23 Burst results for "Florence Nightingale"

"florence nightingale" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

07:19 min | 3 months ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"The atmosphere. So go ahead, humor your politically correct self and believe political hacks at the very elements that make up your DNA are the biggest problematic pollution on earth. Yeah. So a lot to unpack there. Steve, do we even have time to talk about this? The core logical fallacy in there. Is the natural list of what's it called? The naturalistic? I always screw up the appeal to nature fallacy. No. Yeah, the appeal to nature. Oh, okay. It's in you. Sort of. That's not the core fallacy. That's woven in there a little bit. So what am I not seeing? It's a policy of division. It's like when you say that when you're confused different levels of organization, like the pieces all have the properties of the whole, or vice versa. So it's ironic that he starts with pontificating about being competent in chemistry and then makes the dumbest chemistry third grader mistake possible of confusing the properties of elements with the properties of compounds that contain those elements. Right. Right? So the nitrogen is in our DNA. Therefore, nothing that contains nitrogen can possibly be a pollutant. And that's bananas. It's bananas. We breathe air, therefore, if I put an air embolism in your vein, you wouldn't die. It doesn't make any sense. You can't just transfer. Even not just in quantity, but just an application. Some things are toxic when they're used a certain way. But it's also when you combine different elements together, they have different kinds of different properties. Right, I mean, that's how chemistry works. I mean, that's the fundamental aspect of chemistry. Yeah, you can not judge a chemical based upon its elemental constituents, right? I said, what I can do is someone else opened up with. So cyanide is okay then, right? I mean, it's just hydrogen and nitrogen and stuff. So yeah, would you drink benzene? That's just carbon and hydrogen. How about formaldehyde? That's CH2 O. It's water with a perfectly natural carbon attached to it. That's the extreme makes it healthier. So drink all boatload of formaldehyde. It's nonsense, but this guy is getting judgmental about calling climate change, scientists, pseudoscientists because they don't understand what, I mean, what is he saying? You know, the question I say there, everything contains quarks and quartz are naturally. There was quirks in water. So anything with quarks is fine. Possibly be bad. And I think he's confusing. He's also making there's also a straw man in there, which I know only because of other comments that he left. Because he's also trying to say that when people talk about reducing the amount of carbon we release into the atmosphere, that they're talking literally about carbon and not carbon dioxide. Right. No. No one believes that. It's only a problem when it's carbon dioxide. When it's what they're talking about, it's just shorthand. They think there's just like charcoal, again, you should just projecting the people are throwing the worst possible strides. And then making it even worse gaff himself that it's just mind-blowing. All right, but here's the thing. He didn't invent this. You know where he got all this from? Who? Mike Adams. Oh boy. He's parroting Mike Adams. So this meme is out there. That's pretty sad. He's not even the original Linda's ignorance. Yeah. Do you know what that reminds me of Steve? I just made a weird connection in my head. Have you guys seen, I think it's on Hulu. There's a New York Times documentary. They just did one all about mercola and the anti vax and how dangerous it is. It's great. It's like this great super skeptical, awesome ultra mainstream. I think it was a New York Times documentary. It may have been or something. But yeah, it's really good. Check it out. Okay, so it's called The New York Times presents super spreader. Yeah. And it's all about super spreading misinformation. Awesome. On COVID. Yeah, it's really great. You can see it on Hulu. It just came out on August 19th. I highly recommend you guys. Thanks. Sounds great. All right guys, it's time for science fiction. Yeah. It's time for science or fiction. Each week I come up with three science news items to protect two genuine and one petition. And then I challenge my panel skeptics tell me which one is the fake. And there's a theme this week because of course there is. And what do you think that theme is? In Italy. Definitely Italy. Florence, specifically. Okay. See, now you're going to make me feel bad, Steve. All right, here we go. Item number one, Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, was named after the city of her birth Florence Italy. I number two, when the Nazis were fleeing Italy during World War II, Hitler ordered all the bridges of Florence to be destroyed to slow the alliance advance. However, the private tasked with setting the charges on the Ponte vecchio deliberately failed to make a proper connection, sparing the bridge. And item number three, in 1527, anti Medici riders dropped a bench from a parapet, striking Michelangelo's David and breaking off his left arm in three pieces. Kara, have you ever been to Florence? No. I've only been to Venice in Italy. Yeah, only Venice, huh? Yeah, I know it's weird. It's a weird city to only have been to. Yeah. So does that mean I get to go first? Yes, you go first. Okay. All right, these all are totally believable and also completely unbelievable. Florence Nightingale, obviously we know of her. It was named because she was born in Florida who does that. I have a friend named Austin who was born in like Houston, I think. Often from Houston. Yeah, I think so. He's not from Austin, but he's definitely from Texas. And then this middle one has so many details in the Nazis were fleeing Italy during older two, Hitler ordered all the bridges of Florence to be destroyed. Nazis flee Italy. Wait, what? I didn't even know that happened. Did the Nazis? Yeah, you remember when they lost World War II? I remember when that happened? I just remember, but they were they already had these fascist allies. Why did they also have to be in Italy? I didn't realize that they were, I'm so confused. Private tasked with setting the charges deliberately failed to make a proper connection and save the bridge. I mean, that seems believable. And then this last one, anti Medici rioters, dropped a bit. Why a bench? Oh, I'm assuming this would, well, it says rioters, so it maybe was on accident, but maybe it was intentional. That sucks. I've never seen David up close. I'm assuming they would have just like, I don't know, what would they have glued it back together? Super glue. Oh my goodness. I don't know. I'm going to say that the one with all the detail is the fiction because there are too many things that could

