20 Episode results for "Florida International University"

The Attack on Floridas Latino Voters

Slate's If Then

18:45 min | 2 months ago

The Attack on Floridas Latino Voters

"The technology certainly yields a lot of power and with money dot com your business can use it to bring teams departments together, no more lost e mails countless video calls vague action items and endless back and forth for simple projects get everyone on the same page with Monday dot Com a flexible platform that finally allows you to manage your people, projects and external tools all in one place whether you work with a team of five or five thousand Monday dot com is the easiest way to keep everyone connected and on the right track try it out for yourself for a free two week trial had to Monday dot com and take it for a spin. It's impossible to measure the exact amount of disinformation that's currently flooding. The social media feeds of Latino, people in Florida but experts describe it as an onslaught messages with false claims about Joe. Biden are flooding twitter facebook WHATSAPP and even Spanish language newspapers and radio stations. We've been monitoring them quite closely over the last couple of months. This is Eduardo Gomorrah a professor of politics and International Relations at Florida International University. Eduardo, and his team have been tracking the flow of disinformation into Florida's Hispanic communities. They want to know how this information is spread and intern how it might affect the vote. There's one clip in particular that keeps thinking about. Out, either go level that will be incorporated. That's a clip from actually dad radio. A popular station in the Miami area is the third most popular Spanish language station behind one of his yawn and the top Spanish music station. Eduardo says, the woman speaking is a regular on the Augustina Costa show a Spanish language talk radio program basically argues that the black lives matter movement is inspired by Black Magic where people are taking over houses, burning houses, and and harming people. Through. Getting up again doping associated. With a specific warning saying if you vote for Joe Biden this is exactly what's going to happen to you in the recording sort of ends with the woman saying. Don't blame us. We warned you that this would happen if Democrats were allowed to to win. Some no Campbell is assembled under what at Kia Janis. attack. Case. And of course, the implicit message is that black lives matter is dominated by the far left Democrats and that Joe Biden new of course is captured by the by the radical left. This, kind of targeted disinformation was also used in twenty sixteen manipulate voters and particularly to suppress turnout along black voters. Recent investigation has shown that a firm working for the trump campaign for years ago categorized three point five, million black voters deterrence. The implicit goal was to persuade those voters not to vote similar tactics have been used by multiple groups ever since then while voters nationwide are being bombarded, there's a reason why so many. Of these dishonest ads and social media posts are popping up in Florida Eduardo says, but even if this disinformation nudges opinion by just one percent or a fraction of a percent within one subgroup within the umbrella group of Latinos, it could affect which candidate walks away with the state's hugely important twenty nine electoral votes or Ricans of course, seven out of every ten are Democrats but if you can convince one of every ten Puerto Ricans. That there is Global Marxist conspiracy or Jewish conspiracy or what have you to change his vote that changes the outcome of the election. Today. On the show, the disinformation targeting Latino voters in south Florida and how it could tip the presidential election I'm Celeste Headley Filling in for Lizzie O'Leary, and you're listening to what? Next TVD A show about technology power and how the future will be determined stay with us. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast. I think you'll like it's called wild wild tack. It's filled with weird and interesting stories about technology and the surprising way it impacts of culture. For example, they have a story about why apple changed its products to make them look appealing in movies and how the US Army is recruiting. It's next generation of soldiers on twitch or another story of how Tiktok has become the hottest dating APP from Lesbians, journalists, Jordan, Erika Weber, and Joshua Rivera talk to the people whose lives have been weirdly altered by technology and gain insight from. Reporters, who were there listen and subscribe to wild wild tech on apple podcasts spotify or wherever you're listening right now. Support for this podcast comes from dropbox business team work your way there was struggling to balance my professional life and making my son's something healthy in my personal life, and then I realized my team and I can fix this sure. 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Try it out for yourself to get your free two week trial go to Monday dot com today. The vote in Florida is not just important this election it's important every election. But when we talk about the Latino, vote what what exactly does that mean? In Florida the Latino, vote or the Hispanic vote is a very complex phenomenon because we have one point, three, million Cubans of which probably six hundred to seven hundred thousand voters we have one point three million Puerto Ricans of which probably a little bit more seven, hundred, thousand or voters Mexicans about eight hundred, thousand Mexicans were very silent group here. A lot of them are undocumented a lot of them are farm workers and so on. But increasingly were now beginning to see Mexican voters in the state, and then we have the Venezuelans more. Than more recent arrivals who've been coming over the last twenty years right and then over the last decade or so as a result of the financial crisis in Puerto Rico and then the hurricanes right we've had this massive migration of Puerto Ricans into Florida. So if you try to understand how they behave politically, then you have to go into each of those groups and understand who they are. Some have come here fleeing right wing military dictatorship. Some have come fleeing Marxist guerrillas. Some have come clean. You know the the tragedy of Venezuela not. Of the tragedy and Cuba. I want to read you a comment that was made by extra. Sanchez. Who CEO of Mi Familia Vote the and he says this. Quote widespread and systematic attempts to intimidate Latinos to cast doubt on Latino voters. All of this is a feature of American politics that has been persistent and consistent really since there have been Latinos in American politics. Well, I think he's correct. Historically, the Republicans have been able to play other. Latinos, against Cubans Okay Cubans have a very high rate of voter participation. In fact, it's even higher than White Americans. They're very proud of the turnout among Cuban-americans because they've over predominantly Republican but the strategy has always been to kind of suppress other voters. You know we don't want to many Mexicans voting and we certainly don't want to many Puerto Ricans voting because they trend. Democratic. I was interested in a message that came from a group supposedly called coupons put a moon. No. That said, the Cuban government is planning to stage a caravan at the southern border and create an immigrant crisis. I was interested because this is such a reflection of some of the misinformation that occurred during the last election. Why do you think this particular message about the Cuban government sending a caravan of migrants would have any kind of play in Florida. Well in large measure and I think you have to really understand the context that we're talking about here. The reality is that most of the Cuban population in Florida is a product of the Cuban revolution and its aftermath. Most of the Venezuelan population here is a product of the Chavis government in its aftermath. These are people that suffered and you know and I person the the process there, and so have this recurring fear that if the Democrats win, it's really a victory for the for the Cuban regime it's a victory for for muddle in Venezuela and that we're going to become like Cuba and Venezuela, and where are we going to flee to next? That's really what's underlying all of this. and Water says many of the messages combined political themes with false religious claims aimed at influencing residents who might base their voting decisions on their faith one or the other messages that circulates here is that Joe Biden is not a real Catholic. You know that Joe Biden favors late term abortion up until the very tight until until birth when it's very clear that. Joe. Biden has in fact been antiabortion for most of his career and only now has he basically said that abortion should be late term only if the mother's life is at stake. But when you talk to voters here, right Catholic voters, they are convinced that Democrats are going to be chopping up babies even as they come out of the womb and that's a message that's extraordinarily powerful. When we talk about Misinformation Online, we talk about it in the context of the 2016 election false stories spread across social media in support of trump's campaign and the Republican. Party, and that's partly what's happening now to Democrats in Congress have even called for an investigation into the source of the disinformation aimed at Latino voters. But to limit our understanding of the issue in Florida to one side of the political spectrum Eduardo says would be A. And it's not just a disinformation misinformation that comes from the right. It also comes from the left. Is I look, for example, at at some of the statements coming out of Venezuela or Bolivia about covid right one of the greatest conspiracies that's that's been spouted from that region is that it's president trump who who developed covert and he did so to exterminate minorities in the United States into eventually, of course, stop immigrants from coming to the United States, and that you know has been all over the media in Latin America and even mentioned by former president modell is himself on several occasions. So it's been going back and forth there have been dozens of ads placed in facebook and messages on twitter and what's APP that attempt? To spread false information about Joe. Biden but people are especially surprised to see this material appear in two more mainstream credible outlets with a full page ad in the New Wave Oh herald the sister publication of the Miami Herald and a half hour of paid programming on a popular Florida radio station. I asked Duardo how the gatekeepers at these organizations allowed this false content to reach their audience the insured in the Miami Herald Iran for nine months. Celeste it wasn't a one time thing. It was a nine month thing and it was something that was repeated and it was really only when you know somebody outside of the community founded objectionable. The same thing with the gotta call radio seventeen minute segment that ran right that you know there was outrage but there was largely outraged by the Jewish community and we have a very large Hispanic Jewish community. Yet somebody thought that it was okay to be antisemitic for seventeen minutes on Caracol radio. Both of those organizations have taken matters into their own hands and and they have demoted or fired some of the people responsible. The insert of course was suspended. But I think the damage has been done. especially. When you look at it in terms of the the amount of support, those views appear to have. I wonder whether at least some the messages you're seeing in Florida might be coming from Russia or outside agents I mean they FBI Director Christopher. Ray. told the House that Russia is using social media to interfere and to denigrate Joe Biden. We know that the Internet research agency which is backed by the Russian government is using a whole host of fake accounts specifically on facebook and twitter we know that because. facebook and twitter told US D-. Do suspect that some of these campaigns that are ending up in Florida are also coming from outside our borders. Oh, I have I have no doubt I. Mean. That's been the pattern of campaigns not only in the united, states. But elsewhere, I normally am involved in campaigns overseas and this is the new reality. For example, let me let me give you a case in point. There are also conspiracy theories abound in Latin American politics about Latin American domestic issues but because we have diaspora communities now those conspiracy theories that are developed let us say in Columbia are now being repeated in the United States and they're being tied together. So for example, black lives matter has been exported to Colombia and so now you have you know the FARC, the radical left and Columbia is really involved in the black lives matter movement here. Now, WHO's making that up is that the the right wing in Columbia coupled with with you know with sectors of the right here in in in in Miami? Yes is there is there likely you know some assistance from other. Actors who are really good at at at. A developing these kinds of messages probably, and it's been very, very much in the in Colombian circles here. So how might this affect the vote especially among Latinos in Florida because you know the turnout among the Latino. Community is not usually all that high. Do you think that these these false messages and the widespread nature of them could actually depress vote further? I, don't know if it's going to depress the vote because most of what we're seeing seems to suggest that there will be a large Latino turnout in Florida at least right but in large measure the mobilization of the Latino vote especially here in Miami Dade County has been because of this overwhelming message about communism having taken over the the Democratic Party and and you know dominating this presidential candidate. So so what we're already seen in some of the polling, some of the polling that we're doing in fact is that there's already been a shift. Historically, the Democratic Party has one Miami Dade County and historically other than the Cuban vote other Latinos tended to be Democrats. Colombians were heavily Democrat and other south. Americans were heavily Democrat Nicaraguans and Cubans were the two communities that voted heavily Republican today we're seeing shifts for five to ten percent in some of these other communities among Colombians, for example, although Venezuelans are much smaller among Venezuelans. But we're also seeing some of those small shifts which can make the difference in a state like Florida where one and a half to two percent will determine the outcome. That's the objective of this messaging and it has been effective. What thank you so much. You're very welcome Celeste. Eduardo Kamara. Is a professor of politics and International Relations at Florida International University. That's show for today. Thank you so much for listening. Td is produced by Ethan Brooks and edited by Alison Benedict and Tori Bosh tedious part of the larger. What next family DVD is also part of future tents, a partnership of slate Arizona State University and New America. I'm Celeste Headley have a great weekend. Mary Harris will be back in your feet on Monday.

Florida Joe Biden Puerto Ricans Eduardo Celeste Headley twitter Florida International Universi Miami Venezuela Cuba facebook professor Eduardo Gomorrah United States International Relations south Florida intern Augustina Costa Cuban government
Knock, Knock. Whos There? OSHA! Now What?

The Lien Zone Podcast: A Podcast About Construction Law, Contracts, Liens and Bonds

26:01 min | 3 months ago

Knock, Knock. Whos There? OSHA! Now What?

"Hello everybody. This is Alex Barth that with the lean zone DOT COM podcast. Today, we have Brent Huffman, how you doing Brian Good afternoon out. The topic today is knock knock. WHO's there It's Osha. What the hell do I do now. And we have the perfect guest to tell us everything about that. So Brent, why don't you tell us a little bit about your background how you got to where you are today and then we'll get right into it. So we can tell people what they should and shouldn't do when Osha comes knocking. Wow Awesome. Alex Man on. What a pleasure to be here with you on this podcast, the lean zone. So a little bit about myself. I started out in construction. Two thousand four and so I got about sixteen years underneath my belt but I didn't really get into the safety side of things till about. Nine years ago. And it was sort of a one of those positions that I got into as a hey, I gotta find my niche. In this thing, this construction world is is big business and I saw a need for small businesses medium sized businesses that didn't have a designated safety person their company that they needed help. They had no idea what they needed when somebody like Osha came knock knocking on their door. And so I started my own business about two and a half years ago and on helping some small businesses now in just it's wonderful and teaching at Florida International University I'm teaching construction safety to the next generation that's coming along and we're doing that Osha Training Institute there were teaching social, five, hundred classes. It's just it's a it's a great opportunity that was given. I'm. Very happy. So you spend most of your time. Either teaching. Students is soon to be construction professionals as well as the folks in the field getting their what their Osha ten, their Osha thirty ladder safety trench safety. Yes and then I'm also teaching the trainers. That WanNa Teach Osha attendant thirties on teaching the five hundred course on teaching the Osha five ten I'm teaching other trainers how to train more. Song giving back in just. Just. Getting more people into the safety profession. So I've even I've even been taught the director of my program. At Fau I taught him how to be a safety trainer I've taught former professors of mine. Had to be a safety trainer osias. So it's like it's coming full circle for me now. It's great. To the teachers, the teacher, the teacher to the teachers. So tell us maybe a little bit of background about Osha how many how many we're in south Florida so what you know how as a construction professional myself? How likely is it that she's just gonNA show up on their own on my site is it something? I should he's rid reds talked to numbers real quickly just throw some numbers out too. So. Osha is a small agency and the Department of Labor. Their annual budget is around five hundred million dollars NASC- five, hundred dollars a lot of money. But in the government sector. A half a billion dollars is really nothing that's a small agency. So there's two parts to their agent. They have their federal partners, their Federal Osha, and they have their state partners, which is the state run plan. So some of the states have their own Osha. State run plans. In Florida World Federal Plan. So we have approximately twenty one hundred oceans factors. To cover. The whole state. All all allstate's. Twin one hundred. And we're covering approximately a hundred thirty, million workers. Employed at more than eight million worksites around the nation. And to be clear. So you went that Matt Work of art we're talking construction that's what you and I. Focus a lot of our time on but. Is Everywhere. That's. Agricultural Sites Yeah General Industry. Maritimes instruction. So they've got a cover they've got to cover all these sectors, right private sectors. We're not talking about covering the government sectors only private sectors. And they've got a cover with twenty one, hundred inspectors. One one compliance officer got a cover about fifty, nine, thousand workers on average. Seems like a haystack. So how likely are they to show off? So. So what do you see then again before we get like into what to do? What do you see as the primary basis for Osha, showing up on a job site when there isn't a reported accident let's start with that right because that's so yeah. So he'll show that happened their primary focus on inspections is imminent danger. What's imminent. Danger. Osha compliance officer driving down the road sees some workers somebody doing something dangerous. They have the right to pull over and stop the sake act before somebody gets hurt or there's a fatality somebody docks. So that's their primary role. It's not to go out and find fatalities and hospitalizations and investigate second task. So I primary thing worker safety we wanna, we want to locate the danger and we want to stop it before anybody gets hurt or before anybody dies. So that's where most people see Osha on a random basis not. They're coming knocking for a reason. How about how about reporting by Employees Workers, disgruntled employees, disgruntled workers how often is that? An issue. So with US talk about reporting because we were, we have to responsibility for reporting as an employer and were reporting to Osha as an employee case of two different ways that we sort of talked Osha talk the first. Reporting as an employee two reasons why you need to report to them fatality. Or. Hospitalization. Fatality have reported him eight hours hospitalization. There's a hospitalization loss of an eye amputation report to them in twenty four hours. Sold the reporting system not going to really go into that. It's three ways reporting call him on the phone you report on the. Internet or you facts room form over to their office officer to one eight, hundred number and you report the information like that. So the other reporting can be done by a worker K. Those what we call worker complaints or referrals. Doesn't have the a disgruntled employee but can be an employee. Asked their supervisor. Hey, we need to fix this on state tack. It continues on fixes it. It becomes a recurring incident that worker has a right to file a complaint and refer the job site or the employer to Osha, and then they will investigate that is actually their third. US In this in their sequence. So first we had em endanger in, we had fatalities or hospitalizations, and in the third one is worker complaints or referrals and remember those worker complaints or referrals protected by whistle blower protection. So we can't we can't. We've heard a lot of stuff about whistleblowers and recent news so. No. Retaliation for work for no. Absolutely not. So. So now we got the background. Tell me what we should do on on a project EXAC I'm a super I am now josh site and knock knock who is at its own. What is it that I have to do? What is it that they're going to ask me to do that and this is where I think. Is the is the most important thing for people to understand what is it that they're going to ask me to do that? I can say no to. Let's just paint the picture for everybody think about your office, think about the front door of your office osas going to knock on the front door of your office and just paint your picture. What is your front door locally so you're going to go and you're gonNA answer the front door and you open the door and you see. Regular person they're standing there. He's got credentials hanging around his neck. And with Minister who are you? And you introduce yourself I'm Sullen so long or should compliance officer Is going to identify himself and he's going to present his credentials team. So you know who he is. So a federal officer has federal credentials with him. So everybody asked me how how do I know he's real how he is he says he is maybe he's a maybe he's a phony that came down the road maybe sent by my competitor. I always tell everybody. Call your local area office and verify the Ocean Specter is who he says he is. Where's our local area office in this area? So you and I Alex we work here in South Florida our local area offices in Fort Lauderdale. You can look up the number on ocean website or you can call the one, eight, hundred, number, one, eight, hundred, three, or four to Osha. And verify the inspector is who he says he is were in south Florida. There's a lot of funny people around walk around. That's the first step I. Say it's sort of the. The introduction, he presents his credentials you verify and e comes into his into your business you you should invite him and sort of think about it. As if you get pulled over by a police officer, the attitude is everything at a sorta drives the conversation between the of you guys are normal human being treated with respect, and he'll do the same for you. That's always good advice. Yeah. So there now he's he's you've invited him in you've. Port him a cup of coffee and. What what what is he gonNA WANNA. See what is it that I should have available which should I not be scrambling for and again I'm going to come back to this question which is. What is he? What could here? She asked me for that I should say no to. I would say, no. So here's what I say you need to have ready. You need to have your Osha logs ready. What are your Osha logs is everybody I. Hope Everybody's familiar this point with the Osha. Three, hundred, the three, hundred, a three, hundred, the three one. If everybody just this podcast where here it's February twentieth. You're supposed to post your oeser summary February first and then take it down April thirtieth and we post that stuff from twenty nineteen. So literally been done. If you haven't done it yet. You're twenty days late to the party. So. Should you still do it absolutely after? You got to. Your late goal post you gotTa, you gotTa. Get it done. You GotTa get the sources people you gotta get the payroll people together. You Gotta get your safety professional together. You gotta get those that some refilled Scott to be signed by the executive in your office. Don't don't delay get that done and you've got to keep it for five years. So we gotta keep nineteen, eighteen, seventeen, sixteen all the way back to fifteen. I remember when you came and spoke at the Miami Construction Forum. And you talked about that. You you had a lot of people. Surprised because, just looking at the people's faces, it was clear that. People weren't doing that. A. Lot of them don't. At all or they are not putting anything on their logs, they've got all kinds of workers, injuries and all kinds of stuff and I say, Hey, where's your summary? Eh WanNA see your summary I wanna see how many? Employees were hurt or loss time last year and say we had four five guys. Okay Gimme there some readers nothing on it's not written on it's blank. Just, some of the other things that are to want to see they're. Going to tell you, hey, where's your Osha poster? Where's your legal poster? Posted at. Where it tells you why Ocean was created what your rights are under Osha why it's the law. That is a mandatory thing that needs to be posted in your workplace. In are inconspicuous area. So the Ocean Specter, he's sitting in my. Conference Room My job site trailer he's drinking my. Coffee he's GonNa WanNa see all of this. What else is GonNa WanNa see or is he gonNa ask me about that I should be for he's going to want to see employee training records. So we're talking about documentation. Now if it's not documented, it didn't happen I tell that to all my clients. And put a training file together for everyone of your. And document their training. They're gonNA WANNA see that stuff. I can't tell you how many people don't have this. So are just three things they may ask for some other stuff but. Before we get too carried away about what everything Osias looking for lifts let's break down the Osha inspection into four basic steps. We talked about the first one already, which was presentation of credentials. That's the first step. Second step is going to the you're opening conference opening conference. GonNa come in sit down and your comments from table like you said, he's drinking coffee. You've given him some training records giving him some documentation than he's GonNa tell you or he or she could be a woman they're gonNA tell you why they're there. What brought Ocean to your organization? After, that happens you're going to do a job site walk around or A. Walk around they're gonNA walk around your facility. I highly highly encourage you that a safety representative. Somebody with knowledge about safety in Mine Osha. Regulations walk with that Ocean Specter because he may point things out to you that you can fix right away. You know how to take care of it right away. Don't let stuff linger because the more stuff that. The more stuff he's going to write up. He's GONNA WANNA speak to maybe speak to workers privately. You know workers can point out hazards. He's there. In the man Osas here look looking all this stuff. So you're going to. You know again, I keep coming back to this if he says that he wants to do the site tour can I say? No Should I say no. You can't say, no people have said no before but they can go get a judge and they go can go get a warrant and they can come back and they can inspect your place. There's some documents that they may have to request via some type of judge, some of those documents may be protected by. Some. Of the other laws that are in place, we'll just use the hippo laws and example they may be required to request those documents through a process. You don't have to throw everything at them right away but you know having your Osha poster up having training records and. Having. Your Osha summary posted that stuff's got to happen. So they're gonNA they're gonNA look at those things first before they go to into the real depths of. What they really want. So now they've walked around or I've walked them I've walked around Crete lease accompany them do not let them walk on attended. And what's The why? What's wise? That's important because you WANNA know. That they point out. You want you could correct some of the hazards immediately. Maybe they see a guy not wearing his hard hat. And you say, hey, Johnny, put your heart out right away boom. He puts it on. But. If he continues to walk around the area with no hard hat on, he's GonNa say, Hey man supposing workers to. You know. Struck by in. There there ulysses GONNA start writing. Salt. You. You highly encourage. Every employer out there to accompany the ocean specter's he walks around your organization. So we've we've got, we've got the first one, which is presentation controls we done the ought opening conference. We've done the job site site walk around, and the last one is going to be a closing conference. Going back to the Conference Room GonNa tell you what he found at your organization. And what needs to be done to correct those things so would that that in mind he is not going to bring out his ticket book at the end of the conference and started writing you citations. Most people think what you've closed a at the very end we that closing conference but he didn't give me anything he just left. He takes all that stuff back to his office. He writes up his report he gives it to his superior, and that's when they're decided whether or not. You were going to get a citation. That process can take up to six months. Oh, wow. So I can be waiting six months and yeah, five five months and three ways to get a some capital letter in the mail sometimes when there's multiple agencies investigating the same, let's see fatalities on your job site. There's multiple agencies investigating that situation that happened they are waiting from other information from other agencies to finalize their investigation a they may have to go through the legal process it may take longer than six months. But they're they're ideally they're going to close and in six months. The conference is GonNa be closed, and if they decide to issue you a citation, you will get a nice letter in the mail. What is that led? Tell Goi let's talk about that letter and then. What do we do with that letter? So here's where you come in. Alex. here's where I come in. Nature. So now some letters come there dressed the president of the company they'll have a bunch of legal. Ramifications in there if you don't pay if you don't comply. These are this is one of those things where I say you need some type of safety professional somebody that knows what the regulation says. And you need some legal counsel if the requesting additional documents or if you if they believe something is protected. What it could be some type of Patented. Information that they don't WanNa give out. That's where the legal counsel Communist. Hey, we don't. We don't want to give informalities protected by another law. This is their health information is protected. In anything of that nature. So there are reasons why you need council when you get letters. But if you have somebody that knows a little bit about safety and they say, Hey, they caught us they got us. Hey, let's do an informal conference with Osha. What's an informal conference? You're going to contest the CITATIONS YOU'RE GONNA go down and you're GONNA be with Osha and they're going to reduce the citations. Highly recommend you to do this some of the first time offenders. Now, they're actually not even doing the informal conference. They're giving them a discount right out the gate sometimes forty fifty percent on a citation. So. I had a contractor that just got one not too long ago Anthony Citation was for four thousand dollars. And they discounted like forty percent right out the gate. So he asked me some Brench we shall we contest. So we still go out of an informal conference. Will. Do feel like paying. Twenty three hundred dollars of some sort. You'll be okay with that. What how much how much time are you gonNA take up with your own self time I gotta take up what's that becomes a business decision. Out, at the end of the day, we gotta make sure that we're complying with what they cited as for, and that were were making corrections. So. This guy he had, it was a it was A. Two people writing a piece of equipment Osha compliance officer Detroit by pulled him over. told him you can't do this. They got a citation they got an ocean action and dome here comes to citation. So right they they got off a little bit easy. The the Osha. Citations just went up. So everybody knows it. Went Up January. Fifteenth January tenth. I think the memo came out but right at the beginning of the year. So for a serious Osha violation off at thirteen, thousand, four, hundred, ninety, four dollars. Per Violation that's the maximum now minimums around nine, hundred, sixty, four dollars. A same for other than serious, and then you've got the we will for repeats. Maxim own those is one, hundred, thirty, four, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, seven dollars, and the minimum is nine, thousand, six, hundred, thirty, nine, a willful repeat. So you you don't want to be classified in Wolfville repeat. Creates, a whole host of albums because then you know you'll have to you know some. it affects your insurance. It affects you the ability to get work. You'll have to disclose that on pre bid prequel forms Leeann. Yeah not good at all. nope. Don't want to be don't want to be in those categories. And we have a client that has. Received a willful. And we tried to negotiate it down. and the office was. Not Having it to to keep it as a willful even though it was his first infraction I. Ever And and we're fighting it because it will materially effective bit affect his business I'm actually even less about the dollar amount. It's more about just having to report the fact that he has a willful right willful is the hardest one to prove. Because it's the mailing knowingly and willingly part of it so. You know it's It's not one of those things that you want to be classified with those two words the knowingly and willingly don't repeat offenders are where we wanNA keep everybody away from six. Yeah. You'RE GONNA get another serious. You can get a serious violation the it's it's happened to a lot of people, but we gotta stay away from the wills repeats. So. All Good Advice Brandt if I wanted to get a hold of you to use your service, ask you some more questions. What's the best way to do it? Up on the email, send me an email. My emails. brant. B.. Ent. At Corp CRP safety solutions with an SME IN DOT COM. You can also follow me on lengthen. Brent Hoffman. Or you can get me on instagram corporate safety solutions. I can follow us on facebook same sex handle corp safety solutions. Were we're trying to. We're trying to post more trying to keep up to date. We're trying to hit the social media hard because we wanted just WanNa, give all the information out to as many. Help as many people as we can. I really appreciate it and I'm sure people are going to have some questions hopefully it's not right. Win osias knocking on their door. Hopefully. It's before because they've wanted they've asked you to do some training to avoid an issue if ocean knocks on. Yeah. It's like you tell everybody higher good attorney before you get into trouble same safety high rate acquired somebody who deal with trade before you get into trouble. Brent I really appreciate it. Thanks playing and everybody. Thanks for listening. We'll see you next time.

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Under the Sea

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Under the Sea

"Nasa will join an international crew on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean this summer to prepare for future deep space missions shoes innovation now, NASA conducts analog, emissions or field tests in locations that have physical similiarities too extreme space environments, the Aquarius laboratory part of the Florida international university's undersea research habitat and the only undersea research station in the world, sits, sixty two feet below the ocean surface near key Largo, Florida, the interior of Aquarius provides a unique location for NASA to study behavioral effects of spaceflight such as 'isolation team, dynamics, fatigue, and sleep patterns and international crew of astronauts, and aqua, nuts will spend ten days in the habitat on one of Nasr's, extreme environment, mission oper-. Nations, the neem. Oh, twenty three crew will focus on spacewalks. Learn to use augmented reality for training and evaluate tools for collecting core samples on the lunar surface. These astronauts will be preparing for future exploration to the moon and Mars while under the sea for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Atlantic Ocean Florida international universi Jennifer pulley Florida National Institute of aerospac Nasr sixty two feet ten days
On the Ocean Floor

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 1 year ago

On the Ocean Floor

"Nasa will join an international crew on the floor of the atlantic ocean this summer to prepare for future deep space missions innovation now nasa conducts analog missions or field tests in locations that have physical similarities to extreme extreme space environments the aquarius laboratory part of the florida international university's undersea research habitat and the only undersea research research station in the world sits sixty two feet below the ocean surface near key largo florida the interior of aquarius provides. It's a unique location for nasa to study behavioral effects of spaceflight such as isolation team dynamics fatigue and sleep patterns earns an international crew of astronauts and aqua dots will spend ten days in the habitat on one of nasr's extreme environment mission operations nations the nemo twenty three crew will focus on spacewalks learn to use augmented reality for training and evaluate tools for collecting acting core samples on the lunar surface. These astronauts will be preparing for future exploration to the moon and mars while under the sea for innovation now jennifer pauline innovation now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa.

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In Florida, Doctors See Climate Change Hurting Their Most Vulnerable Patients

Environment: NPR

06:17 min | 1 year ago

In Florida, Doctors See Climate Change Hurting Their Most Vulnerable Patients

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Amelia Island, Florida a barrier island on the northeast coast that captivates visitors with thirteen miles of uncrowded beach championship golf, natural beauty and a historic district Amelia Island dot com slash NPR. On a rainy day this past week. We went to visit a man named him in a working class neighborhood of Miami wedged between highway and industrial warehouses. We walk up to the front door of a dilapidated peach colored duplex. But that's not where he lives. He greets us. And then leads us around to a shed in the backyard out keep it. He's saying this big mansion. When you talk with people in south Florida about climate change. You hear a lot about the effects of rising sea levels? Something else is happening. The heat itself is making people sicker from a longer allergy season to air quality issues to mosquito borne illnesses. And the nearly sixty percent of Miami residents who live paycheck to paycheck are most at risk people. Hold him. Who takes us inside his tiny space taped up on the wall is a carefully handwritten budget Iraqi at the internet leased the Irene. Swansea. Yourself going to play we're like anti there. Yeah. He needs to make three hundred sixty four dollars eight cents every week. Gago MS chatting as we sit on a single bed, which is all he has room for along with a microwave on a battery dresser what he is being treated for diabetes and cancer. We're not using his last name to protect his health information. A mosquito flies in through the open door. His shed doesn't have any windows holes in the wall are covered up with blue tape. He's been living alone in the US for years working to send money to his five kids back home in Ecuador boys in their Florida their own book. It what have you sells fruit on the street. He says, it's hard work. I asked him if he's felt a change in the weather as he works outside philosophical team Takami on though, I'm Michael preliminary career mentors. This hinting since the color, whichever say Maceo into what has the summers in south Florida are hotter than ever they're unbearable. So he's had to adapt. He runs a small AC at night when it's too hot to sleep which has been more often in recent years, but he also has to be careful because of the cost when he works outside. He tries to stay in the shade. He wears long sleeved shirts to keep the sun off. And he takes a break in the middle of the day. You'll get there like Yellow Sea interior when you work in the streets. Hotter says you really feel the change. Were you Dr shareholder is greeting colleagues at a clinic in liberty city in Miami holder teaches medicine at Florida international university. But she also treats a lot of patients like horrid people who are poor or uninsured for homeless. She's one of the founders of Florida clinicians for climate action. More about them in a minute. We'll just says a few years ago an older patient came to see her in her clinic she needed more asthma medicines. And she just was not as controlled as she'd been and I'm like what's going on. Hold on notice that other patients will also having more respiratory ailments. So she reached out to other doctors, and they were seeing the same things to hold her says doctors like her unlocked people's lives by hearing their stories and the stories she was hearing all pointing to the same thing climate change was leading to a cascade of health. Th- problems twenty sixteen twenty seventeen eighteen have been the hottest days on on record. And with that heat their mango trees are flowering way earlier than it used to. So their asthma can get worse and ragweed season starts so much earlier. So they need to buy more pricey allergy medicine, you can't breathe when it's hot. There's a risk of dehydration and kidney disease and people get angry in the heat. There's more interpersonal conflicts more interpersonal violence, it's also harder to sleep which can lead to obesity, and they just cannot afford the AC or the AC is old and moldy. So it's just a vicious cycle that I find my patients involved in Florida clinicians for climate action explicitly connects the dots. Four patients their symptoms to a changing climate. It was formed at a conference in two thousand eighteen what doctors looked at the effects of climate change on health holder says patients need to understand what's happening. So they can adapt and be prepared for what's coming and for. What's already here? Doctors are the trusted intermediaries. We feel the messengers crucial who else, but the physician who we see who can really translate what it means by twenty fifty for example, experts say almost half the days in the year and Florida will be dangerously hot hundred five degrees or more. And Dr holder is very worried I hear a lot more about sea level rise and raising the the sidewalks and replenishing the beaches, but it's going to be very very difficult for poor population. It's I don't know how they're going to survive. Back at hold his. He's got a rolling cart loaded with fresh Mandarin oranges packed in red mesh leaves the rain has picked up, but he's still heading out. Thank you. My Calor for you tell you look at the name. Okay. Rain or shine colder heat. He says he still has to work in a changing climate. That's making this city harder place to live.

