19 Burst results for "Flying Magazine"

"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

Aviation News Talk podcast

04:08 min | 2 weeks ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

"Today of course. We're going to talk about that via far into imc <hes>. It's it's not a new <hes>. Reason at all that people are hurting themselves in airplanes <hes>. In fact it's been around for quite a long time. I just finished in fact writing a story for flying magazine. That'll be out. I believe next issue <hes>. About via far. And i m seeing and of course we all know what happens. People fly into whether that they have no business. Being in but big question is why so. Maybe that's some of what we're going to talk about today while everything we're talking about today is certainly weather related. And the unfortunate thing about via far into imc accidents is that ninety percent of them. Fatal which makes them the most lethal of any kind of an accident. So if you're gonna have an accident don't have a fear foreign to die. mc accident. I did a study years ago where i looked at via foreign. Imc accidents over a ten year period. And i was wondering do instrument pilots also have them. The answer was yes so they have them at a somewhat lower rate and i think <hes>. There were certainly times. When i was not current as an instrument pilot and so i would fly via far and you've just got to maintain those normal via far visibility cloud clearance minimums otherwise even if our pilots could find themselves <hes>. Going into imc and having an accident. Well i think that when we we are training pilots <hes>. Will often ask them. Okay give me. The cloud clearances for <hes>. For via far won't see five hundred of below a thousand above two thousand horizontally from you got it baby but the question is does a pilot really understand what that looks like. When they're flying via far how do they. How do they tell. When they're five hundred feet below or a thousand above or two thousand feet horizontally from because most of us never really get up there in those kinds of conditions to say okay. Here's what those minimums look like. And unfortunately i think that <hes>. People fly into whether and then they say oh my gosh in the first thing they do is always look down and looking down does nothing more then make the situation worse because you're in the clouds there is no down there is no up. There's no left and right <hes>. An unless you're really current on instruments up you're gonna lose control of the airplane so the key is is some good risk management to make sure that you don't fly when those conditions are possible or that you give them a very very wide birth which of course we're gonna find in this accident <hes>. Today this pilot did not give the weather at all yeah. I've had at least two times. That i can remember in my forty years of flying where i went to from via far into. Imc one case was at night. And boy. I was working absolutely as hard as i could to avoid. The clouds were in a metro area. Things were reasonably well lit with the surface lighting and yet we still found ourselves in a cloud. There are times when it's just virtually impossible to see the cloud no matter what you do now. A particular case. We were very close to francisco bay. So i knew that a slight turn to the right. Put me over the water. Push for a little bit pop back out of the cloud but yeah pilots set and really need to kind of anticipate win. This might happen and have a good strategy for how to avoid it now. A great strategy. Especially for people with an autopilot. Snap the autopilot on and then do a one eighty. That's true and and of course. I don't think we're going to know in this particular accident yet whether the pilot used the autopilot or not <hes>. He certainly never used the the shoot in the sarah's <hes>. so again we know where this was going. And i think that sometimes when we train students as well that we're not clear with them about the fact that if you do this you will not only hurt yourself. You can possibly kill yourself in anybody in the airplane along with you. I

Imc corporate pilot Max flying magazine koby bryant california Ron francisco bay
How to Avoid Deadly Weather-Related Accidents with Rob Mark

Aviation News Talk podcast

04:08 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Avoid Deadly Weather-Related Accidents with Rob Mark

"Today of course. We're going to talk about that via far into imc It's it's not a new Reason at all that people are hurting themselves in airplanes In fact it's been around for quite a long time. I just finished in fact writing a story for flying magazine. That'll be out. I believe next issue About via far. And i m seeing and of course we all know what happens. People fly into whether that they have no business. Being in but big question is why so. Maybe that's some of what we're going to talk about today while everything we're talking about today is certainly weather related. And the unfortunate thing about via far into imc accidents is that ninety percent of them. Fatal which makes them the most lethal of any kind of an accident. So if you're gonna have an accident don't have a fear foreign to die. mc accident. I did a study years ago where i looked at via foreign. Imc accidents over a ten year period. And i was wondering do instrument pilots also have them. The answer was yes so they have them at a somewhat lower rate and i think There were certainly times. When i was not current as an instrument pilot and so i would fly via far and you've just got to maintain those normal via far visibility cloud clearance minimums otherwise even if our pilots could find themselves Going into imc and having an accident. Well i think that when we we are training pilots Will often ask them. Okay give me. The cloud clearances for For via far won't see five hundred of below a thousand above two thousand horizontally from you got it baby but the question is does a pilot really understand what that looks like. When they're flying via far how do they. How do they tell. When they're five hundred feet below or a thousand above or two thousand feet horizontally from because most of us never really get up there in those kinds of conditions to say okay. Here's what those minimums look like. And unfortunately i think that People fly into whether and then they say oh my gosh in the first thing they do is always look down and looking down does nothing more then make the situation worse because you're in the clouds there is no down there is no up. There's no left and right An unless you're really current on instruments up you're gonna lose control of the airplane so the key is is some good risk management to make sure that you don't fly when those conditions are possible or that you give them a very very wide birth which of course we're gonna find in this accident Today this pilot did not give the weather at all yeah. I've had at least two times. That i can remember in my forty years of flying where i went to from via far into. Imc one case was at night. And boy. I was working absolutely as hard as i could to avoid. The clouds were in a metro area. Things were reasonably well lit with the surface lighting and yet we still found ourselves in a cloud. There are times when it's just virtually impossible to see the cloud no matter what you do now. A particular case. We were very close to francisco bay. So i knew that a slight turn to the right. Put me over the water. Push for a little bit pop back out of the cloud but yeah pilots set and really need to kind of anticipate win. This might happen and have a good strategy for how to avoid it now. A great strategy. Especially for people with an autopilot. Snap the autopilot on and then do a one eighty. That's true and and of course. I don't think we're going to know in this particular accident yet whether the pilot used the autopilot or not He certainly never used the the shoot in the sarah's so again we know where this was going. And i think that sometimes when we train students as well that we're not clear with them about the fact that if you do this you will not only hurt yourself. You can possibly kill yourself in anybody in the airplane along with you. I