Italy Mike Adams Steve Florence New York Times Hulu Florence Nightingale Venice Linda Hitler Ponte vecchio Michelangelo Austin Houston Kara David Nazis Florida Texas
"florence nightingale" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 5 months ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A widely held view of Russia's war. Russia had a more powerful army, rolled in and expected a quick victory. It didn't think western powers would intervene. Yet a poorly planned military campaign led to a fight much tougher than expected. We are not talking about the current war in Ukraine. We are talking about Russia's losing war in Crimea. In the 1850s, NPR's Greg myrie looks at the parallels. Even if you're not familiar with the Crimean War, you do know some of the monumental figures who emerge from it, like Florence Nightingale, and Leo Tolstoy. But this isn't just history. That long ago war is still relevant today. When Russia battled the Ottoman Empire in 1853, the fight was over some of the same territory that central to today's conflict. A year into that war, The Economist magazine, the same one that is still going strong, wrote a scathing piece about Russia and its leader Tsar Nicholas the first. That vast state is in great measure composed of spoils, which she has torn from surrounding nations. Her frontier provinces are filled with injured, discontented, hostile populations. Sounds much like Ukraine today, where Russian president Vladimir Putin is waging war. Very distinct parallels. And I think that Putin has probably overstretched himself in the same way that Nicholas the first did. Orlando figures is a British historian in the author of the Crimean War, a history. Nicholas, who wanted to counteract the influence of liberal democracy in Europe, came up with a slogan orthodoxy autocracy nationalism. And that might just as well stand for Putin's ideology. This is a war backed by the orthodox church. He is an autocrat. He sees himself as a bullet against liberal principles coming from the west. Another historian vladislav zubak has a similar take. It's a classic case but history does definitely rhymes. Several things were similar and resonates with us today. Zubat, a Russian who teaches at the London school of economics, notes that Russia had a huge army, but planned poorly for the Crimean War. Very quickly after the outbreak of the war turned out that Russia was so weak, that it couldn't even properly supply the troops on its own territory. Much like today, where Russia has suffered recurring logistics failures. Nicholas I also thought western powers would not interfere with his war against the Ottoman Empire, which he called the sick man of Europe. Zoo box says the Tsar was stunned when Britain and France joined the Ottomans to support them in their fight against Russia. He could not imagine that the leading powers of Europe would turn against him. Britain and France aren't fighting in the current war, but British prime minister Boris Johnson and French president Emmanuel Macron were among 5 European leaders who recently took trains to Kyiv to express solidarity with Ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky. Putin did not believe that the Europeans and the United States were together, push back against what Russia was doing and come and support Ukraine. Professor Angela stint of Georgetown university has met many times with Putin and is the author of Putin's world. He also didn't believe that European the United States would agree on these very tough sanctions. So he was wrong on a number of counts. Of course, the Crimean War was also filled with folly. One disastrous British military operation was immortalized by Britain's Alfred lord Tennyson in his epic

Russia Greg myrie The Economist magazine Tsar Nicholas Putin Nicholas Florence Nightingale Leo Tolstoy Crimea vladislav zubak army Zubat NPR Vladimir Putin Europe orthodox church London school of economics Orlando Emmanuel Macron Britain
"florence nightingale" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:53 min | 7 months ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on WTOP

"Now east of the anacostia river in D.C.'s ward 8 efforts are underway to give neighborhood something that residents in other parts of the city take for granted Access to wooded nature trails It's easier to commune with nature in other parts of the city than it is in ward 8 Rock creek park has 25 miles of trails ward 8 has a mile and a half Nathan Harrington is executive director of a small nonprofit called ward 8 Woods conservancy He's helping lead the effort to create a three mile nature trail in shepherd Parkway a strip of Woods that runs along two 95 This would be just a foot trail for walking running bird watching dog walking It's not a pipe dream but National Park Service has a concept plan for improving visitor access to shepherd Parkway The natural resource in ward 8 Ridiculous news Firefighters and rest and were pressed into a different kind of service yesterday They helped to deliver a baby at about 8 30 yesterday morning when the parents who were headed to the hospital pulled into the parking lot on wheatley avenue because the baby just couldn't wait The firefighters delivered the baby and then drove the couple and the new baby to the hospital both mom and baby are reportedly doing well Well that is good news Yeah Well you know her voice from singing the iconic theme to TV is reading rainbow Now Tina fabrique stars and the mosaic theater production of Mary seacole She was around the time that Florence Nightingale was on the scene But because she was a black woman she was not given part blunt Tina Fey says the show follows Mary seacole a British Jamaican nurse during the Crimean War of the 1850s 1850s a black woman getting on a ship to another part of the world Just unsurmountable danger The fact that she could move those supplies She was just a real go getter Fabric is best known for singing the theme to TV's reading rainbow I have a grandson and he called me and said do you realize your reading rainbow is on TikTok trending I said honey what does that mean Here are our full chat on WTB dot com Jason Frey WTF news Money news at 25 and 55 Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell confirmed that the fed will continue to raise interest rates until there's clear evidence that inflation is steadily falling but it's a double edged sword for Americans because higher interest rates also mean higher borrowing costs for mortgages auto loans and credit cards Powell also suggested the fed would consider raising rates even faster if prices continue to rise If you're driving to work this morning Jeff clay vos says you are making one of the most expensive commutes in the country Like lots of things gas prices are local higher in some places lower in others same for length of average commute based on the average drive to work distance and average price of gas in the D.C. region the annual commute budget in D.C. is an average.