Florida Miami south Florida Amelia Island Florida international universi NPR Yellow Sea Calor diabetes asthma US Dr holder Swansea obesity Ecuador Maceo Takami Michael
How Climate Change Is Affecting Residents' Health In Miami

Environment: NPR

06:31 min | 1 year ago

How Climate Change Is Affecting Residents' Health In Miami

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from Stanford children's health and Lucille Packard children's hospital. Stanford, delivering nurturing care and nationally recognized the treatments for newborns with critical surgical or special medical needs. Stanford children's health on a rainy day this past week. We went to visit a man named hold him in a working class neighborhood of Miami wedged between highway and industrial warehouses. We walk up to the front door of a dilapidated peach colored duplex. But that's not where he lives. He greets us. And then leads us around to a shed in the backyard. I'll keep it. He's saying this big mansion. When you talk with people in south Florida about climate change. You hear a lot about the effects of rising sea levels? Something else is happening. The heat itself is making people sicker from a longer allergy season to air quality issues to mosquito borne illnesses. And the nearly sixty percent of Miami residents who live paycheck to paycheck are most at risk people. Like hold him who takes us inside his tiny space taped up on the wall is a carefully handwritten budget. Iraqi get the internet leased the Irene. So play like anti there. Yeah. He needs to make three hundred sixty four dollars eight cents every week. Gago MS chatting as we sit on a single bed, which is all he has room for along with a microwave on a battered dresser what he is being treated for diabetes and cancer. We're not using his last name to protect his health information. A mosquito flies in through the open door. His shed doesn't have any windows holes. In the wall are covered up with blue tape. He's been living alone in the US for years working to send money to his five kids back home in Ecuador boys in their food their own book. It what have you sells fruit on the street. He says, it's hard work. I asked him if he's felt a change in the weather as he works outside philosophical team Takami on his Michael preliminary career mentors hinting since the galore, whichever essay Maceo into. What has the summers in south Florida are hotter than ever they're unbearable? So he's had to adapt. He runs a small AC at night when it's too hot to sleep which has been more often in recent years, but he also has to be careful because of the cost when he works outside. He tries to stay in the shade. He wears long sleeved shirts to keep the sun off. And he takes a break in the middle of the day. You'll get there like Yellow Sea interior when you work in the streets. What her says, you really feel the change? Were you Dr shareholder is greeting colleagues at a clinic in liberty city in Miami holder teaches medicine at Florida international university. But she also treats a lot of patients like horrid people who are poor or uninsured for homeless. She's one of the founders of Florida clinicians for climate action. More about them in a minute. We'll just says a few years ago an older patient came to see her in her clinic she needed more asthma medicines. And she just was not as controlled issued been and I'm like what's going on. Hold on notice that other patients will also having more respiratory ailments. So she reached out to other doctors, and they were seeing the same things to holder says doctors like her unlocked people's lives by hearing their stories and the stories she was hearing all pointing to the same thing climate change was leading to a cascade of health. Th- problems twenty sixteen twenty seventeen twenty eighteen have been the hottest days on on record. And with that heat their mango trees are flowering way earlier than it used to. So their asthma can get worse and ragweed season starts so much earlier. So they need to buy more pricey allergy medicine, you can't breathe when it's hot. There's a risk of dehydration and kidney disease and people get angry in the heat. There's more interpersonal conflicts more interpersonal violence, it's also hard to sleep which can lead to obesity, and they just cannot afford the AC or the AC is old and moldy. So it's just a vicious cycle that I find my patients involved in Florida clinicians for climate action explicitly connects the dots. Four patients their symptoms to a changing climate. It was formed at a conference in two thousand eighteen what doctors looked at the effects of climate change on health holder says patients need to understand what's happening. So they can adapt and be prepared for what's coming and for. What's already here? Doctors are the trusted intermediaries. We feel the messengers crucial who else, but the physician who we see who can really translate what it means by twenty fifty for example, experts say almost half the days in the year and Florida will be dangerously hot hundred five degrees or more. And Dr holder is very worried I hear a lot more about sea level rise and raising the the sidewalks and replenishing the beaches, but it's going to be very very difficult for poor population. It's I don't know how they're going to survive. Back home. His he's got a rolling cart loaded with fresh Mandarin oranges packed in red mesh leaves the rain has picked up, but he's still heading out. Thank my say Gallos for you. You'll be a look at the okay? Catella rain or shine colder heat. He says he still has to work in a changing climate. That's making this city harder place to live. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Miami Florida south Florida Stanford NPR Comcast Lucille Packard Yellow Sea Dr holder Florida international universi asthma diabetes US Ecuador obesity Maceo Takami Michael
Clinical Podcast: Cannabis within Healthcare | Jeff Konin

Evidence In Motion Clinical

30:23 min | 1 year ago

Clinical Podcast: Cannabis within Healthcare | Jeff Konin

"Welcome to the I am clinical podcast your host Dr John Childs and Dr Mark Shepherd. We'll be bringing you interviews with cutting edge forward thinking physical therapy clinicians and leaders the goal to further your knowledge base and bridge the gap of what was to what will be are you ready. Let's go welcome to to the EM clinical podcasts where we talk with diverse individuals within the healthcare environment and beyond. I am joined today by my co host Dr John Childs today. We are talking with Dr Jeff Conan Jeff is a PT ATC by training and is currently the clinical professor and director of the doctor of Athletic Training Program at Florida International University Jeff has worked with a number of athletes all over the country. He's also been an uneducated for many years at several different institutions and just to give the listeners some context jeff and I go way back actually to when I was in undergraduate the program at James Madison University where Jeff really served as a mentor to me before I started pt schools so it's Great Jeff to have you back and to discuss an interesting interesting topic today so welcome to the show. Thank you mark John. It's a pleasure reenact especially with this case mark. Yeah awesome awesome to see how paths continuously tenuously Cross and gravy on the show and it's funny because I look back number at gm you and L. things change over the years. I remember when we were working together. You are really into the concussion kind of domain and and it's interesting to see now where your focus is within the topic of cannabis within healthcare of care so I'm really interested to see how did you get interested in this line of Education and interest so ironically it actually came from concussion and I was out west teaching a concussion workshop and one of the participants who is a physical therapists from San Francisco California Post posed a question and he said many of my patients smoke marijuana recreationally in. I'm curious what your thoughts are Jeff if I'm treating them and they have posted cussin' symptoms should I encourage them to stop smoking so that I can have a better accurate assessment of their memory Marie perhaps of their gaze of their balance and I thought to myself never had to come up in a question before but sure it made logical sense to me. You want to do everything you can answer. Get good accurate assessment thought I was off the hook there but he asked are two of his question and the question was would about those who don't smoke and they have post cussin' symptoms that relate to migraines anxiety difficulty falling staying asleep he said should I encourage them him to try a little bit of cannabis in the field. I wasn't as comfortable answering that question and I really had no foundational education background to answer the question so I promise it when I got back home I would look this up summit reconnect with him and I became fascinated and I started to look at literature so I shot him a note back. I wrote what a blog about this and the more I read the more I became more fascinated. I started getting more questions about it. Then dawned on me that medicinal marijuana marijuana is legal in thirty three states and CD cannabis is now becoming more and more accessible throughout this country and there's another world out there where it's being used so I just really got excited and fascinated to learn about this and learn about how it works and what the differences excellent and most importantly how does it impact what we do from a clinical care perspective of our patients and one thing led to another. I put in a couple of proposals to speak on the topic. Jordan have been accepted now. I'm receiving invitations to speak on the topic and educator on this topic. My goal is is to help the practitioner understand how this fits into the realm of care. If in fact it does at all that's interesting Jeff. I mean it's kind of a hot topic topic here you know candidates within healthcare and I'm kind of wondering have you had any like criticism of getting into this line within our profession and maybe the realm home of course I had criticism starting in my house for my family and so what has gotten into you. What are you doing. What are you up to and and when I talk to our colleagues majority of them are a little bit skeptical aunt. What I simply say is. Let me chat with you for about ten minutes in all all. I'M GONNA do is share with you. How I got into this and what I'm learning about it and trying to figure out what's happening around us because quite frankly it's his big elephant the room and most of only know what we know from our perceptions of growing up from our hearsay. CETERA ET CETERA and there's an awful lot of aces out there in fact you know what's really interesting to me is the population that seems the most interested in this. Are The elderly folks there on fixed incomes but they're really tired of using a dozen plus pills that are very expensive and they're talking to their neighbors. They're using Google in their figuring hang out ways to try things in granted. They're certainly placebo effects a lot of what we do but it can't be coincidence that so many of them are saying. I I feel better and I've been trying all these other approaches and I found something that's helped me so while an N. of one is really not high level. Oh evidence a lot of ones that you hear over and over and over again just had me thinking about what is actually happy and surely I'm not the only one in and yes I still have some critics and again. I'm not really promoting the use of any form of cannabis whether it be t h C C CBD ham boils. I'm educating so people understand why patients are looking into this and what the research shows and how we need to get involved in the biggest concern I have if we turn a blind eye to what's around us if our patients come in to clinical setting and save you a marker John. What do you think about CBD if you don't know or your answer is completely against it it my gut senses. Dave already looked into it they may in fact already using it and this is an issue of them with your trust and if they don't feel like corre board or you don't know enough about it. They're not going to tell you what they're doing. They're going to go back and Google Sophomore and asked to France neighbors and I think that it's important that we understand stand the light which we can speak to that. Here's the facts that are out there. In fact let's be proactive and let's have patient education information that we can provide to them and say a here's what you should know about this unhappy to answer your questions. If I don't know the answer I'll look it up and I'll get back with you but think about this. If you are commuting somewhat you WanNa know what medications are on. You want to know if they're seeing other practitioners and if you don't have this knowledge because if they're taking cannabis in a medicinal format they're seeking different physician more than likely so now they're getting care from multiple physicians. We know so. I think it's a trust issue. I think it's also an issue of our quality of care to have a comprehensive background knowing everything that can impact the patient's illness or injury that we're managing Jeff. This is is a really timely. I mean as an entrepreneur get pitched. That seemed like a day goes by something doesn't come across some deal network on investing in some cannabis cannabis related business so clearly this is an emerging area and even within our own profession. We're starting to talk about within physical therapy educational circles all about whether cannabis education should be included in the curriculum and as you probably know jeff from being actively involved in this discussion. The House of delegates actually considered a motion at the next meeting in Chicago for Abtei to develop materials physical therapists could use as resources for educating patients since about you know the use of cannabis related to healthcare now that motion I think was narrowly defeated but nonetheless at least the first time to my knowledge. I think especially on the docket so I guess my question is you know as you look across sort of healthcare and you'll look into. Let's say the physical therapy profession or athletic training. Where are we in this discussion. Are we progressive in the fact that we even had this on the docket or in other healthcare professions. They're widely talking about this and we're way behind as Rehab professionals and just give me your thoughts on sort of where we are in thinking about this issue in terms of being ahead or behind the curve. That's a great question and John. I was actually in the Gallery in Chicago when the discussion slash debate occurred in the house of delegates this was RC for C. Sixty seven dash nineteen in an actually did pass past fifty one to forty nine and it was really interesting dialogue back and fourth. I have to tell you I had to be restrained in this gallery because the motion wasn't about advocating at behalf again it was about putting a worker together to develop resources for members for cannabis. I was really mind boggled why we would be opposed to that and honestly as I listened. He was like Oh Qasem of WANNA travel speak about this individuals practicing in states where there's significant get access to this were at supports and said he look. It's not coming year. I see this with patients every day. It would be really really a fault if we had a body of our membership helped together. All the resources and then others were in states where perhaps they don't see this much or perhaps perhaps her personal beliefs are against this fought against it and so it came to a really narrow vote but it wants proof but in discussions afterwards. I had certain people it did feel like even though it was approved it was going to be a priority our agenda of developing these resources anytime zip. I have had only two of my proposals to speak on this topic not accepted what was for the upcoming combined sections meeting and what was for the upcoming Educational Leadership Conference both physical therapy now. Maybe they weren't well written abstracts attracts. Maybe they didn't fit into the theme of the meetings. I don't know but your question about where this fits into. The curriculum is a really fascinating one for me. It can it at the very beginning as we try to understand. The physiology anatomy of the Endo can happen weight system which is not very well studied and really is all a band around since the early nineties at guessing most of us went to school with a number of anatomy and physiology classes and don't remember sea. Is that our books or studying. I think this could possibly fit into physical agents. You know this could be topical is could be adjusted. Tincture is lots of different ways to put this in your body. I think perhaps maybe most importantly it can fit in the ethical legal classes that we have a lot of different places where this falls across the curriculum and I think it's a great I talked to out of disgust not to take over the curriculum out to dominate the curriculum but what you talk about learning across curve this happened at the very beginning that one's education all the way into their clock a practice because it's real and it's here and so I think when you pose the question are we behind. I think we're behind hind in understanding and educating in one of the reasons I was supportive of this is that it's not really easy to find good quality resources and the argument made against this. RC passing was that we are all individually capable of doing our own research and sharing this education with our patients. The argument for for was the SE. Les Speak With one voice. Let's have common factual educational materials. Perhaps educational links that we can send people to that are being updated because this is a fast in fact. It's the fastest growing industry you mentioned. Entra parochialism fastest growing industry United States and there are universities Anna Community College. I just learned for example Miami Dade Community College. They are starting full degrees in the concept of cannabis degroot gooseberries. You can specialize in the cultivation of agriculture of the plant itself you can focus into the healthcare setting you can focus into the business setting setting whether it be the tax laws or banking industries and so to a certain extent. Yes we are way behind but with that said. I'm not not an advocate of rushing and getting behind this one hundred percent because I think if we go fast too soon we WANNA be obviously be careful of our credibility. Which is why live is fully support factual information coming out with what voice from an association. That's good historical perspective there you know on where parts fit in within the really physical therapy and you know. I like your thoughts about how this could fit into the curriculum because I think you know as educator Educator Myself. You know there's always this idea behind curricular creep. You know I it always seems every every year. Isn't it that we're always always like this would be great to add in you. Just start getting almost like bombarded with areas and topics that can be added in whether it be dry needling or this the topic. We're talking about now or something else you know. It's just it always seems like it's something and so it's nice to hear that you don't feel like you have to basically rewrite your curriculum to fit this in because obviously it's a part of many different systems that cannabis you know relates to infects so it makes complete sense that it doesn't have to be a major component on it but we need something in order to start learning about it otherwise we're like you said patients are. GonNa come in and we're going to have our own bias or perceptions or things along those lines so just good points to bring up in curricular creep is real and it doesn't unfortunately a company things that we remove typically so we're constantly putting more and more into the curriculum as of now a two hour presentation can't really provide a good solid foundation for clinicians to understand doc what it is. It's happening around now. We can expand that to a full day workshop and really have people get caught up to speed as it relates to the laws yes for example because as I travel around and speak to individuals of different states also tailor the presentation to their state however it's important to understand understand that regardless of your own state law you need to be aware of your surroundings straight loss because if individual can travel two hours across the lion and have a better opportunity to access with looking looking for certainly they will so. It's really important to know even if it's not legal in any form in Iran state in their pockets of the country where it's not it will be naturally. We're seeing some really interesting things everywhere. State laws are overriding federal laws and I think one of the interesting things is going to be the next national election cycle e costs. Let me give you greg's apple. I alluded earlier to how the largest population that's pushing his seems to be the senior citizens in Florida where I am in the last election in two thousand sixteen the President won the state of Florida by about one hundred twenty or so thousand votes vote's not a lot of votes right soon after that our governor was elected in our commissioner of agriculture was elected both on on a grow cannabis platform there are now three hundred fifty or so thousand medical marijuana carb users Florida Florida in it is estimated by the next election. There will be about a half a million. If you're a anti cannabis running for president candidate handed it you will not with the State of Florida which is a swing state in a national election. That's how powerful this issue is right now. Just in this state the state you're seeing similar. Events of other states where banking laws are changing industry is changing in. There's job creation as a resulted this it really what's happening is this has moved so fast that the state government are simply trying to figure out ways to regulate number want which is a good idea from safety perspective but in all honesty exit number two because what's really interesting in this business right now is technically a majority of it is still illegal. You cannot markets for example. THC It's still a schedule want illegal drug in the United States. However are you still pay taxes so you're allowed to run a business but this'll wanting allowed to have a dispensary you cannot take tax write offs S. You cannot deposit your money in a bank because they are. FDIC shirt and they can't take illegal drug money but you pay taxes to the government so it's like the wild wild west right out every aspect of this but we can't slow this down. This is moving at a speed unlike anything anything we have ever seen before and ultimately the laws will catch up federal regulation will standardize a lot of what we see at which will be faced with just a slightly different statute in each state but the neighboring states if they're equivalent of their statutes you will see people flock from one state to the other and we're seeing saying that now with Florida. I'm sure Branson Arizona. We see a lot of snowbirds that come down and they're trying to figure out if you will how they can access some more reciprocity so that they can do whatever they do. In the state. They're coming from at just transferred across state lines or Florida truly fascinating to hear that perspective give in to switch gears a little bit here Jeff. You know I've heard these different terms being used. I mean you hear about CBD. There's hemp medical marijuana and obviously recreational marijuana. What are the differences between these because I think it's important. It seems like it's important to know what that is right. That's a great question so so I guess to start is understand that this is a plant we're talking about. It's not a drug unless it's made separately as an a synthetic for but it's an actual plant in the plant is grown in many places it can be grown in Colombia can be grown up Portland Oregon in so the plant a- as it grows can come in different force and what are the forms that engrossing is CD and CD is a non you've four component of the plant and the other side you'll see is the thc or the virtuous marijuana which does have the euphoric effect act and what are the greatest concerns about the THC nowadays particularly from a recreational perspective is that it's a lot stronger than it used to be so if you go back into the sixties seventies in advocates say well. There's really no reason why this can't be legal adult recreational use. We used to do it way back. Then Cetera et Cetera or the concerns medically right now is that the growth of the THC in the plant is significantly higher than ever used to be almost three times higher than it was huck aids ago itself itself is actually THC however it's an incredibly low dosage of TAC's point three percent point three percent of of marijuana's count it so it doesn't have a thc in it to create a fork effect in fact the farm bill that was passed in December of this past year was passed because hemp is at natural plant product that is used around the world at any other countries to develop things like from industrial-style paper various forms of Colognes at lotions rope natural gases and so what we found here United States was at there's there's an argument to separate him out of the rest of the plant particularly out of the THC capone and use that to create jobs allow allow farmers to have opportunities to grow and export these products in why this became where it is today was decades ago through the Nixon mm-hmm and the Reagan administrations there was an original we call drugs schedule classification in the classification marijuana as the global term was scheduled in the first classification schedule one that was alongside of heroin and LSD in so one of the reasons why we don't have a lot of good studies on this right now is we're not allowed to study marijuana just like we're not allowed to study. LSD or a heroin. It's not likely it's going to pass an institutional review. Board objects can write whatever the government has created pathway for this at so through a number of different applications fair amount of money to apply for these applications and a couple of years you can get approval through the government to you perform your studies if thc is involved with a significant amount of restrictions and typically it limited forms of the type of thc they have and and again as I mentioned if they have one grow planters university in this country that has federally approved grow plants and that's the issue that we usually studies but the ground in Mississippi versus Portland Oregon versus Columbia is completely different in that's a really important point because if somebody asked you this where are patients typically say quite frankly. This is what a lot physical therapist asked me to is. CBD good does it work that sequence me asking you do you like micro beer tastes snack many different products and there's actually studies that have shown where individuals have gone up and down the streets of communities where they've been selling cbd various stores and they pull those out and go testament elapsed they find out there's actually no. CB Dan those products whatsoever and you can see that type of situation all the way to everything from CBD infused beer to obviously CBD gummy as an out as their golf courses in Canada that encourage you to come there so that you can enjoy CBD at each hole Ashok. Our various parts of the country is a significant arguing a recruitment tool in early. One of the biggest opposition to this industry streep was the beer industry but they maxi not one eighty and now there are some of the biggest investors because they were concerned that the people found usage Dan either recreational or St D. that they would stay all the burs so instead they found a match if you will and now you see microbreweries with CBD coming up all over the country Jeff. This is really just a fascinating discussion and I know one. That'll be super interesting for our listeners and an issue that you know on kind of the leading edge of where we're heading in healthcare as we move towards a close I wanNA throw one little SORTA curveball and maybe take us back to quote unquote more traditional sort of Rehab but you obviously have a dual role of having been very actively involved in both physical therapy education an and athletic training education in dual credential than so you've seen over the many years the sort of the rivalries scope of practice issues all the sort of been fighting whatever you WANNA call it between tease. ATC's and you know most recently I think it was at the next conference the President of the Athletic Training Association as well as Sharon done the president of Ta got together and it seems that our professions are finally starting to realize we're not each other's enemies but perhaps we're actually colleagues in this whole pursuit of a less invasive non-surgical less Pharma less imaging sort of future of healthcare both of which pt and athletic trainers owners. I think fit perfectly into that strategy so my question is what are your thoughts on this. What I think is a renewed sense of collaboration between our professions and where. Where do you see it headed going forward? Why Gye certainly hope you're right on that. This isn't New Era Tori Lindley came out to Chicago and shared a stage took Sharon done and then Sharon actually came out to Las Vegas for the athletic training and shared a stage with Tori. I think on the national level the leaders are on the Saint Age and what's really going to be important is that at the state and local levels we see similar relationships developing in many places they already are developed upped but from a political standpoint I served for three years many years ago as a liaison between two organizations nationally and I probably a las a fair amount of friends from both sides because we were at each other's throats at that point in time in the truth of the mattress scope of practice perspective you know if you look at Asu the AP Ta for example the percentage of membership that actually work in the sport setting it overlap with athlete trainees what they do. It's not a large percentage pitch so many physical therapists that are active are not even aware of this. They don't even know who or what athletic trainers aren't what they do. This is a non issue for them but there's so so much that we can do together to share it particularly nowadays whether it relates from the beginning of the classroom setting with interprofessional education alway to interpersonal actors is an teamwork in the settings that I've been. It's always been a hallmark for me for everybody to work together and I really hope we're seeing a renewed relationship here. Because many any of us are either Dole credential or were very good friends with each other. We do a lot of similar things together both of the job setting anything outside the job setting and so I'm excited to see that it would be really nice. If we could show the patients don't care they don't understand but if we could show the rest of our healthcare communities that here's a way to work together other including at the lights statute level. Would we each these things to change. You know I know down here in Florida. Physical therapists are not able to drive Adl and it it was because of the acupuncture board in fact that fought that well you know it'd be nice to have support with each other there and have another organization stand behind you to see positive legislation legislation. Go through in an effort to improve your practice so I'm glad you brought that up. I'm certainly an advocate behind those relationships it all religions for that matter. I mean charcoal is to get the patient better. There are certain things that we do that none of us all in a technique if you will but we share some commonalities this is a great opportunity charity right out with two basic leaders to do away and stuff to the rest of us to follow a great perspective great wrap up there. Jeff and thanks again for your time today a day just going through what you know about cannabis and how it relates to health care particular in our kind of backyard with the Rehab professionals but we look forward to hopefully having you back on the show soon and thanks again for everything. Thank you gentlemen. I really appreciate the time of the opportunity great to have you jeff. Wow what a great episode with Dr Jeff Cohen who is a dual credentialed physical therapist athletic trainer and would really had a good time I think uncovering a new very progressive topic on the area of cannabis education it certainly being discussed within healthcare in general and weather and win it should be the included in healthcare education specifically we talked about the physical therapy profession and the recent passing albeit narrowly of the RC the motion to develop resources for AP TA to develop resources that therapists can use an educating their patients about medical. Marijuana and cannabis use discussed a lot of the You know misconceptions you know in any new area whether it's a new treatment technique or something like marijuana that has been sort of previously illegal well in many states and now becoming more legal and mainstream in just all the truth fact fiction around its use in its potential benefits and healthcare so jeff is certainly a very valuable valuable resource and I know our listeners will enjoy connecting with him online about the use of of cannabis in healthcare so as always you can find us on the blog the evidence in motion blog at EAE MTM is our social media handle whether it be facebook instagram or twitter we always appreciate state your feedback and mark and I are always open to ideas about a guest that we might have on the show so without further do thanks as always for listening and we look forward worked to having you again on the show thanks for listening to the EM clinical podcast ast with Dr John Childs and Dr Mark Sheppard for more information on the podcast guests and the latest and physical therapy visit. WWW W. dot evidence in motion dot com slash blog. If you like this episode be sure to subscribe like rate and review on your favorite podcast directory.

cannabis Dr Jeff Conan Jeff marijuana Florida United States Dr John Childs Google Jeff mark John John Florida International Universi President gm Chicago Portland James Madison University Oregon
Aquarius

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Aquarius

"NASA will join an international crew on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean this summer to prepare for future deep space missions innovation now NASA conducts analog missions or field tests in locations that have physical similarities to research station in the world sits sixty two feet below the ocean surface near key Largo Florida the interior of Aquarius provide nations the Nemo Twenty three crew will focus on spacewalks learn to use augmented reality for training and evaluate tools for for innovation now Jennifer pulling innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA extreme space environments the Aquarius Laboratory part of the Florida International University's Undersea Research Habitat and the only undersea eighteen core samples on the lunar surface. These astronauts will be preparing for future exploration to the Moon and Mars while under the sea.

