17 Burst results for "Floyd Norman"

"floyd norman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on KCRW

"That. You gotta say back daddy's serious. You want to look at this. Dad? I love you copy. In advance of the big night. We wanted to talk with Peter Ramsey. He co directed into the spider verse any joins me now from NPR west. Welcome and congratulations. Thanks so much. Great to be here. How does it feel? That's a big one it. It's kind of surreal the emotional level of the response is what kind of really taken us all back. We we thought it might mean something to people, but what it seems to mean is greater than I think any of us really anti painted. And you know, I don't think anybody goes into a Spiderman movie thinking you're going to win an Oscar. So that that whole thing is like, whoa. Okay. Here we are when you say it's meaningful to people tell me a little bit about some of the response that you've gotten what do people have been telling you about why it is so meaningful to them. First and foremost, you know, we're doing a movie that has the first Spiderman who is not white on Peter Parker's, a beloved character that everybody's known for really a couple of generations now and introducing this new version of the character in miles Morales. It's what we hoped and it's far more than we hoped. It's you know, you really we really do get emails and texts and letters and people saying, you know, my I saw this with my child, and he turned to me or she turned and said that looks like neon screen or they're speaking Spanish at home or I could be him. And it sounds like, you know, the cliche of what representation means, but you know, it it's like hearing the word love, and then feeling love actually experience people's response to it. This movie has been called as important as Black Panther. Why do you think superhero movies were at the forefront of representation right now? I think they're kind of our new version of a national myth. You know, they encapsulate. A lot of things. Heroism responsibility. Bravery sacrifice a lot of things that other cultures have handed down through the ages in in mythic stories. And I think it's got a lot to do with where the superhero kind of sits in our national consciousness, and, you know, people of color, you know, they want to be part of the story. Want to be part of the myth. If you can't be part of a myth like that. Then what do you have in a culture? You are the first African American to be nominated in this category. Talking about breaking barriers. How does that feel? You know, you never think of yourself as like pioneer or barrier-breaker at least I don't not consciously because I'm just trying to do the best job that I can and surrounded by incredible collaborators, my co directors Rodney Rothman, and Bob Persichetti a genius. They just like me. I think our whole careers have just wanted to get it, right? And wanted to push the boundaries a little further. So in that way. I don't think about it. But I know good, and well, yeah, it does it does mean something and my achievement in being here is backed up by a lot of other people who really did struggle and laid a lot of tracks. So there's a there's a long legacy of black enemies and professionals Floyd Norman, Ron husband, Frank Braxton, even friends of mine still in the business Bruce Smith and Marlon west who are pioneers in their own way, have like laid this ground. So that I could be. Here. And I'm just grateful grateful and lucky cocoa one last year for best animated film that movie had a Latino cast and now into the spy divers could win this year. Black panthers. Also, Spike Lee is also up for a long overdue director Oscar are we finally seeing change in the film industry. It sure does feel like it this past couple of years. It really has felt like the winds are shifting a bit that the old myths about will these films don't travel internationally or the audience is limited or their niche products. Somehow, I think all those kind of old ideas are withering away and dying and good riddance. But from all indications that I'm seeing out on the media. The train is like nowhere near stopping. There's so many exciting black creators and creators of of color and all genders, and it's going to help unlock a key creatively for a lot of people in a lot of different ways that we don't even realize yet. I gotta ask you do. You know, what you're going to save? You win. Put you on the spot. Well, you know, we've been trying to like not jinx ourselves. But there's so many of us and we've got like three directors. Right. You know, five producers, and it's like, we all know good. And well, we can't say everything we want. I'm dying to thank of course. My wife, and my kids, and my mom and dad, of course. So I'm gonna give you the opportunity now in case, you don't get it on stage. Awesome. So hit me. Yeah. The the main thing I'd say is, you know, I think the studio academy begs everybody, I'd be all responsible. But then I'd have to say. To my family to my wife to Alex, nNcholas and Maya love you guys. Thank you to Herbert. And Pauline Ramsey this goal guys coming to visit you real soon. That's what I'd say. But I'd also. Yeah. If we had more than forty five seconds because somehow or other, you know, the message of the movie is the thing that we really do want to live on and want to address. So what this movie is meant to people. That's the heart of any sort of acknowledgment. We should give at the Oscars. Yeah. Absolutely. And by the way, Iowa's practice. My Oscar acceptance speech in the Merricks, even though I don't think I'll ever get one. But good luck to you. Peter Ramsey co-directed Spiderman into the spider verse along with Bob Persichetti and Rodney Rothman, it's up for mated feature film at this evening's Academy Awards. Thank you so much. Thank you. It's been a pleasure. We do not cut people off during their pretend. Oscar acceptance speeches on NPR one more reason.