Mary seacole Nathan Harrington ward 8 Woods conservancy anacostia river Rock creek park Tina fabrique D.C. National Park Service Florence Nightingale Jason Frey Jerome Powell Tina Fey fed Jeff clay vos Powell
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:31 min | 9 months ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"That say, you know, maybe a centimeter or two. There's other studies that seem to indicate up to 8 centimeters. That's think about think about if I were to go 8 centimeters deep to your skin all over your body. There's a very small fraction of your body that's still in that shadow. A lot of the cells of your body would be amenable to exposure to that type of radiation. Man, so this kind of stuff, this is why if I can avoid supplementation I will, there's just so many things that we don't know yet and we're constantly getting these bits of information. And I know that a lot of this stuff has been known sort of anecdotally for a long time. You've got photos. Was it Florence Nightingale that realized during World War I? That it was like, hey, if you put the soldiers wounded soldiers out in the sunlight, they heal faster. And so we've had sort of an intuition around this stuff. But now is the data comes out and we realize just how much is going on, it's anything that you can sort of get in its natural state, strikes me as better. So if I followed what you just said. All right, you have an engine. It's prone to overheating. The sun gets in. It triggers the production of melatonin, which goes into mops this up and acts as sort of the cooling system. Yes. Ironic, given that it's the sun, but that is that what's going on, and then I think as we explain that, we can get into COVID and why it matters so much. That's one of the things that's going on. But one of the things that we've discovered is scientists is that the mind and the body are a lot more connected than we thought they were. So one of the other things that light does is when you are exposed to light, that light that comes into your eyes, it hits the retina and we know the eye goes back to the back of the brain and that's where the occipital lobes are and that's where you can visualize lights and you can see it acutely and consciously, but from anatomy, we know that there are neurons that come from the back of your eye that don't project to the back where you see vision. They go to other places of the brain. Other parts of the brain that are involved with emotion. Other parts of the body that are brain that are involved with mood. Something called the peri habenular nucleus. That's a very technical. Yeah, but if you look that up, this is what they believe is implicated in seasonal affective disorder. Known as sad SAD, seasonal affective disorder, affects about 5 to 10% of the population. People who live at northern latitudes don't get a lot of sun, especially in the winter time. And what they notice is that they become more depressed. That depression can have an effect on health as well. And so getting them enough sunlight, getting them enough light. This is light that you don't necessarily see consciously. This goes to a part of the brain that's unconscious vision of light. And that has an effect as well on overall health as well. Yeah, okay, so that's very interesting. Okay, so we've got the body, the mind, the far more connected, light is playing a way deeper role in all of this. What are some of the elements of that that we're misunderstanding that we're just now beginning to grapple with? Yeah, well, number one that vitamin D that you can't package the sun in a capsule vitamin D. I think it would be a mistake to say that, well, I'm taking my vitamin D supplementation. I don't need to go out into the sun. So vitamin D is produced in the dermis when ultraviolet radiation from the sun comes in. Ultraviolet radiation generally comes in between 10 o'clock in the morning and 2 o'clock in the afternoon. And it's at that point because the sun is directly overhead and ultraviolet has a really hard time getting through the atmosphere that it's the sun basically has to be right overhead for that to come through. Vitamin D is an immunomodulator. I mean, we've done a lot of studies in science in the last hundred years looking at vitamin D and its impact on bone and calcium. And we've come up with these levels in the government to say, this is how much vitamin D you need to have. But what we're now starting to understand is that vitamin D is far more important than just bone metabolism. It's involved with immunomodulator therapy. There was just a study that was published two months ago. That showed that people who supplement with 2000 international units of vitamin D daily over a period of 5 years had all of the autoimmune conditions reduce. Psoriasis inflammatory bowel disease, you name it scleroderma, all of those just basically went down with supplementation. And so I believe that when we don't spend enough time outside in the sun, we're going to get levels of vitamin D that are going to drop. We're not necessarily going to see rickets because you don't need, you don't need a lot of vitamin D to prevent rickets. But you might be seeing a more nuanced presentation of vitamin D deficiency in those types of patients because you need higher levels of vitamin D to prevent those sorts of things. Okay, so going back to lights relationship to illness, wound healing, COVID, is it all around this idea of the overheating engine, the production of melatonin or is there is it the immunomodulation of the vitamin D unknowns, like it's both. I think it's probably all of the above. There was a very interesting study that was published out of the university of Edinburgh. And they had the same question that you had. We see that vitamin D is attached to we'll bring up COVID-19 in this case. As you mentioned, because that's an illness that that's involved with stress. And oxidative stress, in fact, and what they found was when they looked at the United States in the winter time. The sun is pretty low. People south of the southern border of Tennessee can probably still get enough vitamin D even in the wintertime here in Southern California. We could probably get enough vitamin D in the winter time. But if you're far north of that, you're not going to get it. What they found was that when they completely eliminated the people that could get enough vitamin D with sunlight in the winter time and just like looked at those that could not, there was still a connection with where they lived in the latitude and their mortality to COVID-19. What I mean to say is the further north you lived, the higher the mortality was. And the further south you lived, the less the mortality was in a population that really wasn't getting vitamin D from the sun at all. So what does that tell you? And they came to the same conclusion as your mind would is that there's something else in the sun that's modulating this natural history of COVID-19.