NASA Undersea Research Habitat Atlantic Ocean Nemo Twenty Aquarius Laboratory National Institute of Aerospac Florida International Universi Jennifer sixty two feet
Episode 158: Dealing with Common Problems for Fast-Growing Companies, with Tim Fulton

Absolute Advantage

44:02 min | 2 years ago

Episode 158: Dealing with Common Problems for Fast-Growing Companies, with Tim Fulton

"Welcome to absolute advantage. The show guaranteed shorten your path to success. We talked to amazing entrepreneurs and leaders at the top of their game and give you the tools to develop the advantage to lead succeed and make a difference. Now, here's your host, successful entrepreneur, investor and master connector, Kelly Hatfield, welcome everyone. I'm Kelly half yield on this show. We aim to bring you strategies and insights to shorten your path to success. And our goal as always is that you're going to walk away with at least one tip idea strategy or insight that inspires you to take action in life and your business. So just make sure you're listening through that filter. Also in our discussion will explore concept that you all know is near and dear to my heart into the heart of this show, which is the idea of the ripple effect and how our actions as leaders ripple into the organization and beyond. So make sure you're listening. For for through that filters. Well, as you're listening to our guest today, which I am super cited excited to introduce. We have Tim Fulton with us today. He is a nationally recognized small business consultant and advocate with more than thirty years experience and entrepreneurship as a successful business owner. A small business counselor and an adjunct university professor temps. Purpose and passion is helping other succeed. His history includes serving as an assistant director of the small business development center at Clayton state university and the director of the family business institute at Florida international university. He's worked with thousands of business startups and existing business entities as a catalyst for starting and growing their business enterprises. And you know what this man does not rest. Ten is the author of very popular award winning book on small business titled small business matters and the follow up book, small. Business matters and all that jazz. Tim also publishes his own award winning monthly newsletter. Small business matters as a public speaker, Tim is address groups from the association of small business development centers. The cruise line industry association and the American society for training and development. He's also appeared on television and radio programs as an advocate for small business and entrepreneurship. So as you can all see, we have a well-qualified guest today and inex- cited to to share his expertise with you. So Tim welcome. Thank you so much for joining us Kelly. Thank you so much. I was reminded as as you were sharing my biography, there was one time one time only that my mom set in on a on a speaking presentation that I did, and she heard a similar introduction. And when I finished sit down, she reached over leaned in and said, you know, you've never been able to keep a job. Think of that every time I hear that introduction. Oh my gosh. Awesome. I love that. Before we, I have some real specific. I love your area of expertise, and I know it speaks so well to our listeners here. Many of whom are onto preneurs leaders before I do that, though. I'm really curious. So you've spent more than thirty years in entrepreneurship in some way, shape or form. And why is that? What? What is it behind that kind of passion that you have for it? I'm really interested in that part of the story for you. And why leader? Why entrepeneurship is such a passion of yours. Well. That we like many of your listeners. I was an entrepreneur at a very early age. I was one of those kids that delivered newspapers on a bicycle and kids still did that. I in school, I sold bumper stickers. I sold candy. Anything that I thought I could make money doing. And that was just part of my DNA at a very early age and went away to school in Orleans to Tulane university and got a an undergraduate degree in economics and got a masters in. I think I was only Hurson in my class did not go work on Wall Street or go work for a banker, a big insurance company. I thought that was crazy. I thought, why would anyone want to work for someone else? Why would you not want to work for yourself inside got out of school immediately got involved with a retail store. Tire automotive business had that for about five years and sold a business started. Another business grew it sold it at that started a. Pattern that lasted for about fifteen or sixteen years of starting businesses and selling them. And then I found that I enjoyed being around other business owners as much as I enjoyed being a business owner, and I got involved in a variety of different groups, chambers of commerce in Qantas clubs, and always talking about my business and their business. It wasn't long before people started asking questions like, you know, how do you do this? Or how'd you start this? Or how'd you get volved in this? And that kind of morphed into to speaking and doing training for small business owners consulting and coaching in. That's where the second half of my career got started. Small business matters as a consultant coach to to business owners literally fell into it, and I could be happy. I feel like I'm the luckiest guy on the planet. I love that. I know one of your key focuses is helping growth minded entrepreneurs grow so that I know that there's. The growth minded. So can we talk a little bit about that and how important that is an entrepreneur. And one of the reasons why say that this conversation just came out the other day with a company we were working with and and they've really style stalled out kind of plateaued, we're, we're helping them find some of their engineering talent, and they said, well, this is the way we've always done it, and and there was really a lot of resistance to looking at doing something a little bit differently. And so how important is that growth minded. Piece to the puzzle here of entrepreneurship, Kelly. I think it's it's critically important. One of the first business books that I've ever read was a book called the Email. It's now called the revisited by Michael Gerber and he, he pointed out something that I, I didn't know at the time and that is most small businesses are not started by entrepreneurs. They're started by technicians in a technician is someone who has a particular skill particular experience in at some point. They start a business around that technical skill. It's the chef who opens up the restaurant attorney opens up a lot practice. I thought all businesses were started by entrepreneurs like yourself and like mate. So the fact that over ninety percent of small businesses started by technicians, those individuals don't necessarily want to to grow a Goliath size business. In some cases, if they're. In a job for themselves. In some cases, they just want something that they in a couple of others start an an enjoy more of a lifestyle type business, and and there's nothing derogatory at all about those businesses. Majority of small businesses, I think fall into that category. But then there are the entrepreneurs who start businesses with a a vision of picture of something much larger than what they start with. In those I just find those are the business owners that I enjoy working with that don't like in my case, I didn't know anything about cars started a tire out amount of business at didn't know anything about technology co, founder of an internet software company. But what I did understand were just some of the basics, the blocking tackling of how to grow enterprise. And so that's what I found. That's where my sweet spot is in those folks that I enjoy working with the most, the ones that start small but see something much. Larger down the past for themselves that so you mentioned growing growing enterprise, you just use that term. What are some of the most common struggles you see related to growing a business? Sure. Couple that come to mind. One is what I've found is that businesses go through a growth curve and not unusual that about a couple years in or at about a million dollars or so in revenue. This will oftentimes hit a barrier growth barrier sealing so to speak where the businesses been growing nicely doubling, maybe incised over couple years and all of a sudden that growth stops and the business owner gets very frustrated because I can't figure out why the businesses stop growing, and they don't realize is as a founder of the business, they're not doing one job. They're doing a dozen jobs right there. See everything c. c. c. o. they're wearing all the hats doing all important jobs and they're capable of doing that for a certain period of time. But at some point it catches up to him and they can't do everything to me balls in the air, and that stunts the growth potential of the business and in some cases will cause the could cause of business to fail. If that business owner is not willing at some point to say, you know what? I can't do it all. I've got to be willing to delegate. I've got to be willing to make a few key hires and focus on whatever it is that I do best. That's the first thing that I see is not far into the the life cycle of the business, the business owner, Scott to be willing to to delegate and and find really good people to come. Join them in in this business venture. Got it to, let's kind of go down that path here with minding with finding good people. I know that you know a common struggle with growing business is often finding the right talent Yelm to to help the silicate that growth. So what are some of the challenges you see companies Mace? Is it relates to hiring and growing their team or and maybe some best practices or any thoughts around your area of expertise on this subject? Because this is a big one or a lot of people right now right now, especially. We're certainly in a, it's a war for talent right now and your listeners pry her that already. But I see it every day with my with my clients, my CEO's that it, it's it's a very tight labor market or were virtually full employment. The best people are working someplace. They're not looking for a job. They might be tempted, but they're not tickly looking to make a switch. And so if if those businesses have got positions fell, it's very hard to find quality talent today. So couple things that I suggest to my clients one is to hire early too often. They wait too long. They wait till it's almost say disaster, you know before they bring in that first salesperson that that that I, you know, financial person. I suggest that they hire sooner than later. I have never had a client. Tell me after hiring someone that the higher too soon. More often. I hear the opposite. I hear I should hire this person six months ago, twelve months ago. So that's the first thing is is higher early as as counterintuitive is at might might sound too many of your your listeners. The second thing that comes to mind is is in your youth Bryher this and your listeners pry have as well is higher, slow fire, fast. Again, I say the opposite quite often is that business owners maybe because the market conditions are hiring way too fast. It's, you know, kind of a gut instinct us. You seem like the right person. When can you start? And then been doing well in, they know it's not going well. And usually one can tell within the first thirty days, whether it's a good higher, not and the statistics. I saw recently that it's like twenty five percent of all hires end up being what we thought they're going to be. And so within thirty days, I know this is a good higher this, the miserable higher, and then I wait another year before let the person go because I'm just certain that either they can turn it around or have. Era call in my life and and somehow situations going to get better. So I- preach to my members exact opposite is is despite the difficult is get good people is is go slow, make sure you've got the right person, and if it's not the right person act quickly and not only is that good for the company, but it's good for the individuals while because they know as well as we do that, it's not the right fit. It's not the right position. And so we're not doing them any favors hanging onto them any longer than than we have to. Now that such great points than can you talk a little bit about because all the into the spirit of full transparency firing fast has been an issue for myself and my business partner through the life of our different businesses that emotional piece kind of gets in the way. And, and I know there was one change that we made that made a difference for us, but I'm interested in your perspective on so firing fast means you. To have a lot of clarity around. You know and take some of the emotion out of that. Right. So what are some of the things that we can do to help us fire more quickly and the emotion out of the decision and have it be based on facts? I guess. Co degree question and something that many of my clients struggle with, and you mentioned one is one is a very high level of accountability, and it stops. It starts with the interviewing process and the and the job description, a job description that is heavy on results and light on actively in. It's it's a something that is gonna bothers me. I look at job descriptions and they're just there's a lot of fluff. There's a lot of description of activity, but very little consideration of results. And I think it should be the exact opposite. I want this individual to know exactly what I expect him or her, and and and whether it's it's, it's dollars. It's time whatever the measurement might bait. I suggest to my clients, every employee should have at least one number that they're fully responsible for. So the job description should be clear as to what that number is, what this person's going to be held accountable for in when. I suggest if that's true that most employees will end up firing themselves. There's clarity and accountability. No one wants to get fired. I can say that up to ninety nine percent of most people. I think no one wants to be fired in if they know that that's where they're heading. Most people are gonna fire themselves. They're gonna go someplace else, but there's not clear if they're not sure if there's not a count ability, they'll hang in there as long as you. What up with it. Totally. Second thing that's really important important is culture and and I strongly suggest to my clients that they developed core values within their company, those core values than define the culture, the personality of the organization, so that when someone is not performing or they're not behaving, either one to me or fireable fences, not performing or not behaving, the culture picks that up. And again, either they're going to fire themselves or the team is gonna fire them. It's not going to be left up to me, but a strong culture leads to a strong team and that team will take the initiative to make sure that person does not feel comfortable than that within that organization. But it starts with it with with having core values and a strong organizational culture. I love that the, I hope everybody was listening in picked. There were so many excellent nuggets of information. Action in there. I think you're right people that hold Bill fire themselves, but there has to be a lot of clarity around exactly what the expectations are. So they know if they're not measuring up and that was our big mistake was that it was like, oh, you know. Our hearts would get in the way. And then here we are four months later in the, you know, we're so anyway, I love it. Thank you so much Tim for that. Let's stick on the subject of. Of the talent war. And and you mentioned this a little earlier, which is, you know, we're in full employment, so most people that you're interested are working, which means that you know the people that you have working at your company may be in demand as well at, so as far as being recruited away or so, how do we keep the talent that we have on board? Do you have any insight? I know that culture piece that you just mentioned. We could probably dig in a little bit deeper on that, but but but any thoughts around that particular piece because I think every company was not paying attention to the right things is vulnerable to having their employees pick from them. Cultures certainly creates stickiness for people in in so bad. You brought this up because I find many companies are so focused on going out and acquiring new talent, and they're losing sight of what's even more important in that's retaining their existing employees. I saw a statistic. This was just a couple of weeks ago, seventy four percent of all employee's in this country will be looking for another job within the next twelve months. Seventy four percent doesn't mean they're going to take another job, but they're gonna look at at other opportunities. And again, part of that is just that the market dynamics that were experiencing today and part of it I think is generational is well that I think as a generation lineal cz are more likely to to look, you know, for to make a switch than maybe previous generations. So I think companies. Particularly small businesses have be mindful of this is what are we doing today to retain our best people? And you know, particularly your, you know your superstars and the best thing for superstars they, they wanna be around other superstars. And so going back to what we talked about before that if we have a b player a c. player, that's the surest way to lose a superstar is by surrounding them with a Bs, be players, see players, particularly the players because you're superstars are they'll volunteers, they can work anywhere they want, and they can make the same. Basically the same amount of money if not more someplace else. So they choose to work for your company, the superstars do. And so we have to think about given that they are, they are volunteers, what do what can we do? What we need to do to make sure that they don't wanna go someplace else. Something else to keep mine with your best workers is that they. You wanna be challenged. They wanna be challenged in their position. They want opportunities for growth opportunities for learning. I think they want the bar raised at appropriate times. They don't wanna be micromanaged. And I find that sometimes that my clients are guilty of of micromanaging their best people, and that's just that's employ suicide this quickest way to get rid of a really good employees. I think Kelly, I think we also have to be mindful of what it is is motivating each particular poi-. Every employee is unique in terms of what is it that's going to get me excited about this job? What's gonna keep me in this position? Is it an opportunity for growth? Is it an opportunity to take on a different position? Maybe somewhere down the line. Again, for younger workers, it's an opportunity to to work in a fun work environment to work around people that I like and no. And again, the. Opportunity for advancement. So just understanding that every play is different everything. Each of them will be motivated in a different way and just requires a lot of hard work to retain employees too much more so than I think in the past. Absolutely. And I think that that's one thing to the point that you made a little bit earlier as we're so focused on adding team members that we forget about the team that we have and developing that team, or you know, and in creating opportunities for them to step into, and I love what you just shared with us all around this and and I wanna go just a little bit deeper. So what do you have any advice? And again, this is something that came up just the other day where one of our clients had somebody who's really been had been performing really well. So we know they have the ability. They were what they really a high performer within the organization. Great attitude. Somebody who just has the. Vision of the company and embraces everything that they're all about, but their performance that that performance piece has gone, just downhill. And so you know, I was surprised to hear that they were considering. I've worked with this company for years, and I was surprised to hear that they were considering making a change with this employee and actually terminating. And I thought, what in the world, you know? So any thoughts around how to how to either reenergize reenergize or or inspire someone to. Maybe move past media. I don't know any thoughts around that topic. Sure. It's funny. I just wrote an article in my newsletter last month month before about this exact topic. There's a tool that I use with my clients. It's called the Welsh. Grid was created by Jack Welsh when he was at GE and it's a tool to evaluate people and it looks at job performance in it looks at job behavior. Those are the two criteria. And so the the dynamic that you just described as someone with good behavior. Good, good. You know, kind of person you want working for you, but for whatever reason is not giving you the performance that you'd like in term that's used for this type of employee. Is there a cheerleader? You know, they're the great, great mindset, great personality, someone you want on your team. But for whatever reason, again is not achieving results that you expect. And Kelly, my experience has been with a cheerleader. There are three and only three scenarios that that are coming into play, and I'll be more than happy to walk through each one place that the awesome. The first is it is a training or resource issue that the individual either has not had the training though the wording to do this job, or they don't have the resources in. Those could be technical resources. Those could be financial resources could be human resources. They don't have the proper tools to do the job. So that's the first thing that I normally ask about is, okay, does this individual have the the training expertise to do this job to have the resources that they need to be successful? That's number one. The second scenario is it's a right bus wrong seat situation. Again, this is the, we want this person on our bus. They share our values, but for whatever reason they are in the wrong. Seat during the wrong position. They're in sales and they should be in customer service in customer service. They should be in operation somehow they've gotten into the wrong seat. Sometimes this happens that you know, they start off in the right seat, but as the company has grown as the organization has expanded that position has outgrown that individual and and we, we've all seen this happen in growing organizations in the example us oftentimes is, is the bookkeeper I hire someone when I, I start my business, need someone to do my bucks to do payables receivables, hire someone may with very little experience. But again, the right mindset to do my county first couple years, no problem. They can handle the position now several one million dollar business. I've got a three to five million dollar business. I no longer need a bookkeeper. I need a county manager for my business in the question is, can that. Bookkeeper step up into that accounting manager position. Some can some can't. Well, if here she is not able to then have a very difficult situation because I may know that I may no longer have a seat for that bookkeeper. Now, any accounting manager? What say that they're successful? They move into that accounting manager position. Now I go from three to five million revenue NAMA ten billion dollars in revenue. I don't need an accounting manager. I not. I now need to see a though, and it's very unlikely that that person who start off as a bookkeeper canal, take on that position as the CFO my company. So it's not. It's not their fault. The position has outgrown them a Verne. Harnish is one of my favorite authors wrote one of the books called mastering the Rockefeller habits, and and Kelly. He said the following, he said in a growing organization, the positions in that organization will always will always outgrow the individual. In that position. So it's not a question of if it's just a question of when the position will outgrow the individual. And then the question is, what, what do I do that individual? And that's a very tough position for any business owner operator. So number two is the, it's a right bus wrong, say Kelly. The third scenario is is something that is far more common than we would tend to think in that is there is something going on outside of the business that is impacting that individual's job performance something going on at home, something going on related to family to finance, might be health related something going on outside of work that's impacting their performance at work. And so those are the three different scenarios. And I've yet to run into a situation that I've worked with a client that that when they described this, this cheerleader that they didn't fall into one of these three scenarios. I think by by understanding, identifying those then makes it much easier for the the leader to determine what might be the appropriate prescription the path to work with this individual. I hope this was helpful. Super helpful. So you know, even just an asking looking at this situation and then asking these questions in do, do we feel like this is a training and resource issue on? Is this the right seat for them and and could perhaps there be something going on, we know about something going on personally, or you know, we need to find out whether there's something going on personally, if we don't feel like the first to apply, maybe it's maybe there is something personal that we just don't know about or maybe we do, but we have an understood to the extent that that impact might have been on them and Kelly from me with a client, not long ago and walking them through the scenario. And number one train resource issue, don't think so position outgrown. I don't think. So in I asked about, you know, could there be something going on outside of work? And his immediate response was, this was a an energy engineering company is that I don't think so. You know, he's not said anything to me. I think everything's good at home and that's not unusual. Oftentimes we're not comfortable, you know, delving into the personalized of our employees while it turned out that this individual was going to very difficult divorce been married for number of years, very difficult, divorce, and was having a significant impact on his job, performs the employee, didn't even realize how much of an impact it was. Fortunately, the CO the company realize what was going on, put him on the bench for about three months, just allowing him to work his way through the situation. It got better brought them back, put a back on projects and that employees still with them today. But. Just an area that we tend not to want to to ask about. And yet it can be as significant as any of the other two of possibilities. That's thank you so much for sharing that. That's perfect. Totally helped with the situation, my client Maeve and be listening to, you know, listening to this here in the future, and this is going to be great advice for them. So thank you so much. When you look at, let's stay kind of in this leadership. World here. And you know, one of my favorite authors is John Maxwell and he says, a good leader asked great questions. So what are some of the questions you ask team members or or that you're, you know, the people that you you consult with help foster growth. Well, that's that's a good. That's a very good question. Like you. I enjoyed learning from John Maxwell and the idea of servant leadership comes to mind and the importance for leaders to see themselves in that position of serving their their direct reports and asking the question on a regular basis, how can I help you? What tools do you need? You know what? What, what? What should what should I know about what's going on here within the workplace, taking on that kind that mindset of the servant leader and making sure that our people have whatever tools resources that they need in order to be successful in that were able to to create a try to remove any of the hurdles that aren't ploys face the in in trying to do their job and and trying to create a heard. Some describe a friction Lewis. Work environment so that aren't poise, can do their job and trying to limit anything that's causing friction within their workplace. And kind of let that metaphor for later is what's creating friction, what's preventing them from achieving the results that we want. So that's one very simple question is how can I help you today. Trying to think what else? What other, what? What would be other good questions? I, I like the idea of continual improvement. So leaders asking their direct reports specific questions about how can we do whatever we doing, how can we do this better actually approve upon process a procedure, assist them because so so often the problems that we deal with our, our design issues and just because they've been with us for fifty years doesn't mean they're going to continue to work moving forward. And so looking for design problems before they become problems and just asking those types of questions to our people is is this are, you know, are we still doing this the right way? Is there a better way that we could be doing this half? Could we be doing this differently? How can we approve this? How can we innovate this? How can we create a little bit of disruption within the workplace? So we might come up with a better way of doing things like any of those questions. Would be great to pose to employees love that. What what about questions that you ask of yourself as a leader? You know? So when you're, you know, through your process or what questions do you ask yourself as a leader. Questions that I would ask myself as a later. The first one comes to mind is what else when else could I be doing that would would help that would positively impact those that I'm responsible for leading? What else could I could I be doing? Oftentimes I find that my clients in these are leaders are CEO's of of small companies that they find themselves stuck particularly on decisions and so ask them, I south, okay. What is it that I'm stuck on today? What is it that I'm not making progress on and how can I get unstuck is who do I need to talk to what I need to figure out? How can I become unstuck. One, I think procrastinating on decisions is not always a bad thing that I find some of my clients too often over procrastinate with they get stock, they're not willing to ask for help. And so things just don't happen in. So being willing to ask for help. But just asking that question, what am I stuck on today? Love that. That's the one I'm going to add that to my Tema list. What about, you know if you were in and I'm not sure that this is fair advice, and if you are fair question, if you wanna give more than one answer here, but if you could gift all of your knowledge on one lesson of leadership to an entrepreneur of small business, what would that one lesson of leadership be that you would give him or her. One lesson in leadership. Actually, a couple come to mind. One one that comes to mind is the importance of a reference a little bit earlier, the importance for the leader to keeping score of the business. I suggest to my clients that they're the head score keeper in their business at the highest level, making sure that they're keeping score keeping track of whatever the most important numbers are for the business, and then making sure that, as I mentioned earlier, that every one of their employees is keeping scores, well, that they've got a number that they're keeping track of. So there's a cascading effect from the CEO all the way down through each employ within the company and its in the idea is that to think of the business as a game, and I can't think of a good game that there's not some method of keeping score. And so I think that's that's imperative for the CO two kind of had that mindset that I am responsible the highest level for keeping score with. In this business, it's a game and certainly were out to win, and we've got to be able to keep score. Love that. K. what about you know, the. This is a big one, and I get lots of questions around this or thoughts around this, and I ask it of a lot of guests. We all have the same number of hours in the day, the life of an entrepreneur in a leader is chaotic one or can be a chaotic one. Do you have a couple of strategies that maybe you use or you work with your clients to use that help maximize productivity. Kelly. A couple of things come to mind is one is being mindful of of altitude that as a leader, our activity were doing different things during the course of any given day and asking ourselves from time to time. Okay. What what to tude am I working at today? My fifty thousand feet in my work on highly strategic impactful activities, or am I at five hundred feet? And I'm in the weeds and I'm working on very tactical issues. The probably someone else could be working on. So that would that's one in terms of impacting productivity is is just being mindful of altitude in what level in in my working at the other one I mentioned earlier was about delegation is being willing to look at what it is that I'm doing. And so k is, is this within my scope? Is this the question I asked my clients. Is at CEO work when I see them making travel reservations. When I see them doing something that seems very tactical, I'll say is is at the work of a CEO. And so I hope that if I asked that enough that they began asking that question of themselves and if not, who should be doing this work, I'll I'll sit down at the desk of clients and say, okay, pick one thing on your desk that someone else should be doing and usually ends up being a dozen different things that someone else should be doing in there. Just a frayed of delegating. 'cause delegation is maybe one of the hardest things that leaders have to do, and yet it may be the most important thing that we do, and so getting them into a practice of of looking at whatever it is that they're working on Saint okay, is in my the right one to be working on this have not who should I give this off to? The last thing that comes to mind Kelly is, is that I firmly believe that CEO's. Should should build the turmoil uses margin in their schedules. So many of my CEO's I'm sure the folks that you work with, you know if they've got, you know, eight hours where the work they're trying to build that into a six hour schedule and so their over scheduled in terms of meetings and activities. And what I would rather say is that that's that my CEOs that may be fifty percent of their day is scheduled and fifty percent of their day is unscheduled because I find that sometimes the their most productive time is at unscheduled time. It's at time that they just bub into a colleague and have a conversation. All of a sudden something great comes out of that unscheduled conversation or they're going out to lunch or their picking up the phone and calling up a customer vendor, a stakeholder in the business, but allowing that kind of free time to to work on things is very hard. I think for small business owner. And I think it's just critical. That's such great advice. I love that. So build margin into your schedules. Wonderful. Will I am loving our conversation? I'm I, I want to be mindful of your time and not of our listeners. So I've got one more question, but before I ask that, how can our listeners? So if they're interested in signing up for your newsletter or an having you come speak or working with their organization, buying your books, how can they find you reach out and connect. Great, thank you. The newsletter, small business matters published every month has been for the last ten years. Very easy. Either. Your listeners are welcome to Email me at Tim as mall. Business matters online dot com or just go to the website. WWW dot small business matters online, that calm and they can sign up. The newsletter is is, is free and I'd love to have them all subscribed today. I have two books that I published when it's called small business matters. In one, it's called small business matters in all that jazz. Both books are available either on the website or on Amazon as well with whatever's easiest in third thing is just if I can be any help whatsoever. They're welcome to Email me. I'm happy to take your questions and and be a resource in any any way possible. That's fantastic. Thank you so much for being so gracious, and I will make sure that all of that is in the links are in our show notes as well, so that you just link right up to your site and everything. So we'll make sure that they can get there and find you easily. Last question. So is there a question you wish I would've asked that you feel like would have brought a lot of value to our listeners today or key takeaway for them? As we as we end our conversation. Well, a topic that comes up frequently. Oftentimes I'm asked to talk about exit strategy and it. It's a topic I find that is very overlooked by many business owners. I got into this business, how will I get out of it? And. I got into this mess. And they spend a lot of time figuring out how to get in and unfortunately, very little time thinking about how to get out. I had three different clients of mine all business owners. All got legitimate offers from buyers last month in one month off three at nowhere, people called him and said, hey, I want to add like to buy your business. And so the question I'll ask my clients is, are you ready for that phone call when you get put in the term you put in a play when somebody reaches out says, have I talk about buying your company? Are? Are you ready to have that conversation? And to oftentimes I find the answer is no. And so that's the last thing I'd like to leave with your listeners is the importance of spending time and spending time working on your business position it to where you to where you can have that conversation, and you may decide, hey, I'm not ready to Sal. It's not the right time the right, not the right person at the right circumstances. But I just want you to have your business in a position where you can have that conversation where if you choose to want to engage and possibly sell your business, that it is sellable, that it's that it has value in it sellable. So the time to start thinking about an exit strategy is is today to damore too late. I love that temp. Thank you so much. I have enjoyed every minute today. So many great key takeaways. I know how precious time is. I am so grateful. You've spent some of yours with us today. So thank you so much for helping our listeners get the absolute advantage, Kelly. Thank you. This has been a joy events. Great questions in maybe you'll have me back again l. I would love that. I'll start my my bid for now. Thank you. This has been absolute advantage interviews, advice and success strategies for today's thoughtful leaders, but there's much more to come, visit absolute advantage dot com slash by tunes to subscribe and leave your rating in review for the show that way. You'll never miss an episode. We'll talk to you next time. Absolute advantage.

business owner Kelly Hatfield CEO Tim Fulton accounting manager consultant founder John Maxwell inex professor Clayton state university Orleans Florida international universi assistant director technician director Jack Welsh
WFOR CBS4 AM UPDATE 11-3-20

CBS4 News Miami

02:19 min | Last month

WFOR CBS4 AM UPDATE 11-3-20

"Cbs for news. Headlines are sponsored by your volkswagen dealers of south florida. Checkout local offers at vw. Florida dot com. Hello i'm mariel. Rodriguez he are your. Cbs four news headlines. The day is here election day. twenty twenty has arrived. If you're voting in person today the polls are open from seven. Am to seven pm and you must vote at your assigned precinct. Turnout has already been historic in florida. Nine million ballots have been cast nationally. It's more than ninety eight million more than thirds of all those cast in two thousand sixteen nominees. No the path to the white house likely leads through florida. President obama made a last minute push for nominee joe biden. He also drive in rally at florida international university monday night here encourages people to vote. If they already did he told them to make sure others have voted for trump. The president's daughter-in-law rallied supporters in miami. She told voters not only support the president but all republicans biden's camp hope for a strong black voter turnout in south florida. Trump's campaign is leaning heavily of south florida's latino community and of course many local races won't be decided today. Miami dade county will elect its next mayor either. County commissioners di bobo or commissioner daniele levin. Kava there were the top two vote-getters in the august primary. The korean miami dade mayor carlos jimenez trying to head to congress representing florida's twenty sixth district their term limited. Republican is trying to unseat democrat. Debbie mirka sal. Powell was first elected two years ago in the twenty seventh congressional district incumbent democrat. Donna shalala again facing republican muddy. And be that assad chilly Also face alessandra. Two years ago. Chila won by six percentage points in broward county. The highest profile race is a one for sheriff. The current share democrat gregory. Tony is running against republican attorney. H wayne clark who has campaigned on his legal and business experience having never worked in law enforcement make sure to join us all day long for election day coverage on air and online at cbs. Miami dot com. Those are your cbs news. Headlines i'm miracle rodriguez.

south florida volkswagen florida biden's camp hope Cbs di bobo or commissioner daniel Rodriguez florida international universi Cbs carlos jimenez joe biden miami Debbie mirka Florida white house dade county Trump obama Chila dade
AP One Minute Headlines Feb 18 2019 11:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

02:45 min | 1 year ago

AP One Minute Headlines Feb 18 2019 11:00 (EST)

"Want? French across fans Joyce because it's back quite more demand. Little Caesars large full pretzel frost pizza, featuring a cream each header cheese sauce have aronie and afford cheese plan surrounded by a delicious folks that saw present frost for just six dollars dot ready every day between four date and only six bucks from the home of pretzel cross pizza. Little Caesars at participating locations, plus tax. After years been roll dough put in each of my life. I'm free receipts of a mind of their own go, paperless manager travel expenses online with my taxi business, make the smarter choice of my taxi dot com and McCabe, I'm Ed Donahue with an AP news minute. President Trump is lashing out. A key officials involved in the Russia probe namely, former FBI director, Andrew McCabe, and the current deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein in an interview with CBS's, sixty minutes McCabe who was fired last year by the FBI describe Rosenstein is having raised the prospect of invoking the twenty fifth amendment to remove Trump from office, South Carolina. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham wants answers, democracy people enforce the law can't take it in their own hands. And was this an attempted bureaucratic coup? I don't know. I don't know telling the truth, I know Rosenstein, vehemently denied it. But we're going to get to the bottom of it. A man with a banner in an American flag. Climb to construction crane Nira. Florida campus where President Trump was scheduled to speak today. The Miami Herald reports the man spent about two hours top the crane at the northern edge of Florida international university on the campus in the Miami suburb of Sweetwater, Florida. I'm Ed Donahue. Eight you with the rhinestone dot collar between us dogs. I just convinced my human of grade to new home with the twelve hundred square foot bathroom, I think she called it a yard with Wells Fargo's three percent down payment on a fixed rate loan. My Uman realized new home was within reach learn more at wellsfargo dot com slash Wells Fargo, home mortgage down payments is three percent on a fixed rate loan require mortgage insurance after home mortgage consultant about loan requirements. Wells Fargo home mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank. Equal housing lender. NMLS Alrighty, three nine hundred one sky dining, this amazing, Jeff. But you know, what else is amazing an iphone six s for just forty nine bucks at metro really imagine streaming all the way down with that amazing Cameron of switching that smart. You know, what else is smart parachutes? Switch to metro and get an amazing iphone success for only forty nine bucks. Metro by t mobile phone offer requires porting of number currently active on T mobile network are active on metro in past ninety days. See store for details and terms and conditions.