IMC Francisco Bay Sarah
"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

09:45 min | Last month

"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"You know every which way up and down in and out. Dough, look at me I wanna fly I want I want to be one of the first people in a in a drone to fly by you know as a passenger so I'm the wrong person you. Say that. I'm risk-averse about flying a seven, thirty, seven Max, you'll be the first to fly in anything it seems but. Yeah except maybe out a window. Yeah. Yeah. It's terrible. A so Does. Want one more thing added, and that's a synthetic sensor that would be redundant with the to mechanical sensors. Now, Boeing says that adding a synthetic sensor will take twenty to twenty four months but Yassa, I guess is comfortable with. A delay in, we'll take an Iou they'll take an IOU. Yeah. So but but he also says our analysis is showing that this is safe in the level of safety reaches high enough for us. What we discussed with Boeing is that is the fact that with a third sensor, we could reach even higher safety levels and I believe they're talking about an angle of attack indicator. So. Our sensor. I mean. So we'll. We'll see because. I mean when that accident first one happened back in twenty perfect. Almost two years ago I don't think anybody flew turban airplanes could could believe there was only one angle of attack indicator on versions of that airplane Get do that at big airplanes? This is a new turban you know but one sensor in there and then have the airplane go wacky if something happens to that but. That's kind of what happened. So but we'll see we'll see. All right. Next item comes Well, it's from Flying Magazine Rob Pen this in TSB points to alcohol impaired pilot is the cause of Alaska accident. In, rob this was from one, thousand, nine, hundred, nineteen, the accident in Alaska Piper aircraft. A Piper I believe it was tried tracer that in this when I saw this I was. I was in shock because I I didn't read that right I. Mean This guy didn't actually take other people in a Tri Pacer out of. A little town in Alaska for an aerial tour after he'd been shrinking. At the I can't read that right but he had in fact the the toxicology report showed after because unfortunately airplane crashed. and killed everybody on board. It's showed that he was five I think five and a half times above the legal limit. For alcohol in your system to to be legal to fly an airplane. which you don't get much I don't know the exact amount, but it's it's not much. But to believe that somebody would do that. And he had a student pilot with him I, I'm assuming probably in the right seat or something who had also been drinking and everybody knew that these people had been drinking before they ever took off and it was just the most amazing. Story. Because what you're left with is okay. Yeah, they did it. But why would they do that and we found that through the NTSB report that the pilot had a history of Didn't say alcohol abuse, but it just said he liked to drink. But. Again, I, I cannot imagine that happening I mean in all the years I've been flying it never. It never occurred to me that Oh, I've had a couple of beers I know what I'm GonNa do on their run across the street and grab the airplane I. Mean I just that so alien to me to even imagine how this person apparently. Seemed to say, it's no big deal. I can handle this and it costs four people that lives. Well, the NTSB report talked about different levels of alcohol in the blood and it noting that different people are affected differently. By alcohol and pens on. Body mass and things like that. But. Says, it and they prefer to alcohols ethanol. Concentrations as low zero point zero, two grams per deciliter. Some some relaxation, some loss of judgment at zero, point, zero five grams. Per deciliter, there's further degradation of judgment psycho motor functioning, and alertness. And at concentrations above point one there's prolonged reaction time altered perception of the environment lack of coordination. mood and behavioral changes essentially the twilight zone. Yeah. But it keeps going it keeps going it. Point fifteen individuals may have a significant loss of muscle control major loss of balance concentrations above point to. Individuals may experience Amnesia or blackouts and double vision. So the toxicology tests performed by the FAA forensic. Sciences. Laboratory. Detected ethanol in the pilot's blood at point two, five two and what makes matters worse was this was High Alaska. So add to the factor that they're at altitude. I mean just to to make this even worse. Am kind of with rob I. This is just one of those. stunners you just sort of go. Okay. You know. I never park. You're playing across the street from the bar I mean, let's start there and for more importantly when in doubt don't fly pilots are usually so good at regulating their their alcohol intake. They don't WanNa lose their license anymore than anybody wants to lose their driver's license. And everybody should take a lesson from it. So Alvin in the astronaut program were there specific prohibitions about drinking prior to launching into space shuttle? They were the same ones actually flying t thirty eight. What were you restricted to I mean that if you were gonNA fly the t thirty eight tomorrow morning, I mean what does the? Backup. Time that you can't have anything alcoholic a role was ten hours pod with wildland no residual effects. So you can't just really pound one on and show up hung over saying I've got my ten hours in. Now you WANNA be precious ever and nobody replay shows. Yeah I I can't imagine. I mean, it was bad enough with this situation here with us this pilot in Alaska. But if you're launching into space I, think that you'd want to be a empty stomach at least my life. I we see in defense news army to conduct thorough review of Aviation Fleet in fiscal year twenty three. So I mean as you would hope, the military is constantly looking ahead to the needs of the future. as far as the US army's concerned, they're they're kind of balancing funding for the current fleet versus investments in future technology. In that future technology David includes things like the future armed reconnaissance aircraft and the future long range assault aircraft. Welcome to the army version of the ten. And believe it or not. This has a direct effect on me considering where I live outside of Philadelphia and it directly affects Boeing and the NCAA CH forty, seven F blocked twos. D-. To move ahead and move beyond the current technology and make the defiant, the Sikorsky Boeing defiant and the. Bell Valor the Beltway Valor as their future purchases. and. They want to save money they want and they want to. Like, any good company would they want to? Look at the future and put the investments there. However, most major companies don't have this thing called Congress. Congress. Looks at things like C. H., Forty Sevens and goes that's going to affect my district and therefore. They're getting involved. So the army is in fiscal year twenty was going to start eliminating things and we and they've done this once already when they eliminated oh fifty eight. And went to the age sixty, four es. There was a lot of controversy over that but the army was trying to stay fluid and stay flexible. and. Have money to purchase more modern technology. You know we're suppose you're never supposed to be fighting the last where you're supposed to be fighting the next war. and. The siege forty-seven F is a very capable helicopter but. I don't think we want to be flying C., H. forty-seven fs like we do B fifty, two's at the end of the twenty first century. So what it boils down to is the army is trying to find.

Alaska Boeing army NTSB Rob Pen Congress Flying Magazine Iou US army High Alaska Sikorsky Boeing Yassa FAA C. H. loss of muscle control Amnesia F Alvin Aviation Fleet
"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

08:04 min | Last month

"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"To protect twenty, eight, hundred pilots against furloughs this year and another thousand furloughs in next year. So I think it's really great that management and the unions have been working together and I've actually read stories of of in one case, a husband wife who took early retirement because their kids were working for the same airline they wanted to. Make Room for them to to have a job. So it's really kind of Nice to see how everybody's been pulling together to try and make this work. Yeah, and I think it's a good idea that the program the cares program is not just a total free lunch so that the airlines can just take free money and you know that's great. That's the end of it. There are strings attached. There are some considerations so that they're motivated. They being the airlines are motivated to try to you know work out things on their own. So they're not beholden to the government in some ways and I think that was one of the issues that that people were concerned about when they started talking about a second relief bill that. Okay. So you give them more money and they put off the furloughs for three or four more ones. Well, what's going to change whereas the motivation to to try to to to conduct business differently that might help. Reduce the amount of money that the government needs to give them. But of course, the other thing we have to be aware of worldly talking about the airline industry and the nation industry I mean there are a whole lot of industries look at the restaurant industry and. The country, I mean You know the people in Florida are thinking. Well, you know we're eating outside. Uh, it's. It's not awful. But for those of US north of the Mason Dixon. Line we already know it's been getting. It's been getting cold. So then go to work much longer and what happens to them. God. Only knows. On that note I saw the Delta CEO on CNN. Don't take this. Wrong. All of you airline nuts out there but he was a complete, ass. He really came off as. They mentioned the fact that you know there are restaurants in the arts and else. And he didn't have an answer that they should get money all that mattered to him in the way it came off was the airlines get money? Which? I'm sure he didn't mean it that way but I mean like. I said there are thousands of other industries that are equally as affected as the airlines and to be. As cold hearted as his responses were to that interview about not acknowledging or being empathetic towards the rest, the country and it was just the important thing to him was airlines in. My. Gut. Reaction was good Are you eliminating your bonus for the year to supplement the income because there's been? No. I I don't see upper management taking cuts at Delta or some of the other airlines. They're asking people to go on early retirement and stuff but but the fact that even when you went when you mentioned when it was mentioned by the by the host that you know there are other. Other industries are equally hurting need a financial break. He didn't seem to care all. He cared about was the airlines getting that break and I I. I'm really disappointed if that's the tenor of our industry or the airline industry that you know the where we should all be in this together, I really feel bad for all of those people who have lost jobs in this industry you know. But in all fairness I have friends in the arts that have no redeeming. They're not getting any funding and they're going to be at least another year before they're. Back up and running in. I I'm one step away from our museum. You know we we've getting grants, but there's still a lot of. A lot of people hurting in the lack of empathy from the Delta CEO was. Really, disheartening that he couldn't find it in himself to understand the plight of somebody else in another industry. That's often been the problem between Labor and management for decades and decades and decades. I know that I just saw something today the senior management at South West was taking twenty percent pay cut I don't know. What else they're doing but most other industries just say, Hey, folks, that's the way it goes. You know we're paying you twenty percent less than thirty percent less or. Forty percent and you know good luck to you and and you're right they. But but the people that seem to to live in the senior management world at some of these huge organizations are just completely different planet from the people out there at an airport you know de icing the airplanes load the bags. Dealing with. Cranky passengers as they Try to get to see the combinations changed or or whatever it is. And again. It's easy to do that, but you don't win any friends so that when things change they go. It's okay. I'll do this because I don't have any choice but oh, am I going to remember you? And so when the next negotiation for something comes up, they go I don't think so. You know and I was thinking about it even further when he was brought mentioned things like the food industry and such funding that goes to the airlines isn't going to the airport. So the people who work in McDonald's or the magazine stand at the airport and it shuddered because no one's flying. They're not getting that money yet. It's great. The airlines are getting bailed out but their whole infrastructure surrounding them. That aren't getting that cares money to go with them. I understand your airlines important. But your airlines are also have the effect on other people and. Just because you're getting bailed out and you're keeping pilots on, doesn't mean you're having an airport full of people getting on those airplanes, where's all of the people like TSA or just security or? Like Rob said that baggage handled that's throwing bags from the airplane onto the truck to get back. You know all of those people are also hurting the lack of empathy was really really disturbing. Yeah. That's unfortunate that it. Is it came across like that All right. Well, let's Push on. Recall last year last August there was a Cessna citation latitude crash. I think rob the passengers and crew kind of barely escaped with their lives before the thing. Erupted in flames and you you've talked to this issue in in flying magazine. It was something that I had heard about but had not read and when somebody said, you know boy, you really need to read this accident report. I spent some time with it and I was amazed at just. unfortunately I mean, these are our friends, our comrades, but the number of mistakes that these two pilots made along the way to this accident was just..