Oscar Peter Ramsey Rodney Rothman Black panthers Bob Persichetti NPR Peter Parker Iowa Merricks Pauline Ramsey Spike Lee Floyd Norman Morales Academy Awards Herbert director Spiderman
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"It's not nice. No, but that's that. It's so we did one years ago. We were on the magic. What we learned is with their different ships. If you're on the dream, everything is dreamy if you're on the wonder, everything is wonderful. So everything says that to the point where I wonder if people tonight like cringe when they hear it over and over again a great cruise, it was the best. We do cruise ten years ago, but this one was so much better than the first one, so good. Good for you and talk about some of the commission as best friends of szeswith jungle book. They wrote to you before they got to meet you, they'd commissioned some work from you and told you that's bad. A cat named Aguirre passed away. They wrote to flow. And they said that we would like to commission some artwork for you. He not only drew what they asked through something else. Wrote them a letter saying he was so sorry that they'd lost. Cat made a point of all this. So we were all together when we got when I got to meet Floyd for the first time was with them. So they're crying and I'm crying because if you cry, I'm right there with you, and it was just fantastic. And since then they've had more from you and it's really, really neat. So that's something people can do if they want very sweet. I started out doing these little Disney drawings just as a chance to relax and get away from my digital work. Because these these little paintings, I do are all analog. They're all computer free done by hand with pencil and paper and ink in pain, you know, like like the old days. So I do these things and these are originals and get away with this because they are original. They're not copies or not reproductions. So they are original pieces of art that I'm allowed to to sell to to Disney fans who always have a favorite character. And so it's been fun. But now I'm beginning to get overwhelmed because there are so many requests for everybody has a favorite Disney character. They want this Neko. They want share Khan, the tiger or Mickey Mouse or Donald Duck, or professor of Drake. And so I'm just. Loaded doing all these days. They, it's great that somebody I get so many requests, but now it's becoming difficult to fill all those requests because they're coming in so quickly to follow Jews advice in charge. The drew Drew's and says, the answer is charged more money. Won't do that. One of the things I didn't understand when I was young and getting involved in all this was that being a great animator doesn't necessarily mean you can draw well. Yeah, tiredly different skill set almost right and. And some animators get asked on the flies convention or some gathering. Oh, please join me Mickey Mouse. Right. For them because they don't draw. They don't draw pictures. They draw movement. Yeah. And can you, can you fill that in a little bit? Can do everything. Well, you know, it. I've had to draw the Disney cartoon. Well again on this Disney cruise ship. I part of what I did all on the cruise was to draw Disney characters for the guests. And so basically I just I didn't have any routine. I just had a large sketch pad and I just started drawing every Disney character I can think of Mickey Mouse Donald Duck, goofy Pluto, stop this. He going and then just draw them, throw them on the floor. Let. In the lead people grab whatever they wanted. And so. I still look at my drawings and I think they're awful, but but people think, oh, these are really, really great joins. But to me, I just I just see sketches that are terribly off model and because I work with these old Disney guys who insisted that you draw everything properly. I know that my drawings leave a lot to be desired, but I know the fans don't feel that way. They love the drawings. They love the fact that their original, their fresh, they're spontaneous. So I just keep on doing it even though I know my drawings are pretty pretty tacky. So anyway. People ask me if I can draw the way that he drowns and we're pulled redundant artists. We're both artists, but I don't do what he does. He doesn't do what I do. So I could do sketches, but I don't want to do sketches and I'm an illustrator..

Disney Mickey Mouse Donald Duck Aguirre Donald Duck Drew Floyd Khan professor one years ten years
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"When he hears one and he wrote a beautiful song that they now play every night after the fireworks and that led to this collaboration, this book and the woman who sings that Ashley Brown was Mary Poppins in the stage production. So it all comes together. Gorgeous for. Yeah, she's mazing. We'll, I'll say, I didn't want to work on this book course you didn't. Here I'm going gonna. I'm actually going to tell the story because it's a, it's a really good story, and it's ended up really good, but Richard and Floyd and Wendy left con were the ones who talked about making this book and I knew about it kind of, but that's all I knew. And then we had our first meeting which came in and and my cubicle at Disney publishing literally right where our little staging areas. And so I told my boss will all be listening and I wanna see how to bridge you when you don't know, you're in the meeting, like okay says, well, I'll say hi, no, come out, you're in the meeting. So I come to the meeting. They're all talking and the Wendy says. So Richard were right. The book Floyd will draw the book and Adrian will paint the book. And this was my first time hearing that he didn't tell me my Boston. Tell me no one told me and this was the same year that are movie came out. So we were traveling for the movie, and I also have a job that oversee hundreds of books Disney. Publishing. So I was like, I don't have time for this. I really don't. It's a forty eight page book, whatever. And so I was coerced into painting this book and change this down to accommodate me not having time. And also because my boss said, the book should look like Floyd drawings and I'm an illustrator. So paint paint, like whatever which obliterates the pencil. We wanted the Floyd deflate nece as my boss said to show. And of course it does. And I'm happy now that I did it because getting to hear Richard and Floyd talk about Walt after the meeting was over was like the best part, and we have a piano in our office. And so Richard, what always playing it didn't matter if if he was tied to come in, he plays song, we'd all come under bar cubicles and this Richard do his whole medley of songs. What have you. So now I'm really proud. Good. And. Loyd paid me Floyd paid. You understand. I'm a Disney employee and I didn't get paid. I had my paycheck and he and Richard got paid. I didn't get paid anything. So I told flow, you give me some money. I mean, this is not right. So I made him give me like a thousand dollars you know to and he did, where's the love. Where's? Where's the love. I don't suppose we'll do me any good to say you got paid in goodwill. No, she wanted to cash. Artists don't get what they should get. Are those usually kind of filler short. You know. So I think pay me so I could say the same for writers go into that. You ever want to see the best watch. Harlan Ellison, pay the writer. It teaches you everything you need to know, right? Yep. Yep. In only the way that only the very, very different to Walt Disney Harlan, but magical nonetheless. So you guys recently took a Disney cruise? Yes, that was so much fun. That was so much fun, which which ship you on the dream, the Disney dream. I don't know where. In a big circle. What was cool was bumped us to first class which was a total surprise to us. We'd never done that before. So that was kind of cool having concierge and it's almost as if you're legends is what it is. Well, keep in mind. We were hanging out with ROY, Patrick Disney. Dr Michael Jiechi. No, Jared, Jared, Bush Joe's shows e Trinidad station. Martin of Becky Klein farmer, Bill farmer. I mean. Britton Brit. I went the rest of the legends basically just just hang out billions on the sneer. No, no. A lot of Disney fans, though. One was here Josie, Katz, who's out in the audience we there. She is and her. We on castaway cay like, wait a minute. We're on this island and there she is like, what are you doing here? So don't stock them..