Florence Nightingale Psoriasis inflammatory bowel d depression scleroderma university of Edinburgh Southern California Tennessee United States
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:46 min | 9 months ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Unfortunately, with the London centered government at a time and the slow pace of bureaucracy helped came to life because the English government at the time did not believe in famine aid, they believed that you had to work fear crust literally. So you worked by building roads and infrastructure and you be paid and then you could go to the soup kitchen and buy something to keep your family alive. But unfortunately when you say so you have the wealthy within the safety of the walls and then you have the Catholic indigenous people. I always think of it in kind of modern terms. You think of indigenous people who are giving the colonial overlords trouble, you know, you have to keep them down, and even during the famine, I think they continue to export food to England. The peasants didn't have buying power, all they had buying power for was potatoes in the potatoes didn't grow, but the export crops they were doing fine and people were still exporting to England, telling the peasants just you got to work harder to get your crust. So the government really didn't respond well. But you know who stepped into the breach and can sail where the sisters, the sisters of mercy and the convent. They became experts in feeding the local poor and providing education and also nursing the sick from cholera. And that meant when the famine passed, three of them went to Crimea and nursed side by side with Florence Nightingale, no less. So much history, so much history. Amazing history, kinsale is a favorite seaside town for the Irish to enjoy as a weekend getaway, and it's just a quick drive south of cork city. It's also become quite popular for a culinary and historic destination for visitors from abroad. Kinsale is Barry maloney's hometown,.

English government England London cholera Crimea Florence Nightingale kinsale cork city Kinsale Barry maloney
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:51 min | 11 months ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"So on the practical side of things for the novelist in the room, anytime you have a magic system, the problem always becomes, well, how do you have conflict in a world where people can do whatever they want? So there has to be some limitation or some cost on magic. That's not necessarily always true. There are other ways of writing stories. But it is quite difficult for your plot if you don't have some reason why people would choose not to use magic in some cases or why they would run out of magic in some cases. So I knew that I had to have some sort of cost. And that's kind of where the history came in because often when I'm casting around for ideas, I will just turn back to the history and think about what it says to me thematically. I was reading about Charlotte and her formal name was Maria Carolina, so if anyone's looking her up, she's often called Maria Karolina, but she went by Charlotte. And she had this very interesting tragic life where she did start out as this utopian teenager who went to Naples and married this terrible king who was not interested in the business of government at all. And she managed to make herself the de facto ruler of Naples. And then, and she was totally into the all the enlightenment philosophy. So she was very much like the character of Catherine in the Hulu show, the great, if anyone has seen that. So she was very much like that where she was very idealistic. And wanted to create this perfect world. And then as things started spinning out of control all around her, she turned into a terrible tyrant and was she started running a police state. She had secret police torturing people killing people. And Napoleon was respected her because, you know, she was just as bad as he was in a lot of ways. So that to me was interesting is that along the way she felt that she had to sacrifice her moral core for what she wanted. And so that, if that, okay, well, how can I translate that into power? How can I what is it that she lost along the way? Did she forget who she used to be? Did she forget how to love? Did you forget her compassion? And so I started developing this idea of sacrificing parts of yourself, some of it's quite physical and some of it is more abstract. You did mention as part of that excellent answer Kate, about chart being obviously an actual historical figure and what we know about certain things. And I was just thinking that when historical women do achieve lasting fame, quite often the ones we remember best work in fields that are stereotypically female leanings, you've got Florence Nightingale in nursing Elizabeth frying welfare, got popular novelist, mothers, and obviously in this case queens..