President Trump Wells Fargo Bank rod Rosenstein Andrew McCabe Ed Donahue Wells Fargo FBI Senator Lindsey Graham Florida Joyce The Miami Herald Florida international universi Russia deputy attorney general South Carolina AP Miami
The Bilingual Advantage: A Research Update

Entre Dos Podcast

23:29 min | 1 year ago

The Bilingual Advantage: A Research Update

"A podcast about weight embalming like my mom. I'm Bala Monica. Nah Welcome to enter those a podcast about racing bilingual children as parents bilingual children. You've likely heard about the bilingual advantage this idea that people who have two or more languages developed cognitive advantages particularly particularly within the realm of executive function which is responsible for things like attention and task switching research to date has yielded conflicting results and according to some researchers the debate over whether there's bilingual advantage advantage or not has reached stalemate and this episode we talked to Dr Anthony Dick an associate professor of Developmental Science and cognitive neuroscience at Florida International University. He published a study in May that found no evidence disadvantages and executive function in bilingual children. We went into learn more about his study in the state of the research into the cognitive advantages of bilingualism. Yes so the the study that we did well basically what we found. We were investigating whether there's there's this bilingual advantage to executive function right so this is the the idea that that children and adults who speak more than one language sort of gain an advantage outside of just the ability to speak a second language or a third language. They're multi-lingual and that is in the area of executive function which is sort of the ability to to control your behaviors to shift attention to stop yourself from doing something and then then <hes> do something different and people differ in terms of those abilities and there's a lot of work in the past couple of decades at a suggested that if you speak a second language that you sort of get better at doing things just in general in terms of executive function so that's what that's what we are investigating with this study but it's it's part of a broader study of many different sites across the United States. It's part of this adolescent brain and development study that is ongoing and started researching and doing doing research on nine to eleven year olds in two thousand fifteen and then it's continuing on for another five years surge going on and we're falling all these kids Longitudinal and Florida International University is the Miami Miami <hes> site in this this nationally <hes> study across the United States and your study really caught our attention because because when we started working on this show last year we noticed that there were discrepancies in sort of the concept of the bilingual advantage in the research in that field and sort of the end the popular narratives that surround and that that concept right for instance when you look at media covered to bilingualism you'll see claims that range from you know these sort of amazing cognitive advantages to like children that are bilingual have superpowers so this Area R._E._O.. Bilingualism research feels like it has gone from an era where we had to tackle the perceived disadvantages like A._K._a.. Like confusion for instance <hes> bilingualism to now essentially sort of. Figuring out what the advantages are if there are any in at least in the cognitive <hes> aspects of it right so yeah so what do you think this idea of sort of the bilingual advantage has become how much a widely held an accepted view well. I think the way you framed it is great because I I think you do have to go back in time to a couple of decades ago. Where parents of bilingual Oh parents were considered sort of concerned about how they raise their children in terms of whether they should focus on one language or or whether it's okay to to try and learn two languages at the same time and the early thoughts were that like you mentioned that it would be confusing in that it would actually impair language development and it's great that the research is basically suggested? That's not the case that it's it's fine to to have your children learn more than one language is growing up and this is actually you know the default fault in a lot of different countries in the world. The United States is sort of unique in that this is even an issue in in Europe and other parts of the world. It's standard to learn more than one language so I think it's important important to point out that parents should not be concerned that their child is learning more than one language and the the benefits just in general of learning a second language or pretty significant so parents should continue to try and teach. It's our children the second language I'm not bilingual myself but my son who is just turned eleven this week. He's going through a bilingual Spanish English program here in Miami so I totally support that so I think it's important horn first off to set out set out that there aren't the problems that people used to think that you would be confusing kids when they're they're learning a second language but then there was this attempt to show. Maybe they're additional benefits. It's so there was sort of a a pushover in the other direction and the early research was really compelling so the first couple of decades of that there was the suggestion that <hes> kids who were learning a second language do this advantage in in sort of their ability to shift attention attention in and perform multiple tasks and things like that and the early research was really quite good and everybody got very excited about it. The the issue with it is a lot of it was conducted in small samples so we'll in about two thousand fifteen or maybe a little bit before there were people who are doing some some research trying to what you call replicate and extend those findings so you try to replicate the early finding and then extend it to some something being new in the in the study you're doing and they were finding they were having trouble replicating the early findings so a couple of researchers did what's called a Meta analysis where they went and looked at all of the different studies in the literature to see if across all these different studies at different sites with different researchers was there in effect that was continually showing up which would indicate there's something real going on and the men analysis didn't find a lot of compelling evidence for that and then there was another one done last year on adults so the initial analysis focus on on children the one last year and adults also didn't find that that you see these effects consistently across studies so what what we wanted to do is is take advantage of that and sort of jump off from that point and say well. What if we look at it in a very large sample? Would we find something and we also didn't didn't find this advantage. We did replicate one finding which. The parents should be aware of but not overly concerned about which is that if you learn two languages you're basically trying to learn vocabularies at the same time and you only have a certain number of hours in the day to do that. So you may end up <hes> with a reduced English vocabulary here in the United States to some degree but your total vocabulary across the two languages doesn't really suffer and that replicates some prior findings in these studies do you. I think some of the discrepancies perhaps the reasons that some of these findings can't be replicated. Are there certain variables that may also impact those findings like for example you know socioeconomic status or education levels. Is there some of that like or bilingualism in general because there's different levels of bilingualism right and so I'm wondering does that impact or does that have something nothing to do with the discrepancy among studies yeah definitely so there's a lot of potential reasons for it so one of them is that people measure bilingualism in slightly different ways and it's actually quite difficult to to measure it accurately so you're both bilingual. I'm assuming so how would you describe in your own life. How how bilingual are you? Would you say very bilingual or you you very fluent in Spanish as you're set in your first or second language. I guess we were just talking about this yesterday right Paolo about how it has gone up and down <hes> we both grew up with Spanish as our dominant language right so oh English was second and but but after being in this country for over two decades right both of us you know are bilingual are Spanish sort of like proficiency has gone up and down because of that professionally affectionally will use English <hes> even there have been periods in my life where I've mostly used English for everything <hes> my husband's speaks English so after some and now that our daughter's you know are here and we're trying to get get them to be bilingual. We are you Spanish way more so it's sort of it comes in waves right. I you know it's it's like the idea of the muscle. If you exercise it it gets stronger and the same thing happened with these cognitive domains but you're you're pinpointing pointing like sort of the complexity of what is a bilingualism and you know if you learn the two languages simultaneously from birth like your your daughters are probably doing. That's going to be a different kind of bilingual experience than if you let's say you move to the United States when you're six or seven and the only start learning English once you end up in the school system. That's a that's what you would call a sequential bilingual and those different kinds of bilingual's are definitely research has shown they're sort of different kinds of of a bilingual bilingualism and then you have this this added complexity that you're sort of describing which is it really depends on the person's individual experiences so even though you have that complexity though you can. There's definitely a difference between a person who only speaks one language in terms of their level of fluency and one who speaks two languages like my fluency in Spanish is pretty poor so I wouldn't argue that I'm very bilingual but if you have fluency you can carry on a conversation and comprehend the languages into in both languages that would be some degree of bilingualism. It's sort of more of the the issue of degree that you'll get into when you start talking about how that might affect other domains and that's certainly an important issue. The second thing you mentioned with socioeconomic status this will definitely affect. The cognitive development and a number of domains is sort of a complicated relationship with with the language and also with the executive function outcomes and socioeconomic status. We'll definitely predict a number of different an outcomes like academic success executive function so it has to be taken into account and one of the arguments is that if bilingualism allows you to sort of have this executive function advantage it may be a little bit of a protective effect on the negative impacts of lower socioeconomic status so we looked at that in our study it isn't reported in the in the paper but we didn't find any evidence for that but that has been found other studies that the bilingual advantage is especially prominent in kids who come from low income backgrounds so it's an important important caveat caveat to these things I mean this it is complicated to to study this stuff and do you think you mention <hes> this is a._B._C.. Study that yeah that you use the data from this massive massive national study that has sort of given you access to these massive sample sizes right yeah the I think the study is really a game changer I think it's funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National National Institute on Drug Abuse and they put a lot of money behind it and it was a bit of a risk but I think it's turning out to be an just an excellent investment of of tax payer money because what it does is it allows people. It's public data set so anyone can go and try to get access to these data. Even if you're outside of the silencer that means that it's all open it has this large sample apple size so over eleven thousand eleven thousand eight hundred thirty kids I think is what the somewhere around that in the final number for the for the first series of visits and that's an unprecedented sample size for studies of of child development with the number of measures that we collected so this study that we reported here is only taking advantage of the behavioral measures we collected so their intelligence tests and things like that but the study also so did a bunch of neuro imaging measures structural and functional imaging in an M._r._i.. Scanner on all of these kids and so that is going to allow us to understand how brain development is impacted by experience and we also have a lot of genetic data from saliva samples on the same children and background interviews of their parents and the children to try and understand what sort of experiential sorts sorts of things are going to impact brain development and behavioral development so to study itself is is a huge deal in the sample size makes it so that you can really get at some of these very subtle differences because in smaller sample studies you often don't have enough representation of different levels of complexity but with the larger sample you do have that representation and you can start to interrogate him more carefully. Could you tell us about your study's findings because we've I don't think we have this gus knit. That's important so tell us what you found about executive function bilingual's yes so we did we looked at the first data released which had forty five hundred. Kids in there were nine to ten years old when they were tested and we measured three different executive function measures which sort of measure attention one of the measured attention one of a measures what you call task switching so the ability to sort of shift between different tasks in an easy way and then we also looked at conflict resolution so resolving conflict between two potential decisions so those are sort of the executive function measures we also measured their English vocabulary. We didn't measure their vocabulary in other language because over forty languages were represented in the in the sample the majority of them were Spanish. We're speaking but it was still very high representation of other languages so we focused on the English vocabulary because all of them were English speaking children in about sixteen hundred of them. We're also speaking another language and the great thing about the sample is because it's so large there was a very good representation of race ethnicities that are representative of the of the general population of the United States. There was a good representation of socioeconomic status so we get a lot of studies suffer from the problem that they they sort of oversample. You know like middle income households all sold because those people are tend to have the means inability to go and participate in research studies but it was a lot of effort made to try and sample across a range of socioeconomic levels so that made it so that we could look at the socioeconomic status effects and then a lot of the the people the children in the study along with their parents some of them born outside the United States and <hes> had we had a large representation of immigrant background so we can look at those things so we we collected those data we measured bilingual status just by self report so that the child said <hes> whether they were could speak a second language or not but then we also wanted to get it a little bit more into what that meant so we we also ask them. How often were they speaking the other language with with friends and family and so that allowed us to look at sort of it's sort of a proxy measure zero bilingualism or a little bit crude so would have been preferable to have a better measure I think but it turns out to replicate the the vocabulary finding from previous research so I'm not as concerned about it? I think it gets at the idea of bilingualism pretty well but generally we looked at whether if you spoke another language quite often with friends and family did that predict higher executive function meaning if you were sort of the person who was fluent in two languages using one using in the school system probably and the other with with family and friends that should predict according to the literature that was out there should predict better executive function and we didn't find that across the three tasks in fact we did a little bit of an analysis which looked at whether the finding on executive function looked any different from random data and we founded did not but the finding for the vocabulary difference did look different from random data so so that replicated in I want to emphasize a very slight disadvantage for English vocabulary not overall vocabulary we didn't we weren't able to measure that but for English vocabulary. Gaebler and I mentioned the reason being that if you're trying to learn to vocabularies you're sorta splitting your time across the two vocabularies so you may end up with a slight disadvantage for English vocabulary if you if you're learning a second language although in my opinion and the benefits far away those disadvantages so that's generally what we've found is that we couldn't we couldn't replicate the executive function advantage finding but we did replicate the the slight disadvantage for English vocabulary yeah and and and one thing we like to tell our listeners is that language is a continuum and in many ways so as the developing research that surrounds it we have seen an explosion of this bilingual and multilingual brain in development research happen in the past decade and it seems that we have yet to reach a consensus about these very big important questions well I. I think you make ah great point about science. Scientists love to argue with each other. There's at least there's a good bit of people on the other side who who would look at this study and say okay well. That's one study and it didn't measure bilingual well bilingualism as well as we would have liked and some people have said <hes> while you only looked at three executive function tasks you'd probably find it in other stuff so scientists like to poke holes and other studies and they're right. There's no one study that is going to decide whether something is or is not true if you study if you identify more people who are bilingual and you study larger samples that should give you a closer to you correct answer about whether there's something about the population of bilingual's that's different but obviously it matters how you measure things so it's important to get good measurements as well and this study that we did it is part of a larger study that was not specifically designed to look at bilingual advantages so we're sort of pulling the data out that that we could use to address the problem but I think if <hes> if you really wanted to know if this was something that's a real effect or not. I think a very large study with a lot of different measures that tries to really get at and measure bilingualism really well and uses a lot of different executive function measures that would get get at the problem and probably bring a lot of people on board who who maybe you know if they found there was a bilingual advantage. I would believe there was if it was a very well controlled large sample study if they didn't find it I would. I would be inclined to believe that so I think you have to have compelling evidence and part of the compelling evidence is that you need to do large sample studies and this is why I think the A._B._C._D.'s study such a game changer because it was only with this twenty twenty one different universities across the United States getting together in a big consortium to try and collect all these data at the same time and it has been really a sort of a Herculean effort because F._A._U.. Florida International University's one of the <hes> the sites in the study. I get to see firsthand how complicated it is to try and collect these data but those kinds of studies going forward. That kind of investment is going to really change how we understand child development. I think thank you Dr Anthony Dick for talking with us about his study. It sounds like the research and the Bait over whether there is a bilingual advantage may continue on and we'll be following going along closely. You can read more about his study bilingual advantage debate in the show notes. We haven't asked him some time but please if you like what we do. Take a moment to rate and review our podcast. We would be so grateful yes very grateful and.

executive United States Florida International Universi Dr Anthony Dick Miami Bala Monica Europe associate professor of Develop National Institutes of Health apple Paolo representative Gaebler A._B._C._D. National National Institute on eleven year two decades
Senegal's Stunning Gold Jewelry ... And The Controversial Women Who Wore It

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Senegal's Stunning Gold Jewelry ... And The Controversial Women Who Wore It

"For hundreds of years Goldsmith in Senegal been crafting some of the world's most intricate, jewelry, but outside of Senegal. There are tick tradition has largely gone unnoticed. Now, the Smithsonian's national museum of African art in Washington DC is showcasing the jewelry. Here's NPR's Narita Eisenman. I'm at the exhibit and I spot Marian. Ashby johnson. She's peering into a glass case containing an enormous necklace. Three pendants of elaborately layered gold. I'm still admiring my own piece of jewelry bring back so many memories, they begin in nineteen sixty three when Johnson joined her husband on a work trip to Senegal capital, two car walking the streets. She noticed all these hole in the wall workshops where artisans were crafting gold jewellery. Unlike anything she'd ever seen it was made from filigree thread of gold. That's what it is a gold wire that's impossibly thin, which they twist and layer into these dense yet astonishingly delicate lace like forms. The technique dates as far back as the twelfth century Senegal, but Johnson soon realized goldsmiths were melting down many of the older pieces to make modern designs. She decided to buy up as many as she could never realized I should do this now or it wouldn't be done at all some items. She couldn't afford she'd watch as exquisite designs were destroyed right in front of her some of them, I found copies of later. But in many cases, they were gone. I never found them. Again, still Johnson ultimately managed to amass more than two hundred and fifty pieces the best of which have formed the core of this Smithsonian exhibit. Amanda Maples the curator says she also wanted to tell the story of the women who've been wearing this jewelry for hundreds of years, including a class of powerful women whose influence still reverberates through Senegalese culture. These women known as sin Yarze, which around in the eighteenth and nineteenth century this in yards were mixed race descendants of European merchants and high status Senegalese Wollo. If women by the seventeen hundreds many of them had emerged as independent business women in their own, right? The typical senior might ships managed trade networks employ men, she can speak several different languages European and wolof maple says she'd be renowned for her patronage of musicians her glittering dinner parties and most of all her opulent fashions they were thought of as these these women that had the most voluminous cloth on sambas, really bright, huge gold jewellery. I mean, they had the biggest gold jewellery, and they would parade through town. So people can see how much wealth they had. And how successful they were. Ooh is a top fashion designer from Senegal the Smithsonian commissioned her to recreate a scene yards outfit Lucia Bosa Shapur fun defend a suit a head wrapped in a conical SugarLoaf shape a gallon of sumptuous fabric with huge puff sleeves. And of course, ill abuse it to the gold filigree necklaces earrings bangles toe rings and yet there's. An ugly side to the seniors story who Dita nura Moustapha is an anthropologist who studied this in yards influence in current Senegalese culture, this wealth and power and beauty and influence was gained through perhaps morally ambiguous methods Mustafa notes that the senors generally built their wealth through quasi marriages with European traders, many of whom made their money, either directly or indirectly through the transatlantic slave trade the senors themselves also owned slaves. But Mustafa says today's Senegalese are also mindful that these were African women who found a way to thrive at a time of European encroachment. They are recognized and held up as I cons of a negotiation of being able to bridge and balance many worlds Hilary Jones is a professor at Florida international university who's written a history of mixed race peoples in. Gaulle and she says for modern women in Senegal. You know, what they see are women who were incredibly successful created a kind of space for themselves against all odds and UC the fashion designer says, you can see this in yours influence, in the way modern Senegalese women, use fashion to protect dignity and self-assurance. It's an attitude so celebrated in Senegal it has a name Saul say, so just. The cell say means to dare says see to present yourself in your finest without fear. Narita Eisenman NPR news. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Senegal Ashby johnson Narita Eisenman NPR Senegal Marian national museum of African art Comcast Washington Goldsmith Mustafa Saul Amanda Maples Dita nura Moustapha sin Yarze Lucia Bosa Shapur maple Florida international universi Gaulle Hilary Jones
Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them

1A

36:02 min | 1 year ago

Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them

"Support for this n._p._r. Podcast and the following message come from better help online counseling by licensed professional counselors specializing in issues including depression stress eddings -iety visit better help dot com slash n._p._r. To learn more and get ten percent off your first month. This is one a. I'm kimberly adams in washington sitting in for joshua johnson. We can all agree agree. Uninvited guests are the worst. I noticed that the worms in my garden we're very active and close to the surface and that the soil they were leaving behind was very granular like coffee grounds. I did some research and discovered that there has been an invasion of asian jumping worms. We actually have an invasive plant here four hemlock. It was brought here from europe as a pretty garden flower but it's incredibly poisonous. It hasn't been something that has killed young children and it also has killed cal other local rodents that are beneficial to our ecosystem for the nine foot a ten foot and a thirteen foot place on we've killed in my yard now we're we're seeing iguanas curly tail lizards jesus lizard and true chameleons and then also we have the typical gold feral hogs wild hogs all the plants in all of the water invasive there all night there invasive species are a serious threat. The national wildlife federation says they put more than forty percent scent of threatened or endangered species at risk that last caller talking about the snakes in his yard that snake is the burmese python a non native invader later that has spent the last quarter century decimating florida small annual animal population scientists at the everglades national park say the reptiles are responsible for a drop in the small mammal population of up to ninety nine percent so where do invasive species come from why are they so destructive and how do we get a handle on them before they each strangle and smother everything in sight and barton has some firsthand experience with invasive species and the burmese python in as a wildlife biologist at the conservancy of southwest florida. He joins us now in welcome to one a. kimberly. Thank you for having me look forward to talking with you. On the important issue. Today's show was produced in partnership with our friends at smithsonian magazine. You can read the article featuring ian. The snakes makes that eight florida at smithsonian mag dot org now an first of all what does make a species invasive so to get to the invasive status that is usually have to have some economic or major environmental impact. The burmese python seems to be public enemy number one down here in a true through example of an invasive animals you mentioned that are decimating our native wildlife. Jonathan on facebook writes to this day. I wonder who had the bright the idea to build a breeding facility for a dangerous carnivore in a perfect habitat for it. It may have been for science but i really hope they feel awful for the mess. They've made an why have pythons become such a big problem in southwest florida well first and foremost this is a product of the pet trade. You can look at sightings records that go back to the one thousand nine hundred these yes. The <hes> the conservation on endangered species the records that are imported imported here through to the united states and hundreds of thousands of burmese pythons have been imported into the u._s. Since one thousand nine hundred seventy nine thousand nine hundred seventies i said yeah i remember when i was a teenager lots of kids. One of them wanted them as pets. Yes i grew up in the nineties <hes> over there there and went to school at stoneman douglas high school and park land on the east coast of the everglades and i had to albino burmese pythons in high school that a friend gave me and <hes> <hes> they were notorious scape artist. I kept them in my house and one of them was always getting out and my mother has many stories about where they showed up in the house so i think that might might have been the origin story for some of our tracking that we do now here in southwest florida so you mentioned that they came to florida in particular. Was this a national issue. Burmese pythons were being brought in pets all over the country and florida is just where they took root or was it just in florida that they were mainly popular well. It's kind of a perfect storm. Storm situation of florida has many ports of entry climate thriving trade and <hes> whether snakes were intentionally released or they escaped aped or there is an ongoing myth that hurricane andrew in one thousand nine hundred eighty two was the origin of burmese python population that storm did knock over a reptile breeding facility but i've looked at the numbers and talk to my colleagues and they were well established throughout the greater everglades <hes> prior to that event so if it's a multiple choice question i'd circle d all of the above for how they got established right. That was the breeding facility that our listener was mentioning earlier which is just as you mentioned one of the causes of this invasion so what's your estimate of how many are out there. How many burmese python are are there slithering around south florida kimberly. That's the million dollar question and nobody really has a handle on that. You hear tens of thousands hundreds of thousands but it's more more complex than that it some. They're not so evenly distributed across the southern peninsula. There may be other scenarios where in the western portion of the state here we're fighting a separate introduction that occurred and that east coast population is sort of meeting <hes> overlapping with those as well so the mantra is is to follow the science. That's what we've been doing here at the conservancy for the last six years on this project. You can't make some of these things up that we've seen it almost reads. It's out of a sci fi novel of sorts and <hes> very it's. It's crazy so tell us a few of those stories. Walk us through what it's like when you're out in the field trying to capture these snakes. You can't really make this up <hes>. If you told me ten years ago we'd be tracking giant snakes here in collier county. I wouldn't have believed you and so oh six years ago. We <hes> formed a research collaboration with our partners. <hes> had some initial support from the u._s. Geological survey and work with the department environmental <unk> protection but during that time we've been doing the heavy lifting literally and we catch pythons we insert radio transmitters inside them let them loose and then it sort of a one sided game of hide and seek where we let them go and <hes> follow them around to learn their behaviors and they have revealed revealed a pretty amazing story and they are fascinating creatures just want to get that across. They're they're beautiful. Animals brought here from no fault of their own and and through those years we go where they go and it's very much off the grid. They're showing us their movement patterns. Their home ranges there <hes> and you neak behavioral abilities that they have across our landscape and i wanna make important distinction here. Don't want to be labeled it just studying getting them to death. We have very much applied that science those findings tracking these animals into a useful removal control tool tool for specific areas of the state and during the course of the study concurrently with our <hes> research partners of the u._s. geological survey we determined that following knowing these male pythons can lead you to reproductively active breeding females in the ecosystem so we're using the snakes biology against them and into that tune hunting and tracking for these animals since two thousand thirteen with the help of our research partners. We've removed twelve thousand five five hundred pounds of burmese python from fifty five square miles outside of naples florida. I mean really just can't make that up. That's what we're dealing with over here. We have another comment from one of our listeners of about fighting invasive species the way that you've been doing my name is gerry. I believe it's a waste. It's the time to fight. Invasive species is like trying to put the lid back on doors box. It's here they're here to stay. Climate change is bringing a lot of changes. Animals are going to be moving around as they adapt to the warming climate and then with the rising oceans bid leads are going to be gone and what's your response to gary is fighting invasive ace of species a waste of time well. That's a half empty way of looking at it and <hes> the only constant is change as we know but <hes> we need to follow the science and get after this issue because our native wildlife's at stake those twelve thousand five hundred pounds of of <hes> pythons or move that i mentioned debbie twice that in native of animals that it took to reach that size and biomass so we're witnessing the the changing of our greater everglades ecosystem real time and what i i would say to that is like the everglades national treasure. It's a jewel and it's everyone's everglades and so this is an important issue of our time and that's what we've been focused on here in our science department very quickly and is it even possible for the pythons to be completely eliminated from the everglades at this point never say never eradication radicalization does seem off the table. <hes> the system will balance it self in the future what that will look like who knows but as mentioned or in the removal phase now while working on localized control we must save our wildlife and that's our focus here <hes> at the conservancy and need to join forces with anyone with anybody and you're listening audience there that can provide any type of assistance technical <hes> financial <hes> track down this is extremely important issue and we've got our pulse also our finger on the pulse of this and <hes> to be continued and barda zek is a wildlife biologist at the conservancy of southwest florida in thanks for joining us. Thanks so much kimberly and special thanks to our partners at smithsonian magazine. I'm kimberly adams of marketplace glad to be with you. You're listening to one a. from w. w. a._m._u. and n._p._r. Pro se <music> support for this n._p._r. Podcast and the following message come from the united states postal service every day. Innovative companies are reinventing the way business happens but none of that is possible without the right people people who get packages to over a hundred and fifty million delivery points affordably and on time with the latest technology and expertise who can help you deliver the future of commerce. The united states postal service see why they deliver more ecommerce packages to homes been anyone in the country at u._s._p._s. dot com slash future. It has already been unav- vengeful summer in politics between the twenty twenty debates and the president's battle over immigration. There's a lot going on and win. There's news as you need to know about the n._p._r. Politics podcast is there to tell you what happened not to mention. We're hitting the road so you can meet all of the twenty twenty contenders appeal is gonna drive me <unk> grazie the n._p._r. Politics podcast subscribe. We're discussing the spread of invasive species in south florida and across the nation. We got a flood of responses to this hour. It's clearly something that affects your day to day in many cases. Here's just one message from our inbox. Hi guys my name is chelsea and i work as an environmental interpreter in michigan and we're seeing invasive all over the place. I think the greater question is what is an invasive <hes>. Is it something that's actually native that maybe taking over native populations is it introduced and invasive and how do we deal with that but as our world gets more global and we start seeing these intersections of cultures and vases or something that's never going to go away paul e mails from my home state of missouri. My days are spent spent fighting honeysuckle bradford pear japanese beetle and a dozen other invasive species on our farm. Our landscapes are being changed before our at our is anyone younger than thirty does not know what missouri looks like without honeysuckle and pair. I'm older than thirty. I don't remember what it looks like without honeysuckle. Let's ed two more voices to the conversation. Joel traxler is a professor of biological sciences and program director of marine sciences at florida international university city joel welcome to one a. Thank you and kerry brown. Lima is director of new york invasive species research institute at cornell university. Kerry welcome come. Thanks kimberly great to be here joel. How long have invasive species been a problem in south florida and more generally well. We've had invasive species. She's in south florida and in the united states more broadly <hes> as long as people have been coming to these areas because people bring with them the species the plants and animals that they depend on sometimes just because it reminds them of their home <hes> location <hes> english cu- sparrows house barrels were brought to the united states for example <hes> love and into new york early on <hes> and <hes> in more modern times <hes> we've had invasive species in south florida like that have become <hes> <hes> really gotten on the radar in terms of their impacts on people and their interests in terms of plants brazilian pepper. <hes> is is a good example <hes> as well as insects that affect agriculture and these things have been on the radar for a very long time you mentioned some of the plants the ants steve e mails can we tell lowe's home depot and nurseries to stop selling burning bush japanese barberry lemon balm and other invasive plants. It's i'm getting sick and tired of pulling them out of the forests and parks kerry. How big of an issue are these sorts of big distribution centers of the different plans that people might want to make their gardens looked pretty <hes>. How big of an issue is that. It's actually a really big issue. A lot of the invasive plants we have a today he actually came in with the landscape and horticulture industry. Now we have a lot greater restrictions on which one you can bring in and actually here in new york we even and have prohibited species so some of those species that were listed by your your listener actually aren't allowed to be sold or distributed here in new york anymore but we call how those pathways the ways that species arrive here and purposeful introduction ford landscaping is actually one of the ways. A lot of species have made it here debbie emails. The impact of invasive species is often a huge domino effect in northern michigan and i'm sure many other places invasive species of plants most often brought in mm for aesthetic reasons drive out native species. These native species are the only viable host for many beneficial native insects which then affects the birds that ethan lethem insects humans can have a positive impact by choosing native trees and plants carry. Can you talk a little bit about the ripple effects of <hes> bringing in an invasive plant will yes i mean we have a lot of insects and we have a lot of interactions that have evolved over thousands millions of years. We've got in <hes> plants plants that insects will one of insects will only use that specific plant so when an invasive species comes in like an invasive plant that was planted and then spread spread. We actually eliminate the possibility of those other species surviving. There's been research done when it looks at introduced trees that are used for landscaping versus native trees like an oak for example they look at the number of insects that live on that tree the oak has way more insects available and the birds depend on those insects so when you decide you don't want say an insight to nibble on your trees in your garden so you plant one. That's from another place. It doesn't have any native eight of species that will feed on it. You're actually really hurting the wildlife and other species that depend on that for their for their habitat. Let's switch back to invasive animals of for a moment and this next note from a listener hi. This is whitney in boca raton but i moved here. You're eleven years ago. The guana population was present but not totally out of control and now in the last year and the iguana population has just totally totally. Boston's and there's huge iguanas everywhere all over boca raton now hello. My name is john in west palm beach. I live on a canal and the guana guana have been taking over our yard. They eat are mangoes. They eat flowers are lemons and our lines that we're trying to grow hi. My name is louis. I'm in then yeah beach and <hes> i have a problem with iguanas <hes> almighty property there are anywhere between five and ten on a daily daily basis in the <hes>. My papaya trees flowers and other vegetables that we grow hello. My name is connie. I live in margate florida data. We are inundated with iguanas and there's different varieties and some of them are four to five feet long and this one day there were ten of of them kind of running away from our building the flowers and plants and i know that other places they do damage to see walls and things like that. Thank you whitney john lewis and connie for sharing your stories with us dole. What's the deal with guavas in south florida well so i'm an aquatic ecologist but <hes> i'll well you can't help but see these guavas <hes> really remarkable their populations have really expanded and i think by analogy not we're seeing also in freshwater fish <hes> big increase in and spread of quite a few species and i think that <hes> one thing is happening is is that we have not had a very cold winter since two thousand and ten in january two thousand ten we had a very remarkable <hes> cold snap <hes> that a lot of attention has been <hes> drawn a lot of attention because of its impact on invasive species and other tropical species that are sort of the northern edge of their range here in south florida and and since that time we've just had mild winter after mild winter and so a lot of these species that are <hes> from the tropics like iguanas <hes> really thrive live in the cold winters that sort of limit their range just haven't come and <hes> you know it might give us some insight into the future we have warmer warmer environments in warm environments throughout the peninsula of florida for example some of these species might and it's reasonable to expect be expanding their ranges and <hes> and and we might see changes in the ecology <hes> tied to that from these tropical species land rights. I appreciate that you're giving airtime to support important issue while climate change is discussed daily invasive plants which are trashing woodland's across the country with dire consequences seem to be on few people's radar dr this gets at the point of climate change playing a role in some of these species going from as joe mentioned benign too invasive kerry how oh do does climate change play a role in the perpetuation of invasive species invasive species are these super adapters they come in and that's what allows them to spread and become so overabundant is the fact that they adapt to their new environment really well and invasive species are already in a position to adapt when the climate starts warming or we have more extreme events so invasive species are th that are present are there and ready and waiting to move <hes> joel mentioned about species being able to survive winters here in the northeast winter have become much milder with less snow much longer warmer seasons are invasive forest pests the insects and pathogens that killed tree species are usually limited by cold climates are no no longer limited anymore so we've seen their distributions marching north and being able to impact areas that we never thought they would be able to survive before we've also seen scene plant species op research showing that they can actually be resistant to herbicides <hes> in higher su two environments. We have several listeners who commented wanted on climate change and invasive species in their area. Hi my name is act calling from colorado. We have seen the beatles that regularly feet on the coniferous trees here just absolutely balloon over the last decade and scientists say it's largely due to global warming. They're able to to come down to lower elevations. They don't die off in the winter and if you just take a casual drive through the rocky mountains you'll see evidence of it everywhere for a discussion on him. Day species must include climate change and i think that that will inform people looking forward art rather than looking backward at what's there now. Joel are certain regions of the country. Perhaps even your own more vulnerable to invasive species species due to climate change <hes> step aside the climate change angle for just a second <hes> south florida you know well certainly has a an <unk> exceptional history of invasions because of our benign our milder climate i mean to say and <hes> and we're getting a lot of species that are coming from parts of the world that are <hes> that are tropical warmer and they get a foothold here <hes> and become established and then <hes> <hes> that might create a situation where those populations can then expand iran expand to other parts of the country. There's also the possibility of <hes> genetic modifications in populations that come because you introduce <hes> groups groups of individuals from different parts of the native range and in the new range they interbreeding ways that might reorganize <hes> the you know the population genetic structure and allows thousand take advantage of new changes there might be really strong selection for a with a relatively small number of individuals in a new range that might <hes> enhance <hes> the frequency of individuals that have tolerances for <hes> more <hes> colder temperatures and and other factors like that that that <hes> enhance this invasiveness element. There's a lot of interesting ecology here in more than one way that you might have species <hes> become invasive climate change. I my thinking on this is that <hes> this represents of a disturbance if you will or just a reorganization of environmental factors that are kind of key determinants of the list of species their dynamics their patterns of abundance in in any geography around the world and so the key thing about climate change isn't it oh it's changing because of course <hes> the climate's that's environments <hes> have always changed hits the rate at which changes occurring which is unprecedented <hes> perhaps even in geological history to our knowledge in many places of the world <hes> and so this change is occurring at a pace. That's faster than the biological ecological processes that <music> governed the formation of <hes> of flora and fauna. You know <hes> have played out to to get us to what we have today and so so that creates opportunities for species that are able to take advantage of it. You disrupt the factors that establish the kind of the norm of conditions that set the flora and fauna that we're used to seeing you disrupt those factors and the species they're able to move to take advantage. Most rapidly can move in place for themselves. We'll continue our conversation with joel traxler professor biological sciences at florida international university and carry braun lima director of the new york invasive species research institute at cornell university more in a moment. Stay close support for n._p._r. And the following message come from carmax for more than twenty five years carmax has made it easy to sell your car they provide free appraisals and offers on the spot carmax will buy your car even if you don't buy there's in fact carmax has bought more than eight million vehicles to learn more more and schedule your free appraisal visit carmax dot com <music>. Hey it's mighty anal. Hassan host of n._p._r.'s let u._s._a. The u._s._a. every week we bring you mix of reporting diverse voices and coverage of current and emerging issues that impact our lives let the u._s._a. Is one one of a kind featuring stories from the heart stories that make you think and maybe even inspire you to action. Listen and subscribe now. Let's carry go back to you. There is an environmental consequence <unk> as well as possible contributor to the spread of invasive species but what about the economic impact or or health effects. How else do these invasive species touch our lives well. There's a lot of ways that invasive species can cause economic harm. We have agricultural pests and weeds that cause us to lose crops ops in crop production. We have forest pests that are killing the trees trees that we use for wood products. We have lakes and dan rivers that we use for recreation for transportation that when they get clogged up by invasive species either we have to treat that invasive species or we lose tourism tourism dollars in that lake or in that area and so there's a lot of economic ways that invasive species a lot of ways that invasive species can impact our economy me. There's also the cost of trying to treat them. Landowners that have invasive forest pests come on and start killing. Their trees are spending millions of dollars. There's a year to remove those trees and so they can actually come out of taxpayer dollars some of these economic impacts or come out of loss in production of agriculture but they can also hit our own in our wallets and as far as health impacts we have invasive mosquitoes that are carrying diseases and spreading diseases around we have have interactions between invasive plant species and say ticks carrying lyme disease where we're seeing an increase in tex- in areas that have an invasive basis species so there's these interactions and we also see species like for example here in new york we have giant hog weed where if you touch it and then are exposed to sunlight it creates really terrible burns on your skin can really injure your is if it gets in your eyes so we had that yeah. It's not that quite as scary seeming as big snake but a lot of impacts that that we need to be on the lookout for and employed some of these species as much as possible you mentioned those economic comic impacts earlier and we have several tweets about beatles and how they're affecting things adam fierce tweets japanese beetles are making their way west. They've hit the colorado front range hard in the last few years and are likely here to stay western. Fruit growers are scared and jake dorton tweets. You mentioned taxpayer dollars the tweeted i've work in environmental inspection in west virginia we have been invaded by the ash borer beetle as i look across a fully vegetated landscape escape. I see scores of dead ash trees. It's a sad state of affairs de tweets my ecology professor gives extra credit for students who who spend time a radical japanese honeysuckle and privet from natural areas kudzu also eight the south. I'm so tired of trying to kill it off my land kerry. How do you fight an invasive species well once an invasive species becomes established and spreads. It's really hard to actually remove it. We have few examples where we can and you mentioned the word. Eradicate radical means get rid of it completely our best bet and the most cost effective of and most likely to be successful is when we prevent species from coming in to begin with so through policies behavior change we can stop this introduction shen and the spread from one region to another of a species but when that's no longer an option wants a species is everywhere. It's really we're just trying to protect our our assets protect that pond that we care about protected trees stand that we we love in our backyard but we are. We have a really hard time getting rid of it. There is one one method that can actually in a long term and sustainable way reduce and invasive species population and that's called biological control where we're introducing producing after very long testing and research period to make sure it's safe for introduction and won't cause harm introducing a predator from the native range take the invasive species that can can help reduce its population and its introduce range and so that's one of the few long term solutions we have and that's not possible possible for all species but we do have a significant number of success stories where we've watched these kinds of biological control programs reduce populations. They have a number of examples samples in florida and we have examples here in new york and across the country as well and we have an example from a listener in michigan as well hi. My name is sarah. I'm from grand in rapid. I'm actually a conservation biologist. I worked specifically with ecological restoration and a lot of that has to do with invasive species removal for us. This is the never ending battles so it is a big debate. Do we do nothing or do we keep going be hope for early detection and rapid response because that helps us radically from the area and a lot of times it just has to do with containment and not allowing it to spread to other people's properties other types of native communities you carry. Can you talk a little bit more about early detection and rapid response so when a population is the best option is to prevent it from coming the second the best option in potentially winning battle against invasive is when we can detect it when the population is small enough so early in its invasion <hes> <hes> and then get rid of that small population to prevent it from spreading to other places. The problem is sometimes. That's like finding a needle in a haystack. We've you've got huge. Landscape diverse places where people don't go that often or don't win even know how to recognize some of these species so sometimes it's useful if we know this species that are potentially coming in if we can keep an eye out and have volunteers or people who are working in land management agencies looking king for those and then if they do pop up in a small number we can't snuff out that population so that's what they mean by early detection and rapid response you detective while it's small and then you get rid of it quick goldie tweets eat the invasive away i can think of at least half a dozen invasive in my home michigan that are edible and some even taste good asian. Carp is an invasive species in the in the midwest where i'm from and i know that people have been trying to make that a bit more appealing on dinner plates. We had some listeners away way in with other ways that they're trying to fight against invasive species. My name is noreen. I lived in palm bay florida for my part on my property. I have controlled invasive as a species like brazilian pepper by removing them. I've also controlled cuban tree frogs where i find them which are an invasive amphibian species and humanely euthanize those that i've found found in addition i've also planted all native plants in my landscaping and i try to educate my neighbors about the value of planting biggest to lord of free of invasive basis species. Hi my name is wayne. I'm the owner of clinton <hes> we have two food trucks. I news wildly catfish which is an invasive species in the chesapeake bay watershed. There's needed species. There and the wild fish is causing havoc on that environment so we are buying them up and serving wild and catfish co-boys so yeah that tall. We are trying to do our part. Thank you for leaving us. Those voicemails <hes> kerry what else can everyday people do to confront the problem of invasive species in their communities well as i had mentioned not spreading them around further is a really great way that people can contribute by brushing off your boots so there's there's any seeds in the bottom of your boots after you take a hike and then if you go someplace else you're not bringing the seeds clean drain drying your boat so getting all the water out of your bow oh and washing off any plant material or any organisms so that when you go for maybe an invaded lake to an uninvited lake. You're not taking that along with you on. There's recommendations is not to move firewood. So if you're gonna camp far from your home don't take your firewood with you because you might bring along some hitchhiking invasive forest pests and so those are all small changes changes that we can make in our own lives to stop avoiding them joel at what point does an invasive species become so pervasive in an area that it's just part right of the native species at that point or at least part of the accepted ecology of the environment. I'm not aware of any <hes> technical criterion during that we would use for that but there are plenty of examples of <hes> <hes> of species to become a naturalized and which people think of as a part of their air <hes> fonterra flora in fact introduced <hes> sometime maybe in the distant past in fact if you're having trouble now with the problems of other he's species harming your european honeybees and we're losing the services they provide for pollination and there's a an an invasive species harming naturalized naturalized species that was introduced but it's useful for us todd tweets. Let's not forget that we homo sapiens are the original and most destructive invasive species. Invasive species are not bad per se. They are just doing what mother nature intended exploiting an ecological niche carry braun lima director of new york invasive species research institute at cornell university. Thanks for being on one a thank you kimberly and joel traxler professor of biological sciences and program director of marine sciences dances at florida international university. Thank you for this show was produced by haley blasingame with help from page osborn. It was edited by orion donovan smith breath and was made possible with help from smithsonian magazine. You can read the snakes that eight florida featuring guest in barda zek on their website smithsonian and mac dot org and find out much more about their work on our website the one eight dot org. This program comes to you from w. A. and you part of american university in washington distributed by n._p._r. Until we meet again i'm kimberly adams. Thank you so much for listening. This is one a. the.