Richard Floyd Disney Disney publishing Walt Disney Harlan Wendy Loyd castaway cay Mary Poppins Harlan Ellison Ashley Brown Patrick Disney Britton Brit Katz Boston Adrian writer Dr Michael Jiechi Josie Trinidad station
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"And I know what you're thinking. Floyd is the coolest and then you Adrian, you go dammit. They're both really cool equal amounts of cool. Are you on? She's a lot younger than I am the. I am. So how'd you meet. Was it nice? Was it tender. No, no, not really. No, not nice. They hired me Disney. I have the. I'm the first digital artists that Disney's ever hired in publishing. But they hired me to help them do their first digital book and as a fee Lancer and they didn't have a computer for me and they said, well, there's a room in there. The guy that usually is there is not here today. He sick, so going uses computer and so I went in and what was funding about Floyd office was that I couldn't tell who he was patients, everybody, they're all colors, all kinds of people. So if someone is hitting me, whose room is this, I couldn't have said who it was. So I was at its computer. It was a Quadra, nine hundred on their. Forget that. And and Floyd came in. Now he says, he said, who the Hiller you or what the hell are you doing there? But he didn't say that he Sharma, he just asked me, won't you know, who were you? And and I said, oh, I'll get up. If you want to see your room, I'll leave. So no foul work over here. You sit there and we talked the entire. Day, and we've just been talking ever since those kind of. But, but I will say that. Now, looking back because I met him and Lee Nordlinger, Dave check, oh, Jim Mitchell, and they were all frayed of me. And I didn't know that until years later that they were scared of me. And then Floyd told me that they were scared to me. Well, because I was mean. But I was because she thought we were stupid. You worse. Let me explain what they wanted. They wanted to take this old Disney and they wanted to turn it into digital and they wanted to paint it and repurpose it, but they were so stupid they were. They were. They were drawing in bit map. If anyone knows anything about digital, they were drawing bit met, which means you're drawing with pixel by pixel and they're like, we don't understand why is pixels. And I said, you idiot, why don't you go into the thing and turn it on grey scale, and then you'll get a full line. Oh, okay. And they did that. Then he started doing it in color, and it was like little pixels because they were drawing in two fifty six color. And again, I said, you guys are idiots. Why don't you go in there and why don't you chain to millions of colors, which they guy come God. It's an, it's it's a miracle. Now the colors are. So they call me the Photoshop lady, and that's how I came to work for Disney. And then I'd been ever since been twenty. Five years twenty five. Twenty five years of reminding them that they're idiots. To this to this day still. It's a employed ever work together on projects there. I try not to. We did. We did recently. We did a book with the wonderful Richard Sherman. Kristin, Kristin, would you bring your book? Can you get out. Throw it this way. I would also like to say so my best friends are here and their jungle book nuts and Kristen Nikki's looking for you. Yep, he's there that way. And they commissioned Floyd to draw some jungle book art for them. Thank you very much. Thank you. This. This is the book. View at home who want one of these. It's called the kiss. Goodnight, it's beautiful. You can't have this one because it's Kristen's, but you can buy one for yourself there. Absolutely beautiful. And it was inspired by a song written by the great Richard Sherman, right? Who in turn was inspired by Walt Disney's. Thinking about the end of day at Disneyland. You spent the day, it's now dark out. You see the fireworks show and Walt apparently said, I wanna leave him a little kiss kiss goodnight. And Richard knows q..

Floyd Disney Richard Sherman Walt Disney Kristen Nikki Lee Nordlinger Lancer Jim Mitchell Quadra Hiller Disneyland Adrian Kristin Sharma Dave Twenty five years Five years
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Know, creating all even burgers. It's still a big deal for me. Diner. Food is fine with me. Diner. Food is just great. Yeah, that's the real food speaking of jobs and employment, right. After sort of wrap this up by asking you about the unusual nature of your current relationship with the Disney company? Yes, just to say you no longer work for them, but you still show up there every day, a beautiful. Mascot. Yeah, that is. That is what's it. Like I said, my relationship with the Walt Disney studios as most unusual and I'm grateful that they indulge me. My wife is employed by the Walt Disney company. She comes to work every day and mainly I would I would come to Disney because I would drive to work every day, but I got tired of just driving my wife to work and then driving back home again and then driving back to pick her up at the end of the day. So I decided to just stay. Yeah, I moved into an empty office and I just stayed there. Even though the studio had every right to call security and have me ushered off their property. I really didn't belong there. But by being there, they just got used to me and. They begin sending jobs my way. In one of the first jobs I got, and I'll never forget this. We were working on some kind of an animation game thing for children. Something being developed for kids and John Lasseter was there, and he said. Why don't you get Floyd? He's down the hallway. He's not doing anything. And so that's how I got that job because John Lasseter saw me hanging around and and that's how I got that job. And then and eventually other jobs began to come my way. And so I just kept on working until people begin to regard me as a Disney employee, even though I was not. So it's been very interesting relationship, and I think I'm still kind of in that murky area of, I don't really belong there, but nobody has asked me to leave. So I'm kind of like kind of like didn't didn't Kramer have a job like that on Seinfeld. I don't mean this literally, but sort of do I'd like to see him try. Park myself, right outside of Disney and just sit and wait and just see the day that someone goes flick. Do you worked here. We're going to invite Floyd's wife, Adrienne to come up and..

Walt Disney company John Lasseter Disney Walt Disney studios Floyd Seinfeld Kramer Adrienne
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"This coffee is delicious. You know, my favorite one that you do, what is that? Rochester? Oh, yeah. We caused a lot of trouble at Pixar animation studios because Kim Mitchell Rony does a wonderful, Jack, Benny and when Kinney and I would get together a Kinney would be Jack Benny. And I would be Rochester and I would always, you know, Mr. Bennett is Rochester. That seemed to offend some people. You guys were doing it you? I guess it's two years ago at Comecon you were on a panel because of your film doing it and not. I have a lonely life where I'm obsessed with Jack Benny and didn't have a lot of friends as a child. And that was the funniest thing I've ever heard my life. I was crying standing in the back of that room, cry, laughing, everyone's going. What's a Jack Benny. Away Chester. It gets even better when I was a kid back in the fifties. I would actually go over to CBS television city, and I would be backstage on the Jack Benny program. I was literally backstage with Jack Mary Livingston Dennis day Phil Harris. Rochester, they were all there. Don Wilson, and Don Wilson who always laughing for some reason. Jack will be back in just a moment, but first. It was an incredible time live life television. I mean, it was an amazing time and I was back stage with these iconic figures. Phil Harris, you know, they were all there. Live CBS television in Hollywood. I know, I know, and thank goodness. It looks like they're going to save CBS television. The latest word that I. Yeah. There were some people who wanted to develop that Ling. Yeah, open space there. Hungry eyes are looking at it. Yeah, like vultures to keep them away the wonderful old studio. I mean, so many people, Carol Burnett was there. She did her show there and just just an incredible place. Yes. My dad always talks about growing up and hearing it or seeing it. When you be watching shows. I was a TV junkie kid the baby boom years and to sit in my house in New Jersey. And here art Gilmore say now live from television city in Hollywood. Oh, that just sounded so magical and exotic it was and I came out here and I met art. What? A lovely man? Yes. Oh, it's funny how things can come full circle in your life. Yeah, they really do. It is amazing in that. You know, when I arrived here in Hollywood and it was still that that radio was still big. I mean, I'm so old that I remember radio and being and being a radio star was a big deal. Sure. Because everybody listen to the radio, and so I remember that. I mean being a radio star seemed to be more important than being a movie star. You know, they'd always say so and so's star radio. Oh, and then they were sort of add movies, you know they were in your home? Yeah, exactly. Just like television that come right into your identity. Oh, that's a different feeling than you get from watching a movie, starring a sixty foot screen. That's incredible feeling too. But I think radio has an intimacy. It does it really it really? Yeah, I love. I love LA radio and and my memories of Hollywood when my parents would bring me to Hollywood, I was a little kid and we would actually go to CBS and NBC you know, totally demolished. NBC was on the corner of sunset and vine, I guess. Yeah, and they totally tore the place down, but it was a magical place and all of these stars radio where we're doing their shows there, and that was a very special time. What did your parents do. Well, my parents were not artists. They ran a restaurant in Santa Barbara, California, and not a classy restaurant. Just pretty much a diner, but I loved the restaurant business because who doesn't love being around food. You doesn't know naysayers here. Exactly. And so, yeah, I, if I was rich guy and had a lot of money, I would open a restaurant because restaurants are just so much fun. The only trouble is if you open a restaurant, chances are you're going to go broke because it's a very tough business. It's very tough to survive, but this something wonderful about, you know, just being in a restaurant and and I love being in the kitchen being around shifts. You.

