to to be live streamed and if you want to watch me while I record a show warts and all you can tune in to twitch dot TV slash tax stuff there's a chat room in there you can participate in that and whatever I take a break I'm happy to chat with all of my fans in there and and answer any questions sometimes you guys point out things that I need to address I gave an explanation that was a little too vague and I should go back and and suss it out a bit more and I really appreciate it because it means that the podcast everyone gets ends up being better as a result so you guys can help me out.

one second thirty nine inches sixty seconds ten seconds
"folio" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"folio" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"On evil facebook Bateaux Dot I._N.. Ford slash mastermind were on twitter at bad crypto were on instagram at bed CRYPTO podcast telegram bad go dot I._N.. Ford slash telegram and also in this two years before we close out and then it's important note that we have launched our own cryptocurrency ruin that is it's actually a thing it's now it's on blocked folio in fact if you haven't followed that coin on blocked folio yet even if you don't have any go and follow because we're on signals now in that means them when there's a bad coin announcement. That's probably the first place or maybe second place that will announce it so when you at your block folio you'll see there's an update from bad coin that is true that is so awesome that were on were on <hes> block folio like you said we're also coined GECKO GEICO and so you can actually see how much the coin is worth in real time as it fluctuates kinda funny you know and you think about it. <hes> you know Bitcoin came out October two thousand eight and then all the way into July two thousand ten you know I it doubt it then it reached twenty thousand minors. We've had as many as five hundred minors doing it concurrently at one time which has been pretty cool so right now as of <hes> this recording <hes> one one bad is point zero zero zero zero to three seven nine cents Nice so a lot about one four hundred of a penny yeah I mean it's it's it's as worthless solicit the day we conceived it but it's up to you guys in the community to use it. We think that there's a team putting together a foundation for if that comes to pass then we're GONNA make donations from our supply. I have bad so that the foundation can conduct activity around bad coin but until then <hes> we depend upon the community to use it and create what they want and so far we've had a bad tip pot created for telegram. We've had had a bad faucet created by user and there's a lot of bad things that are coming up like well out of bad things. We got bad visors. We got bad acid irs <hes> people out there sharing the the words of the badness <hes> in honor your sure you've worn in seventh for seven days Joe Com that reminds me of Mitch Hedberg Joke You know Mitch Hedberg I do but I never said I haven't changed my shirt and seven I don't know I said that we just haven't worn the one that's in hanging. It doesn't mean I only want other sturt. Yeah yes okay. We crossed you right now. As I reminds me of the of the Hedberg Joe he goes you know you ought to club. This got lots of black lights and everybody looks cool except me because I was under the impression. The mustard state was removed antastic or a temper listen. It's an all my God. He has my favorite comedian. Thanks for humoring US for hope humoring Mr Travis Right by listening to Mitch Hedberg and <hes> we'll catch guys on the next regular episode please do rate reviews subscribe evangelize. July's be a bad ambassador and tell somebody who needs to know about the good news of Bitcoin cryptocurrency about this show and thanks for celebrated with us. Yes thanks so much and as always the bad crypto podcast is a production of bad crypto l._l._C. The content of the show the videos and the website is provided for educational informational entertainment entertainment purposes. Only it's.