south florida new york united states kerry brown smithsonian magazine kimberly adams florida michigan cornell university conservancy of southwest flori director europe Joel traxler washington florida international universi south florida colorado national wildlife federation
MILCA EXANTUS

Taking a Leap

24:47 min | 10 months ago

MILCA EXANTUS

"The MM-HMM HI everyone. This is your life coach. Debra Brown welcoming you to taking taking a leak or guest. Today is Milka. Extensive milkshakes Santos was born and raised in Miami Florida and has been teaching in Miami Dade County and Broward County South Florida since two thousand and two throughout her career. She has developed a passion for helping others achieve lifelong dreams and goals. She earned both a bachelor's and master's degree from Florida International University University in teaching and learning with a minor in leadership. Her Passion for personal growth has been used to motivate children adults to learn strategies that lead to and career success. Welcome to the show Milka branching you for having me on the show and act welcome to listeners as well. Thank you for being here. Thank you so Milka the first question. The only question that every guest gets what has been your biggest leap in life. When you look back at your life? Wendy you do something that just felt big. Oh Oh wow I'm just recently back. In December I just published my first bit book and thank thank you so has been one of my biggest leaves in life right now. She's been something that I've been working towards That I was very young though I was changed. This probably seen my first book on December of last year as been one of my biggest My big because it has helped me to really overcome allows lot of a lot of challenges. A lot of cheers at that. I have had along the way What would you say? Your Primary Fair was You know I my primary fear was really and I do something that I'm passionate about. We can remember in the third grade raid my third MS Johnson. I remember to walk You know she asked a class. What do you want to do when you grow up and I remember Just saying that I WANNA be a writer and I also want to be a speaker and so at a very young age I I knew that I wanted to write books but You know I I Win along my journey and develop the passion and then when that's holly I remember you know first starting off as an English major and then You know Mr my first paper my professor gazing pay my my paper back. It was still Red March and once I get the paper you know. It really made me feel uncomfortable in terms of could I actually promote writer and for for a very long time. I had a lot of fear about you. Know pursuing my big dreams. You know like of writing a book and So Oh you know really making that decision last year to overcome the fear of Creating something That I I proud of and I can share with others Wasn't makes the milestone from me I it just really push me in in terms of really are moving those limits that I had created for myself. You know out of fear that you know I could never overcome you know this writer's block that I created because of that first paper in college. I was overcome that the we he knows somewhere out there. Some listener also has some fair that they need to overcome. And you have been carrying the spare for years. What what would be your advice? As far as overcoming a fair goals what does ice would you get an individual. They're experiencing the same thing world. I pay the. I Ching the first advice I would give if it's really make a decision in terms of Really wanted to get rid of the fear I think from me. I got to a point point where I said you know what I want this out of my life and And and I was prepared for all of the obstacles that I would say like I made the decision and I prepared myself for all of the obstacles. That was long away because I knew for sure that you wouldn't be an easy journey to get there and so for the listener of this as who has that big dream that you know. They've been holding living on in their hearts for a long time out. They make that decision and and prepare you up to push through all of the obstacles losing all of the Challenges and keep your eyes off at dream and the accomplishment and how you're going to feel when you accomplish wish that that goal or that dream that you you you have so I would say make that decision be prepared and take action and that's what this this This journey Arne of becoming a writer was all about for me. It was really about making the decisions every day taking action every day. Hey until I see the result. This is what My my top picks them every day to accomplish those big. Oh south listener make that decision every day work towards it overcome the fear and of course Challenge the title of Your Book Because I know from the title. That message comes through loud and clear. Tell us what the title is well. The title of the book is called. My success planner take action every day to win. Think plan change grow. So so I designed the book Thinking about my younger stuff. This is the book that I I wish I had the plan. I wish I had when I was in high school when I was starting to make decisions that impact my life as an adult it started it starts at the very you know young age. You you know we start making you know decisions towards our adult like and when I when I started my journey of thinking about the book I wanted to write from me. The F. kept thinking back about what about one book. I wish I had in high school. That could've prepared me In terms of my future. So I'm looking at that You know it's all about This this cleaner is all about You know waking up in making those decisions Mike Setting those mindset goals. That's going to drive you everyday. Having that positive mindset You know being being intentional about how you're feeling your very motions being intentional. Your health In your fitness how you feel in your own body how you feel towards your relationship how you're growing growing in your relationship also about you know taking action towards your professional goals in your finances so for me These are some of the things that I felt as as a young adult Going through high school you know I learned a lot about you know mats and and You know biology and science but a lot of emotional work at in due in high school a lot of the mindset work I. I didn't do it in high school. So those are some of the things that I I begin to develop on my own self discovery journey and You know while this this this is what this book is all about. Because I made a decision on that I wanted to improve myself and And that's the journey started. And that's how I discovered you I I work with you along Getting over some of my obstacles with the relationship when I when I lost lost my dad about two years ago I knew I wanted to improve relationships. I want relationships get better in terms of my grieving process in terms of collation ship. I have with my mom And so just mindful by all the different areas of life in finding that balance And you know it can be overwhelming but This books this book. The waste design is is really design really helped people find that Allen Invest what this is about so was it easy for you to write the book then it sounds like you heading off all you make it sound so simple milk with an easy poke notifying their having you know the fighting. I mean I have been fighting and fighting in fighting and fighting. Originally the book was called. Burn to lead. Because I totally believe you know. There's a leader in all of us in aspects of our life. There's a leader how we show up in the world so originally always always writing the book and you know it was just a a good grief you know in my mind. I kept wrestling with. This book has to be interactive. I want the readers to interact with the book and I want to read it to really think You know everyday about the different aspects of life and I didn't want it to just be like okay. You read a chapter naked. I want the book to be reflective I I want to read it to think about the the their mindset. I want to read it to think about their emotions and so it was not an easy journey for me because this was some of the the the the work that I had to do as an individual You know in my own personal growth and development so it was an evening and I use my Kleiner in day and And I needed that safe because originally when I started even writing my book I had about four or five journals that I was writing in terms of my spiritual growth in terms of my personal grows and she turns of my professional growth and I had five five five different journals debate. No no no I had to put it all together other and I was doing it all separately and I said I wanted. I won't one space. That's going to allow me to find that balance so to answer your question. No it was not an easy journey I would not say was easy but I can definitely say I fought through it to to accomplish the goal for the the person who probably thinks writing a book is is difficult advice that what were some of your obstacles also on the journey and what would be your advice to the army. You know recently I I read a quote On by The actor actually worked with the coach and she wrote that everyone should write a book and after writing my own with. I truly believe I believe that EV- every last one of we do have a book inside of it. It's like your own personal story your own You know your own out take on on life so for that person who who would like to write a book. I would definitely say to start writing down to ideas you Have with the book You know what's the message on that you want to share with the world What is that? You're really passionate about Bob. Because I think The the book that I design came out of a passion that I just have for helping people. This accomplish go so I think for that. That's person who wants to write the book I it's it's really about. What is that that that that you're motivated motivated to share here with the world and you know start with Just developing your ideas and if you had to see help in terms of going toward shop in terms. I'm so working with the coat because I actually had to work with A book coach because When I first started the journey I wasn't really sure about the book that I wanted to? I in fact I didn't even understand that I had about three books inside of me and I was actually trying to right also looks at the same time and my book to my look. No no no you have to stop you have to focus in on. What is that that message? What does that one message? And then I was able to develop that one message and I was able to create this one book but you really need to get down to. What is that message that you want to share with the world identified that message that you WANNA share with the world and start writing it down and if you have to go to to some writing workshops with some writing we're separately you'd have to hire a coach hire co but definitely that we develop that idea? What would you say because of course we talk a lot of bullets your personal journey? What would you say it has been the guest the most enlightening thing for you that you learned along your journey to get where you are today that we really have more power than we think we do I think a lot of times we feel so defeat it like. We feel like there's not more that you can accomplish I for my journey. I just I just have a different perspective about life that every day that we're giving then there's more that we can accomplish and we don't have to shy away from it you know we don't have to do it all you know but we can definitely be excited about life. You can be expected about what we're doing We can be excited about going to the next level and we don't necessarily need to settle You know we we we we we. We may not have all of the answer and back off a trip. And that's that's what life is foul. You know you might not have all of the answers but everyday take on a new challenge every day. Enjoy the process. That's my niche. Now you know every day enjoy joy. The learning process everyday take on a new challenge. Don't get to constable You know in your zone you know a lot of from me. I felt like I had I had gotten comfortable where I was in my life and I knew there was more inside of me and I wanted to take action and to keep pushing my my life forward you mentioned yeah you mentioned and you know settling as you know what were you settling for I think I had gotten really constable with just being a the teacher and But although I really enjoyed being a teacher I enjoy being in the classroom. I enjoy inspire my students. I definitely still believe that there was work to be done outside of the clash and so for me it was about you. Know How can I reach more pe- more our people. How can I impact more people so for me? It was really about happy not impact more people and I believe the last one of you know we have that that singing inside of us. That's really special. And we need to continue to share with the world and that's why for me even as a coach. Now I tell people you know you had to find that balance in that passion in that purpose at every season of life at every season of life you know even even even for that you know seventeen year old seven seven year old or or that seven year old that eighty year old. I still believe that if you had that Brooklyn's like this you know that one more day of doing something exciting Would you say that the fact that you have been a teacher for as many years that you have has really well is the contributing factor to your level of purpose or pursue this purpose. I definitely think so I I knew early on that. I really wanted to impact painful as something I. I've just been very passionate about. I just enjoy seeing people grow every cassidy would have always been A mission for me. How can I continue to evolve talking? I continue continue to get better. And how can I continue to support others. Who are around me to get better so for me? It was a a natural transition wishes for me to go into the teacher and now as I transition now into being an author and and You know desert great else. You know who was thinking about becoming an author speaker and I and I continue to grow in my journey's all about you know our life insurance abso- we'll continue to impact people to actually grow and Just become their their greater cell. So Oh you know. Sometimes we have to kind of hit rock bottom to make this huge. Then you see that in your life. You've ever really gotten to that. Wadham wear a chain emerged Walmart. It's been you know. Just a slight ebb and flow kind of thing. You know I I really would say that I hit rock bottom when I lost My Dad about two years ago That was a very very devastating. Time of my life You you know. My Dad had been sewing for my life on who he was. He was that one person who really Inspired me in terms of it's just the way he was so passionate about God passionate about the word of God. Hashing in a Fox is too loose delivery because he was a ministry as a pastor and his delivery every the word of God and when I lost my dad I was just like what just happened. Here I can understand. I can understand the purpose of being and on the earth you know after after I lost my dad and I was really crying out You know trying to find my purpose and And I I connected with you and you're able to help me through that transition into find purpose again Because I ah you know we have to keep pushing actor devastating loss like losing a family member losing a loved one. I mean sometimes you conceal like considered the smoothest and I was on the outside that this week I I couldn't understand why you know I had. I left my I lost my watch. It was almost and it was almost like I had to find find out why again and I find that why am I said you know what while I'm alive. I better be the the best of it because I'm not going to be here forever but while I'm here I better make the best service that when I'm not here my dad I I I can truly say a he was a very impactful man. He impacted his family and people around the world as a minister as a man of God in a lot of people and and I stopped and I said I said to myself you know. What are you going to leave behind what you so you can be on? How are you going to be remembered and we have to pick myself up In a big way. You're on a book. Actually go through the biggest one right now. What was the biggest goal you've ever right? Had you know and just go for you getting done go I wouldn't stop until I got it done. I saw you pick the biggest seeing. They always wanted to accomplish. And you get it done. And that's how I do it last year and again those Watson Watson Schefter does this is like you have to brush yourself back up again and you have to dust yourself that could be cut a finance strengthen. You've gotta find that we'll you gotta find that motivation the purpose and to keep pushing herself. Wow fabulous fabulous. So how can people reach the Jews. They want to first of all those. Get your planner or just learn more about what you do. And so forth offense so Misses me My guy is call. It's all I pay. He are dodging please. Flash first name M. I L. A. X. A. N. T. wet against link tree L. Y. N. E. R. dot com slash Milka and my l. a. and examples advances E X A N T. You and people can also connect with me on Instagram at no example this M. I l. g. e. x.. ANC USO on my web for Web. Page you can find the link my website you can also sign on the link who That link to get the planner as well. Thank you milk. Turn me thank you for having today. I'm deborah new are welcoming pitcher. Thank you everyone for listening. My guest today was Milka Executives. This is your life coach. Debra Brown thanking you for tuning into taking a leap. If you have any questions or comments I can be reached at taking a leap DOT COM or at nine five four three six one three six six one seven. See you on the other side of success.

Milka writer Debra Brown Florida International Universi Wendy Miami Florida Milka Executives Miami Dade County Santos Broward County MS Johnson DOT COM Mike Kleiner Allen ANC professor Bob
TBD | The Attack on Floridas Latino Voters

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

17:26 min | 2 months ago

TBD | The Attack on Floridas Latino Voters

"The, technology certainly yields a lot of power and with money dot com your business can use it to bring teams departments together, no more lost e mails countless video calls vague action items and endless back and forth for simple projects get everyone on the same page with Monday dot Com a flexible platform that finally allows you to manage your people, projects and external tools all in one place whether you work with a team of five or five thousand. Monday dot com is the easiest way to keep everyone connected and on the right track try it out for yourself for a free two week trial had to Monday dot com and take it for a spin. It's impossible to measure the exact amount of disinformation that's currently flooding the social media feeds of Latino people in Florida but experts describe it as an onslaught messages with false claims about Joe. Biden are flooding twitter facebook. WHATSAPP and even Spanish. Language newspapers and radio stations. We've been monitoring them quite closely over the last couple of months. This is Eduardo Gomorrah. A professor of politics and International Relations at Florida International. University. Eduardo and his team have been tracking the flow of disinformation into Florida's Hispanic communities. They want to know how this information is spread and intern how it might affect the vote. There's one clip in particular that keeps thinking about. Out either go level that will be incorporated That's a clip from actually dad radio. A popular station in the Miami area is the third most popular Spanish language station behind one of his yawn and the top Spanish music station. Eduardo says the woman speaking is a regular on the AUGUSTINA. Costa show a Spanish language talk radio program basically argues that the black lives matter movement is inspired by black. Magic where people are taking over houses, burning houses and and harming people. Through. Getting. Up. Again doping associate. With a specific warning, saying if you vote for Joe Biden this is exactly what's going to happen to you in the recording sort of ends with the woman saying. Don't blame us. We warned you that this would happen if Democrats were allowed to to win. Some No. Campbell assembled under what at Kia. That case. And of course, the implicit message is that black lives matter is dominated by the far left Democrats and that Joe Biden new of course is captured by the by the radical left. This kind of targeted disinformation was also used in twenty sixteen manipulate voters and particularly to suppress turnout along black voters. Recent investigation has shown that a firm working for the trump campaign for years ago categorized three point five, million black voters deterrence. The implicit goal was to persuade those voters not to vote similar tactics have been used by multiple groups ever since then while voters nationwide are being bombarded, there's a reason why so many. Of these dishonest ads and social media posts are popping up in Florida Eduardo says but even if this disinformation nudges opinion by just one percent or a fraction of a percent within one subgroup within the umbrella group of Latinos, it could affect which candidate walks away with the state's hugely important twenty nine electoral votes or Ricans, of course, seven out of every ten are Democrats. But if you can convince one of every ten Puerto Ricans. That there is Global Marxist conspiracy or Jewish conspiracy or what have you to change his vote that changes the outcome of the election. Today on the show the disinformation targeting Latino voters in south Florida and how it could tip the presidential election. I'm Celeste Headley Filling, in for Lizzie O'Leary and you're listening to what? Next TVD A show about technology power and how the future will be determined stay with us. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast I think you'll like it's called wild wild tack. It's filled with weird and interesting stories about technology and the surprising way it impacts of culture. For example, they have a story about why apple changed its products to make them look appealing in movies and how the US Army is recruiting. It's next generation of soldiers on twitch or another story of how Tiktok has become the hottest dating APP from Lesbians Journalists Jordan Erika Weber and Joshua Rivera Talk to the people whose lives have been weirdly altered by technology and gain insight from. Reporters who were there listen and subscribe to wild wild tech on apple podcasts. spotify or wherever you're listening right now. The vote in Florida is not just important. This election is important every election but when we talk about the Latino vote, what what exactly does that mean? In Florida the Latino vote or the Hispanic vote is a very complex phenomenon because we have one point, three, million Cubans of which probably six hundred to seven hundred thousand are voters we have one point three, million, Puerto Ricans of which probably a little bit more seven, hundred, thousand or voters Mexicans about eight hundred thousand Mexicans were very silent group here a lot of them are undocumented a lot of them are farm workers and so on. But increasingly were now beginning to see Mexican, voters in the state and then we have the Venezuelans more the more recent. Arrivals who've been coming over the last twenty years right and then over the last decade or so as a result of the financial crisis in Puerto Rico and then the hurricanes right we've had this massive migration of Puerto Ricans into Florida. So if you try to understand how they behave politically then you have to go into each of those groups and understand who they are. Some have come here fleeing right wing military dictatorship some have come fleeing Marxist guerrillas some have come flamed you know the the tragedy of Venezuela, most of come fleeing from the tragedy in Cuba. That was made by extra Sanchez who's CEO of Mi Familia vote the and he says this. Quote. Widespread and systematic attempts to intimidate Latinos to cast doubt on Latino voters. All of this is a feature of American politics that has been persistent and consistent really since there have been Latinos in American politics. Well, I think he's correct. Historically, the Republicans have been able to play other Latinos against Cubans. Okay Cubans have a very high rate of voter participation. In fact, it's even higher than White Americans. They're very proud of the turnout among Cuban-americans because they've over predominantly Republican, but the strategy has always been to kind of suppress other voters. Want to many Mexicans voting and we certainly don't want to many Puerto Ricans voting because they trend. Democratic I was interested in a message that came from a group supposedly called couponers put a moon. No. That said the Cuban government is planning to stage a caravan at the southern border and create an immigrant crisis I was interested because this is such a reflection of some of the misinformation that occurred during the last election. Why do you think this particular message about the Cuban government sending a caravan of migrants would have any kind of play in Florida. Well, in large measure and I think you know you have to really understand the context that we're talking about here. The reality is that most of the Cuban population in Florida is a product of the Cuban revolution and its aftermath, most of the Venezuelan population here is a product of the Chavis government and its aftermath. These are people that suffered in. The first person the process there, and so have this recurring fear that if the Democrats win, it's really a victory for the for the Cuban regime. It's a victory for in Venezuela and that we're going to become like Cuba and like Venezuela, and where are we going to flee to next? That's really what's underlying all of this. And what does it says many of the messages combined political themes with false religious claims aimed at influencing residents who might base their voting decisions on their faith one or the other messages that circulates here is that Joe Biden is not a real Catholic. Joe Biden favors late term abortion up until the very tight until until birth when it's very clear that Joe Biden. Has, in fact been antiabortion for most of his career and only now has he? He basically said that abortion should be late term only if the mother's life is at stake but when you talk to voters here, right Catholic voters they are convinced that Democrats are going to be chopping babies even as they come out of the womb and that's a message that's extraordinarily powerful. When we talk about misinformation online, we often talk about it in the context of the two thousand sixteen election false stories spread across social media in support of trump's campaign and the Republican Party, and that's partly what's happening now to Democrats in Congress have even called for an investigation into the source of the disinformation aimed at Latino voters but to limit our understanding of the issue in Florida to one side of the political spectrum, Eduardo says would be. A mistake and it's not just a disinformation misinformation that comes from the right. It also comes from the left look for example, at at some of the statements coming out of as well. Our Bolivia about cove it right. One of the greatest conspiracies that's that's been spouted from that region is that it's president trump who developed covert and he did so to exterminate minorities in the United States into eventually, of course, stop immigrants from coming to the United. States and that you know has been all over the media in Latin America and even mentioned by former president Motorola's himself on several occasions. So it's been going back and forth. There have been dozens of ads placed in facebook and messages on twitter and WHATSAPP that attempt to spread false information about Joe Biden but people are especially surprised to see this material appear in two more mainstream credible. It's with full page ad in the New Wave Oh herald. The sister publication of the Miami Herald and a half hour of paid programming on a popular Florida radio station. I asked water how the gatekeepers at these organizations allowed this false content to reach their audience the insured in the Miami Herald. It ran for nine months. Celeste. It wasn't a one time thing. It was a nine month thing and it was something that was repeated and it was really only when you know somebody outside of the community founded objectionable. The same thing with the gotTa call. Radio. Seventeen minutes segment that ran right that you know it was there was outrage but there was largely outraged by the Jewish community and we have a very large Hispanic Jewish community yet somebody thought that it was okay to be antisemitic for seventeen minutes on conical radio. Both of those organizations have taken matters into their own hands and they have demoted or fired some of the people responsible. The insert of course was suspended but I think the damage has been done. A. Especially when you look at it in terms of the the amount of support that those views appear to have. I wonder whether at least some the messages you're seeing in Florida might becoming from Russia or outside agents I. Mean The FBI Director Christopher Ray told the House that Russia is using social media to interfere and to denigrate Joe Biden we know that the Internet research agency which is backed by the Russian government is using a whole host fake accounts specifically on facebook and twitter we know that because facebook and Twitter told us do do you suspect that some of these campaigns that are ending up in Florida are also coming from outside our borders? Oh, I, have I have no doubt I mean that's that's been the pattern of campaigns, not only in the United States but elsewhere, I normally am involved in campaigns overseas and and this is the new reality. For example, let me let me give you a case in point. There are also conspiracy theories that abound in Latin American politics about Latin. American domestic issues. But because we have diaspora communities now those conspiracy theories that are developed let say in Columbia. Are Now being repeated in the United States and they're being tied together. So for example, black lives matter has been exported to Colombia and so now you have you know the FARC, the radical left in Columbia is really involved in the black lives matter movement here. Now, WHO's making that up is that you know the the right wing in Columbia coupled with with with sectors of the right here in in in in Miami. Yes. Is there is there likely you know some assistance from other. Actors who are really good at at at developing these kinds of messages probably, and it's been very, very much in the in Colombian circles here. So how might this affect the vote especially among Latinos in Florida because you know the turn out among Latino community is not usually all that high. Do you think that these these false messages and the widespread nature of them could actually depress the vote further? I don't know if it's going to depress the vote because most of what we're seeing seems to suggest that there will be a large Latino turnout in Florida at least right but in large measure, the mobilization of the Latino vote especially here in Miami Dade County has been because of this overwhelming message about communism having taken over the Democratic Party and you know dominating this presidential candidate. So so what we're already seen in some of the polling, some of the polling that we're doing in fact is that there's already been shift historically. The Democratic Party has one Miami Dade County. And historically other than the Cuban vote other Latinos tended to be Democrats. Colombians were heavily Democrat and other South Americans were heavily Democrat only Nicaraguans and Cubans were the two communities that voted heavily Republican today. We're seeing shifts for five to ten percent in some of these other communities among Colombians for example, although Venezuelans are much smaller among Venezuelans but we're also seeing some of those small shifts which can make the difference in a state like Florida, where one and a half to two percent will determine the outcome that's the objective of this messaging and it has been effective Thank you so much. You're very welcome. Celeste. Eduardo. Kamara is professor of politics and International Relations at Florida International University. That's our show for today. Thank you so much for listening. Td is produced by Ethan Brooks, and edited by Alison, Benedict and Tori. Bosh. DVD is part of the larger. What next family DVD is also part of future tense. A partnership of slate Arizona State University and new. America. I'm Celeste. Only have a great weekend Mary. Harris will be back in your feet on Monday.

Florida Joe Biden Eduardo Gomorrah Puerto Ricans Celeste Headley Filling twitter Florida International Universi United States Miami Venezuela the Miami Herald facebook professor Cuba south Florida International Relations intern Cuban government Arizona State University
What happens after you break the glass ceiling?

The Big Story

18:45 min | 9 months ago

What happens after you break the glass ceiling?