Jack Benny Hollywood Rochester CBS Jack Phil Harris Carol Burnett Jack Mary Livingston Dennis Pixar animation Kinney Don Wilson Kim Mitchell Rony Chester art Gilmore Santa Barbara Mr. Bennett New Jersey NBC California
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"And I gotta tell you that book was nearly gags that I had drawn over a nearly twenty year period of Michael Eisner, as he fumbled and stumbled his way through the through the Disney company. And Michael was just, I mean, he was so rich material. I, I never ran outta gangs because Michael Eisner just provided gag after gag and joke after joke and to the man's credit. Michael appreciated the jokes. I Joe about him. He took it. He took it all in stride yet a sense of humor. He recognized that when I was making fun of him. He was the center of attention. Sure. That's really what he wanted. He, he didn't mind being portrayed as an ogre. He kind of enjoyed it is long as you know, the book was about him. He was happy with. It's so when I published a book I sent, I copy I sent to Michael Eisner's office, so I knew that way I could be fired right away. Wouldn't have to wouldn't have to wait and Michael really enjoyed the book and sent me a nice. Thank you note and I gotta give the guy credit for having a sense of humor. Absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. Only you. Now, if if you are curious to know more about Floyd or hear more of his stories are learn more about his life and extraordinary career and extrordinary marriage to boot. What's that DVD you have over there? Blu Ray actually. Pardon me. It's a Blu Ray. We're way up to date now a Blu Ray. Maybe that was done by Michael fury and Eric Sharkey, and it's called Floyd Norman animated life, and real. It is really good. And if you've seen it and think you've seen it all their bonus features on the Blu Ray material that didn't make it to the final cut of the film. And now it can be yours if you purchase this Blu Ray and even got a post, a wonderful poster image drew by Druce. Rusin did. Did the poster ceautiful. Just go to Floyd Norman movie dot com. That's Floyd Norman movie come. I feel like you could get Morgan Freeman a run for his money, be the voice of God. I'd be really start doing impressions. I don't do impressions. I tell people that when I was a kid I grew up on l. a. radio announcers, and I just love the way these guys sounded. So they really influenced the way I speak today. And so whenever I go into that, that voice where I sound like. I sound like a Los Angeles, radio announcer. You know, one of my favorites was Gary Owens. Hello? Hello, Mary, Gary here I had lunch with Gary Owens at the smoke house one afternoon, and I felt like I was on the radio. Did you Gary Owens at him, Gary over you in each other? We went Gary Owens back and forth, you know, would you mind passing the soul. Thank you very much. My.

Michael Blu Ray Floyd Norman Michael Eisner Gary Owens Michael fury Disney Morgan Freeman Joe Los Angeles Rusin Eric Sharkey Druce twenty year
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Well, there was only one studio who had advanced that far in computer graphics to be able to do such a thing, and that was Pixar. The little company up in northern California of that was being run by John Lasseter who had worked for a time at the Disney studio. And when I saw this film, I don't know if anybody else realized that. But when I saw it, I realized this is going to change everything. I realized that the animation business was going to be profoundly changed by what Pixar was doing and of. Of course it was today the production pipeline at almost every enemy that film is digital. There are exceptions. There's still some hand-drawn work being done, some stop motion, but predominantly our films are being made digitally, and that revolution was led by Pixar. And I saw that and nineteen ninety four. And of course, I said to myself, I wanna go work with these guys. And so thankfully, Ralph Guggenheim producer up at Pixar animation studios paid us a visit one Friday afternoon. And he said, I need some guys to come up and work with the kids up at Pixar because we're in new studio. We need the help of some Disney veterans would anybody want to come up and help us? And immediately I said, I'll go. So I was the first volunteer. I said, I will go to Pixar because I realize that's the future. And you were working in the story department again? Yes, I was back in story at that time. Yeah, and that's where Pixar and needed help. You know, they recognize the importance of the kind of storytelling that the Disney studio was known for. And so a guy like myself who had worked with the old man who had worked with Walt Disney, I kid take what I learned from Walt and take that up to Pixar. Sure. And you know, sort of mentor new generation of animation, storytellers and from the way I hear it in any case, they eventually maybe maybe even sooner than eventually adopted the template of Walt Disney's story telling techniques, very much, so which explains Pixar extraordinary success because it's based on those fundamentals, Disney visual storytelling, and a lot of the Pixar guys, Dr John Lasseter and Joe ramp, and all those guys, they learned their craft from the Disney mass. Stors made who taught him that stuff. It was the old Disney guys who taught those Pixar guys, how to tell stories how to make movies it was Disney set. Talk about a through line. Yeah, generations broke. Why would you not follow that cause? Some of them went to Cal arts and study with Eric Larsen. Right, right. Yeah. Some of them joined the studio hired by the studio in their training program. You bet where you've been here and some other people. Yeah, so lucky them. Oh, yeah, yeah. And a lot of great young guys came through Disney in the seventies guys, like guys who didn't last very long because they were little bit too Rambo, Rambus guys like Brad bird and Tim Burton, and. And John Lasseter who was actually let go let go from Disney and you know, because these guys, you know, we're considered a little bit too radical for the for the studio. At that time they were individuals they, they truly were and they were the guys who were going to change the industry. Yeah, they were going to change everything and did. Of course. Yeah. We haven't touch on one other high point of your career. You were the last person to write and draw the syndicated Mickey Mouse comic strip where you not? Yes, yeah..