Maria Carolina Maria Karolina Charlotte Naples Hulu Catherine Napoleon Kate Florence Nightingale
"florence nightingale" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:54 min | 11 months ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And for her being sober, feels great. You know, compared to drinking or being drunk. Did you ever have people say, I mean, Doc, you're telling me that the reward is mindfulness? I mean, come on, how can that compare to binging on whatever it is I want to binge on to shut down these feelings, I'll be a temporarily of fear, anxiety, et cetera, et cetera. Well, I think the difference here is that overindulging on anything is not physiologically adaptive. And so our brains know this and they're going to say, hey, you better cool it on whatever that is. And actually, what feels good is kind of this eudaimonic state of being, where there's just this ease, there's balance. We're not driven. And when we're overindulging, not only do we get the consequences of overindulging, where we have to deal with the headache or the hangover or the full stomach or the guilt or whatever. But at the same time, all those pieces are driving us to crave that thing more. And that craving is very unsettling. It says do something do something do something. So especially when you bring all those pieces together, it feels much worse than simply noticing, oh, there's some chocolate. Am I hungry, or do I just want a little piece for a little bit of sweetness and can I stop there? There's always a pleasure plateau that we're going to hit. But if we don't pay attention, that's what they're awareness comes in. We're just going to keep doing those things habitually, driving us to really a bunch of different negative outcomes. So I'm saying awareness helps us see how unrewarding these other things are, yet the awareness itself helps us go through life, not constantly pulling at this and pushing it that and pulling it this and pushing it that. So you're not using meditation or mindfulness or awareness as an eat your vegetables, good for you type thing. You're using it as a way to orient the brain toward what actually feels good right now, always. Yes, and I would argue that eating your vegetables actually feels pretty good. I guess it does. Feeling healthy feeling energetic, not having a sugar rush and crashing. Not being constipated, you know, all these things that come from eating our vegetables, eating whole foods. For me, it's a no brainer. I mean, it is so much better. You talk about curiosity being the superpower. Could you substitute or add in a word? This is a big word, not in length, but in its cultural heft. Could you add in something along the lines of love? Absolutely. Yes. And I would say, well, my lab's research types of love and I think you know about this, but if we look at the commonality between, say, curiosity, and love, they share a quality of experience. Which is this opening up? Is this expansion? So when I'm feeling love from somebody or when somebody's kind to me. It just feels good. I feel more connected. I feel more open. And when I'm curious about something, I feel more open. I feel more connected with the world. So I think the two have slightly different flavors. Like it's slightly different phenotypes, let's say, but at their core that opening is the same. And I think I remember deeper mom who is this famous meditation teacher, somebody asked her, you know, what's the difference between loving kindness and awareness or something like that? And she said, there's no difference. I hope I'm not misquoting her on that. But the idea there is at the court, it's the same. And at the core of these practices, whether it's kindness practices or love, truly selfless love, not all love you if you love me back type of thing, which is more transactional. That core of opening, I would suggest is really a key aspect of mindfulness itself is helping us see basically how unrewarding it is to be contracted in whatever leads to that. So divisiveness leads to contraction. And how great it feels to be open and connected, which both love and curiosity do. So I don't know if that gets at your question or just provokes more questions. But that's how I see it right now. Both. I've always been confused when you hear meditation teachers say things like love is attention or attention is love. But I think now I'm starting to understand it that just this open, interested, this is also a loaded word, but caring, but not caring necessarily in the sense that you're like Florence Nightingale, but just like you, I like the expression just north of neutral. You know, you do give a crap on some very basic level. Then to me, it feels like those two can be. If not interchangeable at least closely closely related. Absolutely. And I would suggest that they can foster each other. They can support each other because anything that helps move us in the direction of opening helps us see how rewarding it is and helps us look for other things that will do the same thing. Hence, for me, a fully balanced meditation diet includes both. And I discovered this very late in my meditation career, both straight up mindfulness, feeling to breath, and then when you get distracted, start again. And loving kindness. Where you're actively boosting your capacity to care. Part of for me where I got confused on this is that love is such a freighted word in our culture and we start hearing string music and seeing white lights at blah, blah, blah. But actually, if you define it down, it's quite useful to think about it as just our wired or innate capacity hardwired capacity to care. Absolutely. And you can direct that towards yourself in moments of anxiety. And for me, can even have a cognitive aspect to it of, okay, I'm noticing that I'm feeling fear, but you know, this is the organism trying to protect itself. I think I'm stealing that.

headache Florence Nightingale
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And healthcare. That is going to drive. Transformational change your opinion. And i know that quite off topic on those What do you think what did you think we could go with that. And where is that. Where is that opportunity with regard to these kinds of this kind of situation that spacing the world of healthcare today. Yeah it's a great question. Rebecca i you know. I think that like many other things. The answer is in more collaboration. I don't think it's incumbent upon anyone heart of our system to solve the puzzle. I think that you know when you think about educational institutions partnering with places that nurses could work in contribute afterwards and understanding whether it's a hospital system or managed care organization home health. Whatever it is. What are the skills that were looking for. And i think part of it is giving people a realistic look into what practice environments look like. So you know. I think that there's definitely room for maybe some tweaking in the educational process. They are but. I think there's even more room for partnership in collaboration really much earlier on not to swim. People are graduating. Were the you know six months before when you start interviewing with different areas you so whether it's through internships receptor ships rotations just exposure to lots of practice areas right. You know when. I was a nurse. I don't know that anybody didn't think but you are going to go. Work two years med surge in a hospital. And you know you start on the night shift. And then you're gonna go down. I think now just defining different pathways. Finding what's a great fit for people and realizing that it's a journey. You don't have to do the same thing forever. what really do you have. A passion for nineteen th. That takes a lot of exploration. So i think we all have apartment and i think it's a tremendous opportunity because really our future depends on. These nurses that are thinking about becoming nurses are in school to become a nurse and are continuing to learn. And i guess i would just end with you know as nurses we can never stop learning I think florence nightingale really emphasized that from the beginning and to be a nurses to be a continual learner. And i think we all need to commit to that and the organizations that we work for with have to commit to supporting that. I love that the organizations that we work with is absolutely the right way to look at partnerships and collaborations and that it is not any one institution than it is going to take all in healthcare. it's really invested. Miss workforce that we have a future has fashion. I'm so happy you know. We are facing dark times in nursing. I mean you can't open a newspaper turn on the news. It seems this time without hearing something devastating about nursing in the frontlines. And you know. I think that when people are listening today they assume.