"Take a look around you on any given day and it won't take long to notice. Women don't have equal rights but there's one place where we find some of the more shocking examples that's at work statistics candidates with its latest numbers on the gender wage gap college and university graduates. Who are men earned more on average than their female counterparts worth eighty two percent of Canadian women viewed as over bearing if they had a strong opinion at work but on the flip side to that it's eighty seven percent felt men who expressed strong opinions at work are viewed as leaders and confident woman. Now hold twenty. Four percent of senior management positions globally. Those numbers are important because workplace. Equality is what's generally used to measure women's progress and the progress we've made can't be ignored but women still don't earn or own as much as their male counterparts and those positions at the very top of the power structure. Women rarely occupied them even when they do. The same challenges persist this is despite messages of empowerment being touted globally despite women being encouraged to have more confidence and to own their own careers. So what's stopping us from getting to the top and staying there? And how do we change it? I'm Stephanie Phillips in for Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Laurent mckeon is the author of no more nice girls a book about gender and power. An excerpt from her book recently appeared in the Walrus island so when we look at statistics of women in power in positions of power in Canada however we represented at the top Not Very well in fact in a lot of industries and spheres of public life We're not really represented at all and I think what makes it. Even more depressing is that you can see the disparity between representations sort of at the middle bottom where women are represented and then when we get to the top you know and they're not so for example thirty eight percent of all. Mba Students in Canada are women which is not parody but is okay but then when you look at Executive positions in Canada fewer than ten percent of women occupy those positions. So we start to see the disparity when we look at government has vote. We are represented among half of the voting population But then you get to the level of MP's for example we see that the number hovers around like twenty five thirty percent of most years and we look historically and only eleven percent of premiers in Canada. Have been women so you know it just once you get to the top. It's like where are we? We're not really there at all. So eleven percent. How many premieres is that actually? Eleven Eleven Hodel not even present so eleven total and the I was not elected until nineteen ninety one and one hundred and fifty years. Yeah those are kind of depressing numbers. So what happens when women do get to the top? Yeah I think we believe that wants women get to the top. You know. We're at the top and we will have the you know the power that we fought for for the C. O. You know we will run the company. People will listen to us. We'll stop having to deal with maybe all the B. S. that we dealt with When we were working our way up but that's not true. We have this idea of a glass ceiling and you know we shut her through it and then we are on the other side but we're not thinking about all the broken glass but still there once we shatter and in fact the stats. Here are pretty depressing. As well. We know that once women occupy the C. Suite their pickup actually widens to sixty eight cents For every dollar a man earns from I believe seventy eight or seventy nine so it. It dips earlier and on top of that. We also know that women like women. Ceo's are significantly more likely to be fired forty five percent more likely to be fired even when they're doing well like especially when they're doing well because it's like oh like well now's the time to get the white dude back in here like you know. Now we can You know really. Innovate and exciting. Again women are also far more likely to get hired when a company is in crisis. So it's forty percent of women are hired when a company is crisis versus twenty percent of men and we could say. Well that's great. That's because we trust women when companies in crisis but is actually a research shows that is actually because it's easier to blame women when things don't turn around and it's easier to replace them when they do so. There's this white savior effect where women people of color are often replaced by the white savior. Who Comes in and saves the company from you know the disaster that they put it in and it's all just smoke and mirrors to kind of maintain the power balances that were used to. Can you talk about more of the double standard between women and men when they're in the are in positions of power? Yeah a lot of women that I spoke to and and the research but you know women that spoke to feel that. They're kind of in the situation where they can't win. And it's sort of this double expectation Particularly when your power and the idea that you're supposed to be nice but not too nice and you're supposed to be you know a boss but not bossie or else you might get called another be word that is not as flattering You know they're supposed to be attractive but not too sexual authoritative but not mean and it kind of just swings back and forth until you're like well. What am I supposed to be like? You know I'm you can't win and you're left to follow this very narrow tightrope that is incredibly easy to fall off of. Yeah it's I think you described it as superhuman almost in your writing right yeah. It's the standards set like no one can live up to that. And you know we've found that when you inevitably don't live up to this impossible standard your judge so much more harshly Then men are in a working environment so I wanted to talk about the pedestrian bridge that collapsed at Florida International University. Can you can you tell me about a bit about that story? Yeah so it was a real story. Yes which and why emphasize that will become important in. Just a few seconds so in twenty eighteen other bridge collapsed and six people died and out of that real horrible incident Sort of this myth grew online until people believed it and it was the mid that an all women engineering team built the bridge and people created fake news actual fake news that spread and they cribbed all of these photos from the actual company that was responsible but from their international women's Day posts so they just pretended and made all these fake sites and links so that it looked like only women worked out the company. Wow and then a lot of people would say like well. That's what happens when you hire female engineers. No wonder they aren't in stem and it wasn't just on the Internet. I would hear this story repeated to me more than a year later or just regular people be like. That's not true. It's not what happened but it shows. I think the power of the kind of societal Gulab. That women are not competent in certain fields in particular he feels that are historically male dominated. I mean this is not the only time women have been blamed for something. That isn't their fault wire. Wire women the scapegoat when things go wrong. You know. I think that were just kind of we're primed for it in a lot of ways like as a society were primed to blame women. We blame mothers when kids do something bad and we you know wives when husbands. Do something bad you know. It's always the story of like well. What did she do to make him do that? You know that kind of a narrative that has persisted in politics and pop culture. You know we look back at history and literature. We're just so predisposed to do it when someone nudges us there we go the whole way. And then how does that play out for women? Who are in positions of power. What does that look like at the top were often really adverse to the idea of women in power and you know for a lot of people that I spoke to who you know started thinking about this or maybe changed the way. They approached power and leadership for them. A big moment in history was Hillary Clinton's loss and the polls expected that she was going to come out ahead. You know everyone thought it would be okay. Even though is seeing the herring that she took in the press and sort of the the hate that was happening on social media and and then you know she just became like this ultimate person. Who CAN'T DO ANYTHING RIGHT? You know. It was criticized when she got emotional. She was criticized when she was powerful. Choose was criticized for what she was wearing issues to five hundred masculine and she wasn't perfect of course but she became This symbol for everything like we don't like about women in power and when they get to the top they topple you know they become such a target That people just work very hard to take them down right. So can you explain the he skilled? She's lucky phenomenon. Yeah there's this phenomenon that researchers I've done what you just said that he's skilled. She's lucky and is this tendency that we have to would may look at men and women empower you know and whether that's in a very public position or maybe just like in in our own small company were man's promoted or women has been promoted and we tend to fall back into these very stereotypical traditional narratives. Which are like well. He got there because he's so good at this one account or he really killed this project and of course he deserves to be there and if it's a woman we say well she's lucky is probably because she's attractive or you know she was really nice to the boss or like and it. Kinda just goes from there. But it's not just other people that follow this narrative women fall into this narrative. Allot to you'll hear and that's part of how the term got coined because you'll hear a lot of women. Researchers have heard a lot of women that they interviewed like. Ceo's people in powerful positions when they're asked how they got there. Just had this like really lucky break. I was really lucky to be in the right place at the right time and you know kind of fell my way when I got really lucky with this one piece of success we ha- we buy into the narrative to in it. It perpetuates it. Gotcha I WANNA get more into that in a bid but I. I don't want to ignore the intersection of race and gender here so what happens to a woman of color who has the same qualifications as an a woman with a so called white name? Who's applying for the same job right? Power is so layered and our perceptions of power and who deserves to be empower and who's skilled and not lucky really becomes more complicated when we start thinking in terms of like race and sexual orientation transgendered and you know there has been a fairly famous study where researchers send out resumes with white sounding. Names like emily Sarah Carey things like that and they also sent out fake resumes with namesake. Kisha Tunisia and they found that when the resumes were perfectly matched. Women with white sounding names. Were far far more likely to get a callback and even when they were both high. Quality resumes like exceptionally skilled. People not only did the got not shrink actually widened Based on stereotypes of WHO deserves to be there Where we place value and in the end Researchers determined that having a white sounding name on your resume adds an additional eight years of experience. Well which is devastating and depressing and should really make us look at some of the biases we have about who deserves to be in what spaces and how we inherently project skills and power onto certain types of people right you wrote about how confidence is being sold to women and women of color people with varying abilities in books like lean in by. Sheryl Sandberg and Hashtag girl boss by Sophia Amoruso. The message is that to have success. All women need to do is just be more confident. But is is confidence enough. I mean I would never say like. Don't be confident lick. You should never be confident in yourself. I wouldn't say that but I think where it starts to get really muddy unlike very Sticky especially for women is. When were told that you just have to be confident? You know you just have to be a girl boss. If you just believe in yourself enough then you can achieve anything and I think what's dangerous about those messages. Is that they kind of encourage us to ignore or overlook all the systemic barriers. That a lot of people face and you can't really confidence your way into equal rights or into rooms where people don't want you to be there and on top of that. It's very shallow idea of confidence. It's lake is something that companies are selling to. So it's like you know. Be Confident but also by this pair of shoes or this makeup or you know or the Sern- outfit and that's all you need to get ahead and I just think that we run into some very dangerous story when the conversation stops there because it puts all of this blame for not getting ahead back on that person and not on the system that really perpetuates these sort of inequities exactly. Yeah I wanted to talk about that cycle right. It's like so hard to get to the top. Get to the top and then you face off these other barriers. Are Things get worse? And then you either don't want to like lift other people up to be at your level or you just don't want to be in that position anymore like what else is perpetuating that that cycle. Yeah it's exhausting exhausting and I think you know there's so much that perpetuates it you could. You could answer the question into as you could talk about like all stomach barriers that exist that are complex and threaded through the way that we structure society in a very masculine way or you could just be like sexism. Think of those answers are right. And we're also in this place right now kind of driven by these past two or three. Maybe four now years of like anger and activism and ready to speak up and really challenge those structures that hold this and plays and ask you know. Why do we keep following this set of rules? Are This path that you know has always been there and has been successful for men but has not ever really been successful for anyone else very much successful weight men Like a very subset. I'm an to and you know we're caught in the cycle and we keep getting spit out of it more exhausted by it and it's not working. We're not really lifting anyone else up like it's kind of this set of rules that doesn't really apply to us. And what else could we do? If we started to redefine what success looks like our leadership looks like or power. Looks like at all? What do you think it's going to take to get to a point where we can ask those questions and finances? I think we're already starting to in some ways like it. Seems DAUNTING INCREDIBLY? Daunting to be like you just have to change the system. Burn it all down and I think that's not in some ways not usable like it's not going to happen in my generation at the same time you know what I looked at in. This book was people that are starting to do that. Like in their own ways in their own lives in ways that are large scales he no large-scale political movements large-scale social movements but also the kind of smaller more personal scale and questioning. Why things have to be the way they always have been so whether it's you know women that are starting to make a technology with women. I in mind Which is not really how the stanfield has since innovated. You know whether it's thought or whether it's you know a small company that is making greeting cards Of New Homework moments with women of color on the front of their cards. You know. That's another way to challenge power and who gets to be celebrated it might also be Trans film directors who are creating their own films With trance stories friend of mine but also creating different sorts of film says because we know certainly in the past few years. We've learned that film says can be very toxic places so it's just people that are shifting and stepping aside this system and asking like why am I following that role? Why am I trying to be like that? Why would I be that type of director or that type of journalist or that type of C o? Maybe I can run my company differently. Maybe I can credit kind of film and I think that's how will start to get there. That's great I think that's a good place to end it to thanks Lauren. Thanks Lauren. Mckeon is the author of no more nice girls. That was the big story for more from us. Visit the big story PODCASTS DOT CA or follow us on twitter at the Big Story F. I'm Stephanie Phillips. Thanks for listening.

Canada Laurent mckeon Stephanie Phillips Ceo Walrus island Lauren Jordan Heath Rawlings Florida International Universi Hillary Clinton C. Suite emily Sarah Carey twitter Executive Gulab Tunisia Sheryl Sandberg stanfield director Sern
Small Steps, Giant Leaps: Episode 49, NEEMO Case Study Deconstructed

NASACast Audio

36:52 min | Last week

Small Steps, Giant Leaps: Episode 49, NEEMO Case Study Deconstructed

"Nimmo's lasted so long because it could adapt and be flexible and pivot to address the skills needed to do those tasks whether it's going to mars whether it's going back to the lunar surface the reason that we believe in this analog and i believe that it's been successful is because it is so similar to spaceflight living in undersea it's complicated is located world underwater. It's like you're surrounded by the plants and when you go to space it's like your surrounding the planet you're in outer space now and it's kind of this is more macro view of it but i think ultimately what it results in is just this appreciation for just for the place we share as a home and sometimes it does take opening up your eyes to the on wonder kind of in an extreme way around you to really appreciate that. Welcome back to small steps. Giant leaps a nasa apple knowledge services. Podcast we tap into project experiences to share best practices lessons learned and novel ideas. I'm only the nasa environment mission operations project or nemo is a nasa analog mission that sense groups of astronauts engineers and scientists to live for up to three weeks at a time in aquarius. The world's only undersea research station. Aquarius is located three and a half miles off key largo in the florida keys national marine sanctuary and operated by florida international university. The undersea world much like space is a hostile place for humans to live and demo nuts experience some of the same challenges they would face on a distant asteroid planet or moon nemo project manager. Bill todd retired astronaut. Nicole stott and nasa johnson space center knowledge management office investigator for case studies. Joyce abby recently collaborated to develop a nemo case study and build. Nicole enjoys join us now to discuss nemo and the case study. Thanks so much. For being our guest on the podcast. Thank you for having us ex to be here choice. What prompted you to write a nemo case study well. Every year i get together with lie. Jsc knowledge management office counterparts. And we do. Some brainstorming and one of the subjects came out for a possible case. Study was analogs. And i'm aware of this different analogues that jsc and the the agency has but one near and dear to my heart happens to be nemo. And that's because. I know the project manager and i've been following along on a lot of the nemo adventures and even got to sit in on an educational outreach event where we spoke to the nima crew on a particular mission so it seemed like a perfect perfect analog to focus on what did you like about having the nemo story captured in the case study format. Well first of all like having joy savvy my good friends since high school working with me on a project. so that's always fun Yeah you know typically what we see is folks wanna do something about nemo they they talk about the who what when of the mission and show a lot of imagery in it in in. It's cool stuff. But what. I was really fascinated by it peaked. My interest when joyce talked me about this was that she had done an exceptional amount of work on the. How and why. How do we accomplish these missions. In in why are we doing them. And what the relevance is in the appropriateness so that was really interesting to me and i The fact that she delve deeper so to speak was was really what what mattered to me. Nicole do you think this case study helps people to get the full picture of nemo. Well you know. I'm i'm counting on it. The the two people that you just heard from that are pulling it together. You couldn't find anyone better to do it. And i think that it does round out the full story like bill said i think that was joyce's intent from the very beginning and it's a really important story to tell there's so much that i think is surprising about the way we explore space that going to to live and work under c- might be one of the most surprises comprising things about it and as missions themselves that stand alone with with value on their own. I think that's even more significant. And and people should know about it on all on all levels of what it's about. And dina i do want to say that it wasn't just capturing and diving deeper into nima but really showing its relevancy to what we're doing today in space and what we're will do tomorrow and really getting a grasp on what bills intent is with nemo that each one of these missions is truly emission with objectives and goals and most importantly capturing those lessons learned from their experiences. That could serve us today. And of course in the future as we continue ace exploration. This is a really good point. Choice and part of our activity today. We more or less want to deconstruct the case. Study and i think part of it is once you decided that this was a topic that you wanted to capture in a case study. What kind of exercise did you go through to come up with an outline or a framework to tell the story. Well well i typically do my normal outline capturing any risk mitigation plans a do a lot of research on the background. So i can tell the a little bit of the history some of the challenges and most importantly lessons learned and then i basically throw them out the window Every time i interview or principle. I am surprised by something. They may say we may have our conversation going to completely different direction or there may be something. They highlight in our conversation. That i want to dive deeper into and it wasn't too hard to have a decent outline to begin with for nemo but i let bill and nicole and The other individuals. I interview kind of take me on this journey. And that really informs what that outline a look like and how i build the different components of the case study and of course importantly capturing those lessons learned anybody else with any thoughts on your involvement as far as pulling this together and making it into a case study. I'll just add. I'm happy to have been invited to participate in it And i think there's a guy by the way joyce approaches these things. It's not an independent study right. It's it's going out in. It's it's looking at these topics kind of human level to you know involving the the humans the people that were actually involved with them and i one of my greatest. I think the greatest gifts i had is An astronaut training was the opportunity to to participate in one of these missions and it honestly opened my eyes up to what it was going to be like prepared me as it was intended to for flying in space but it gave me you know other gifts to i mean just this whole new perspective on the world around me the ability the opportunity to live you know actually in the planet under the water of the planet for an extended period of time and appreciate that so i think there's aspects of of the mission and of the program that will come out just by that approach that joyce and bill have had to this Better because you're it is human thing that's going on. It is a human thing. And i think for me Joyce's approach that. She took coming to me. Talk about it was not so much a list of questions It was more a conversation. It was more about. Hey bill puck about. How did this happen you know. How did you get involved in this. And and what. What motivated you to want to do this type of thing in you know. How did you determine that this could be something that was viable and we just had a conversation about it. And when you when you do that when you open it up and you just allow people to express themselves and oftentimes maybe maybe too much Too long conversation but but in there. There's some nuggets of importance on. Why we're doing these things. And and that type of methodology i think is very good for capturing the types of details in the in the how and why were doing the nemo missions. Thanks bill a new wanna essay that i particularly selected. Nicole says oh we could talk about nemo and how the experience there compared to her first journey to the international space station and that was rather important and of course with bill. You could not have a story about nemo without bill but letting him guide me. I do come up with a list of questions but oftentimes our conversations. And that's truly what i want it to be a conversation a dialogue that leads us to a completely different journey than i had intended. And i know nemo is much more than the case study and visually i think it resonates emotionally with a lot of people and technically and that's one thing with case studies. I prefer personally. Is the human element. That's involved in technical effort or an engineering feat or whatever it may be. I think we can write technical papers all the time. And sometimes nasa does a great job communicating technically. But we don't connect to the more human side of things and we don't express a story in A layman's term. That someone could just pick up not having an electrical engineering background or not having a operations in space background but really understand what's happening why it's important and what we we've learned from it who talking about the importance of the human aspect of the case study. Another striking feature with the nemo study is. That is based on successes. A lot of times case studies are based on researching and analyzing a specific problem or failure. Couple questions what are your thoughts on the impact of a case study. That's based on successes. And would you recommend this as a model for nasa project managers who may be interested in developing a case. Study while i would. I would think that this would be Maybe case case study on success might not be the way to terminate but a best practice for a particular project and i would point to nemo and that Oftentimes we do tend to learn so much from our failures. And that's a great thing always and we ignore the things that have been incredibly successful and that nemo is one of those things and i think when modeling a project or an effort. It's a great idea to study what what's been successful about nemo that it's lasted for so long. That we've had so many breakthroughs with it in technology As far as it incubating new technology and new experiences. I won't speak for bill here. Because i could never do that very well but i but i mean i look at i think about my own experience with it just how wonderful it really was when you look at the whole package experience for in terms of preparation for flying in space and then the independent mission that it had on its own you know the the areas of technology were you were utilizing and and you know employing as part of the mission. But that's success. I think was is built on stomach here but the the point that you made about lessons learned. That's not just something that was you know this goodness that came out at the end but i mean there were lessons. I you know with with our team as we went in. That weren't always probably the best example of how to do something i'm thinking about. You know us as a crew. As part of the thing and then learning from that. I mean i think that's a big part of what goes on with one of these missions and his is a goal of it too is like. Hey try not to do that in space and learn about it here and then figure out know a pathway a solution forward so when you do encounter in something that way in the space environment I mean i had times where i thought about things that i experienced and for me. It was really big. Like in the part of it We we were on a training day. Bill i remember this and we were all swimming back. We had been deep and we were going back up to where the boat was going to be. And for some reason. My b c. Did and it was taken me up. I trying to get back down. It was pulling me up. But and i remember otto just looking at me with this look on his face like like he was gonna kill me like what is she doing going up. And it's like an. I'm trying to get back on trying to get back down. But because the one of the ultimate failures as a crew member on a saturated dive mission would be to surface. And you know. I did not want to be that person but it helps me throughout the mission from that point on really thinking more about my own equipment about the situation awareness of everyone and everything around me in a way. That was was much more sensitive. I think that i had been up to that point. And that was not a success on my part that was that was a failure on my part that got me there. Well yeah. I don't know that it's necessarily failure but i think you guys make some great points going back to your original point about how we measure success and i think joyce about lessons learned is critically important. It's the way that we deal with lessons have been learned and Certainly one aspect of it is failure along the way things are going to fail. The reason that we believe in this analog. I believe that it's been successful is because it is so similar to spaceflight living in the undersea it's complicated isolated world things break just like they do in space and that's just given to us. You know my background is a simulation supervisor. I got i got paid basically to break stuff. Well i don't have to do that. I mean to just break. it's very similar to be in on a mission but when you have failures it's very important that you keep track of of what they are and you go back and you iterating you make corrections to those so that the next mission even are the next day that you can respond to whatever failure was and you can improve upon and then learn and i think another important thing is is to be flexible and adaptable. And nimmo's spin fairly resilient over the years and flexible. We you know started off mostly in the shuttle years know. We grew to to working in the space station and then and mars and the moon an asteroid. And we've been able to pivot a different points and in work on different extreme environments in focus toward answering questions to be able to to adapt to those environments and. I think that's really important to be flexible in nimble at all times and make sure that you're always looking out for the customer in doing what the customer needs you to do not what you want to do as an individual or a team in lastly i think for me. I've been very fortunate. I've had a partner. Alan crime that that i've worked with for over thirty years mark reagan and we grew up in space flight training together and and we started this whole name of thanks from twenty years ago together and having a team of people that grew up in the operations environment as instructors as a flight controllers and engineering and in life scientists gives you the background that you can develop an analog like this to be as realistic as possible because because we're familiar with what it is like in space to be there with the procedures the protocol is like and then ultimately we understand the safety issues in the consequences of the safety issues and we focus heavily on making sure that we do safe mission so that we can be successful and you know built. You made several points there. That really were i. Hope expressed in the case study. Is that always maintaining relevance regardless of what nasr's goal is it may be to land on an asteroid while nemo's lasted so long because it could adapt and be flexible and pivot to address the skills needed to do those tasks whether it's going to mars whether it's going back to the lunar surface and always keeping relevancy in mind and then it just happened to be a happy coincidence that we're celebrating twenty years of humans on board the iss nemo's celebrating twenty years of missions that and. I don't think you can have a program that wasn't truly relevant to what we're trying to accomplish as an agency with human spaceflight and that wasn't important for the human element to actually bring those awkward nuts on board to To conduct these missions and some of these missions actually took technology that eventually ended up on the international space station so really maintaining that relevancy for not only the nasa mission every individual nemo mission. That's that was really crucial in. Appoint that bill expressed early on to me and hopefully stands out the case study. Well i think nicole can address this as well as she did. An eighteen day mission under c- And had a lot of opportunity to perform experiments in interact with her crew. But but as far as the relevance is concerned. It's not just that you provide answers to questions that that exploration of the moon or mars that we have and we can tie them to goals and objectives. It's not just that but it's also that the training that we provide for the astronaut office the opportunity that we provide the astronaut office is relevant. We don't ever want to put a crew in a situation where we give them make work and we just keep them busy in this isolated environment to be real. We need to be doing real things real experiments real objective real construction real communication. That answers questions that we're going to. That's going to help us. Make it to the moon or mars because a highly educated crew member like they all are. They're gonna see through that very quickly. If they're performing tasks there aren't relevant and then not real so we work very hard to make sure that our our partners whether they be medical doctors or engineers or from other nasa centers when we bring them altogether that we're all working from the same page in making sure that everything we're doing make sense in his appropriate for both the undersea mission and whatever our in goal may be and that you know bill that will both of you have said is huge And i i love the word relevance. Because i think it applies across the board with this is that not only is it a relevant environment. I mean it truly is an extreme environment. You're in a position where as a crew you have to have to deal with the things that go wrong in that space that go into the surfaces stopped the option right and That's that same thing is true in space. The relatively confined that. You're in that lifestyle but when it comes to the mission itself just from a not just physically being able to do the tasks if they were just kind of fakey Things to keep us. Occupied but psychologically. There's a huge. There's a huge aspects of that you're doing meaningful constructive valuable worthwhile work while you're participating in this this training mission and that's why i can almost is take the training off the front and just put while you're participating in this mission because it is stand alone but it also totally totally applies in every way think we could argue in every way too what a crew member will experience in space. And i would add whether you're going to the station or back to the moon and mars. It's it's a perfect analog to it you make some great points in nicole. We never use the word simulation involving this. Because there's nothing simulated at name when you're living on the sea floor sixty five feet under see at saturation. Basically means that your body has become saturated with nitrogen. You cannot leave that environment. You can't go back to the surface unless you've gone through the whole decompression profile net takes about fifteen hours which coincidentally is about nicole white about close to what it takes for a emergency something so they're pretty close so you can't just get up and leave the habitat so you you can't trick your mind into believing you're somewhere that's extreme it. It knows it knows that you're they are and both physiologically. And psychologically you have to adapt to being in that environment. And i think that let's one of the reasons it works for us. So well is because it is real and there's nothing simulated about it so interesting getting to hear all of you talk about your different perspectives of nemo and built one of your quotes and the case study says that at an early age you formulated the idea. That c- and space are very similar in recognized synergies between the extreme environments. How did that ultimately influence development of nemo. Yeah that's That's great question to that harkens. Back to my youth and i- i grew up in cocoa beach. Florida during the i dream of jeannie days was of course during the apollo days and i was there during both apollo success and apollo failures and it was you know a great place to grow up but You know come sunday night for me. It was about. It was all about the undersea world of jacques. Cousteau indian is glued to black and white. tv and. i spent time snorkeling and diving in the florida keys. And when i was when i was really young. And i just happened to be around. All the apollo astronauts in space family and and these undersea explores one of them. Very good friend of my father's was scott carpenter and scott. From an early age he had been on in mercury and sea lab and he was a huge influence to me for the undersea part in my father being part of the space program just kind of meshed in my mind that these two environments they were always having to deal with the same types of things and at the end of the day they were both adventurous and they were both fun they were both environments that i thought would be a great place to make a living in In do wonderful things and you know that was always my motivation was in a how can i. How can i do these two things. How can i mel these two things in do that from my life's work and i guess just kind of worked out but Yeah it it started from very early age through my whole career. I've been fortunate to have people that were influential in seeing space in around me and willing to talk to me and guide me and help me learn and that's kind of been kind of been my passion my life you know. I don't really know how to play golf. I don't. I don't go golfing on the weekends. Sounds like a lot of fun. But i my my golf so to speak is is seen space in the synergy between those two things and learning all i can about undersea habitation and driving submersibles and living and working in extreme places. And and that's my passion and that's what drives me. Oh yeah. I can see that bill. Your passion really does come through nicole as someone who has lived and worked in both of these extreme places. What are your impressions of the experience. You know. I spend all day talking about that. Nobody wants to hear it. Really i do. I think i think the word blessed came up Back there along the way i think. That's what i feel like really honestly truly fortunate and thankful that i got to experience both of those and I think bill said this was the first time ever heard this whole idea of inner space outer space and when we were getting ready to do the the nemo mission during the training. There's a really wonderful chart that he and mark show that has a you know a spacewalker. And then somebody in their gear working on the sea floor and then you know just this the the habitat and the space station in this whole idea of inner space outer space and That really i mean that really impacted me a. It took me a little bit longer to understand that synergy that bill bill grew up with and just felt in him. But as soon as you recognize it holy moly you just get it. There's no denying the the way these to play together. But i think kind of the more of the the human side of it again. Is that the opportunity experience those two extreme environments in such a i. It's like glorious way. Almost you know. I have these memories inside of the habitat of the lights off at night and looking out you know as the barracuda coming in and the around dinner time where there was the the two normal grouper out our window and just feeling like i was getting to witness this life around me an away. I'd never experienced before and might not ever again and the same was true in space. You know underwater. It's like you're surrounded by the planet and when you go to space it's like your surrounding the planet urine outerspace now. It's kind of this more macro view of it. But i think ultimately what it results in just this appreciation for ina just for the place we share as a home and sometimes it does take opening up your eyes to the on wonder kind of an extreme way around you to really appreciate that if that makes sense absolutely you've talked a little bit about how the nemo missions have contributed to space missions. Are there other ways that come to mind that nemo has been a real contributor to human spaceflight that goes on a lot of different directions. I i Something some are very big and something's are minor impersonal one of the main things that that a lot of times people don't see in and don't really realize is the opportunity for the development of the people that are in the project. There's a lot of times People come to the end of the project and they're enjoying it and it adds a whole another dimension to their knowledge base and the way they look at things in the in in what they wanna do further in their lives. And i think that their opportunity to work with other government agencies in external partners outside of nasa is critical because we do great work at nasa and oftentimes. Now we believe that we do it probably better than anybody else. And that's good. It's good that we have that confidence and knowledge because we're doing difficult things but it's also important to realize that there's other organizations the us navy for instance that are doing similar things working in extreme environments and on the house objectives that they have to complete and they have to be safe about doing them and the way they go about doing it may be completely different than the way we are so we can take away a lot of lessons from from working with these other partners in comeback and it makes us stronger as an agency and makes a stronger as individuals in his opportunities that we really don't get in other positions working for the space program. You know dina one thing. I found really interesting. Was people seem to be drawn to nemo. One of the individuals i interviewed was a co op. Student who had provided some under sea tools or even tools if he will nemo and when he was eventually hired on at nasa his goal was to work as a part of nemo to contribute to nemo and did everything that he could to prepare himself for that and was eventually successful and moved on to great contributions in the tools world and operations world. So i think nemo instigates a passion if you work for nasa typically you already have a passion for space exploration. But nemo ken distill that even further and show you unique ways that you can contribute to that. And i think it's a great leadership or a skills development tool for personnel. It's not an easy job as he told me. It's you're working hard. It sounds like a great time being in the florida keys but it's it's challenging and The folks who are most successful at it have the same passion that they do for space exploration and it really I think further distills that for them Really interesting how does nemo factor into nasr's plans for future human missions to the moon and mars while right now we're part of the expiration program and of course it's a little bit slow this year with them. Everything that's going on. But what we do for artemisinin the gateway programs in what we're looking at is very specific clear objectives and we look at those oftentimes they're operational objectives on the lunar martian surface. We look at those objectives and we see what we need to accomplish in what out of those objectives. Can we do in nemo that makes sense that is appropriate and relevant in there. There is quite a few of those operational objectives such as how we operate on the moon with a rover and how we communicate and how we perform scientific tasks and how we navigate on the moon. a lot of those types of things in in dealing with lighting conditions. All of those can be appropriately done on a nemo mission and that's what we're focusing on There's other places besides name. Oh that are really good for looking at other aspects and we let other places such as neutral buoyancy laboratory. They do a great job for what they look at and some some other locations so i think it really comes down to finding out what you're good at and finding the objectives that nasa needs to answer the questions that needs the answer and then focusing on those in streamlining those down and and making sure that you come back with a deliverable come back with a product that has answered some relevant questions for our exploration needs. You know bill you you point on something there that we really haven't talked about and that is keeping your customer in mind bringing value to your customer whether it's a researcher. Principal investigator scientists. A nasa director. That has a technology development questioned. They're trying to answer. But always keeping the customer in mind. And i think that again is also points to nima remaining relevant because that is part of its main tenants core value is what value do we bring to our customer whether it's an astronaut astronaut office technology development medical research those type of things is keeping all those things in mind have allowed nemo to laugh so long and contribute so much. That's good point joyce in its we run like a business we do. We are careful about the way we spend money. We wanna make sure that there is a return on the clients and customers investment that they get some strong things out of it and it's a two way street people like working with nasa in. It's okay to capitalize in it. That's what's great but at the same time we never want to take advantage of these situations. We want to make sure that the people were working with get good value out of what they're doing and they get a good return get questions answered the they need answer so following. Strong business practices in maintaining flexibility. And relevancy is what has enabled us to continue to be successful. Live really enjoyed getting to talk with the three of you today. Getting to learn more about the case study. And about nemo's well thank you so much for joining us on the podcast as my pleasure absolutely. It's been enjoyable. I wanna thank you and your team for in enjoys pulling this together And i want to thank the people that participated in nemo for the last twenty years. And it's it's been very fruitful for me very rewarding and Hopefully we can continue for some more years as one of those people bill. I say thank you to you for the opportunity to have been a part of it. It's it is as i hope all of you can tell it's not something that just impacts your ability to go fly in space but it has an impact. I guess i can only speak for myself but on the rest of my life i mean it really has been influential that way and i hope that many more people have the opportunity to experience in preparation for their own space flights but just kind of a really life changing experiences. Well you'll find links to topics discussed on the show including link to the nemo case study on our website at apple dot nasa dot gov slash podcast along with nicole choice and bills bios and a transcript of today's episode. If you haven't already we invite you to take a moment and subscribe to the podcast and tell your friends and colleagues about it for more interviews about what's happening at nasa checkout other nasa podcasts at nasa dot gov slash podcast as always. Thanks for listening to small steps giant leaps.