Pixar animation studios Disney Walt Disney Dr John Lasseter California Ralph Guggenheim Cal arts Eric Larsen producer Rambus Stors Brad bird Tim Burton Joe ramp
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"I think your favorite animated feature, right? Robin Hood. I can't. I can't pick one, but it's up there this. Do you find this people? My age. I'm thirty two people my age obsessed with that Robin Hood. Grownups hated and I don't underst-. It's one of those weird things. You and all your friends, you have no time for this film me and anybody around my age. We're like, this is golden. What is wrong with you? I don't. I don't understand. I mean, that's what I always find leflore yard. I been a story Artis and Robin Hood was the film that brought me back to a mation. Yeah, I came back to animate on robinhood. Yeah, really? No. I did animate Robin, the FOX simply because I wanted to prove if only to myself that I could do Disney animation. So I did animate robinhood. You know, the, the character, the FOX that was the, I think the only time I enemy on a Disney feature film was on Robin Hood. And shortly after that, I got fired. It's because you couldn't do any better. It was perfect. Knew that was the end. It's really funny. Actually, Mike, getting booted out of Disney at that time really had nothing to do with my animation. I was grateful for the opportunity to work on Robin Hood, and I'm glad that so many people love the film today, but. The Disney management and myself, we really didn't see eye to eye. So I felt that it was time to part company in case you haven't noticed? Floyd is somewhat outspoken, somewhat someone? Yeah. And has a tendency to be honest. Yes, yes. And I do love the company. I mean, I have to remind people that even though I've been booted out of Disney number of times, I really loved the Disney company. I really, I really do, and we have this great relationship that even, you know, we're kinda like squabbling parents, you know, I, it's a marriage of sorts, and sometimes you get along and sometimes you don't and then their breakup. But you come back together again because you truly love each other. So that's my relationship with with business video. That's futile. Yeah. Now you also went yet another step forward ride by working up at Pixar? Yes, on Toy Story, two right. Monsters as watch, keeps lasting Jesse, which I've decided is for me. Thank you for putting me on your your iphone. There. Thank you. That's just Jessie is on my iphone. I know. Amazing all my birthday. It's amazing. Every time people ask me all the time. If it's named after me, I have no idea why they think I would have that kind of poll, but I've had many people's going. Those Jesse named after this point. I'm like, yeah, of course. You sure if course yodeling cowgirl, that's me. Why would you fight that? No doubt. That's what was when did you first start animating with computers? Because the thing is you are you're a creative person and every way and you're not the type you don't strike me as the type who'd go. No, I'm not going to try that. I would see you more someone going. I'm going to be really good at that and better than you. Adrian. The story begins in nineteen ninety four when I arrived in my office in Glendale, California because we had been booted off the Disney studio loud and we were in exile over in Glendale. While they built us a new animation building. So we had to have someplace to work. But I came into work early one morning and there was a movie of being run an editorial. There was nobody around like the building was empty in here is this film onscreen and it didn't look like anything I'd ever seen before? Well, the movie was toys story. Pixar, animation studios. I motion picture was in production. When I saw this footage on the screen, I realized this was not something being done by Disney, and I just sort of put things together in my head. Well, this is obviously the job that's been contract that out to somebody outside of Disney doing this, who could it be?.

Robin Hood Disney Jesse Pixar FOX Jessie Glendale Floyd Artis Mike California
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"So we want to keep this positive, right. We won't go into detail questions. I'm just ask you like a. Give us some adjectives that come to mind like raw shack test. What are some words used to describe your experience of working with Walt Disney. Exhilarating, terrifying. Fascinating. Insightful. It was just all of those things to number one, I could not imagine myself even being in a meeting with Walt Disney. Keep in mind when I came to the studio. I just wanted a job as an animator. I just wanted to sit in the ranks with those other great artists. The idea of being in the same room with the master himself. You know, keep in mind with the hundreds of people who worked at the Disney studio. Walt met probably with no more than a dozen people. You know, in those meetings, maybe a dozen people in those meetings upstairs on the second and third floor. Imagine being one of the people in those meetings on a regular basis you look around. And the question I asked myself continually is why am I here. What am I doing here? I mean, I'm here with all of these masters and these guys who had created this, this, this this industry who'd guys who've done brilliant work. Great, storytellers, great artists and they're sitting there with Walt Disney and I'm in the midst of all of these genius. You couldn't help it. Ask the question. What am I doing here? You know? So it helps that you're a really brilliant artist that that would probably be the why on that one. Well, that's only your opinion. I must be wrong because Walt shows you, I must be off on that. No, I can't imagine having to report to him and I can't imagine. I can't imagine seeing my name on a screen with those people like you're talking about took awhile. What were what were the premiers I mean, did you go to the premier's that you do those sorts of things? Which really funny there was a of glamour in a Mason in the early days when I mention glamour and Holly. It took us a long while before we had those glamorous premiers. Usually we finished the film, the film God released and we moved onto the next movie. There was there wasn't a good deal of celebrating or the press junket and all of that because nobody cared that much about animation. Remember seeing your name on the screen. The first time I saw my name on the screen. Yeah. Was it took a while and I have to tell the youngsters, what's that. His, his wife and my mother sitting next very dangerous. You guys. Hecklers. In the old days, you didn't get screen credits. When I started on the jungle book back in nineteen sixty six. I knew that there was no way my name would be on the screen because it just didn't happen that way. The way screen screen credits were doled out. You had to have been with the studio number of years. You had to just not just work on a film but prove yourself as as almost a master in that particular area. So you really had to earn a screen credit and when I say earn it, you really had to earn it today. You know, they get people's pets screen credit. Everybody gets a screen credit. You know, the cater the driver. You know the friend of the producer, the guy who dated the producers daughter, everybody gets a screen credit, but back in those days it took a while and I received my first Disney screen credit on The Hunchback of Notre Dom. That's in the nineties. That's in the nineties. I started in the nineteen fifties. I didn't get. I didn't get a credit till the nineteen nineties. That's how long it took the credit on your. AMD. It's a joke. There was no, I am deeply. It's a joke. Maybe there should have been. I don't know. A squirrel. Squirrel is top and they just write a check every time you make a movie. So you had you took a respite from Disney for a while. Then you came back for a while and worked on jesse's..