Rebecca florence nightingale
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Florence <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <SpeakerChange> would have given <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> them <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to honor <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> her service. <Speech_Music_Male> The government decided <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to create a fund as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a token of appreciation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and gratitude. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They called it the nightingale <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fund <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and threw it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> A big sum of money <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was raised and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> gifted to florence <Speech_Music_Male> to us however <Speech_Music_Male> she pleased <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> eighteen. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sixty florence <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> set up her own <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> institute called <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the nightingale school <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of nursing at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> saint thomas <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hospital in london. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The school gave hope <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to women who wanted <Speech_Male> to work and <Speech_Music_Male> serve and earn <Speech_Male> their own living. <Speech_Male> It may training <Speech_Male> and schooling more <Speech_Male> normal for women <Speech_Male> in their society. <Speech_Male> It was an <Speech_Male> excellent school. <Speech_Male> One of the first to <Speech_Male> be developed based <Speech_Music_Male> on an accurate scientific <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> method <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in fact <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it was so advanced <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that most of the techniques <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that florence developed <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in the school <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> are still <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in use today <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and to this day she is <Speech_Male> considered one of the founders <Speech_Male> of nursing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> training <Speech_Male> florence <Speech_Male> also believe that nursing <Speech_Male> starts from the <Speech_Male> home <Speech_Male> with this she set up <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> various training camps <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in smaller neighbourhoods <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so that women <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of lower class <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> could learn from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> her. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> This improved the level <Speech_Music_Male> of health in poor <Speech_Music_Male> families immensely. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Not only was florence <Speech_Male> a fulltime professional <Speech_Male> nurse. <Speech_Male> She also published <Speech_Male> many books on <Speech_Music_Male> nursing and healthcare <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> her most famous <Speech_Male> writing is the notes <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on nursing <Speech_Music_Male> what it is and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> what it is. Not <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which is the best <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> guidebook for household <Speech_Male> nursing. <Speech_Male> It has detailed <Speech_Male> step by step <Speech_Music_Male> procedures on <Speech_Music_Male> how to best tend to <Speech_Music_Male> patient at home <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to honor her service. <Speech_Male> There are plaques <Speech_Male> and statues <Speech_Male> florence nightingale <Speech_Music_Male> all around the globe. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Three statues of florence <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> are in derby england <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> alongside <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> numerous plaques <Speech_Male> from <Speech_Male> los angeles in the <Speech_Male> usa to- <Speech_Music_Male> andhra pradesh in <Speech_Music_Male> india and <Speech_Male> konishi <Speech_Music_Male> in japan <Speech_Male> various countries <Speech_Male> have put up statues <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and respect

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"The school is called the institution of protestant deacon s.'s. There she learned all the important skills to take care of others medical needs. She was a fast learner so she made quick progress and after moving back to england soon became the head of a hospital in london in eighteen. Fifty four a war broke out between the countries of turkey and russia. Did you know there was a country called turkey. It's a big country on the mediterranean sea between europe and the middle east. The war between russian turkey later became known as the crimean war. Since england russia and france were allies. British soldiers were sent to fight in the war to help sick and injured soldiers. A hospital was set up in qatari turkey and sadly due to the war. Many injured soldiers ended up in the hospital. But the soldiers weren't being taken care of properly and this means soldiers who didn't receive the proper care often did not survive the leaders at the time wondered what to do and someone suggested just the person to help that's right. Nurse extraordinaire florence nightingale. Florence was a friend of the minister of wars wife and he requested her to accept the job so florence. Not being one to waste time quickly went to work and assembled a team of thirty four nurses and all of the supplies. They need to help the soldiers waiting in the hospital in turkey when florence and the nurses arrived in turkey. They were shocked at what they saw. The hospital was so overcrowded. Soldiers had to sleep on the floor and it was very unhygienic which means it was unclean. And it's very important that a hospital is kept clean because if not germs can flourish and make six soldiers. Even sicker there were puddles of drain water everywhere and worst of all there were rats. It's no wonder that all of the soldiers were getting infected florence new. If the soldiers were to get better the hospital would have to change right away with money from england. She quickly improved the conditions. She ordered new equipment cleaned up the rooms and even set up the kitchen to serve better quality food. Oliver training is a nurse was put to good use to save the lives of the soldiers and improve their quality of care. She was a true nurse. Who properly cared for her suffering patients. You'd think with all of this business. Florence would just want to rest at night but at all hours. Florence kept an eye on her patients at night. She used to make her rounds checking on each and every soldier. She used the lamp to light her way and the soldiers named her the lady with the lamp. Imagine if you're a soldier suffering and cannot sleep at night imagine what it would feel like to see that lamplight coming down the hall know that someone cared for you and was checking in on you. This is the kind of care that florence gave. She also wrote letters to the home of the soldiers who were unable to do it themselves and found ways to entertain them thanks to florence and the other nurses hardwork and selfless service. The conditions in the hospital barracks started to change the mortality rate. Which is the number of deaths in a certain period of time decreased by two percent. This means that more and more soldiers were starting to survive their injuries. This was such exciting news papers back in london started. Writing articles about florence nightingale. People started calling her a heroine. Even the queen of england wrote her. A thank you letter. After the crimean war ended florence's work did not end and after seeing how poor the conditions were in turkey. She set out on her new mission to make hospitals better across the empire. She met with important figures. Such as queen victoria to discuss her ideas eventually. The army started training doctors and nurses to take care of soldiers with the karen concern..