Mitch Hedberg Ford US slash facebook GECKO GEICO Joe Com Bitcoin Mr Travis seven days two years
"folio" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"folio" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"And welcome back here to the final segment of the best stocks now radio hour and it looks like we're going to finish the show about where we opened the show with the market so pretty strong start to a new week here. We're kind of are in the summer, doldrums, a little bit were in between earning season, lot of big money managers on vacation. But look, the institutions, they're active in the market, and they're about eighty percent of the daily volume that we see in the market, the five -delity the Schwab's, the T Rowe Price's of the world. They can really really really move markets around and muscle different stocks around. Well, I'm gonna pull on from our emerging growth or folio in baseball vernacular. I've used this analogy before our premier roadwork Foley is the major leagues. In fact, it's the. All all right. The ultra growth is down a notch. Aaa hoping to make it to the majors someday and then below that AA, which is the emerging growth portfolio currently owns about twenty two twenty three stocks in there. And these are young stocks and hope to get pulled up AAA someday and maybe some day be a major leaguer. I remember when some of these major leaguers were small much smaller companies. At one time you take an Ulta beauty or a Lulu, lemon, which are now large cap companies. At one time, they were very small companies like app folio on ever heard of that one. Well, I found it using my app app. Folio was in my app, and I added a few years ago and started rising in the ranks. And I've been watching it, and now I own it in my emerging growth board votes is aggressive as it gets here. Gunnarsson capital management. Apfel oleo is a three point five billion dollar market cap company, which. Puts it solidly in the small cap arena, the symbol as AP P F, it's not a recommendation. It's an example of a stock that meets my criteria and might two criteria are valuation momentum and I like to see a good healthy. Stock chart at folio develops cloud based software, Josh, you know, all about cloud based software. His father is a cloud base off wear guy. And the cloud is growing very, very rapidly in it's one of the hottest areas in the market. At folio designed software for small and medium sized businesses in property management and the legal industries..

Folio Aaa T Rowe Price Schwab Josh five billion dollar eighty percent
"folio" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:33 min | 3 years ago

"folio" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Folio and how that really and damage potential return because you make stupid moves, especially if you're looking at it too frequently when we're talking before the break about how this doesn't just affect normal people like Johnny boy here. This affects re-live money managers, your financial planner your money manager, I would be very, very cautious if someone said, you know, what I've been looking at the performance of X Y Z fund, and I've got this other fun here. That's really well, look at the track record or the last one three five years, and you make that switch this, Johnny. When I was in the brokerage business, here's a young man. That young but in the mid nineteen eighties area. I will never ever forget that. I did that mistakenly. So with a doctor. Client. And I lost this die as a client because I went in he had XYZ option income fund or something like that. And I looked at the performance and I said, you know that option income fund, not looking so good. Why don't we switch it to ABC fund after it had already performed? And of course, he said, sure, whatever you say, and over the next couple of years the new fund underperform the old fund, and he was a pretty smart guy. And he said, well, how did you know? And I said, I didn't. And he said, you're fired probably perfectly. So yeah, yeah. And that's when I started really doing my own research and homework, rather than relying on mutual fund wholesalers guys come in. They bring you launch, and then they take out they wine and dine ya golf games and all that stuff. And whether you want to admit it or not you start to tend to like to want to do business with those jar. They're buddies with you now right? Business with us. It's like it's a lot like having a plant, and pulling it up every day to see the roots are doing, and then you say, well, it rained more across town. I'm gonna go take this across town. There. And then all of a sudden, does it rained up in the next county. I mean, this is this is chasing yield so, so money managers do this your financial adviser, probably not the good ones. Not the best practices ones. But many do this mine mutual fund is better than your mutual surprised at that. I'm surprised it John, it's of course, it's not with mutual funds as much anymore with money managers. That's what is their investment platforms. And now with all the software, you can screen funds in ten seconds. I understand. Maybe you put the window dressing at the end of the quarter you've, you know, you take the best performers you stick them in there. So that when the report comes out, it looks like you had, it the whole time I get it, I suppose, but even that I've just not convinced it's the right thing. So I was starting with the two twenty nineteen studied by MorningStar. So this is just fresh off the press. Right. The print. Showed the same behavior including moving into previous outperformers away from premium previous underperformers, once again, the funds that perform on the past did not go on to perform, and I was thinking about you. When I first met, you know, you're a very young man, that, well, twenty four or something a little bit of money. And you, you were glued to the what the oak funds or something like that. I'm trying to remember it. Zillow green. Oh, yeah. We don't even. They were technology finds that I was talked into buying by the morning show guy who fancied himself armchair strategist, and I bought them and the next day after I bought these NASDAQ funds. This is again in the nineties. I'm looking at the TV for an hour hour and a half the next day and just thinking. Oh man. I hope it goes up. Oh, no. Look at it, it's going down. It created a lot of stress on my part, which brings me to the financial pornography. I don't have time to really get into this, but Nick Magli early wrote about this, and it's really brilliant stuff. I it's a term that I used to use twenty years ago, it was made famous by somebody that was I, I didn't coin it, but here's what he had to say. Financial pornography is the normalization of exceptional financial circumstances in order to gain attention. He's talking about the financial press. And how they utilize headlines, essentially to try to get clicks through and to convince you that you're an idiot, basically unless you did what I told you to do or what you could've done. Maybe they didn't. Tell me do it at all. But you could have done this. He says this considered article, I read recently about a young woman living in Manhattan, while making only twenty five bucks an hour. Of course you can't live in Manhattan on twenty five bucks an hour. But she, you know, became wealthier whatever, but what she didn't do is tell them that her parents paid her rent, you know, they gave her a credit card and so forth. Oh, so that will how I how I lived in Manhattan, well, twenty five bucks. An hour is pretty good. Not for Manhattan, not from an Hatton. Yeah. Then he goes on other headline investor became a millionaire twenty six to make a lot of money master these ten rule. Oh, those are. Yeah. Okay, if you're clicking on that forget it. He goes. Onto say, how did the guy make the million bucks? He did became a millionaire at twenty six all when real estate one hundred percent financed, totally leveraged real estate. He became a millionaire, and none of that leverage stuff was in his top ten rules, wasn't really had nothing to do with real estate nothing to do with leverage. I could take, you know, borrow twenty thousand dollars go to Las Vegas. And if I'm lucky bet my way, up to a million bucks, next one was on this day, nineteen Ninety-seven Amazon goes public, if you invested one thousand dollars in that particular IPO, it would be worth one point two million dollars today that was a tweet. Yeah. One of these financial wizards. Yeah. What it failed to mention is in order to have turned that thousand bucks into one point two million. You got to go back and think about what happened to Amazon..