Walt Disney Disney jesse Holly Notre Dom AMD producer
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"It went right into production because there was no one else to ask. If all said it's okay, then it's okay. Walt says, no, and then it's it's done. It's not going anywhere. So in a way that helped the production process move swiftly and I keep in mind. We were doing a total rewrite of the film because Walt Disney hated the first iteration of the jungle book, and he wanted us to start over. He said, I want everything redone. So we had to move very quickly to through the story process and move these sequences into animation. Thankfully, Walt Disney made decisions quickly. We had a great team of animators who were masters at their craft, so they had no problem grab into stuff from us and pushing this work right in the animation. And because they were so darn good, they were so talented, they were able to just not this stuff out like like it was nothing, but keep in mind these guys who'd been on the job twenty thirty years. And so they were masters in every way. So you know the work guys like Milt and Frank, and Eric and all the others dead was no just just beautiful work and they just made are seen sparkle. So it was a real pleasure to work on the jungle book. Even though I was sort of a naive young kid. I was up there playing in the major leagues really. I was like a rookie plane in the major leagues because I was with all of these guys who who had done, you know, decades of work at Disney and they were still at their best. Yeah, that's kind of. It's a bittersweet film to to watch it for Disney fan because we all know it's the pinnacle. And it's also the beginning of the end. It was the last film left animated film well-supervised. Right? And there have been other things in the works, but this is the last one he was hands on the producer of and. And in the years that followed some of those animators retired, some Muthu Imagineering. Chose other ways to express themselves. So this is like the gathering of the clan? Yeah, one last hurrah. It was. It was indeed. And of course we had no idea in that last year. Nineteen sixty six. We had no idea how ill will Disney was because he even though I'm sure that he wasn't in the best of health. He never showed any signs of ill health. He work with the same determination and enthusiasm and passion that he always had. So he honestly showed no signs of slowing down and that's why his death came as such a shock and surprise to all of us because head we've seen a sick man before us. You know, you start to think, oh, you know, time is short, but because Walt was so active in so engaged and so dynamic. We had. Idea that when the film wrapped up probably in late November that in a matter weeks, all would be gone and that's why his passing came as such a shock to all of us are at..

Walt Disney Disney Muthu Imagineering producer Eric Milt Frank twenty thirty years
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"You had to end between them perfectly so they move their dancing down. So they're moving up and down and back and forth. And all of that and you're, you're in between all of that tedious job, tough job, but you know, that's like you've got pearly nightmares. That's tiny little girls going. Oh, yeah. But we gotta done. You did it done. It's Mary Poppins. It is. I mean, you know, in the same way jungle book. This is the best possible audience to to Disney nerd with. Of course. John book jungle book, what what about the the movie that I tried so hard to avoid. Go for you isn't that the way it works out that evolved at Disney feature films when I heard they were going to do the jungle book, I said to myself, I think I will sit this one out. And so I had the opportunity to be an animation assistant to one of my favorite animators. The wonderful ward Kimball. So, yeah. Ward was great because ward would give me scenes that were pretty much you know stacks of paper with not a whole lot on it. 'cause ward was so quick and he didn't have the patience to draw stuff. He knew that his assistance would do all that and ward often hand me a stack of papers, animation drawings, and you would say, put the funny stuff in here. But but I was working for ward and having just a grand ole time when my boss, Andy England call me into his office one Friday afternoon, totally unexpected. He says pack up your office, you're going to be moving upstairs to see wing to work with woolly right Amon on the jungle book. I was flabbergasted because. I didn't know anything about storytelling. So why in the world would this young animator be sent upstairs to the story department? So naturally as why me Andy gave no explanation, he says, don't ask any questions, just pack up your office. You're going to be moving upstairs to work on the jungle book. And I thought I'd be going to some kind of trainy period some kind of a tryout, some kind of an apprenticeship or so, you know, I hadn't done this job before, but Monday morning, I was handed. An outline by Larry Clements. Monday morning, I was working on production day one. I didn't have any time to even consider whether or not I could do the job. I was literally thrown into the deep end of the pool on day one. And I just started storyboarding along with my colleague Vance, Gary, and the man who would be looking at my storyboards would be Walt Disney. Think about that. First time on the job, having never done this job before. And guess who's going to look at it? Walt Disney for young kid like me, that was terrifying, but it was wonderful. I mean, that's what's so great about challenges in life. They are terrifying yet exhilarating. And then when you get something like the boss approving what you've done and what was not big on compliments, I'll never forget when I looked at the boards fans and I had done, I think he showed showed us that he was pleased because he said very simply that's more like it and walked out of the room. Like I said, we'll Disney was was not big on compliments. So when he said that's more like it, I, I realized that we were on the right track bullseye bullseyes. Exactly. That's right. Now, people sometimes especially people who aren't conversant with animation terminology would think a story man sits at a typewriter. Ter- computer now and types of script, but that's not what it was like at the Disney animation department. No, indeed it was the same..