nasa joyce bill Nicole florida keys national marine s Bill todd Nicole stott Joyce abby nicole twenty years Nimmo florida international universi mark reagan dina iss nemo nemo eighteen day three weeks sixty five feet nicole white
Hablme Beb: A Chat with Dr. Melissa Baralt

Entre Dos Podcast

23:03 min | 1 year ago

Hablme Beb: A Chat with Dr. Melissa Baralt

"It indicates a podcast about waiting bombing plank thank you this is Monica and this is Paula. Welcome to end throws a podcast about raising seem bilingual children. We talk him to show a lot about exposure to the minority language and how crucial it is and the development of bilingual children and while well this is a given in some circumstances it can be challenging for parents trying to teach their children a minority language in English dominant countries like the US. I recently felt this pressure. When soy started in an English only kindergarten program I worried that we had focused too much on her Spanish development and which would not be valued in her new school setting and wondered if that would affect her in any way so far. My worries have been completely unfounded. She's doing fine and I should know better but that feeling of swimming against the current is always there. Today's guest Dr Melissa Vault is an associate professor of applied psycholinguistics at Florida International University. She has focused a big part of her academic work on empowering parents to pass on their heritage challenge to their children. It's why she created Abba movie. Talk to me. Baby a nap aimed at helping Hispanic parents foster their children's language development. We spoke to her about how the APP came about and what parents can do to help their children develop language. I really really have a foot in stem in a foot in humanities and I think that that kind of cross discipline approach to what I do very much told led to the journey of how odd movie came to be so on my humanity side. I'm a teacher trainer and I have the frankly privilege college of serving teachers in helping them develop a teaching philosophy at work mostly with teachers who teach Spanish so what does it mean to have a role in helping a young adult or a young child even pre K. acquire another language. How do you do a lesson plan. How do we design communicative tasks and then in my stem side I research the brain effects of Bilingualism so cycle linguistically. How does second language acquisition happened. What are our environmental factors or classroom based factors. Melissa's work on a funded study that looks at the cognitive effects of bilingualism in preterm born children also paved the way for the creation of the APP sure enough we are seeing that bilingualism who is in gives preterm born children in edge when it comes to executive functioning so I'm I continue to work with teachers and I continue to do this study with my colleague Ashley in the Prematurity Study. We've been doing this. we started out looking at behavioral tasks we recently gently added a brain imaging component to this study and so seeing that even though they on average were born about a week earlier and end were sicker babies they weighed less the the bilingual. Hispanic children have better executive function than the monolingual children that said every single Hispanic parent in that study told me that they had been recommended by a pediatrician Shen and or a teacher to stop using Spanish at home with their child presumably because of the child's history of a preterm birth so hearing these these mothers stories and then my work in the center for children and families because I I do home visitation end intervention for children who are greatly at risk for language delays delays really with the mission of helping and supporting mothers to use their home language whether that Spanish or creole or Portuguese in continuing to hear stories of from these families that they e had been recommended to either not use their home language especially Ashley. If there is a history preterm birth for risk or presence of developmental delay I would also see that watching and interacting with with caregivers and young babies win caregivers do not use their their maternal attornal language with their infants or young children that language input to children that rich syntactical complexity. That's so critical for language language. Growth is just not present. It's like it's a very simplified language and we would see this reflected in these children's language measures as well the came into play when Melissa submitted an idea to a challenge by the health resources and services administration an agency of the US Department Department of Health and Human Services the agency as researchers educators business owners and community members to submit an idea aimed at reducing the word gap and teaching caregivers to talk more to their children with the goal of improving language and literacy outcomes. I submitted a short essay and I said I think I think the bigger issues that in. US Society we have this very serious language ideology problem and the language ideology problem is if you are white and affluent it's positive and productive for you to use and learn another language you plow so but if you are Brown in poor whore learning are using another languages cultural baggage and the fact is from a health standpoint that language ideology is harmful harmful to families who are culturally and linguistically diverse because it mediates how they talk to their children which therefore impacts the child's school readiness once he or she starts kindergarten in therefore impacts that child's literacy gains number one the challenge. Melissa told all does that her main goal for the APP wasn't so much about the word gap in case you're familiar with the term it refers to a construct dating back to the nineties that states that there there is a gap in vocabulary children from low socioeconomic backgrounds who may not have rich language interactions now. There's a lot of really good debate right now. In the literature on the construct of the word gap itself but the the main point is is the fact that quantity and quality of words and interaction so strongly predict language acquisition literacy and academic success so ave aims to teach caregivers that that into dussault in Spanish and to keep up their Spanish in maintain their Hispanic culture in pride and also working with the government limit the learn the science act early developmental milestones or in their APSO that caregivers can mark those off in. Should there not be meeting those milestones then they can reach out to somebody to to prevent that risk of a delay later on that and what's Nice about the APP is the ubiquity of technology it really lets it helps deliver this health information because it is a health factor to families who might not have access to this information or access to a provider but even when encouraged to speak to their children in Spanish or their minority language parents may steal feel concerned about their children falling behind in English. I I would say that that is actually the number one concern that Hispanic parents or parents of another language have is my child needs English to succeed in school in this this country. My child needs English to be able to learn science and math at Cetera but mom and dad. Please don't stop because bilingual is is the greatest is gift. You can give your child cognitively economically down the road. Socially I mean we even see research that that bilingualism awesome has profound benefits later on in the lifespan so it can delay the onset of Alzheimer's by an average of five years in addition of course helping your a child get a much better job because of the fact that he or she speaks more than one language in research. Meta analyses statistically significantly show that dual language acquisition will not delay child in school on the contrary it only only enhances that child's academic success we see this in areas of executive functioning in reasoning in attention in planning and even in accepting other's differences so we know that the children who are willing well. They're they're just more accepting when it comes to semantic ideas like okay. I'M GONNA call all this moon. Alright I can call it Luna as well and that very much with young children relates to okay well you know what he's different from me but that's okay and and we see the bilingual kids are better able to do that so there are ways that you can still make sure your child has is exposure to rich English as well but keeping up your heritage language and most importantly really promoting proud bilingual identity yourself herself. That's the best thing you can do for your child. We ask the Melissa having a language rich environment in one language. That's native to the parent or caregiver can help children acquire another language. Yes and there's there are tons of research and therefore evidence based practices that we can do in I would say the two parents that it really depends on the type of language situation you have in your family so let's say you are a family where both both parents speak the same language in its minority language so if if that is your situation use that rich native aided minority language so your heritage language as much as you can at home and as a family you can also seek out rich. English Input Opportunities Return for your child as well one great place to do that is the public library which is free they have so many activities in reading circle and activities you could do and set up play dates cetera. There are ways to make sure that your child is also getting exposure to English. VP K. is a great context to for families Let's say that you are a family and again it can be to carryovers a single parent and you are a bilingual parent so you speak both the minority and the majority language promote a proud bilingual identity with your child and show your child how important it is to use both languages in the United States. Young children are absolutely going to gravitate towards English in so try to use the home language as much as possible in reading really to help with that and so in in in the APP and also on the album movie instagram account we give lots of of suggestions of activities that you can do and and then if you are a family maybe your English dominant you speak here. What's the majority language in. You really would like to raise your child is bilingual. it is absolutely possible and so just as with the first recommendation there are many things that you can do to promote language learning as a whole wolf family goal so one of my favorite things to do is of course promote reading reading is essential end so vital for language learning and and there's there's some wonderful empirical studies at support even when it's not the parents native language just reading in the other languages so beneficial you could have nights where it's it's fun and maybe your child can have a Buzzer in anybody who switches to English gets buzzed. There's there's lots of fun games that you can do to promote that again. It's promoting a positive learner identity. Now you asked in this. This may be deviating a little bit into research you you asked about the role of non native language input in interestingly. There's there's some some incipient research that shows that it really depends and I think that this is why connecting Stam in the humanities is so important and I. I think we don't know yet in fact I'd love to brainstorm with you ladies on this later on and I think bringing together researchers parents could get down to this but I I think it's related to the language ideology problem. We have the United States so some research that that I have done here in in Miami Erica Hoff off up in Florida Atlantic. She does research and then some other colleagues in speech pathology so we see that we look at language patterns. Saturn's Solit- say there's a Hispanic family using Spanish only in the parents are really trying to maintain Spanish only in the home with for example very a young children and toddlers compared to an English dominant family who really wants to promote bilingualism in his using Spanish more even though that might not be their native language language we see that over time there's differences in the way that the children respond so that Hispanic child whose parents for sandwich might be Spanish they tend to switch more and more to English on the contrary the Anglo native English speaking child old they tend to use more and more Spanish with their for example mom with the goal of learning Spanish together with the mom. So why is that what's going going on there. What is it that you know if you have two mothers who are speaking both non native languages for example non native English or non native Spanish. Why do we see that Anglo children tend to be more engaged in really working in trying to use in acquire Spanish Spanish as a second language but we don't see those same patterns with Hispanic Families for example where the child really trying to use stick to Spanish and again I I think it has to do with the ideology so children know in may be seen or experienced the way that certain very ignorant people in our society can react when a language other in English is spoken whether it's that we're not sure but what what I will tell you is speak your maternal language the language you're most comfortable in in do not fear using language that might not be native not you to promote a proud lingua identity with your child. Research supports that it's the best thing that you can do and you can absolutely do it. This observation Asian surprised as I mentioned to Melissa that my daughter increasingly speaks English to me. Even though we have a positive association with Spanish you know that that's very very normal and that's okay and I think in your case in of course with with the scenario described to you earlier so data here Miami also I did a year long study at a a well-known bilingual school. That's public up in Washington. DC called SKRELA anyway waster. We saw the same things there even in a classroom context and you can't divorce out socioeconomic status that absolutely plays a role I think with with all families families it also has to get to a question of input so in your daughter's case I bet if you were to do a a family language audit or a language audit of of a twenty four hour period her awake hours what percentage of her work hours are in actual Spanish productive inductive use where she is using the language creatively in making meaning in the language in I will tell you so. This is anecdotal total. We need more research on this but it seems that the magic number might be twenty percent in so one one thing that I like to suggest to Paris's versus if you can whether you really WanNa get your child to to keep speaking to like heritage language context Portuguese or Spanish or Haitian Creole. If you can try to get your child so remember it's passive so just listening watching TV. You're listening to music. That's not the same as productive actual creative you so where the child is speaking in playing and singing in the language if you can make sure that twenty percent of those awake hours or in productive use of that target language that really really helps to maintain communicative competence in in proficiency in that language for your child it's always interesting to to look at those and see okay what what what percentage of the day are we actually using for for example English and Portuguese and it and it helps we love the idea of auditing language usage and home. I've done an audit in our home with soya a and it helped me formulate a plan to give her exposure to Spanish now that she's an English only kindergarten program. It's hard for young children to have a dance school and come home and tell mom and dad about school win. The day was all entirely in English and so one thing I tell parents is how can we make it fun so so back to your point money cut number one coming up with strategies to engage in help young children produce in the target language for Heritage Language Maintenance and then number br to finding out what community resources there are where children actually have to productively use Spanish raising a bilingual child is possible people but as you'll hear from Melissa we can't ignore the role that social factors in identity play an outcomes as I continue to do work in this area in a lot of my work. Is You know in with some amazing colleague so Dr Ashley Darcy Mahoney Dr Natalie Ali Brito Dr Anne Larson. We we talk about what's called. New Zealander Lingua language nutrition. It's a metaphor in it's actually kind of from a public campaign perspective they launched skuld talk with me baby. It's all throughout the state of Georgia under the Georgia Department of Health so training the nurse workforce which is the most trusted workforce in the nation to talk to MOMS critically about talking to your baby and why and how that's so important in just talking to your baby is as much as you can in that rich interaction in as as we continue this work in look at the effects of language interaction in different languages and how to really promote in in help each child child reach their full potential so much of it too is dependent on just a positive socio linguistic enlisted identity and by that I mean really feeling proud to be Hispanic in proud to speak Spanish and being empowered to do so do that in do so in public spaces in what does that mean for for young children for families and we can't have these conversations about early childhood and Developmental Language Literacy health outcomes in in young children without addressing like when I was talking about earlier the harmful language ideology in unfortunate rhetoric that it is going on in the United States about language use of in it's this real double figuration of Spanish. Where you know. It's really positive it's it's it's so interesting how very affluent white families what all of their children to be in bilingual schools schools and yet socio linguistic and second language acquisition research shows the way we become bilingual is by engaging gene in conversational interaction with speakers of those languages and so if that can't be happening in public spaces in our country than than we have a problem problem there and so before really getting to health in language in developmental milestone meeting etc we we also need to be talking about social factors and so. I think if if the main message I could I could say today would be it. It absolutely is possible to raise your child as bilingual. Even if you don't speak fat second language you can learn to mom and dad and caregiver her and let's also address being proud to be Hispanic and speak Spanish or what other language you speak in really promote positive sociolinguistic identities because that I'm finding in my research significantly effects language outcomes outcomes. Is that identity factor. Thank you so much to Melissa or out for speaking with us. You can find more information about her work and maybe we at optime DOT ORC. We'd love to hear how you create a language rich environment for your child join us on Facebook Book Instagram or twitter at in three of those podcasts and if you haven't yet please rate and review us and help us spread the word about enter those Estella established. Sima knows uh-huh

Dr Melissa Vault US Heritage Language Maintenance Developmental Language Literac Dr Ashley Darcy Mahoney executive Miami Florida International Universi Hispanic Families Alzheimer Paula Monica instagram associate professor US Department Department of He Washington Facebook Luna Sima
Rob and Trish McGregor On Synchronicity and ET |432|