Manhattan Johnny boy Amazon Zillow ABC MorningStar Las Vegas Nick Magli John twenty thousand dollars one thousand dollars one three five years one hundred percent two million dollars twenty years ten seconds
"folio" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:44 min | 3 years ago

"folio" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Dragging, my part folio down. Okay. This is where number two really hits home with me. I think it's a false thought to think that bonds are a safe investment at all times because they could put a drag on your part folio as it is for me. And I ain't happy right? You know, it's teeter totter know. You know, you don't want. You don't want to be the little kid on the playground with the big kid on the other end as interest rates rise. The I mean the bond value goes down it's their proportional. So when you think about that Terrell, I mean, I know that you in your portfolio yourself. I mean, you got to think a little bit more aggressively. But I guess that's a function to where you are in your retirement right now, what age you are in what planning when you're looking at income planning retirement planning, if you're plenty five versus fifty. When I was there. Yeah. You know, I got into the National Football League as a young player could take more risk because I had some time wasn't near my retirement age. So all right. Let me just be a little bit more aggressive in my investments. And as I've gotten older, I'm forty five years old now, I don't think that way anymore. I just it's a different time. So I'm a little bit more. I guess yeah. I'm a little bit more careful can't afford to have any major losses now. So I have to be a a little bit more. You know, this less aggressive in little bit more conservative in how I think. But also, you definitely want to give some gains in there. But you don't want to. I know I'm not a position right now to do anything for like if I have a major loss right now that I don't know if I can recover because I'm I'm entering retirement age time is always running. It's like a football game. And we've made that analogy last week where you talk about are you in the fourth quarter right now. With your retirement are you in your mid to late fifties? Seeing the you know, the the last half the fourth quarter, or are you in the first half of that that makes a big difference? Another thing too. Isn't it that you can assume that some financial tools are always good summer always bad, but that's not necessarily true either. Because you can't be prejudiced about one investment or of another keep your eyes open, right -solutely. And again, you know, just thinking I mean, it's like we were just talking about bombs. They at one time they were they were quite a quite something. And now not as much and again, the same thing with the newest folks. I mean, they went through a whole, you know, evolution with annuities from always being bad to now. Guess what? There's some good ones out there. There's always hibernates to Terrell that people can take advantage of to retirement. Absolutely. When you look at stuff, it'd be nice if it was all black and white right in terms of. Okay. This is always that is always that's the same thing with the you know, when you're playing football to it's there are no absolute, no absolutes. No. But there's there's definitely different kinds of. You know offenses and you see today and how some teams going back to our more traditional office. But then you have some guys doing a little bit of a hybrid between this new sort of read option offense. And and what they've done in the past. And and it really just it's about what fits the, you know, the players the coaches, and that's system and try to figure out what's the best fit for them. And once you figure that out then what you stick with it. Here's something that should be near dirtier heart as an athlete Terrell that is some people in retirement one of the big mistakes, they make is not planning for long term health care on. I know there's varying opinions on this and the cost thereof as a good investment. Isn't it not a good investment? But when you stop and think about it, you have to look at it in a lot of different ways. Because sometimes people underestimate the need for it because they're feeling healthy right now. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, something with me as coming out. You know, basically retiring from football the age of twenty eight years old. That I thought about healthcare at that point. So why would I think about that? But yeah. Years later right now, forty five, and that's that's really kind of forefront of my thought processes to make sure that you know, that I'm taking care of and from that standpoint, it's and it's really again is is kind of we talk about the different stages of a game. I'm like in a third quarter here, and I need to make sure that that's in plan are in place for when I needed because it seemed like it's going to be more sooner than later. And so you got to make that investments at that long term healthcare. Well, that's true. Because a lot of new shares a lot of financial planners. In fact, I would just did a program this morning where the statistic was that one out of three people will need some sort of long-term healthcare steam, that's amazing. And again, you have to plan for it as difficult as that is and and like Terrell just said he's in the third quarter. And you don't have very much time for a Justin anymore, and you need an income plan to I know coach P talks about this. He's out on a Simon right now. But he always talks about an income plan, not just a retirement plan. But some kind of a plan that will afford you Terrell lasting income when you are ready to retire that have that extra income you need for some of your wants and needs. But mostly your wants when you retire. Yeah. Yeah. You know, it's it's really been kind of opening this sort of shift in mentality of just getting income versus some passive income. You know, income you can go out there and get that for me. I do a lot of speaking engagements and a lot of appearances. But when I look back at him like, wow. This this only works if I'm doing if I'm working. So now, we allocate something that's more passive that. You know, if I'm at home if I can't travel income coming from. And so there's been a mental ship and trying to shift. Focus and energy into more income producing endeavors, whether it's income properties. Whether it's a some type of bonds that are, you know, whatever it is or some something this this push off some sort of passive income. And that's really what I've been focused on the last couple of years versus when I first started. It was all about hey, I just want the income now. So I can I was young about energy can go out there and and travel the world, and I can spend five or six days a week on the road. And it was working as I'm getting older. So I need a little bit more, passive income -solutely. And and again, that's kind of what planning for retirement is is to plan for that. And to make sure you're there and just to make sure you're going to reach your retirement goals in time. So here's here's the thing. If you're one of the next ten callers, we're going to give you some clarity. If you will on some of the most vital issues of your financial life. Here's what we're going to do for you an analysis of your current investments with the financial advisor coach Peyton at team Tyrrell as got folks behind him as well. So to find out where you currently are compared to where you believe you are. And this includes that.

Terrell football National Football League advisor Justin Simon Peyton Tyrrell twenty eight years forty five years six days
"folio" Discussed on Sports Gambling Podcast

Sports Gambling Podcast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"folio" Discussed on Sports Gambling Podcast

"Best port folio gets you five thousand dollars and Ryan yes, my debut. I finally wrote about it finally wrote a blog about winning two hundred thousand dollars on draftking whether this happen just just last night when you went all that money anywhere. I don't normally bring it up. It is funny because now that it's in blog form and on my purse. Feed people are who didn't listen to the podcast, and maybe I worn at my wedding where I mentioned it. Maybe they didn't know maybe because you don't know when to drop that in like, hey, I just want to hundred K. Yeah. It's it's a we you don't wanna bring it up in conversation. Don't bring it up. It's a good problem to have. But now that a draft kings is on board promo code S GP, I figured, hey, it's time to write about it. So check that out on the on the website as well. The Ryan this is a bonus podcasts. And what better bonus than a interview with the great Bill Burr joining us on? They my bookie dot AG hotline, the one the only Bill Burr Bill, it's March madness, are you are you one of those guys who fills out a bunch of brackets or you're gonna fill out a bracket. I used to be that guy. I got a kid now. So I watch the games between watch like the Mickey Mouse club in puppy dog. Pows feel your pain there? I feel your pain. The kids have been out of town for for like four days. I've just immersed myself in college basketball. It's awesome. I gotta say watch hockey team watch basketball. He knows what it is. But then three minutes inch just like watch dogs. Purpose passed. So I sent surely only once was highlight value or co career him blowing out the speaker of that L, you know..