turkey england Florence russia florence nightingale qatari mediterranean sea middle east london france europe Oliver queen victoria army
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Your eyes and imagine you're a soldier in war but you're not on the battlefield instead you lying in bed recovering from injuries received in battle through ms pitch black. And it's been a long night and you. You're very uncomfortable. You're sad and not feeling. Well you miss your family back at home and wish you were not sick but suddenly you hear a door open and you turn and look down the hall. There's a light from the lamp and it's moving toward you. You smile because you know who it is. A woman a nurse stops by you and puts her hand on your shoulder. How are you feeling she asks. Can i get you anything. She gives you a drink of water. Let me know if you need anything else. She says and then walks away to attend to another soldier. You'd feel lonely and sad but now you feel much better. Thanks to the woman who had become one of the most famous nurses of all time. The lady with the lamp florence nightingale florence nightingale was born on may twelfth eighteen twenty. Her parents were english which means they were from england but at the time they were living in the city of florence italy in this is where she got her name florence. Nightingale's were a very wealthy family. Her father was a london banker. Florence in her sister had a very easy privileged life growing up. They got to travel all over europe as a family. Imagine how interesting that would have been. After their travels. They settled in their home country england. There they had two homes a summer house in derbyshire and a winter. House in hampshire with the homes came servants. Who took care of them. And all of the housekeeping. Like i said it was a pretty easy life for the girls and the parents who had plenty of money to live in comfort during the eighteen. Hundreds most girls didn't get a great education. But william nightingale wanted the best for his daughters. So we took special interest in their learning and taught them many subjects like history geography and literature. Florence was a very gifted child and soaked up everything. Her father taught her even at a young age with lots of practice. She could speak in several languages such as french. German latin greek italian and latin in the time florence lived called the victorian era women from wealthy families were expected to only do housework with the servants. Doing most of the work and host guests. They weren't supposed to look for jobs earn money. Florence saw this but wanted something different. She wanted to work for herself and earn money for herself. She wasn't with the way the world was. She wanted to find her purpose in life and believe there was more than running the home and taking care of guests. In fact at an early age she decided her calling in life would be to help others to ease their suffering. She loved taking care of sick pets and servants. Being a nurse seemed like a natural fit for her desire to help others but they were very upset and refused to let her do it. They told her she wasn't allowed to go to nursing school in their minds. This was very inappropriate for a woman of her wealth and status. Like i said it was a very different time and florence was going against what was normal and her day but do you think florence just went along with it nope. She was determined to become a nurse so she could help others. Finally after a lot of persuasion her father gave in and she packed.