Delta CEO Rob flying magazine Florida Mason Dixon US CNN South West McDonald
"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

05:22 min | Last month

"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Boeing move all seven eight, , seven dreamliner production to South Carolina. . Well, , Boeing made the decision we talked about previously all assembly of the seven eight seven dreamliner will be consolidated in South Carolina this ends production of the seventy, , eight seven or will in Washington. . State. . The Detroit? ? News reports that Seattle based commercial airplanes. . CEO Stand Deal said the move to consolidate the work in North Charleston South. . Carolina will be done by mid twenty, , twenty one according to our best estimate. . I guess this is a decision that's kind of not unexpected mid twenty twenty one sounds pretty quick to me <hes>. . Yeah I mean <hes> but I I WANNA make sure I've got this right. . Was It south Charleston North Carolina or was it the other way round? ? Oh. . So so south North North Charleston South Carolina. . Okay. . I think I've got that. . Okay. . Right now it's I don't think it was unexpected at all I mean and actually Not even just now I mean, , Boeing has wanted you know since the time they open that place in South Carolina's nonunion shop I mean I think the <hes>, the , the people at the head shed have been looking just itching for ways to. . To move as much production there as they can because they don't want to deal with the with the unions. . And there's some manufacturing issues as well as we've said, , the after mid few slows sections of the dreamliner assembled in North Charleston in those sections get airlifted on the dream lifter cargo plane for for Washington. . State. . But the seventy eight, , seven, , Dash Ten, , mid fuselage is too long to fit inside the dream lifter. . So there's no way to get it to Washington state. . So you've gotTa have some. . <hes> final assembly in. . You. . Got Me doing it. . In In South Carolina. . <hes> if you WANNA do the DASH ten. . What happens in South Carolina? ? By I'm starting to know. . There is that logistical issue. . There's no doubt about that <hes> but of course they they've known about that for quite a long time that it was coming. . I don't. . Personally I. . Think they just said this is a great time because WHO's going to really give us any Gulf because we're so involved with so many other things and everybody hates Boeing right now. . Anyway. . Well I. . Think. . The whole seven, , three, , seven. . Max. . <hes> debacle has has helped move it in this direction elated announced back in April that they were gonNA produce production to ten planes a month. . Now, they're , down to six planes a month, , and you know with low production volumes just doesn't make sense to have two lines open. . The the big issue is is probably will cost around one thousand jobs in Washington, , which is. . Really really unfortunate. . So yeah, , I mean the whole the whole Boeing thing just continues to <hes> you know have A. . Backlash in you know different areas affecting more and more people. . I. . Wonder if they'll off they Boeing will offer to provide relocation assistance for the The Washington. State . employees. . That was my first thought. . Then I started thinking well, , you know maybe the volume is so low now and looks like we'll be for a that they don't need. . The move may be any of the Washington workforce down to South Carolina. . Yep. . That's my guess in the if they do need people is probably you know very few that they they need. . Maybe, , a few specialists you really think they want to move union labor from Washington to South Carolina. . I I was just GonNa. . Say Dark and cynical. . I don't think the Union House? ? How would that work? ? I? ? Mean you can't have. . A shop that's part union in part nods when there's no contract down there now Charleston. . So you have to all be nine union. . So I mean, , if there was a movie, , if somebody did choose to move if they were offered that I would assume, , they would have to give up their union membership and become non union employees like the others chur and who's going to do that I mean I, , think the job I if it's a matter of keeping your job and losing it, , maybe I think people are realistic but. . I, , don't think there's any intention of Boeing moving anybody. . You know probably the and and and the other thing is it doesn't matter because the culture as far as. . Issues with the systems in south. . Carolina. . Are just as bad. . There's dreamliner issues. . As well as all of the Washington issues. . So it's not like Boeing's culture in that division is any better than Boeing's culture in Washington right now. . They're they're screwed up across the board with the possible exception of St Louis. . But that's really not bowing that's mcdonnell-douglas so.

Max Trescott David Vanderhoek Power Aviatio Ella Max CIRRUS aircraft Rob Mark Flying Magazine Senior editor publisher
"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:11 min | Last month

"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Welcome to the airplane Geeks podcast. This is episode six, hundred and twenty three of the show where we talk aviation I'm Max flight and with me is Max Trescott. He's host of Aviation Newstalk podcast he's a national see if I've. And he's an expert on the CIRRUS aircraft. Ella Max and listeners around the world. Great to be here on another Funday it is a fun day. It is we we've been having fun here just carrying carrying on I know she'd probably just use the previous half hour is touch. Be Oh, my God it is. It is also with us is David Vanderhoek Power Aviation historian and military aviation expert. Hey, everybody Yeah. We were actually having a good time. Maybe we need to do another one of those airplane geeks unplugged episodes because. Know when when we have our guest on like this guest, we sort of have a wild time minutes just money. Money. Do we have someone special here with us? Well. I don't know in a little a little bus way. With this is Rob Mark Senior editor of Flying Magazine and publisher of the jet. Wind. Blog. Arab hey hi how are you guys? Thank you so much for inviting me a it's been a while. The place doesn't look a whole lot different I guess I expected to see some improvements by episode six, hundred, Ninety something or whatever. But it's okay I can. I can still make this work. All right. We that's why we bring you on the show rob because you're the one guy that can make it work. That's right. Hey. We we wipe the microphones down for you. Now you know what the previous half hour was like. All right. Well, look let's. Let's jump right into some of the aviation news from the past week. Or are you guys ready road from the West? Ready Say Ready Rob. Oh. Sorry. Ready..

Max Trescott David Vanderhoek Power Aviatio Ella Max CIRRUS aircraft Rob Mark Flying Magazine Senior editor publisher
"flying magazine" Discussed on The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