Ward Disney Walt Disney Andy England Mary Poppins John Kimball Larry Clements Amon Vance Gary
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Well, there it was down in Anaheim, and I could literally look across the way and see all of these tractors and earth movers and all of this stuff going on. And of course they were building Disneyland. That construction had started, and it was amazing that in a year's time, imagine that a year's time they built the place. Can you believe that on a starting starting scratch? Yes, starting from scratch. They constructed Disneyland, and it was. It was about a year and in July nineteen, fifty, five. I was there and I think the paint was still wet. Amazing, truly amazing experience. Did you hear the speech? No, I did not. That was opening day actually. I'm kinda glad I wasn't there. I think everyone they weren't there opening day. I was. I was there opening week, but not opening day. So I did. I did miss the speech, and there were all these stories about women's heels sinking and if you haven't read some of the really, they're funny because it didn't happen to us kind of thing. The opening day of Disneyland. Just everything went wrong every possibly the toilets broke like everything. Every kind of thing went wrong yet it was still magical. Yeah. Magical, sewage just beautiful stuff, but they fixed it. They did fixed the fixed quickly. I've always wondered when you're an animator working on an animated sequence or film. If you break it down to numbers. I mean, there's twenty four frames every second. And if you expose it twice, it's still twelve frames a second. And then you multiply numbers of seconds. Number of minutes is a number of our head. Yes, and it's just a staggering number and it's it's kind of like climbing Mount Everest. It seems to me or the Matterhorn and stay on brand STAN brand. How do you, how do you approach that? Or how did you approach that? Did you break it down to? No, I'm not climbing the Matterhorn. I'm climbing a foot and a half of the Matterhorn. How did you deal with that? Well, animations always been a tedious rather tedious process, and that's why people who become animators are a little bit crazy, I guess, because it is so much work. Keep in mind that when you're making an animated film, you're pretty much making a movie by hand. Now that sounds kind of insane. You're literally making a movie by hand even when we animate onto, which is what usually happens. Where you're doing your animated instead of twenty four joins a second. It's only twelve drawings, but that's still twelve joins. Now when we were composite in with live action on a film Lake, Mary Poppins for instance, where we had to composite our animation with live action, then we had to work on ones. So that means we were literally drawing every frame of film that's in that movie that has animation. Every frame of that motion picture is drawn frame. You know, that's a drawing twenty four literal frames per second. That is a lot of work. And that's why I took us so long to do the animation on Mary Poppins because even after we completed the live action after everything had been filmed. The animation guys still spent another year just doing the animation for Mary Poppins. That's how long it took. That's the kind of tedious task. It was so for you, it was not a jolly holiday. Well, you know, when you sign onto this job, it's kind of like joining the marines. So when you're asked to charge that hill, you realize this is the job I signed on for, so I better darn well do it and enjoy it. So even though it's hard work, even though it's going to take many, many weeks or months of work, you, you just knuckle down in, you do it and whatever's required. You just do it. Would we found out we were going to have per lease in the super Keller fetch Listrik ex PL Adoc. -is we had the draw all of those pearls on the Perlas outfit. Every everyone of those pearls. We didn't have any computer assist. There is no shortcut no digital shortcuts. Every one of those little stupid pearls had to be drawn. You had to drive you one of them and then not only did you have to draw them..

Mary Poppins Disneyland Anaheim Mount Everest STAN Perlas
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"And patient with all of us kids. And we learned from these Disney masters firsthand. So a real opportunity for for all of us young kids who they're the famous nine men, right? His animator directors that he dubbed that in the late thirties or early forty second. Yeah. Is there any one or two that you spent a particular amount of time working with? I was lucky and I in the sense that I had the opportunity to meet all of the nine old men. I didn't work with all of them, but I think I work with most. Of them. I work with lounge berry John loans berry. I worked with milk called Frank. Thomas didn't work with Ali met olive course, but it didn't work with Ali Johnson work with Eric Larsen and Wolfgang. Right? Amon, ward Kimball and less Clark I met didn't work with less, but I did meet him. So I had the opportunity to work with these guys, and I think I probably spent the most time with milk call because I was on sword in the stone from almost start to finish with milk call. And boy, was that a learning experience? Because he was one of Disney's, finest animators, and incredible draftsman. So I learned a lot from milk called and he also had a reputation as being a pretty ferocious guy. You know, bombastic loud, scary, but I never had one problem with Milt because I had a secret. I learned how to make him laugh. And I used humor to my advantage and because I could do funny jokes and make note laugh. I never had a problem with him even though he was he was known as the scariest animator Disney. What now you just mentioned that he's he's known ended this reputation right that his draftsmanship. Some animators worked. I've heard these terms as all secondhand. You're some major work very loosely, right? Some work very tight. Some very precise right others were. Kind of flexible and what they did, and then that required their assistant animator yet another job category, right to come in and sort of clean up their work or be able to guess, or an educated, guess kind of way what they were really going after in there screwy dry. Exactly. And that's why the assistant animator that's very important job. It may sound like a menial tasks, but an animator really needs a good assistant because this is a person who's going to follow you up. This is the person who's going to clean up your drawings, who's going to almost intensified what you're going to put down on paper and to be able to see through that, you know that morass of sketchy lines all of this stuff on paper and then choose just the right line to clean up Frank. Thomas was a was an animator who just filled his his page. With scribbles and his key assistant Dale Oliver had to note just what line to choose to make that the final line and boy that that takes some doing sure I know about this because I failed miserably trying to follow up Frank. Thomas, I totally destroyed one of Frank's scenes and I'll never forget the pain and the humiliation. When Frank one day call me into his office and Frank, Thomas is very gentle man, but still very scary. And he said, Florida, who is you coming to my office. Chunk you sheen you did for me and joins weren't very good. Maybe we can sit down and point you in the right direction. So so I spent like two hours or three hours standing behind Frank, Thomas, as he ripped me to shreds, and I tell you, I went home that afternoon in tears, but that's the way it was. This was bootcamp for animators. This was this was you're working with the top people at Disney and they were serious and you better know your stuff or you better learn it fast. Well, that was why they produce films have such exceptional quality. Exactly. Do you remember your first trip to Disneyland. My first trip, the Disneyland. I was not really at Disneyland. I was sort of I was at Knott's berry farm. Are you allowed to say that..