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

1:25:21 hr | 1 year ago

Rob and Trish McGregor On Synchronicity and ET |432|

"Skeptical were we explore. Controversial science and spirituality with leading researchers thinkers and their critics. I'm your host Alex Karras and you know I've taken to letting skeptical listener's there's guide me on who I should talk to. And today's show is a great example of how wonderful that can be when you let other people take the reins. I am almost embarrassed to tell you that I wasn't aware of the tremendous body of work. You can see some of the books on the screen that have been generated by the husband and wife. Writing Team of rob entries McGregor both separately. We have each become award winning authors as well as together have done some amazing work but on so many of the topics that we we love to talk about here on skeptical and we like to dive into deeply as they have so. Synchronicity is remote viewing UFO's ET's spirit. Communication Astrology Wicca a lot of stuff that we haven't talked as much about these folks are just a tremendous well of information and as I just alluded to its quality stuff. It's not like people. They crank out a lot of books. But there's great stuff in these books so hello I'm blown away. I'm super excited to have them on and to meet them and have a chance to talk to him. Rob Trish thank you both so much for joining me. ANSW KEPCO THANK YOU ALEX. Now if our dog shuttling shows up in his pictures because he's right under the table here thanks for inviting so you guys as I just mentioned. We're going to be talking a lot about these many many books you've written and we're GONNA play a little game that I like to play in jeopardy where you pick the topics in Wego where you drive us. But as as I'm often guilty of I sometimes kinda jump in there and pick the first one and here. I guess we have to talk about books. Yeah it started basically a when I met Trish I was working as a newspaper order a daily paper in Hollywood Florida and I was assigned to do an an article on how the Cuban refugees come to Florida in the United States. The Cuban boatlift in nineteen eighty and this is like a years later how they were integrating into our society. Trish was Teaching English as a second language at Florida International University and so attribute we started talking and after the interview and it turned out that both head read all of these books and Jane Robert Budgeting Roberts and we knew no one else fluid. I'd only had they not read. The butcher hurt him. The had no interest in in the subject matter so it was nice to meet somebody who had similar interests and things went from there. Well that's fantastic. You know and as I mentioned earlier you've written on a lot of different topics and we're gonNA talk a lot about many of the different ones. We're GONNA talk about synchronicity as he's a especially because a lot of people are interested in that and you guys have an interesting theory about how synchronous cities may be at the core or of a lot of these different phenomenon and how they all might be linked but I. I'd like to know more about your personal journey through all these different topics and in particular because this is a show that really likes to focus on science and on one hand. y'All don't claim claim to be doing science your authors but I did gain an appreciation for maybe a little bit of that newspaper Reporter vibe. I bet you have in that the accounts that you tell. I get the feeling that you've tried to vet them in some pretty serious ways and in some of the work that you present to back up some of these ideas that especially when you're starting out where really unacceptable people have become much more mainstream but I felt like you did go to great lengths to show the seriousness and the serious people that were involved in that. Do you want to speak to that at all a one day I I. I read about synchronous when I was eighteen and I had picked up an itching book. The Chinese book of Divination and young wrote wrote the introduction in nineteen forty nine NASA place where he first publicly talked about synchronous thought. Wow this explains a lot. You know because the death penalty also learning astrology which studied and I met rob one of the first questions I asked Hey the inuit synchronicity. He is like my test question he goes. Yeah Yeah I think I do any started talking about. We actually first book. We tried together was on sacred chronicity but it didn't work beginning in those first attempt at fiction book and it didn't go anywhere we just weren't prepared at that point to write a book on cigarettes that here and so you know he had other things going Tristesse first came out. I gotTa Not Raj Raj Reading Project with the corporate executive from Washington. DC Both good our jobs point we around five months later did take part time jobs to actually. It was a full time of day. A wiki mostly our Titan Tristesse teaching English as a second language of nights a after school program at a high school adult adult. You know we we Did that for a year and that's tristesse novel solar night at the the other on projects for we actually started out as freelance magazine. I learned of selling magazine articles. And we're in pretty awesome but the problem was getting paid very slow and very locate a until we got hooked up with Omni magazine. Merli seventy five cents a word and so good. And we got a lot of assignments since From Pamela Weintraub editor. And that's how he met Betty Hill but Hopkins introduced this. All your stuff. You know one of the things we're going to have to do during this show is deal with a lot of name dropping and it's not name dropping. I shouldn't say that because that has a negative connotation but the things people are going to have an appreciation for is seen it all done at all Ben. They're all these people that you've encountered which are just it tr- tremendously important people in a number of these different fields and I've jumped over to the UFO topic. Even though I have up on the screen synchro so let me Oh back to the sink. Rose thank synchronous cities because I think we talked about these a number of times on the show and I want to kind of approach it from a couple of different different angles one. You've written several different books on synchronised cities and you've chronicle some amazing synchronous cities these kind of The coincidences that. Go Way way beyond coincidences in our life. But I also wanted to connect to the fact that on this show we've also look at the undeniable science. That seems to suggest that there's something real going on your so if you look at Dr Dean Raden and his work. I'm very sentimental admits kind of pointing in that direction doctor. Julia Maas Bridges yet northwestern as well and a friend of our show. Andy Dr Andy Pecan. WHO's looked at dreams teams in synchronicity? Unbelievable connection statistically. But let's start maybe from the beginning in talk about synchronicity because if people people pick up this book that I have up on the screen the seven secrets of synchronicity. They'll find some really good kind of factual stuff doc about what synchronised cities are some common understandings. This thing of the the number thing is always interesting to pay me I have to say the other yesterday. I was preparing. I was getting ready to prepare for this interview. I wake up. I look at the clock for four four. You know what happens depends on the day that I'm doing the prep work for the people are the people but I'm sorry please. Let's talk about sink. Rose wherever you want to start we know okay One of the things that was surprising to me. I keep rereading Yom's Autobahn Face and he throughout his liaqat the new miracle cigarettes synchronous that happened to him and his theory was that every number is an archetype of energy. and You keep seeing Cnet particular number until you figure out. Suppose you never figured out until you figure out what the messages that's how young and another demand Bateman. You need to have him on your show. He's a psychiatrist visiting psychiatrist at the University of Virginia. And he's really the first psychiatrist psychiatrist to take on a serious study of synchronous a sense. Yes Yawn I'd like to mention in A couple of our best stories. That are personal. Synchronous used I might That would be considered pretty astonishing Tom. She sometimes people have their own personal synchronised they're very meaningful Person but then you than the tell somebody else in the other us. But these I think are pretty dramatic This one took place in Venezuela at at the airport. As you're leaving the airport it was at a time when the Colombian drug lords were moving cocaine. Cain to Miami but they weren't moving it out of Boga Tani more there were they shifted to Venezuela and so there was a large crescent army presence presence at the border there at the airport. And so we come up with her our luggage and to go through but just in front of us. There's a man who doesn't have any luggage. She just has a briefcase. He's dressed as very tall. He's wearing three key so and looked out out of place in a way and he puts down the Rafe case unlocks opens. We're sending right behind behind him and there's like sixteen seventeen years old with machine-guns leaving her to be. There's only one thing in that reach case and it's cold seabird written by Trish but I I couldn't even because it was written under a pseudonym but we didn't astor situation that Lewis away at the seabird attention there as well and Ah We just looked and got that the that was the big one one other one might mention is I is a windsurfer and I would win. Serve sometimes on a neighborhood late and one day I went out I just I was excited goodness to excite Jumped on my board low too soon. I didn't take my billfold out. And at some point I went down and lost billfold but I really wasn't aware certain that that's where I lost it. I just knew from what certain I didn't have billfold anymore. And so the thing is Is probably in the bottom late but I had the feeling that I was going to come back to me. It's just the other thing I just. I didn't contact any of the credit cards. Didn't try to driver's license so three or four days. Go by and I get the telephone. Poll and a Master's Rob McGregor said. Oh I'm glad you're alive. I was fishing in Lake with a net and came up with take. Your body might be done there as well. And so he finds it and then he decided to meet at his house. House in a man from India and injured is having a big party at his house Sunday. I went there. It was like moving into a foreign born country by the people in the house hanging out in the garage and all over Indian food so looking for this guy is three guys that same make finally gets to the one who owns the host. He gives me the bill allman cards. All my money is in there and I look at. Hey I just I just met you last week. He is a lawn service and he came knocked on my door and advertising. News services are talking for five minutes and and so so here I met him again. That's really unusual one. You know there's a couple of things about that story that I think are really worth talking about battle. Bit further one is that you know as we've shown on this show thirst these different levels to these different paranormal normal phenomena in in like one is we feel a need to prove it. You know so we want to talk about WanNa pull young in or we WANNA pull in some already eighty or like I was doing want to talk about the science. That's been done on it but then in another we quickly get past that we get to the personal you know. And that's something live experience and I I've experienced both myself directly a lot of times. People have medium readings. And it'll be exactly like you were saying rob they'll say you know. This little thing came through that when I tell it anyone else it seems insignificant but to me it was the most meaningful little bit of information that would come through. That brings us to the point of start to ask some really really deep questions who is orchestrating this for what purpose and meaning might might it be orchestrated is it good is it. Bad is at our spirit guides. Are we potentially being deceived as their grand order to everything in his at working out in a clockwork quirk like fashion. I think your work particularly with sink. Rose brings us to the point where we can start asking those deeper deeper questions. So let's do it. What do you wouldn't about it after had initially read Jones introduction to the Chang I I I actually started experiencing which what? I thought it's time was coincidences but it was synchronous cities and once I'm I'm years later. Got Around to writing the seven secrets of synchronicity. We realized that there were really seven. Categories it could actually be more because we we had other other categories too but the editor we were working with said. Let's keep seven secrets you know. We liked illiterate of of the essence so we did a part two on it but but what does things we found is okay. When you're at an intersection your life? Okay you're GONNA move or you're going to get married you're GonNa have a baby you know big big life events. That's when synchronicity seemed to happen most frequently right. That's one thing also also when you travel and you're outside of your comfort zone then you also seem to experience synchronicity. Sometimes they're warnings sometimes they're confirmations and some kind of their tricksters so when you were talking about. Are they good or bad. I mean I had a tricks of secrecy. Kinda kick me off I had written. I was ready a trilogy for tour and I wanted the second book to be into about time travel. So Robert Night were in Orlando at a Scottish festival. And I was looking at clothing. They had air and looked at the label in one shirt and it said time travel. I thought wow okay. Here's confirmation this. This is what my second book. A good idea has it by my editor editor. Said time travel all right. That's a trickster. It was a man station of what I wanted. But not what it's GonNa be so you're talking about asking a question about what's the source of these synchronous abilities meaningful against Incidences we show that. There's like a deeper level reality. That exists where everything is interconnected and an explicit as the implicate inner Implants gives me as David Bona on. Physicists assists describe it and then there's the extricate which is the physical world where things do not seem to be all interrelated later that seemed to be just the opposite oftentimes but what. Synchronicity is is right at the border between the implicit and the Because it's something peeking through from the implicate order where everything is interconnected. So it's it's like a clue like people are more religious like they a book called Garden wicks they see it as a religious. Yeah I got that part of it but I don't think that it really gets at the question of which which can be asked in a number of different ways but it's like who's orchestrating it and for what purpose and we don't. I'm not fixed that we have to come down with a solid answer one way or another and I wouldn't trust if we did because I think the data as were as you've encountered it in your other work like Bloomberg over and talk about E. T.'s and abduction slash contact experience good. Et Batty when we're talking about Demons and we talk about hungry ghosts or we talk about angels. You know we we have a lot of different stuff going on in these extended realms and so I'm I'm all for this idea that you're putting four which is really fascinating which is sink. Rose are this particular means of communication mutation in that kind of inbetween zone. It that that might have a particular purpose might serve a particular function as a way of communication nation but it does drive me towards those questions of who is orchestrating it for what purpose and I think it's all I honestly believe that it's all internal you know if if somebody doesn't believe that a coincidence is meaningful they're not gonNA experience you know generally Generally generally say because sometimes right I mean you see this in your own work right. Sometimes it'll come just beat you over the head. I mean it. Sometimes it'll be really subtle and you have to pay attention to it to get the many other times it's like no I'm tell this is sometimes they even pass right over by Over us we have a sacred Something Small and we don't need big butter the latest. Hey we just the so and a lot of people who don't think we think about this all the time so many books about it but other people aren't really paying attention Aware of synchronicity. I think they have Winston May think about it for a second or two then move on what's really interesting. We have neighbors who have two children and would our first book came. I gave my neighbor Bokan sheet rather than she can't. She said to me Trish. I think I've had a lot of criticism and then her kids started coming over to mistreat mistreat. We've had some secret isn't he's it. Is that a weirdest. Wow Okay I get this as more. Were more often so okay but guys. What does that mean again? We're describing it. which is awesome? I mean you guys have A. I don't want to sound to be taken a wrong. His pants doing this work and for amassing it and again folks. If you have any doubts like that you know they're kind of being fluffy with this go. Oh read these accounts. They're amazing and we can go back to the fact that these people are careful about collecting accounts they don't just go take stories that they pick up the street to try and verify them in many cases through certain extent to a certain extent and like people come on their website and share synchronize. But they won't just stop and take them verbatim they'll go and nail the person and follow up and and really try and verify but again were describing it we we have contradictions all all over the place right. That must trouble you to in terms of does because what you know for instance if you look at the number eleven or eleven eleven and when we started looking into that is kind of blow it. Okay we're how can you be so many eleven elevens you know I mean we were in Columbia last year and the Cartagena was freed found its independence from Spain on November eleventh eleven eleven. I thought how can this be you know so. I don't know WHO's orchestrated I. I don't I don't I mean I do think it's that. Underlying implicate orders exist in that order as well as we executor Ferret Fair enough. I mean if that's your answer trauma just try and pin you down because if that's your answer fair enough is that we are orchestrating it. It's the toll thing it's the we are co creators leaders of our reality so of course we okay I I buy buy that I buy right but then I jump over over to the other says some of the other work. Et is Israel. Okay a lot of people. Don't accept that always amazes me when people go. Yeah I believe in you oppose but I don't believe me you know it's like yeah so. Et's react no matter how we look at it and we'll dive into that in a minute but there is is a being a species of a manifestation of consciousness that is playing in this in between Rome in a way that we don't understand experience the mediums there now talking to spirits who are in this extended realm in a way that we don't totally understand but seems seems to have some ability to access synchronicity or affects synchronous cities in our life. So that in a way I'm not saying it completely completely does but it kind of stands a little bit. In contrast with this. We are creating our what we're creating a reality but these other beings are their toe amazing that I mean a lot of with spirit contact particular. There is interaction. You know a bad. I don't know if they're creating the synchronicity. But somethings that. Synchronicity wanted me is higher beings. He had moved between the physical realm. Tom and between dimensions and non-physical can appear to us and this survey coming onto you a full but just manifesting interesting to us and we're reading a book right now with the women who is A retired veteran. who had his head Luke? Luke twenty heated with. Maybe she's having these experiences and it's continuing to daylight with us. She doesn't WANNA call alliens. She calls them beings and she describes him and she is one of these people who actually likes as she she doesn't consider Today come to her every afternoon. She spends twenty three hours in her bed with them. They're not in the and one of them. Is this creature decimal seven feet tall and looks like a praying Mantis. Go through the ceiling. If I saw it sounds that vitamin SWAN arms. But she says who's better equipped to investigating alien Species Veterinarian to sing. That's an interesting angle. That she sent rob some recordings that she made and then they freak me out they sound inset. Dial you know like if you were standing in an orchard or something. Every cricket insect in the world was singing. Oh you know. We've checked her out. We've known her for number of yours. Jason Legitimate Contact D.. And I has incredible incredible story. I think this story could be the modern day equipment of communion because injured mentioned. It's physical non-physical physical connections and it's it's a fascinating story. She is a lot of on auto body travel that they have hold her out of her body and travel with different dimensions. The Jews Lots of those stearns fascinating and she feels that what they're doing is they're helping her to revolve vibration and I didn't know how she could choose. She's skills that she's living the future. This is what humans are evolved to become both physical and non physical being moved between two realities. In other words we get away from the nuts and bolts idea of space travel women travel through our minds through consciousness and manifest physically elsewhere. Yeah well that that's a topic you guys have discussed and covered extensively in some of your prior books. I just pulled up aliens in the backyard. Art and beyond strange. I mean you have amazing. Cases of contacts lash abduction. I think that's a really interesting topic that I'd like to dive into into you with you. Know One of the guests that I've had on recently in there's several guests are doing this research with the Free Foundation. I don't know if you've heard them but Ray Hernandez ratio. They're down there in Florida and things they've done and raise bent on his show. Multiple Times is. They've looked experiencers and they've tried to look at a that experience scientifically through a very academic survey. You know you know the drill if if you do surveys the right way you can get good date. I mean that's how they that's a date on pain or depression. You know you have to go ask people but you ask them with enough questions Russians and you do it in a way the kind of asks multiple ways and if you do it carefully you can get good data. Their data surprisingly comes back in. It is very much in favor of I. Guess that last. Contact that you're mentioning. They find overwhelmingly people have a positive contact act experience and that the more experiences they have the more they understand their experiences to be positive. They see spiritually transformative formative experiences throughout these they see healing experiences that are Kinda pretty. Undeniable people can psychic abilities. To don't they so I could abilities. He's which is against maybe similar to the near death experience. What people do that but at the same time that stands in contrast with some of the cases aces that you've reported that? I think we have to take very seriously and we have to respect where people are coming from. Some people are having traumatic abduction experiences. That we can't can't really put in any other way. No one wants to be taken against their will and have these kind of weird medical experiments done I in people are reporting morning it and there's good documentation for that people come back and they don't they're close a switch with someone. Close are on backwards. All this kind of strange staff at that. It is really terrifying and then to see your children which in a lot of cases people see their children being a knocked it or having this contact act experience so this idea of the good alien versus the bad. Alan is something that I think really needs to be wrestled to the ground. A little bit more and who better to do it than you to. I don't think there's just one species here. We're not just one way of blacks morlock close invites. And you know we're we're very I think is these Different ulcers yet difficulties of different intentions. So so I think some of them are here. Maybe for not the best of Modems for the future of the human race others may be very neutral coming for harvesting our resources that make use of and others may be benevolence and here do to help us. But that's in a way. Then we want we might want them. Tape landed on the White House lawn. Make an agreement that you know that it should be think that is the best way we have to do it ourselves in there maybe helping behind the scene but not in not in where the concrete Though see we had in one of the cases we talk about in the backyard at the French Canadian who's had experiences secured over a period of time We asked him he was carrying around a vial of holy water. And so rob said senator us. We'd like to take it up to Casa de spiritual community in central Florida and have a friend of ours. Whose exciting psychiatrist read it? So contrary to somebody who takes and object but she also also is a medium mystic so I went in there and I had the bile and she used could be an art m so cathy if you thought it was a violent year on that that was bringing Not Tell her what it was but I to start laughing so she reason she was. Oh they did it for fun in in other words day entertainment. She's entertainment but that it was the whole at dinner freaks out that this is GonNa be entertainment for them. That was so yeah it really was you know I. I had a similar Story from a guy who I interviewed. Just terrific guy. Who is we have a connection? Rob His longtime Yogi longtime meditate for twenty years was under the the the TM guy anyways. He had gone to India and had an incredible series of encounters with a number of mystics sticks gurus and stuff like that and one guy took took him kind of under his wing and said okay. I'm GonNa tell you the truth I can see by your aura. Your consciousness of odd. So far here's what you need. Take it the way. And there's these visitors out there that you're going to connect with Lo and behold he connects x with these has amazing experiences so he claims with people from the star system of serious and he travels out of body experience but the point join of the story without just being another alien story is that's what they said they said you know. Look he said why do you. Why do you show show up in these spaceships because obviously you can communicate telepathically you can travel telepathic leaning goes? That's fun century to and and I think you know the part of that that really resonates with me is that it's the as below so above above you know we often saw as above so but I think that is as below so above. We have people doing things for a bunch of different reasons and we have some some people who's actually be totally can understand either because they're doing something really horrible and they're hurting people and being with evil and we see that and we go. Why would they do that? We see other people that are incredibly ably altruistic and just want to love and help other people we see everything in between the people are obsessed with kind of gaining things all this and why wouldn't there there be that same kind of diversity of consciousness these extended route and moreover. That's only logical that to me. Seems to be what your data is speaking to distort was just came into my head about a year ago We got a email from Whitley. Strieber any said you guys were custody. Gigs and synchronous. Typically we were just leaving custody of because I taught him astrology workshop. Gas A. to where it is their lot goes. Oh can you meet me up there. A couple of weeks said a day and one of the interesting things that came out of that that meeting was he feels that abductions are not happening as frequently or because whoever whatever species or race was doing they had everything they need so that now. Now there's more of the abductions aren't as important import and the way Whitley talks. I mean it's like a ah the cheese maybe exist in the same spirit. The same dimension is the dead and that's why people sometimes when people were abducted. Her had encounters they you would see a love of passed on. I gotTa jump in there with the inquiry. To perpetuate doubt skeptical thing. I'd like to see the data. Uh on abductions aren't as frequent. Because I'll tell you one place I hear like people say you off. Oh sightings aren't as frequent as they were before simply not true. They're just more. Ah Yeah if you go count the numbers on YouTube. They're certainly I don't know if they're more but is less. I wonder the same thing conduction based on what we've just said you know. There's all these different visitors throughout time. Right I mean a forever so the the the that we live in some special time when the aliens are ready to wrap it all up I mean maybe just show me the data in and I can be but maybe it is the so called bad race. That was doing these abductions in these medical experiments. Maybe they're the ones who kind of backed off. But if so that's bringing the good guys I you know I've I kind of set them at a do this skeptical jeopardy thing and then I've kind of the board so now. Where do we want to go? What topic do you feel like? We want to share with people spear contact nick. Let's talk about spirit contact and we already did a little bit. One of the main questions I'd have regarding spirit. Contact is in in. which way do we understand? Spirit contact in spirit communication to be different from what we've already been talking about Sink froze or et communication the extended realm. And also. I I have to ask you maybe. If you WANNA share share with folks the Rock in the graveyard store has a weird a great one and also you know one thing people will find it when in your book is you guys are so brave and open and you share about your your life together as a couple and you share about with your your daughter and and this is a story story that encompasses that accountable family story people kind of think we're weird Al's okay tell you went to vacation. Efficiently Republic Guy was a perilous surfing vacation for my daughter and I are both venture fruits and we will tell. We looked looked up online and Subaru and ice right on the water and it was kind of use shaped with a heart's on either side in the back and look like a nice garden middle. And then you also say the garden actually was breaker and and we were right in the back on. The first levels are overlooked the Graveyard and Megan did not like the drought thirteen years. And she she didn't like having razor right there but So one day we saw the gate was open. So let's see what's going on and so we walked in. The first thing they see is like half of a windsurfer sticking up as a a grave marker and we thought this was some ancient graveyard regard that had been there in a historical but this guy had just died for months ago and that was half of his young Wizar- for was his. We're here the wind blows. I will be that was when it said on which school and then we see grave digger grave bigger up to a study to show you this. There ought descend here. Goes up of time. And so there's graveyards yards layers layers of grades and so he was digging a grave to bury somebody any came upon another grain from an earlier. You're the earlier graveyard. He wanted to show it to us. And we said that's okay. We don't have to see what's over there. And so on the way out rob near the Windsor Jars for my and by this time I wanna get away from this graveyard. So we talked to the management instrument. But it's in the building on the side was just completely empty at the time except for us and so we now the porch look right over the ocean over the door to the apartment was actually closer to this before but so that night we go to bed fairly early. Eleven other living o'clock sleeping. She's in a separate room in in separate room. The back on we both fall asleep and suddenly we hear this sewn boom sound like wrecking ball like a recognized in the side of the building and It very resonant sounded efforts. Now am I dreaming this or this happening and It's just my personal dream and so this happened three times three three bangs like that three times after the night One may have been. I sat up Trish simultaneous setup. She heard the same thing and it was this sense. There was something very. You know enlightening about I just felt really filled with a positive sense of this Trade it wasn't right on nothing frightening range with television we had to watch television and So scared contact. But it wasn't This contact where so you're connecting with the family deceased family member of the Rock. So you stay. He put that right back into. It is an interesting experience because it was such a resonance sound that felt both inner and outer and take and they can never heard anything judge. You never heard which is probably a good one. That's a credible story. And you know we we could like we were talking about before or we could really drill into how you knew. It was the Rock and did that. I may know that. Isn't that the way it is. I mean that's like we're it is for it's like that's what is meaningful and that's the action against your synchronicity. If it's meaningful to you than it probably any crap. Yeah we actually. There might have been an earthquake so we went to the management and asked him if anything there been any reports of thwaites or anything like that then we told them. What Hap- DOC Nacer? Oh that's that's the spirit. But they're friendly they're good. Let's talk about all that in. Let's talk about a couple of these books. The secrets of spirit communication and synchronicity and the other side so this topic of spirit communication is something you guys have written about and from that story and as well as your work in mediums and spiritualists communities. You kind of know a lot about what. What will people find in these books? And what else do you want to share about spirit. Communication that you think is most misunderstood. Let me tell you let me give you one really personal for example In two thousand. My mother died of complications from Alzheimer's and five years later ad hoc locations core concerns and over the years. I tried to keep track of them in the afterlife through Greens like I would dream a my mother still using her Walker in calling for my dad or see my dad using his wheelchair so one night rub taught a meditation course and I think he did a an is partially. Open Meditation. Anybody so why is it partially open as a really relaxed state in a corner of the room a sudden we saw my mother and she was standing outside eater acting in motion people to come on into theater and she looks really young like Inner Thirties. Maybe and then she waves at somebody and so I looked at where she was waving. And I see my dad who also is younger Troughton up to her and they they looked really happy and then they realized I think both Kinda turned there was some recognition that I could see them. faded away. I think that was also the meditation workshop where I was teaching Six sessions and that was the sixth one in the last Lynn Gist. As we completed the final moments of the meditation. The lakes go up. And so I think or maybe Teheran's a something walk back flip on the switch and somehow had slipped off nobody. Nobody is standing handing back there and the but it just right at the perfect moment the lights out as the yeah Mike personal so contact with the other side is often through a deceased loved. Ones context with Friends or relatives who have died like a cousin of mine. I wasn't real close to and I know he had brea cancer and was was very ill and I didn't know how much longer he had left. But I had this dream. It was very vivid dream. That was and he looked very healthy. which is surprising in looking around and saying what's happening in in that he he vanishes in the next morning? My sister called me and said he John to start pushing the dreams are Aren't what we've been able to find out from. Our research seemed to be the most common way if people initially have spirit contact native. Because it's so non-threatening you know you dream about somebody. It's very. My mother had some interesting context with my father after he died. Used to sit in this chair in the den and read locks and after he passed my mother listed in there and they lived in Minneapolis winter. The the window had frost over and his nickname was Mac and she look in there were the initials Mac in the frost. Right next to lurking targeted hits. She saw him. Yeah that is weird with this is what she lives in that state chair. She's half asleep halfway in a Going away there was standing in the doorway of the Dan and his wearing this orange striped shirt and and she says so. Where did you get that? And he just laughs and vanishes some of the questions. I've always had about medium communication seven or and spirit communication love to get your opinion on it. Just done a number of shows as it turns out with some different mediums one. I was a hard time sorting through the discrepancies. Like I had it as me mount outstanding medium. No doubt. She's terrific terrific. She's doing great work she's doing she's a death. Do Law you know. She goes around auspice centers and helped people are making the transition helps families for making this transition transition and she uses her media mystic abilities but she also just uses good dental deloitte kind of things but we get to talk about reincarnation nation and it turns out. She's from the spiritualist tradition. You know the spiritualist church and they don't really don't believe in that which is strange. The helicopter opting out. The thing is strange. He leaves your mediums. There's no all this. I spoke with another just delightful person a medium medium from the UK. And she says yeah. I was kind of brought up that tradition and add that belief and then I had this experience with this woman. who kind of helped me see my past lives CBS? And help me understand reincarnation. What's going on that? I only we understand to be communicating with these other. Realms can't resolve resolved like a basic question like reincarnation and what does that say in general for the information we're giving through. I know I think we tend to think about reincarnation in linear time. That's this life before this life after where she think outside of linear in your time all of these lights coexisting simultaneously. So you're that person's personality but your higher. The South is related to all of those personalities. So maybe you look at that definition. That could be one that could you could say okay. Reincarnation doesn't exist or you could say yes it does exist but that each time at the actual spiritual belief reincarnation nation is not real that doesn't exist. How can they get that? How can they wrong? You know we're going to bring it down to really kind of concrete terms which I hate because the right and wrong is kind of iffy. But but that's how it comes across right because people read your books and your books are well organized and well thought out to kind of make a case or to say how to make for example how to improve your chances of having spirit communication which is totally valid. And that's what People WanNa know you know. How can I communicate gate directly with people who've passed because the in meetings will tell you that to a lot of mediums? Best meetings will say. Hey do it yourself. That's the badly because they realize they. They are intermediary. And they're getting in the way but I'm again kind of interested in the phenomenon itself you know like why is there other. How could there be that? We don't wires her that Dogma in why does it. I don't know history stories. I remember the first time there's a meaning because today we know really well we've known of ears and one time in a reading is situated simple. Can you tell me about my past lives because Oh there. We don't believe in reincarnation and sector out just so shocked okay. Well is that mean. You're stuck in the afterlife for all this time I knew what happens you know and you explain to me. What whatever the belief system about what happens is there and then you know this is kind of related question but something on to ask you guys that the other problem with the reincarnation thing and I pointed out is is that the data that we get back so we can get all attached to the data and science and all that stuff and there's so many problems with it but at the same time we you have a need we all have a desire to kind of understand things in a rational in a logical way so if you look at the data that comes back about reincarnation? It's pretty convincing Vincent. Yeah you look those folks. The University of Virginia even sending Jim Tucker. Now you know Bama Hedge with these case after case for the data data comes through clearly in you know they've done it into controlled way and they have the birthmarks and all this stuff day to day to data and then that what. What do you do with that? Why why what? How do? How much do we rely on that? Data or to. What extent is that not even a valid path half to pursue as it just another way? That were deceiving ourselves. To think we can nail these things down with data you guys have dealt with a lot of scientifically Scientifically minded people dug about remote viewing and Joe Mechanical and Stargate or any number of ways. Where you guys are familiar with science in the data needed support? Treat all that. Carol Bowman wrote two books on Children's past lives and she actually studied with in Stevenson and one of the areas where they differed from my understanding. Is that Carol. Sell these regressions Rather than just finding out who you were that there really about healing certain trauma in this life may be related to previous lives and and she you familiar with the lining case. The the kid who were they first contacted Carol and she flew down. They lived and talk to the boy and she built. There was a genuine case. In fact she wrote the introduction to their book. But what's interesting. I said well Carol get in the Chart Data on look at this kid's chart astrology trip so in the data and they had only berths berth for his previous life is a world war two pilot. But what I noticed in astrology you have the north noted the moon and the South The North node is a direction. You're supposed to move in this lifetime to achieve all of your Tatchell south known as Your Comfort Zone things you've you've mastered previous lies for this kid. The notes were reversed and I thought I don't know what this means but it's really interesting so in answer your question. I mean you can collect all kinds of data where astrology or science or whatever and you may never have the answer you know the answer actually still elude you fair enough. I I personally attest to that. Where else might we go can we? Should we tell people about. Should we share with you about all this work. You've done it Wesley this do Wesley. Spirit Wesley Meeks fascinating this. This story the first question I have to ask and once they hear the story everyone will ask. The same question is tell me this is for real telling me or Fi this 'cause this story folks just grazie crazy starting to we do. Do we know this guy's for real is is talk to them over. Several years of communicated with them is a he was it is a police officer for fifteen years. Newark in Child Protective Services will your bigm private investigator go for several years. Now is does security and surveillance at a Texas is from Texas a Texas hospital. Stern job in his experiences started when he was ten years old when he was in a coming from it was the fourth July family event they were driving home in central Texas and the only rose arose and suddenly there was rain late about five hundred feet in front of our change colors reading blue red and and is there for about five minutes is they. They didn't know what was. And then it vanish on like he was very interested but nobody armie seem to be curious to talk about it after that he has two brothers or some in the car and get eh brothers on Burns and after that he started having out of body experience which he he had no idea it or not experience. Those as I lifted up out of his bobby and He saw floating near the ceiling. Sounds rather getting up to go to the bathroom and then came back in this shaking shaking him for him to go the bathroom when you came back down into his body that was his I experience so he told his brother apparently brother laugh. Data mysterious got mad at him for telling stories in are just. I think the father is upset. And the mother said Os just a dream. You know nothing to it. But he kept having these experiences Talking looking bunch to anybody for the problem you know you have these Daddy. Aw He still pretty young when yeah. When the? When the aliens got involved they would hit? describes one experience. There were seven or eight be small beings for the five feet tall throughout your acceptance rounding his bed and they lift him up now. I'm not sure whether he is out auto body or his file from the account from the accomplishment. I read it. It's one of the things I wanted to ask you about. Because later when he's married his wife it feels him physically moving from the bed so he has some evidence that some of his auto body experiences aren't even even out of bodies in through the which is the also some of the data. We get back from Encounters alien contact next series. It's both so sometimes it's his consciousness. Moving outside of the astral travel thing over and I think that was the our body or NASA to of lifted took US arms and their hovered above the bed and spinning him around around and round. Then they they all surround him and a He's in the center. They spin around him like Sufi user data and I don't know what they're doing a maybe just working with them You know dislike this Susan Women that were that. The veterinarian has similar unusual experiences with these feelings in. So you're ben he During use explorations on his own and doesn't always involve Jeez and and Oh yeah this is you know this is not your he. He feels that he has the ability to manipulate matter while auto body so he goes to topless burn and he sees another guy. WHO's under bobby at the bar? Something Joe but the waitress walks by and he reaches out and grabs hers. Wearing these short shorts grabs her hoax looks under the band host down shorts and the underwear bound to her knees. She drops your drinks spins around looking for the drug anybody and then the other body shakes as like very strange story. Let's add a couple of things to this right because it's GonNa get even even the way that people love to kind of engage with this particularly in the way that you guys do 'cause I wanted establish that you know this is somebody you've actually talk to. It's a real person and he does have this background. Police cop out trained observed the other thing that correct me. If I'm wrong. But at some point he verifies with his brother and his brother says yeah. I WanNa talk about it but yeah I remember that experience too. I remember that I encounter on July fourth and I for and you hear this over and over again with families you know where everybody is on a buries it or sometimes it's subconsciously buried but there's reason and he has independent verification that some of this stuff happened and then the other part like you mentioned Hitler he gets married and he has verification of his. He's complaining increase. Sharing some of this stuff was his wife than at some point. Now he's moving off the bed and he's cold as ice when he comes back to the bed. So there's kind of this contact with the physical world and then we launch into these stories that you're telling like with a bar thing is unbelievable and then what happened or is the what happens in the Astro Astro realm stays in the astro. Because that's true. I told that story what thinking of this lace of knowledge the occasion record. He decided he wanted to go to the occasion record. And so he goes off into the cosmos soaring soaring. Is he started like a star Trek episode. Where you go everything? The stars are linked lines. So you're shooting eight through a space. And then he thinks about what he thinks of the record as best mentioned he thinks about the match. There's this mentioned hovering above it. And he says hard to describe it's so huge and so beautiful and there's all of these different different rooms in each room has incredible large base on the has. This art is just incredible and that that's the stories of individuals. Each one. Each person has this supposedly. has this room in this vast mansion and so were waiting in our rating here. This what. What's what's all the knowledge that is gaining in it? Turns into something else completely. He goes down in the center of the Plaza area. And he he meets this older woman. where just long dress. And and she she approaches him and CanNot Acting Lincoln Guy and at some point she tells him that I'm not not really an older will change my images to I feel comfortable with and people don't recognize hit. He didn't he said I always find ness what why this concern about the recognize. She has been recognized that so any flash rush she she changes and she's younger and Very nicely Average looking at yes. I love the way you know the details away. He tells us anymore because I don't they just add a couple of things one that he really she really sharing some. I'm deep knowledge in there. Is this kind of telepathic. Download where she's able to answer all these questions so normally say with a spiritual higher order we're being and then shifts and he goes like such a guy checks guy. She knows hot. She's pretty good. The super hot you know but Julia. She's pretty good looking. Only they don't have any clothes on then he wonders I ever have any close Shaw Shaw and so. He can tell that she wants to have sex. And this We wrote about the center blog in several episodes and it became very controversial. Some people are very upset by this story. I'm going to record and having sex and they thought this was some kind of lower being because he doesn't have he doesn't have sex here. I mean gas knicks has the most most amazing and also you know talk about tantric stuff. He's not talking about it just in terms of sex. Although this ago likes to auto body travel at the topless bars talking audit as true spiritual union of these limitations. Everything you could Omni magazine here baby prime stuff you know. It's it's all that that that stop that kind of touches them all these things and then also I want to emphasize is the other point which is to me really important like you post it to your form and you get some really smart people and some deep people on your form Oregon. Hey I'm you know. I Have Spirit communication abilities and I think this is a low around other people not necessarily so. We're GONNA talk a minute. You know people need to check out your blog because you guys post a lot of this stuff there. It's an ongoing community and there's some deeper thought that you guys follow up on that so I'm sorry but I wanna Chiro that Axa's fantastic. Please continue the story. Yeah let's tonight one of the women who come in on this Khanna Cannon. We talk about her in aliens the backyard Kyar because she's had a lot of experience with with the dozens of out of body travel is a chief L.. Connie's thing was we don't really know how complicated the other side is. Or how complicated when you go out of your body. We don't. We don't really know the Matrix of reality is vastly complex and she's experience with the city. One of reformer doctors will begin acute very close to and she had contact with Kim social matter and she said it was similarly incredible like nothing beyond any kind of sexual experience the ever visible said the same thing that you said to go on and on and it's just Makes I WANNA die right. Well I think that I I love the openness that you have about that because has just in the sense that I think it. It's to me the only way to really understand Stephen to begin to understand the data is to look at the possibilities and take. I don't think we have to take everyone's story and give them equal weight. That's not what I'm saying but when we find like you do people in you vet them the best you can and you get these accounts. I like the way you guys are able to just lay these out in a book and then say okay. You know they don't All fit together perfectly with one answer kind of thing and that certainly the story with West. MEEKS I mean and yeah you're not trying to pigeonhole it down and say it either has to be true in this sense or it has to be that way. So how does the story. How does three guys are still in contact with West? He's still having having a different experiences. But he's still in that Astro Round GonNa. He's got his little frustrated. Not Getting out that much much anymore. And so he's last couple of times I've talked to him. His t lack. She liked to be a psychic detective. Check give using his abilities and I told him. That's a very difficult route to go because week. We did some writing on an investigation psychic detectives and one man actually because in so much about about this murder is the Boston Strangler case. Actually that he became a suspect and the time all the talked to a bunch the psychic detectives on the show. And if you're going to go into that field the first thing you have to know is you're going to be a suspect in every case. Exactly not the strangler able to talk his way into these wellness houses So now they thought without having the break get that while. He's trying to talk his way into the police. Investigation tool in this the biggest. The this could be him and what they did is they gave his truth combinations door. CIARDI your tabby right. Yeah gave him a combination of drugs that affected his nervous system. I am for the rest of his life and we met him like twenty twenty five years after a strangler case in very still very upset of at Yup physical spoke with a medium not too long ago again just delightful person and somebody that really liked at the end of the day. Hey in respected but her first experience like this ties in a couple of the different stars women talking about already but she had an experience with her mom passing it opened up psychically and then in this opening up a spirit here it comes to her and says I want you to help me resolve my case I was murdered. And I'd like justice and you'll hear about us. I'm sure you guys can attest you'll hear about this. A lot from people who get into the psychic detective stuff and some people go there and some people don't she didn't WanNa go there. This spirit kept pestering her so finally she calls the local police department and says here's what I have and she immediately becomes a suspect but she's kind of got a family a and she has a pretty good alibis so she's able to get over that but it's pretty upsetting in her life but the other thing that that happens with a couple of things happen with one is it. It doesn't lead to a prosecution which is the other thing that SP skeptics particularly. Have a problem with you know it's well then you know they got him right. It's like no they can give all the information in the world and it might not lead to a conviction because there's this whole legal process and in her case the detective detective after he retired from the case years later couple years later contacted her and said I'd like to work with you more because we weren't able to do anything we I think you're right about who defied as the suspect. But we weren't able to go there now. I'm a private investigator. I want to go there the the other interesting thing about resolved no never never was resolved. Brings up a bunch of interesting questions again. Back to the you know what happens in the asteroid stays in the. They can't think this person who's stuck in the asteroid is trying to resolve their case or cases isn't resolved. It isn't meant to be resolved or whatever and so I mean. Do you have any any thoughts about that. And also this medium had the ability to talk to et. and I wonder why other Needham's don't lead with. Oh Yeah of course. I'm talking to beings from other planets all the time but again that seems to be outside of the strangely strangely outside of the swings zone for allow head back in nineteen eighty seven. I think it was when Adam Walsh Walsh. They asked a friend of ours for a while. He was an artist. Psychic was working with the Cooper city cop and he wanted to drive round the mall. Where Adam was last seen and rene was an impact and so they're driving along? All of a sudden rene started gasping. She's just started sobbing. She said Adam Adam. Walsh was decapitated. In about two weeks later. They found his decapitated body knows only founders on his head and so so years later we were with Rene. A young girl had disappeared from greenacres. Florida so rene says you guys WanNa come into the police station. See how I do this sure so we went to the police station. She Renee did her thing. She had a little girl's toys and eventually she led the police to this field. That was fit standard. She said I think the bodies near and I believe the boyfriend did it. You know the other the interesting thing about that story in an away it kind of brings his pack full circle to the synchronicity thing. Doesn't it I I wanted to throw in. Murderous Orion was the the medium that I was burning to that and her connection with et. I think was really cut. Is it humid. She's she's talking to et and it again. It blows me away. You know why isn't if e is out there then why isn't every medium leading with on. Of course yes you know. Et is out there too. And I talked to e t all the time like he should be on your show. I don't know you well. Maybe maybe has been who knows this and were probably reaching the time limit of what people can era to hear goes on and on and on this but we haven't talked about a lot of these topics how love to have you guys back on it and a great but there's a lot more a lot lot more including Robin. I are Yoga Pros and only teaches meditation but he teaches yoga. I I didn't start doing until I was forty years old. Not done it for thirty one years awesome. I've done it for a lot of years. To and you mentioned you know I-in the younger and my first teacher in Dallas was of that lineage and actually brought anger to Dallas and eat in whole interesting thing to talk about their. WanNa talk about the dark side. Because I- anger was not a very nice guy and he was kind of red kind of mean to some students and Ivan saw that firsthand and a little. You know Workshop that we did where we kind of had not evolved in so much an in all those downward dogs that he that he did so that the spiritual path is interesting and the the dark spirits path. Why are some of these people who seem seem to be advanced seem to be doing some kind of pretty things which has an interesting link back to the West make story in that we be perfect and he's not perfect but I love the way that he says he's not per raises a bunch of interesting questions about you know what is what is true true spirituality? What is how so what one other thing about West makes is that he had sent me his two notebooks of journals and I don through through that he had taken notes after these experiences? Interesting going through them and when I got to the one on the record it differed a little From his telling we like she didn't know what the Russian record was. He saying that this this this this smashing of knowledge But in the journal he writes the crush record right at the top so a little different but essentially the the story was the same though that he wrote an Acre Kelly his wife or threatening very very upset that the the best access the record one. We have to throw that in. I'm sorry I love that because that's a great part of that story is it's so human who writes this story but he wants to write it down in his journal given he wants to remember it he wants it and locks it up and his wife finds it this. This is like a question that like you know. I don't have a lot of experience with these experiences. I'm pretty dense but I have been able to lucid dream mainly through my the son who was a lucid dreamer from an early age. was telling me yeah you know this is this happened so it kind of sparked my curiosity thing that's real and and anyone who lucid dreams. If they're honest about it when the first thing they'll talk about you know what can you have it. It raises that same question of what are your what are your obligations or your responsibilities responsibilities possibilities if you're married so our buddy west meeks. He has lives incredible sexual experience but then he writes it down and she's pissed off. I mean that is just real world right. Yeah the tip me of being human and even this woman were working. Working with Nautilus is that it's highly. Vote person she goes outer body and has a experienced suit grabs his guy. They start doing it she she writes it in very right outside zone you know. She wonders why I did that but it was great fantastic. Well well you know the other thing I wanted to point people to and I just pulled it up sacra secret ACA synchro secrets is the other. See it up there but you really. You have to visit it just pulling it up. There doesn't do it justice but I'll have links in the show notes to all of that in these books folks good books and you know if you're an Amazon person in if you have the Amazon unlimited like allow view. I know have you're going to be able to now. This isn't in helping these authors out and we need to help these authors out but they've establish a pretty good career so don't need worry too much about him but a lot of these books are available for free read on Amazon Amazon. So take advantage of that. But you'll get a sense for well written books well researched books the deliver on what they promise so. You know the the seven secrets of synchronicity. You can say oh gee it sounds a little worked over by the publisher but it really works works. I mean there's some good solid advice in there it's laid out in a way that you can follow it and then some of these other books are just incredible going right. Tell us tell us more about not before we let you go. Tell us more about some of the books that people find most interesting surprising being rob. You've gotTa tell us about the Indiana Jones. People are not going to believe that you did that. You also wrote a book with the Jedi Master. Billy Tea Williams Williams Williams and I worked for George Lucas for years writing seven Indiana Jones novels starting with last crusade which I got actor script I getting script in the I adapted NOCCO and that was our forecast bestseller. So you WANNA try some original Indiana Jones novels. It was his idea to go back to like prequels before the movies in nineteen twenty s through the nineteen twenties. which which is what I did in the six original they they were pretty much open to Stories that I wanted to pursue. They didn't have a lot of restrictions on all Georgia's thing that the the mystical object has to be a real object that we know about some legend that you can't just make something up out of whole cloth that it has to be a AH the apparel vilified but I was in actual Object a mystical and so that was pretty pretty much in the you know those look share one after another four months to write one deadline and then I had to start the the next day on the next one and a lot of travel as Indiana Johnson's going over the road then and we didn't have the Internet at that time either when I wrote those early late eighties early nineties But fortunately I my younger years I would work at a newspaper for a year or to save money and travel overseas so central South America Europe North Africa and so I had a lot of personal travel experience. Suzette how we slept in the To the to the ruins because when I started college I wanted to be an archaeologist and I found out at more more jobs in journalism. And that's so hard became reporter degree in Mass Communications Journalism. Were done this. They who's for twelve years before metrication moved to freelance. I I would take these trips up to six months steinmeyer on traveling out of parts of the world and really helped out with Indiana Jones novels. What what do you think? A lot of people are are going to be super curious about that. What do you make about? Maybe the deeper connection of Indiana Jones with with all the other work that you've done do you think Lucas was and is tapping into some deeper meaning there. It certainly seems like he's on the archetype there's something special about the Indiana Jones. Character is a UH legendary character. archetype of the Beshir and everybody knows. And that's how you know people. Hey boy asked me what do you write about. What kind of books do you write and I may not know my name but you know that one of my? I'm curious I didn't create the character but I I gave him part of his early life and we got to go to skywalker ranch. It was amazing and it was in the days where they had security were Lucas At is accorded occurs production student. He had the most amazing library. It was just filled with Books Round he added ladder. It went around the room. You are Dr was only about eight months old. I think we went and she she. This crawled around on the floor Use some you tell your kids you. You've got to go to skywalker ranch and crawl around the floor in their libraries attell that is a story to tell you guys. Have Dan Awesome and thanks for sharing some ghetto. You're really you're a great host. Oh I it's easy. It's easy when you pick the right guest which my audience audience did for me here so again I of of many chats because we really have scratched the surface. But if you were in the dark about about these amazing folks rob and Trish Macgregor. Please don't stay in the dark. Go headed out and check out all their books. y'All we all have a great day and yeah you too Alex. Thanks so much. Thank you L.. Let's again to Robin Trish. Macgregor for joining me today on skipped go and thanks Mike Patterson for helping connect me with them and pointing them in my direction so it was a great Chad. I really enjoyed it. I'M GONNA T- up one kind of weird question here from all the different things that we talked about. What do you make of the West? MEEKS case I mean I think it speaks so many of the issues with this interview one is are these researchers are these authors credible. Have they done their due diligence in and finding this case because if we do take this case at face value it raises so many of the questions we have about the extended consciousness realm well. I don't think it's wrong to question the trickster or the malevolent aspect of spirit that gets involved in this way but maybe that's too narrow of a definition to think that all interactions we would have with some kind of divine. God would be a certain way away

Rob His Rob Trish Florida editor Rose NASA Rob McGregor United States Tom Carol Bowman University of Virginia Alex Karras India Joe Mechanical Omni magazine Florida International Universi Wego Reporter Trish I