06:44 min | 2 months ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

"And what I want to address this podcast and I'm hearing a lot of things like Jason I, , got my private a year ago I flew pretty regularly for a few months but you know life. . And just not flying as much as I wanted to, , and I'm starting to lose that confidence I. . Don't feel like I wanNA, , take my kids up or my wife because I don't feel confident if something happens up there that I can deal with it or at least deal with it is sharply as I did the day after my check reading. . So I've gotten a few versions of that story and I WANNA talk to you about how you can do this how you can stay proficient and you can stay confident and you don't have to spend a fortune to do it and I think there are three main points that I wanna make in small tweaks you might have to make to your flying. . But the first one is in, , you know how close this is to my how hard the standardization the idea that you can ritualized you're flying. . And then remember like rehearse remember and perform the ritual of flying and so all you really have to remember is that ritual and what the ritual is designed to do is to weed out the possibility of thousands of other smaller mistakes from happening I'm great example there is the final walk around on a preflight, , right. . If you just remember to do the final walk around on a preflight, , you might catch tomorrow on the nose wheel cinderblocks blocks on the tail Pito Tube cover. . Fuel caps left off seatbelts hanging out of the door baggage compartment opened I mean I, you , go on and on and on with the things that you might catch. . Simply. . By remembering to walk around the airplane after the preflight. . Okay and that goes deep. . If you want a very detailed version of all of the soap's the standard operating procedures that I teach, , those are all in my book setting the standard. . But that is one concept that will add huge beer flying. This . is an I didn't make this operate. . This is the way the professional pilots do it because they've got money in the game they've got a business, , they have to take care of one of their pilots crashes. . It can't be game over right not only that as you've heard me say the company's survived the accident typically. . So the company has a chance to evolve develop a procedure that will prevent the. . Pie The from any other pilots for making the same mistakes and they can force compliance with that procedure. . That's huge. . That's the whole process, , and if you can get yourself to do that, , you are miles ahead of the game. . All right. . That's one thing we'd like to ritualized the flying, , and the second thing is getting rid of this idea that you go back every two years for what they used to call a biennial flight review or a flight review that is not. . Enough that is not regularly. . You're not going to regularly enough if you're going back every two years and the pros know this to right how often do the pros go back? ? I heard you say it every six months, , right. . So if you're a professional pilot, , every six months, , you go back with your instructor. . Back to the training environment and you go through the ringer right you practice all of the emergency procedures, , all of those things that you might need if someday. . You're you're in a situation where you have an incident? ? You've got your family on board right and all of this training inspires confidence. . So this is the feeling of confidence in the airplane comes from doing it regularly and feeling confident that you can handle the edge cases if they come up. . I'm so what most people do just to kind of get US summarized here three point two when most people do is they get their pilot certificate they here. . Okay. . I have to get a flare view maybe they go get a new club checkout and then that's it right and then they're out flying with their friends and their kids and their wife and two years ago by nothing boy I better go get a flight review that is not a way to inspire confidence. . That is not a way to feel good about what you're doing. . In the pros know that. . and. . So the last thing I'd like to say is this is the part where we get into. . This is the third point where we get into the budget. . Is that there's been a lot of evidence to suggest that if you just keep your head in the game right back in the day they see if you read flying magazine or you re Flight Training magazine those are still great ideas by the way. . But in today's world you've got youtube and you've got APPS late ground school and you've got you know ah so many different ways to stay engaged with aviation. . And I always tell students when they come in to train. . The typical question is how much is this gonNa cost me I don't. . Generally answer that question as a complete daughter a mount I won't say, , well, , this certificate certificate is GonNa cost you fifteen thousand dollars or twenty thousand dollars. . If you really pin me down on it, , I will say it will cost you anywhere from fifteen to twenty five, , thousand dollars. . There's a ten thousand dollar. . Window there depending on how prepared you are when you show up for lessons how regularly fly how busy you are all that sort of stuff. . But that's not even the important part. . The important part is that you really think about flying more like a monthly expense more like a habit. . So when a student comes in and says or perspective, , Stephen Comes in and says, , I'm thinking about flying how much is this gonNa cost me I will usually say how much can you afford each month? ? Right? ? Is this something you can. Afford. . . To put fifteen hundred dollars a month into or is it something you can only afford to five hundred dollars a month into is something you can put an unlimited amount of money anti right I mean I just have no idea where you're coming from but the important part is you're starting to think about it like a habit that you're taking on and you're never gonNA stop. . So you have this monthly expense for flying. . Now, , let's take A. . Relatively for flying a relatively modest budget. . Let's see we have seven hundred dollars or eight hundred dollars a month that we feel as though we can spend on flying right it doesn't sound like a lot when you consider your CFI's probably one hundred dollars an hour on the airplane while it's running. . Over one hundred dollars an hour. . So you're out there spending on, let's , say, , let's just pick numbers. . Let's say the airplanes one hundred and fifty dollars an hour and you go out for one point five keep it keep it. . You know easy math that's two hundred, , twenty, five , dollars right? ? One, , fifty plus seventy, , five, , two, , hundred, , and twenty, , five dollars plus your CFI you're together with your. . Maybe. . Instead of one point five year together for two hours it's another two hundred dollars. . So we're looking at four hundred and seventy five dollars we're looking at. . If you do one lesson a month after your certificate, , you're spending four hundred and seventy-five bucks. . You've left yourself with a budget of about three hundred, , fifty dollars maybe a short two hour flight somewhere with your family. . But you've flown twice in the month right and that's the way you need to think about the finance part of it think about it as as a monthly expense and try to allocate how much you're spending each month a little bit toward training and

flying magazine Jason Miller instagram Patriot Jason I Pito Tube Lynn Flight Training instructor
Staying Confident In The Airplane

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

06:44 min | 2 months ago

Staying Confident In The Airplane

"And what I want to address this podcast and I'm hearing a lot of things like Jason I, got my private a year ago I flew pretty regularly for a few months but you know life. And just not flying as much as I wanted to, and I'm starting to lose that confidence I. Don't feel like I wanNA, take my kids up or my wife because I don't feel confident if something happens up there that I can deal with it or at least deal with it is sharply as I did the day after my check reading. So I've gotten a few versions of that story and I WANNA talk to you about how you can do this how you can stay proficient and you can stay confident and you don't have to spend a fortune to do it and I think there are three main points that I wanna make in small tweaks you might have to make to your flying. But the first one is in, you know how close this is to my how hard the standardization the idea that you can ritualized you're flying. And then remember like rehearse remember and perform the ritual of flying and so all you really have to remember is that ritual and what the ritual is designed to do is to weed out the possibility of thousands of other smaller mistakes from happening I'm great example there is the final walk around on a preflight, right. If you just remember to do the final walk around on a preflight, you might catch tomorrow on the nose wheel cinderblocks blocks on the tail Pito Tube cover. Fuel caps left off seatbelts hanging out of the door baggage compartment opened I mean I, you go on and on and on with the things that you might catch. Simply. By remembering to walk around the airplane after the preflight. Okay and that goes deep. If you want a very detailed version of all of the soap's the standard operating procedures that I teach, those are all in my book setting the standard. But that is one concept that will add huge beer flying. This is an I didn't make this operate. This is the way the professional pilots do it because they've got money in the game they've got a business, they have to take care of one of their pilots crashes. It can't be game over right not only that as you've heard me say the company's survived the accident typically. So the company has a chance to evolve develop a procedure that will prevent the. Pie The from any other pilots for making the same mistakes and they can force compliance with that procedure. That's huge. That's the whole process, and if you can get yourself to do that, you are miles ahead of the game. All right. That's one thing we'd like to ritualized the flying, and the second thing is getting rid of this idea that you go back every two years for what they used to call a biennial flight review or a flight review that is not. Enough that is not regularly. You're not going to regularly enough if you're going back every two years and the pros know this to right how often do the pros go back? I heard you say it every six months, right. So if you're a professional pilot, every six months, you go back with your instructor. Back to the training environment and you go through the ringer right you practice all of the emergency procedures, all of those things that you might need if someday. You're you're in a situation where you have an incident? You've got your family on board right and all of this training inspires confidence. So this is the feeling of confidence in the airplane comes from doing it regularly and feeling confident that you can handle the edge cases if they come up. I'm so what most people do just to kind of get US summarized here three point two when most people do is they get their pilot certificate they here. Okay. I have to get a flare view maybe they go get a new club checkout and then that's it right and then they're out flying with their friends and their kids and their wife and two years ago by nothing boy I better go get a flight review that is not a way to inspire confidence. That is not a way to feel good about what you're doing. In the pros know that. and. So the last thing I'd like to say is this is the part where we get into. This is the third point where we get into the budget. Is that there's been a lot of evidence to suggest that if you just keep your head in the game right back in the day they see if you read flying magazine or you re Flight Training magazine those are still great ideas by the way. But in today's world you've got youtube and you've got APPS late ground school and you've got you know ah so many different ways to stay engaged with aviation. And I always tell students when they come in to train. The typical question is how much is this gonNa cost me I don't. Generally answer that question as a complete daughter a mount I won't say, well, this certificate certificate is GonNa cost you fifteen thousand dollars or twenty thousand dollars. If you really pin me down on it, I will say it will cost you anywhere from fifteen to twenty five, thousand dollars. There's a ten thousand dollar. Window there depending on how prepared you are when you show up for lessons how regularly fly how busy you are all that sort of stuff. But that's not even the important part. The important part is that you really think about flying more like a monthly expense more like a habit. So when a student comes in and says or perspective, Stephen Comes in and says, I'm thinking about flying how much is this gonNa cost me I will usually say how much can you afford each month? Right? Is this something you can. Afford. To put fifteen hundred dollars a month into or is it something you can only afford to five hundred dollars a month into is something you can put an unlimited amount of money anti right I mean I just have no idea where you're coming from but the important part is you're starting to think about it like a habit that you're taking on and you're never gonNA stop. So you have this monthly expense for flying. Now, let's take A. Relatively for flying a relatively modest budget. Let's see we have seven hundred dollars or eight hundred dollars a month that we feel as though we can spend on flying right it doesn't sound like a lot when you consider your CFI's probably one hundred dollars an hour on the airplane while it's running. Over one hundred dollars an hour. So you're out there spending on, let's say, let's just pick numbers. Let's say the airplanes one hundred and fifty dollars an hour and you go out for one point five keep it keep it. You know easy math that's two hundred, twenty, five dollars right? One, fifty plus seventy, five, two, hundred, and twenty, five dollars plus your CFI you're together with your. Maybe. Instead of one point five year together for two hours it's another two hundred dollars. So we're looking at four hundred and seventy five dollars we're looking at. If you do one lesson a month after your certificate, you're spending four hundred and seventy-five bucks. You've left yourself with a budget of about three hundred, fifty dollars maybe a short two hour flight somewhere with your family. But you've flown twice in the month right and that's the way you need to think about the finance part of it think about it as as a monthly expense and try to allocate how much you're spending each month a little bit toward training and