Frank Thomas Disney milk Milt Disneyland ward Kimball Ali Johnson Dale Oliver John loans Amon Eric Larsen Florida Wolfgang Clark forty second three hours two hours
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Duck short cartoons moved up from there, started working on some of the Disneyland shows all for television and really over a period of time in that first couple of years. I worked my way up from simple TV stuff up to the prestigious Walt Disney feature film sleeping beauty, but it took a while to get there. Beauty. Now that was waltz most ambitious and expensive film to date and and it was done in cinemascope or technical? Yeah, it was a wide screen format. So that meant more drawing more painting, more everything or more money? Yeah, more more time. And one story I loved to tell about who Disney was because this really speaks to waltz character. We were in a real crunch, get sleeping beauty completed because the film's behind schedule over budget. So we had to go into overtime. And so the word went out that you animation guys are going to have to work overtime. You can have to putting in some extra time. Walt Disney said, okay, but he had one rule. He said, una want anybody working past nine o'clock because you guys ought to be home with your families and not here at the studio. Imagine that today. Can anybody imagine that today. Good. I haven't. You guys need to be at home with your family and not here at the studio. Well, Disney part of why one of the loveliest things about someone like you talking about Walt as for as many rumors are out there as many stories as people like to come up with, may they rot. You know. Walt was someone spectacular. He was spectacular and something that brings me so much joy hearing you and some of our other friends who actually worked with him, talk about him and tell those stories because it's not here say it's not someone said from that over there. No, he was your boss, maybe not directly all the time, but still you dealt with him and you dealt with everyone else who was working with him. So you knew what kind of a man he was also not frozen. Let's just. No, no. Yeah, yeah, that's that's what we was and what a privilege for all of us youngsters who were there at that time to to work with such an amazing man and with all of the amazing artists, the men and women who made the classic films we saw as children, many of them were still there, and so we were mentored by all of these Disney veterans who were for the most part, extremely gracious.

Walt Disney Disney
"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"I think even had tattoos on his arms like the anchors on anyway, but he was a, he was a funny old guy who was known at the Disney studio as the world's fastest in between her and that was his claim to fame he could do inbetween faster than anybody. So Johnny taught us how to do an in between now that that whole concept to me was totally insane. Do you know what an end between is? It's an artist has to put a drawing in between two other joins now. I know that sounds crazy, but that drawing you put in between has to be perfectly in between. Otherwise the animation would not move smoothly, it would. It would bobble would do that. So in order to get the animation to move Smoot join has to be perfectly in between the two extremes. So we had to learn how to do that. And it took a while to rep our head around that concept because I, I knew a fair bit about animation, but I didn't know about the in. Between, but we all we all learn how to do it. And because we did, we were eventually hired after that first month as apprentice in between. There's and my aunt is inbetween, but a print up Prentice in between. There's that's correct. And my career was on the way. Well, how did one graduate then from apprentice to full-fledged in between her, you kind of had to prove yourself. Once you made the grade as apprentice, then you went to work on production and I went to work. My first boss was a crazy man named rolly Crump. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah, you, you know, Rowley will Rowley was my first boss and boy, what a guy to work for you was he was a brilliant guy, but totally off the wall. The big joke was they said, even Walt Disney wanted to be really crunch. Because Rowley was so cool. He was the coolest dude and the Walt Disney studio. Keep in mind. This is back in the conservative fifties where you know people were pretty conservative back then, but Rowley was this kind of crazy man who wore sandals and a t shirt and that used to drive some of the old guard crazy as Rowley was as such a counterculture kind of guide any. Did these. Drug posters, you know, marijuana, posters that was exhibited in the Disney studio library. Everybody was afraid that Walt Disney was going to have a hissy fit. When he saw role, these drug posters and Walt dealt, they were hilarious. He left his head of you thought that was the funniest stuff you've ever seen and people if you don't know role, ease work, and I know a lot of you folks do. I think the sort of I hate using that word icon, but I think the iconic piece is that giant whirligig sits in front of it's a small world, right? A big big of metallic multicolored. Spinning wheel that just catches your eye on holds it, and that's typical rolly Crump it really is. And Rowley started doing this just as a past time and he had filled his office. I remember going enroll his office down and f. wing on the first floor of the animation building, and Rowley office was filled with all of these little twirling propellers and things spinning and rotating. Walt Disney saw that stuff and said, I could use this guy over in Imagineering and that's how Rowley left animation and became an Imaginaire, brilliant guy. So what film did you get to work on? I you remember the very first thing I worked on as a young apprentice was the Mickey Mouse club, and we were doing Jimmy cricket those little Jimmy cricket, educational. I'm no fool. I'm no fool. Exactly. I'm no food, no Serie. I'm. Going to live to be twenty three. I play safe for you and me because I'm no fool. And on top of that, cliff Edwards was still there doing the voice of Jimmy cricket. Cliff Edwards done. The voice in Pinocchio in cliff was still at the studio, but then so Clarence Nash was still there doing Donald Duck. So there were a lot of things that you know the old Disney was still very much intact when when we started his kids, but you know, started out on Mickey Mouse club, moved up to the Donald..

Rowley Walt Disney Walt Disney studio Disney rolly Crump cliff Edwards Jimmy cricket Walt Johnny Donald Duck Smoot Prentice Clarence Nash marijuana Pinocchio f. wing
"floyd norman" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"floyd norman" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"We've got share interviews you know we interviewed one of our biggest ones is the destiny interview which was with chris barrett the game designer if you like video games and destiny is what does that one six sixteen yes i'm gonna tell you the actual episode numbers for these just search spat out some names and you can go look it up for yourselves we had floyd norman which was the animated for disney who had a documentary about them that's still available to this day i think used to be able to watch on netflix but it's available i think on voodoo definitely the hummers black animator hired at disney in the fifties we had sean christians in an oscar winning director who directed a short film called curfew on and he went on to direct to other movies we get winter we had a oh yeah photographer who ross deb men who has won an emmy we've had an oscar winner todd disalvo who was working at marvel when they were doing the lightermen herman for years really nice guy that was a great one we talked to greg weisman hooper who created created gargoyles and produces young justice and the rebel star wars rebels with dave baloney that was a great interview we had eric sharkey who did the drew shrews who's one of my favorite artists and directed the documentary that's true archies great i i really want donna from the howard stern show like benji girlfriend and howard stern like calendar girl i guess only on youtube though you gotta go to our true that's mike rips we got we have bike rips we dope we had dope lots good interviews.

floyd norman disney netflix oscar emmy todd disalvo marvel dave baloney eric sharkey donna chris barrett director greg weisman hooper benji howard stern youtube