Bill Burr Ryan basketball dot AG hockey two hundred thousand dollars five thousand dollars three minutes four days hundred K
"folio" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

Accidental Tech Podcast

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"folio" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

"And then within like, thirty seconds. I realized he has taken the taken the case the folio whatever stupid word apple uses Ford takes the folio off smart. Keyboard full you. Yeah. Yeah. So he takes a smart keyboard folio, he takes the folio off. And I see him doing the ridiculous look that he made Marco an idea, which I hope you saw on the show art listeners from the last episode in looking peering down every every side of my ipad. And oh, boy did I feel vindicated when he confirmed my assessments that it was not at all bent. And then I did the other also tried to pick it up one hand, which is very difficult. But I was able to do it eventually. And then I did the other test which I was very interested to try checking whether it rocks when you put no case on it. And you put it down on a presumably table with the camera down. And everyone was saying oh, the camera down. I thought it would be rocking. But I was drawing on it with. With the pencil, and it wasn't it didn't rock and even less episode. Marco was speculating, maybe they intentionally bend slightly so doesn't rock, and maybe that's why has been or whatever. I mean. Maybe that's what they're going for. But I can tell you Casey's which does not have a bend that I could perceive. If you put it down with the camera bumped down on a flat hard able it rocks. Of course, it does. How could it not? There's a camera poking at ones that does it rock allot. No. But you can both see it and feel it if you press down on one corner of this four-corner thing Iraq's a little bit. So I I feel like that is a. I feel refreshed knowing that there's not some magic going on somewhere. Because everyone was saying that this thing this four hundred thing that has won a bulge in one corner. Only doesn't rocket totally does it's not. It's the reason people I think thought that it didn't rock is because the bulge for the camera. As compared to the length of the entire I pet, especially the really big ipad. But even the eleven inch is so small, right. So you it the rocking is barely perceptible. But it is perceptible like it doesn't knock or bang or whatever put it move slightly. And I think it's fine as we'll get to a moment. Casey now has a pencil. It's got his name on it. So in case, he forgets. We is he looking Pence on it says Casey, apple pencil. Applicants was just the prog name. That's not part of your name case. You don't get confused. Oh, good. Good. Good. I've got very confused. Thanks for the thanks for the clarification Casey apple pencil and seeing the inscription and apple pencil makes me think I don't really want. The apple. Part that I'd rather just say Casey because now it says Casey apple pencil, and you can't just read Casey you have to re Casey apple pencil, and I don't like reading Casey apple Pennzoil anyway. The pencil is really nice. Whatever says about it is true. The Matt finish finishes really nice. As compared to the glossy one. The weight felt good. The flat side was fine. The clipping on the magma things really cool. Far as I could tell at work like the other one, the devil tapping business can take it or leave it. What else to say about the ipad? That's about it. I didn't. I didn't use it very long. I did use the keyboard a little bit. I don't like boards on my ipad. But it felt okay. He missing out. Yeah. I'm with Marco, you're missing out really doesn't like the keyboard on the back of the thing like where you can feel the keys in the back. I don't mind it that much. But again, I would I don't think I would get this with a keyboard. So yeah, that's that's my one month late brief review of the new pet seems pretty good. It rocks raves. John's archaism. Yeah. I mean, I will say like, I really really think like after whatever it's been, you know, two months three months of using this thing the only complaint, I really have about it are that I do keep covering up the face. I d camera and that the new design of the folios where it covers the back and attacks by the back does make it a way bulkier, both the keyboard and the non keyboard cover..

Casey apple Casey apple Pennzoil Marco Iraq Ford John Pence thirty seconds three months eleven inch two months one month one hand