Flying Magazine Jason I Pito Tube Instructor Stephen Flight Training
"flying magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:15 min | 3 months ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And, frankly, to be honest, it's on the bedside table at night is flying magazine You dio Show Friend Pilot and the editor in chief of Flying magazine is Julie Boatman. We've invited her back today to talk about private planes and the side effect of having less comer. Shal planes in the sky these days. Welcome back to our own world Travel Julie. Nice to reconnect with you on this Saturday morning. It's great to be back. Thank you very much, So, you know it's a few weeks ago, It happened across an article that caught my attention describing how private plane pilots are enjoying really a unique side effect of the Corona virus pandemic. I mean, if there is one out there, and that's being able to fly into major U. S airports with relative ease. Since they're usually next to impossible to gain access to one person I'm thinking of. He did his holy Grail flight of landing and taking off at JFK, LaGuardia and Newark Airport. So they're all here in the New York City area. All within hours, So a few weeks back, another did something similar with his teenage son on the West Coast. So I don't have you been able to enjoy Maybe any bucket list. Airports yourself, Julie or no. Some other pilots who were doing that. I'm not myself, but I certainly have heard from a lot of our readers who have taken advantage of the fact that air traffic control is a lot less busy right now. It's some of these major airports and that has been in the past The biggest obstacle Teo for one of us In a lighter craft to go in and check a major airport off our bucket list. Yeah, I mean, it's really like you, said Robert. It's such an interesting side effect from all of this talk about making lemonade out of lemons, but it's got to be a real thrill for the pilots. Julie But I'm curious. I have to ask you this because I'm thinking of water scheme behind a large speedboat versus a small be sweeper. I used to water ski and I was preferred. Think most water scares prefer the wake of the smaller speedboats. So I'm also curious. Is it dangerous for a pilot typically tow land the smaller planes and navigate these larger airports and deal with the wake that's created by the big Jets, like what are some of the concerns there under normal circumstances versus right now. Sure So wake turbulence is a very real concern for all aircraft, actually not just light aircraft, but we suffer more significantly from wake turbulence and the bigger guys. What's happening in normal times is the air traffic controllers will Separate us will give us several minutes. Of spacing behind a larger aircraft, particularly one of known type that generates a higher degree of weight turbulence. What's happening now is of course, with a lot less traffic. Giving that kind of separation is a lot easier. There's not, you know, not as much work for the controller to have to do that. And, you know, light aircraft pilot hasn't easier time staying clear when they're approaching the airport, taking off or just taxing around. It is unless I mean I always wanted to fly and I would be probably landing at every airport in the country right now, so I know myself, But you know what we know. Clearly Julie that were in the upside down world is I keep calling when we're able to have this conversation, frankly about the reduced number of commercial planes that are operating at major airports and what it means for the private pilots, but In a related but different topic. Have you seen her hurt? Maybe any significant impact that the Corona virus is having on new pilot training? You know, there was a lot of concern, especially early on and still now because they're with significant furloughs and layoffs at the majors and regional That that would trickle down and, of course, decrease the need for new pilots to join those ranks. However, there's a lot of leg in the system. You know, it takes a couple of years for a pilot to go through training. So they're folks in all different points along their training progression that they're still absolutely pursuing those goals because as we come out of this, and there's a lot of enthusiasm and optimism that we will not too long a time. As the major's called back their pilots. A lot of folks will taken retirement that they're not coming back out of So right now it's a bit of weight C, but we haven't seen a huge drop off good news places where maybe some restrictions have kept flight schools from being ableto. I appreciate the update because I haven't seen a lot on that. So that's good. You leave before we run out of time really quickly since you haven't done it yet, if you could, or if you want to, or your goal here, what would be one of the larger airports that you would really love to take a small plane into You know, I haven't gone into either of the three major New York airports and given help, busy that airspace is and how much I usually circumnavigated in normal. Well, Julie, listen come out because we know private played right now. That is the way to go avoiding the crowd. Just a great way to social distance. Always great catching up with you and it fucks listen, as Mary said that Begin the segment Flying magazine. It is a favorite of mine. Their website is flying mag dot com. Always nice As I said, Julia, can I have a great weekend, Okay. Thank you.

Julie Boatman Flying magazine editor in chief Newark Airport New York City West Coast Teo Robert Julia Mary New York JFK LaGuardia
"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

Aviation News Talk podcast

03:54 min | 3 months ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

"Who was flying the aircraft said to me hey, look they're shooting flares off their now turns out he was a former army helicopter pilot. So he he knew what the stuff was and I looked out there and they were probably Jeez I'm I'm guessing at least four or five six miles away maybe farther and yeah, you could see lots and lots and lots of fireworks moving kind of in all directions. It's kind of like it was emanating up down sideways from this aircraft it was quite a light show. So I was I was pretty impressed I. It's long as they're you're not seeing tracers across your path or anything like that Sure. Well, let's talk about other kinds of stupid pilot tricks tells about this next story here. stupid pilot tricks you make it sound like sometimes, pilots are paying attention. In this particular case the pilot and passenger departed. From a Airport Falcon County or I'm sorry Falcon Colorado where the density altitude was ninety, five hundred feet, which is that's the tip off. That's when the instructor says Gee Max if you take off at an altitude of Or. Airport with ninety five hundred foot density outed. What does that mean to you and you're supposed to say, oh, it means the airplanes probably not going to perform that. Well, it's going to have a hard time climbing. Yes. That's right and and to make things even more interesting during the takeoff Run up the pilot notice the engine was not operating correctly. On on one of the MAGS they went back to the ramp and the mechanic set up the left magneto inoperative and then disconnected both of the the leads from the from the MAG. Now. The pilots second and third inch the part I don't quite understand why he'd be doing run-ups with one mag did he already knows is not operating? But. He managed to get full power I. Have a problem understanding that not possible not possible. Yeah and best of all of the pilots. took. Off. From Falcon Airport in Colorado at a density altitude of ninety, five, hundred feet. Oh, and I forgot to mention this was a Cherokee six sort of that stretch Cherokee. They used to make years ago and believe it or not. The airplane didn't WanNa climb really just It has got to the end of the runway and it just stalled and hit the ground and when they pull the engine apart later of the MAG was definitely dead and Did. No one can quite figure out why the? F. Pilots why the pilot made the decision to depart one from a high altitude airport with an inoperative. MAGNETO and it didn't cross his mind that even with both meg needles running. This might be a particularly awkward takeoff and we don't even know what the outside air temperature was at the time So this goes back to what we were talking about earlier is somebody not paying attention or is this a case of someone that should have their pilot's? Certificate scan to make sure that it's it's real because this makes you think this person really shouldn't be in an airplane flying above other people I wonder if this is a case of.

Falcon Colorado the MAG Airport Falcon County Falcon Airport army Gee Max instructor WanNa
"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

Aviation News Talk podcast

05:28 min | 3 months ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

"Well, let's let's move on I mean this is absolutely a tragic story, but we have a lot of other things going on and Of course, in the midst of our pandemic, I thought it might make sense to kind of look at the world of the strange because we need to do something to kind of lighten things up in these times of the pandemic. So you and I put together a list of stories. Oddly we didn't have to dig deeply these are all from just the last. Seven to ten days or so. So why don't you tell us about the first one? Okay. So illusionist for those people that may not know what allusion is, is a sole guys used to call the magicians. And we're not talking about politicians were talking about magicians. Like David Copperfield Amazing Crespin folks like that right? Exactly. never see anymore. But this particular illusionist David Blaine is planning on going flying, according to the news story that we're talking about right now that's going to happen this next Monday a yes. It'll be this next Monday, August thirty first, and he intends to do a try something that's going to be somewhat remarkable and for those of you that may be wondering How much experience does this man have trying things that are remarkable Well, he held his breath for seventeen minutes. I cannot. I it's not that I'm asking how he did it I'm asking myself. Why would you want to hold your breath? But well, if you're a little kid, you're angry with mom and dad, you know, I've to hold my breath. Yes, exactly. But we will do all the all the past experience of this man and but what he plans on doing is taking off under a cluster of hydrogen filled balloons kind of like I, love this part like lawn chair Larry from a few decades ago. Who I think they found up at altitude somewhere if I'm not mistaken. Yeah I think what they found was airliners started reporting that they had seen launcher Larry go by at six thousand and eight thousand and ten thousand feet. Yeah. He was a non pilot rated gentleman who thought it'd be fun to Tyson Balloons to a lawn chair and bring along his BB gun when he got tired come on down. So yeah, he made history he was pretty famous. Case Blaine plans to ascend to an suit of at least the height of Mount Everest, which is roughly thirty thousand feet and he plans to do it without oxygen though he is going to have a a small. Bottle of emergency oxygen with him, and once he gets up there he's going to free fall parachute back to the earth so that he can tell people how cool is was My only concern is that when you start to pass out from Hypoxia, is he going to be cognizant enough to put the emergency oxygen on? And but that's just my thought. So that's the stories about is he's planning on doing that..

David Blaine Larry Mount Everest Tyson Balloons
"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

Aviation News Talk podcast

02:26 min | 3 months ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

"Establish Radio and radar contact again but the main thing is that the attorneys think that if the controller had given him the service that the pilot asked for in the first place, he would have warned him about his proximity to the nearby terrain long before the pilot lost control of the helicopter. Boy So let's unpack this a little bit. Sounds like their whole bunch of pieces to it Oh yeah. Number. One is I. Hear you telling the story here is at the lawyers are saying the helicopter was incorrectly denied flight following more that they had flight following. They were not handed off properly I'm not sure exactly which they're saying were they ever assigned squawk code at any time? No, they never were In fact on on the initial contact the controller a is I referred to him just said, I'm never going to. Be Able to pick you up where you are because he was in an area of four radar coverage but the they did get some some paints off the a DSP I guess on the radar and that was enough for the attorneys to say, well, see there you go that should have been enough in But again, for controllers, they know their areas very well I mean the rated in just like a pilot is. They don't need to identify every single. Airport aircraft that calls them because they can say, okay where you are, you're going to be below my radar coverage or you're going to be up in the hills and I'm GonNa lose you anyway there's no point us even going down this road However, let's let's be serious as we all know the pilot was via far. He had a responsibility to maintain contact with the ground and if he began to fly into conditions that were worse than via far he. To me at least he should have taken some action but it. Doesn't sound like he did. And looking at what you wrote in Flying Magazine, you said that the suit claims quote the denial of service was improper because radar contact had not been lost in services were being denied based on the possibility that might be lost at some point in the future. It strikes me that ATC is allowed to deny service for any host. Of reasons he could have been busy with our traffic can die.

Flying Magazine
"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

Aviation News Talk podcast

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on Aviation News Talk podcast

"And before we start talking with rob I do WanNa Mention Hurricane Laura which the US a few days ago and destroyed hangars and planes at the Lake Charles Regional Airport and the Southfield airports both in Louisiana. I hope you and your family were not severely impacted by the hurricane. Here in California, it's been two weeks since the massive wildfires began the two closest fires to me of destroyed over a thousand structures that are now fifty percent and thirty five percent contained with only a few lives lost four, which were thankful. But unfortunately, over the weekend, there was a plane crash. In Illinois in the wee hours of Saturday morning that killed a judge he had only only use serious for a few days when it crashed at one thirty am in the morning while flying approach into his home airport, which was reporting two hundred foot. Vertical visibility and one half mile visibility, which were slightly below the approach minimums. There were a number of risk factors. One could identify from reading about that accident and we'll talk more about it in a future show. In the meantime, I encourage you to practice risk management and avoid taking unnecessary risk when you fly and let's get on with the show. I asked Rob I talk about an article he wrote for Flying Magazine that gives an update on the Kobe Bryant helicopter crash that occurred when the helicopter was flying in marginal the are conditions crashed. and. For our second segment, here's a little sound effect that rob recorded for our aviation stories of. Rob. Of courses a senior editor at Flying Magazine and they also publishes the jet wind blog at wine dot com he's worked as both an air traffic controller, an airline corporate pilot and CFI. Rob Thank you for joining us here today. Hey. Thank you for. Me Back. Max It's It's always a pleasure to be here on aviation news talk and I'm glad you picked this story about the Kobe Bryant accident because there have been some developments this past week that some some of the listeners may find interesting There was a a a lawsuit filed in. Los Angeles Superior Court about a week ago by Island Express helicopters the charter company that was operating the Sikorsky on behalf of Kobe Bryant, and they sued the controllers, the air traffic controllers from so-calle of over some. Issues that they thought..

rob Kobe Bryant Flying Magazine Lake Charles Regional Airport Hurricane Laura Los Angeles Superior Court Southfield US Louisiana Illinois California Sikorsky senior editor Island Express corporate pilot
"flying magazine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"They had issues executing an emergency procedure. The FAA won't certify the plane till the causes determined and fixed. I would be surprised if this thing is ready by Christmas band, as a retired airline, captain CNN aviation analyst and senior contributor to flying magazine. Just under home. The training for specific to this particular scenario in the emergency fatal crashes sent sales of the popular jet into a tailspin, although recently, one major airline did make a large commitment to the plane, Charles Feldman, KNX, ten seventy NewsRadio concern is growing among growers cross southern California and over California for up and down the state over tariffs. India has imposed India's the state's top market for the nuts last year. China impose tariffs that impacted almonds for David fifth, and, and central valley says that's why I s well he and the, the other growers can withstand some disruption but for long trade dispute well, that would be costly. California. Crop is the eight the nineteen crop is going to start to be harvested. And I would say by mid September or early October will probably have it ready for shipment. So it'd sure be nice if the disruption were ended prior to that California's supplies more than eighty percent of the world's almonds in the impose tariffs in retaliation for the US ending the country's preferential trade status. Study shows that one in eight nurses takes medication to help them. Stay awake. The research presented data conference for sleep. Studies. Does that thirty one percent? Darcy's house symptoms. Shows that thirty one percent of nurses, how symptoms consistent with chronic insomnia. The same amount also show signs of shift work disorder. What's happens when people work during the time that they normally be asleep? Okay. That little later for twenty-five KNX ten.

California Charles Feldman FAA India flying magazine CNN aviation analyst insomnia China KNX Darcy US David thirty one percent eighty percent
"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"I wanna notice something I'm gonna call you out if you guys ever read flying magazine notice that every other contributor in flying magazine has their pitcher on the to'real page except rob who's got the face for radio. Not even imprint there's a reason you you miss a key point there. I'm not a contributor. See? I'm an editor. And none of us editors have our pictures. Yes. His pitcher on his byline on his page when he does his to'real. Right. So which means again, you're the only one that doesn't have can you? Call him for me and do that. And tell them that you guys really think I ought to be on on your face the. Yeah. Yeah. A senior smiling face senior. But I'm upset with launchpad right now because he just said you have face for radio. Most people don't know you and I are brothers. That's right. We look alike. So what you're saying about me? I was the short one mom loved you best. This. That's really the disgusting part of being here at this radio show this go because all of you guys. Well, you're closer to height with me. But these guys they're all like the giants foot nine or something David abbey. Where is he? I know. Same thing. He's like six seven or something, and I feel very inadequate. So that's why I'm really leaving early regardless. You're still outstanding you feel when the rains came and the winds blew he was outstanding. This has been really fun. I hope we have a chance to do this again. I mean, don't worry. Because it's I mean, rob, don't worry. It's yeah. These are short. Or is it the meek that inherit the get them confused? You we have max max west. This is max midwest. So that short meek, and here is that a good thing. Or is that bad thing ever? Sure. I never EMMY ther-. So well, listen, I know you guys are going to hang around for a little bit. But I'm gonna go try and find the tourism board from the Bahamas, and I really enjoyed being invited to your to do this. And let's do it again next year of I'm and next year we bring right? Oh, yeah. We could use a beer. Yeah. Here comes a Huey. Oh, yeah. Anyway. So it's been great. And we will we will meet up again. Just absolutely all right for the week. All right. Great. A couple of things that we might want to talk about wouldn't mask mattress got you. You spent some time with the FAA to the was it yesterday. And it was a good thing because I'm sure people listening to you just now probably said, oh, he's spent some time. Thank you number two down. No. But that's kind of funny. You mention that. Because in a winner, I'm in the air and the controller does something wrong. I was to say to them advise when ready to copy a phone number. Just just turn that right back on them. But never never had the guts to do that. But. Yeah. So you know that last year I went and got my type rating in the Cirrus vision jet which was like being in Disneyland for nine years for pilot nine nine days for for a pilot. It was great fun. I just I have it's hard for me to think of anything more fun than spending nine days with Cirrus back at their Knoxville vision center, you know, rocking and rolling in the simulator and just really doing a deep dive in the day. I think some people may not realize that when you do type rating, it's not just about the flying. I would say that substantially more than half. The time is spent in school and also doing self study on all of the the systems, and when you get into jet all my gosh. There are a heck of a lot of systems you need to understand a witch valves do wide, and you know, it's really it's kind of a fun challenge. I think max, you're an engineer. I'm an engineer. You probably understand how much fun..

David abbey editor flying magazine rob Cirrus engineer Bahamas giants Disneyland FAA Knoxville nine nine days nine years nine days
"flying magazine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Two seven thirty seven max, eight jets has taken a new twist that could be very bad news for Boeing the FBI has now joined a criminal probe of how the 737 max series of planes were certified with allegations of possible criminal negligence. A grand jury is in place and has even started issuing subpoenas for people involved in the development of the seven thirty seven max. Les Abend is a retired Boeing triple seven captain CNN aviation analyst and a senior contributor to flying magazine less as you know, it's not that uncommon in some other countries to have criminal investigations of aircraft accident, it isn't that usual except for perhaps terrorism in this country. No, you're absolutely correct. This wouldn't say it's unprecedented. But it it it, certainly. You know, begs the question, what is it out there? That's been released to to prompt the FBI to act, you know, a criminal investigation when it comes to designing and aircraft. What could that be is it this thoughts of bad inspections or a rush or some kind of negligence in getting this plane out faster than maybe should have been? Well, I suppose. Criminal negligence from the standpoint, I think that if you've been keeping in touch with the media. There was the Seattle times article out that indicated there might be some folks in Jamir wise at at Boeing in coordination with A that sort of was convinced. It kinda remain quiet about some of the concerns. They had with the system. That's in the news this mcat system. And you know, there was an indication they were rushing this airplane along to compete with its rival Airbus. So that's you know, I think whistle blower comes to my head that there may be some whistle blowers out. And that's why we're we're at this point with with Boeing and the FBI, but you know, taking it beyond this particular incident or incidents, but the seven thirty. Seven. Wasn't the the philosophy again in this country as opposed to some other places of not criminalizing aircraft accidents wasn't the idea that that is what leads to being more transparent for people to being more open about perhaps mistakes that may have been made. But with good intent but nonetheless mistakes, and once you criminalize this everybody understandably shuts up. Yeah. No, you're absolutely right. And that's been the philosophy the NTSB all along that's the philosophy. When I was flying. We would file a report basically was what we call a NASA reported in NASA was the one that we've ministration for. If if for instance, I accidentally didn't go to my assigned altitude. Always it wasn't a criminal case situation. I didn't do it willfully. So the fact that I get it might might mean that there's some problem in the system and why I made that mistake and you're exactly right. That would prompt people to come forward with it. So that's why this this this seems so serious point you bring up a very very big big concern, you were talking Wissel blower earlier the other criminal investigations, although rare that we've seen involving this kind of a thing aviation have those been along those kinds of lines. Like, hey, there's something going on with with maintenance. And it's not good in. I wanna talk. In essence. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you're talking to you know, to guy that's been Line Pilots released retired for. Thirty four years. And you know, there there were things that sometimes teaching the Celtics we were pushed in mission hackers, but mostly I gotta compliment my company that wasn't the case. They wanted us it safely. So we felt that there was an issue. We would be Fourth Way. We don't want to take the airplane. Yes. Says it's fixed. But then she write to us. So it it really has been a give and take. Culture, at least from the pilot standpoint, you know, when you get to this point about designing an aircraft. The only place the weekend involved this tell us about your system. So we can train properly for form. And this is where I'm disappointed with Boeing, and and this might be the source of this FBI investigation. How last is Boeing eventually get beyond this. We were having this discussion in the office before we went on the air that, you know, even if they announced okay, we've come up with a software fix. Everything's just fine now with all of what has gone on to fatal accidents. Now, the FBI being involved in a criminal investigation likely to take quite some time to conclude how do people regain confidence once those planes were put back online. That that's another great question as a pilot. I can tell you how you can regain comments you because you lost my trust. When you tell me that the system existed in what it potentially could do. And now, we're all going all my colleagues are going. Well, okay. What else? Didn't you tell me? So what we're going to need is some real honest verification either through flying simulator flying having Boeing, test pilots. Fly seven three seven maximum document. What has been done with a software update? May not just be software involved here. If if there's a hardware issue with to so all of this has to be combined to to to be to those of us. Want to safely take our our customers from point a to point B? And that's the way you're going to get beyond it less. Benzes a retired Boeing triple seven captain CNN aviation analysts senior contributor to flying magazine when we continue in about three minutes looking to avoid more super bloom super chaos in lake Elsinore this weekend. Insurance.

Boeing FBI flying magazine CNN aviation Les Abend Airbus NTSB Seattle times NASA analyst Line Pilots Celtics lake Elsinore Benzes Thirty four years three minutes
"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Her first story comes from flying magazine. This was written by Stephen pope, who's been a guest on this show. We should get Steven back on the show sometime in the future. This is airlines mole real time monitoring of pilot conversations. Some of called for cockpit monitoring beyond the cockpit voice recorders that we already have. I think the NTSB if I remember correctly is recommended cockpit. Video recorders to better capture activity in the event of an accident, but pilots or the union anyway have opposed that. But this article talks about something new doesn't it backs? Does. This is definitely a new slant on this. And let's the kind of the first instant new jerk reaction, I have to this which is the unions will never let this happen. But you know, we could be wrong things things change over time. But historically, they really haven't wanted to have cockpit conversations recorded, and it doesn't really go into depth the article is a little bit tantalizing. But it really kind of suggests that maybe there is a an AI slant to this artificial intelligence slant where somehow they could be. Monitoring. Maybe not a slow the conversation. But the the tone of voice the intonation the just overall the tension in the cockpit and that might help signal problems early on. But I don't know I to me it's a little farfetched. But certainly within the realm apostle -bility. Well, this comes from company in I t technologies, and as you say, they're they're recommending airlines use artificial intelligence to monitor pilot voices either before flight or during flight, they offer up some possible applications before flight things that might predict whether a crew would be late underway to report in at the airport or things like determining if Taylor pilot isn't the right fit for the job even things such as monitoring. 'ring conversations in flight things that might improve safety looking at flight operation quality assurance if. Okay, real time monitoring, Mark. The sounds like something that's kind of your your alley off handed seems like a doable kind of technology. So yeah, I it's absolutely doable. And and I agree that the unions are the roadblock because it's an invasion in much of what they protect. But from the technology perspective. I mean, the thing you have to be able to do is you have to be able to separate the cockpit noise. I just the ambient noise of that environment from the voices and do it at a level of fidelity where you can really get the analysis of tone and tenor sounds like it's an easy thing to do. But but it actually it it still still little bit of a technical challenge to do it. Well. And I think there'd been maybe other other applications in the past that using analysis of of the speakers voice looking for, you know, I don't know demotions or irritation or fear, or I guess whatever. But the the artificial intelligence part of this would be what would be using data to teach the system to look for certain kinds of conditions based on the sounds of people's voices. Yeah. So the artificial intelligence system really is going to provide scale, right? So if you have someone listening to a conversation to determine whether or not the person to agitate it or angry or fearful that person can only listen to one conversation at a time. So what the system would do is understand how that person terp? It's what the. The various emotions may be based on the tone of the speaker learning that pattern and a and machine learning is mostly about computers learning and understanding and then being able to detect patterns, right? You can then have a system listen to a thousand whether their phone calls or voice recordings transcripts simultaneously. In. So I'm just imagining the process of the computer learning the audio that's relevant to aviation. Would you would you use things like air, traffic, control recordings and cockpit voice recordings? In other words. Would it need to be specific to aviation context? As opposed to any other kinds of conversations that aren't aren't part of aviation. So yes, but what what would likely be the best way to build a system? Like, this is not simply say, I'm just going to train it on X. You're gonna you're gonna have systems are trained on understanding conversation. And then on top of that. If you imagine building a cake, right while the things in computers, you can liken to building cakes or baking cakes for that matter, then you'll have a a layer on top understands the language of aviation some of that might..

Steven flying magazine Stephen pope NTSB AI Taylor Mark
"flying magazine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The workhorse 737 supposed to be much more efficient smarter. Even with big changes in the flights control systems. Boeing the FAA determined pilots didn't need to be trained up on those changes. Now that decision could have played a role in the crash of seven thirty seven max. Eight flown by lion air in the ocean off Indonesia, how could it come to be that pilots? Don't get training on a newly developed jet or jet at least with some new ways of flying less. Abend is a retired Boeing triple seven, captain and senior contributor to flying magazine is also author of the book paper wings. So without getting too technical for our listeners. What is the issue involving the seven thirty seven max eight to begin with it? It's a system that was designed into the airplane. As a result of the bigger engines on it. And and and what happens we, call them under slung engines. So when you have a bigger a bigger engine the in an under slung situation the airplane has a tendency when you add powered slower speeds, especially to nose up so Boeing compensated for this by virtue of adding an automatic system that would put push the nose down if the pilots weren't doing it. And this is only under certain circumstances. It is under both manual automatic control. It really departs with the Boeing philosophy of working in harmony with the pilot as opposed to some other electrically fly by where planes, manufactured by other folks that kind of work to protect the airplane from the pilots. So the thought with the lion air crashes. There was some faulty data. The pilots were fighting this new system for a period of time without what the full. Understanding of how to respond to it. How to switch it off. Exactly. And and the faulty system is what we call an angle of attack indicator, which which which is a measure of for our purposes if the airplane is about the dynamically stall. So the system that that that's in question here that had may have the faulty data is only attached to one of those angle of attack indicators to on a seven thirty seven and most commercial airlines the same thing very often the systems will talk to each other and say, hey, we're not getting data right correctly. And they'll disconnect, but it was only connected to one side. According to the system situation that that Boeing set up, but it is very disturbing to me. You know, there's a thirty four year veteran with a major airline that wasn't information wasn't provided as part of ground school in pilot training is it more than just the ground school. Because a lot of people may not. Realize you certainly do that pilots go through fairly extensive training in simulators flight, simulators on the ground. So that things become muscle memory. Right. Is this sort of thing in your view that that pilots should have been given the opportunity to train with in a flight simulator? It's valid question. However pilots have to recognize the situation that they're in and in this particular circumstance, as as most of us know, it was a very low altitude comparatively so they didn't know what was happening to their aircraft until they can isolate understand exactly what's happening. They can't react with the system. And if the system is doing something automatically, it doesn't compute and if an airplane is going down when you're asking it to go up that's very disconcerting to a pilot. But in in answer to your question. Yes. There is a system that you that that's been time immemorial where you cut out what we call the. Stabiliser trim switches and that stops it. But you have to recognize it by virtue of what we call a runaway. Trims would you? You you visually see it and feel that this is what's happening. And I I don't think in the system that these pilots visually saw -xactly what was having happening to their aircraft in order to respond to the Czech loose that you referred to. If there was going to be training for everybody from the outset on this plane, total redesign or, you know, not just an upgrade that would have been what expensive time consuming for the airlines. No not for this system. Absolutely. Not this was well, we call his pilots differences. You know, we go. We most of us had made your airlines retrained every nine months, and every and during those nine months, we discussed various systems on the aircraft. So if you transition to this particular airplane, it was just a matter of getting. Additional information. It's the same basic model of the seven thirty seven. It's been around since the sixties. It's a stretch version with brand new officiant powerful engines as I understand it there. I believe three airlines in this country that currently operate the seven thirty seven max eight as a retired airline, captain. Are you confident that those airlines are now in light of the lion air incident, adequately training, their pilots how to deal with this particular issue. Absolutely. Absolutely. And and unfortunately, it is result of this lion. Air incident. I remember this. This accident hasn't been concluded at this point. The final report hasn't hasn't quite come out. So you know, I in some respects we are. We are speculating there may be more to the situation. But no, I absolutely believe that any domestic carrier in the United States. All these guys all these Galveston and the guys that are flying this airplane understand what what to do. Unfortunately, we call tombstone technology. You know, as as a result of people having a tragedy or being involved in a tragedy. We we tend to learn a lot more. And that's that is the philosophy NTSB which follows I, you know, the international rules for accident investigation. But I'm very confident that that pilots here in the states know what to do. Retire Boeing, seven seventy seven captain and senior contributor of flying magazine. Also, author of the book paper wings now this much, by the way. I'm sure of you don't need any extra training to download radio dot com app onto your phone. You commissioned to the KNX in-depth podcasts like one click one click. The tip say don't need any special manuals nothing. Really? And it's free. So it's not even like GPS free. When we continue in about three minutes the reviews are in Super Bowl commercials. This year were anything but super. The problem when I was younger to cigarettes three cigarettes. It was it was the habit. My mom. She was always like you need to get rid of them. The jewelry chance. I liked it found that it really works..

Boeing flying magazine ground school Indonesia Abend FAA Galveston NTSB United States KNX nine months thirty four year three minutes
"flying magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"flying magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And he's also been writing the jump seat column in flying magazine for nearly fifteen years now, we've invited to join us today to get his candidate view on whether airlines are training pilots for the real world. So let's get right to them. Welcome less. It's nice to connect the voice to the jump seat column that we read regularly. Nice to be Robert. Well, we really appreciate that. So you wrote something recently that connected with Marian bang about the way pilots at most airlines are being trained and ensure everyone listening right now knows it's tough to predict things in life. So it makes us wonder as it did you? Why airlines are primarily training their pilots for one emergency at a time. When certainly in real life situations, multiple things can occur simultaneously or in some type of chain-reaction. Share your thoughts with us on this particular that question very well. And that being said it's difficult to set up multiple emergencies because there are so many variables that as you mentioned in your question. So you know, we can only guess on what caused an effect was in particular column that I wrote that referenced the April two thousand eighteen accident with south west Philadelphia because of an uncontained engine failure. And that was a good reference for what it could. Because the bottom line was they had a fan blade go through the engine and just basically. Insent trap null into various parts of the airplane. And unfortunately, the tragedy of losing that one passenger also unfolded, but this. Although not very typical this has happened before in the past. And and and so it affects multiple systems so number one it affected the engine. Okay. We're all trained to deal with engine failures. But then it effected also the flight control system. If you saw the pictures of the airplane. It was peppered on the leading edge of size two scenarios going on simultaneously right there. And they said we have played control issues, which could potentially been another checklist. But they did they have to have the did have a depressurization issue because the the window literally got thrown out by we're that unfortunate tragedy happened that passenger. So now, they're dealing with explosive depressurization issue. So now these are two multiple emergency. So in training. This scenario can be can be.

flying magazine Philadelphia Robert fifteen years