william nightingale england nightingale Nightingale Florence florence derbyshire italy hampshire london europe
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan. And this is encyclopedia. Britannica are stemming. Most of the day is synonymous with excellence in nursing named the lady with the lamp. She revolutionized hospital sanitation and used her command of statistics to advocate for health reform. Let's talk about florence. Nightingale florence nightingale was born on may twelfth eighteen twenty two an upper class english family with florence and her older sister parthenon dopey are named for the italian cities where they were born growing up in a wealthy family. Florence split her time between the families to english estates and was home schooled by her father. Despite receiving an education the expectation for florence was to marry young and start a family but florence had other ideas when florence was a teenager. She believed she received a message from god calling her to work with the poor and the sick when florence told her parents she wished to pursue a career in nursing. They were not pleased at the time. Nursing was thought of as a lowly service position. not at all what. The nightingale family had intended for their daughter but confident in her calling. Florence would not be deterred and refuse to entertain the idea of marriage eventually. Florence's father gave in and she was permitted to attend nursing school in both germany and paris. Eventually florence's father gave in and she was permitted to attend nursing school in both germany and france. Florence quickly made a name for herself in the medical community and she returned to london in eighteen fifty. Three to serve superintendent of a hospital that catered to upper class gentlewoman in eighteen fifty four. The crimean war broke out and the british army found itself ill equipped to handle the sudden and overwhelming number of injured soldiers. Newspapers began to report on the poor conditions of these facilities which were plagued by overcrowding a lack of supplies and unsanitary practices. The army needed. Help the secretary of war sidney. Herbert contacted florence and asked if she would lead a group of nurses to treat the wounded soldiers. Florence agreed and along with thirty eight other female nurses arrived at the brit. She agreed and along with thirty eight. Other female nurses arrived at the british base camp. Outside of constantinople florence agreed and along with thirty eight other female nurses arrived at the british base camp outside of constantinople. Or what's now known as istanbul. Initially there was resistance to florence and her team. The doctors were not keen on working with a group of women nurses but eventually the dire medical needs overwhelmed. Prejudice and florence's nurses began administering support to patients. Florence made quick work of turning around. The hospitals practices her team brought in supplies source nutritious food and reinforced sanitation practices. Florence herself was known for carrying around a lamp to check on soldiers in the night. Suss earning her nickname. The lady with the lamp within six months. The improvements florence's team made lowered the hospitals death rate from forty percent to two percent after returning from the war. Florence advocated for hospital reform employing data and statistics to make her case using her success. In the crimean war as an example. She presented her findings and recommendations to queen victoria and prince albert in eighteen fifty. Six this led to the formation of the royal commission to improve the health of the british army. Florence was known for her skills with data and statistics. She's credited with creating one of the first pie charts and was the first woman elected to the royal statistical society in eighteen fifty-eight her advocacy also lead to the creation of the army medical college. In chatham england. She captured her expertise in hospital safety in her book. Notes on nursing what it is and what it is not in honor of her contributions during the war. The nightingale training school at saint. Thomas hospital was established along with a fund that allowed florence to continue educating england's nurses. For years to come. Florence nightingale passed away on august thirteenth nineteen ten. She was ninety years old. Florence's legacy lives on two years after her death. The international committee of the red cross created the florence nightingale medal. The award honors excellence in nursing every two years to this day. International nurses day falls on florence's birthday all month. We're talking about stimulus for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter or manica weekly. You can also follow the show on facebook and instagram. At encyclopedia were manica. And you can find me on. Twitter at jenny kaplan special. Thanks to liz. Caplan my favorite sister and co-creator talk to you tomorrow..

Florence jenny kaplan Nightingale florence nightinga florence british base camp constantinople florence british army germany sidney Herbert constantinople paris france Suss army medical college istanbul london army
STEMinist of the Day: Florence Nightingale

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:13 min | 1 year ago

STEMinist of the Day: Florence Nightingale

"Are stemming. Most of the day is synonymous with excellence in nursing named the lady with the lamp. She revolutionized hospital sanitation and used her command of statistics to advocate for health reform. Let's talk about florence. Nightingale florence nightingale was born on may twelfth eighteen twenty two an upper class english family with florence and her older sister parthenon dopey are named for the italian cities where they were born growing up in a wealthy family. Florence split her time between the families to english estates and was home schooled by her father. Despite receiving an education the expectation for florence was to marry young and start a family but florence had other ideas when florence was a teenager. She believed she received a message from god calling her to work with the poor and the sick when florence told her parents she wished to pursue a career in nursing. They were not pleased at the time. Nursing was thought of as a lowly service position. not at all what. The nightingale family had intended for their daughter but confident in her calling. Florence would not be deterred and refuse to entertain the idea of marriage eventually. Florence's father gave in and she was permitted to attend nursing school in both germany and paris. Eventually florence's father gave in and she was permitted to attend nursing school in both germany and france. Florence quickly made a name for herself in the medical community and she returned to london in eighteen fifty. Three to serve superintendent of a hospital that catered to upper class gentlewoman in eighteen fifty four. The crimean war broke out and the british army found itself ill equipped to handle the sudden and overwhelming number of injured soldiers. Newspapers began to report on the poor conditions of these facilities which were plagued by overcrowding a lack of supplies and unsanitary practices. The army needed. Help the secretary of war sidney. Herbert contacted florence and asked if she would lead a group of nurses to treat the wounded soldiers.

Nightingale Florence Nightinga Florence Germany Paris France British Army London Sidney Army Herbert
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

"They start to understand what the alien their rocket crashes is trying to tell them but through facial expressions so they start matching up like they can feel. They feel each other to know what i mean. They can't speak and eventually there's a relationship and if they do form a bond and then the alien helps them build iraq and he. He gives it agro alien. Doesn't do anything. I'm what's the we'll see a game called. I have to what it is but it's coming and then there's no out you know all these things are in the future of course got sorry rabi and there's bots not cognitive therapy because there aren't enough therapists so cognitive therapy is just really again. It's i studied that at oxford to where you write down your reaction to the situation. Let's say somebody walked down the street in on the opposite way and didn't look at you. What would you think will. I'd always think they hate me so everybody has something else if somebody a friend of yours walked on the other side of the street and didn't look at you. Some people think they didn't see me and cbt ask questions like that and eventually you gotta get it that every your reactions are always the same so you start to see you. How would you think that they hate me. What would you think that they hate me me too. Hey everybody thinks some people would say but they wouldn't see a shrink. Oh they just didn't see me. Make some normal not normal but some people don't have the bed not many but it's not like you start to worry that people think badly of me. We have petty much what people think yummy too. It's it's more extreme than that. You know you can Most of us have more negative thoughts and positive in my other book. I tell i say why 'cause has to do with evolution and survival but the the cognitive therapy isn't just for that. it really is her much for severe. You know yeah so you wouldn't go to somebody's just because you think somebody can exercise with swaggie come preoccupied with that when your thoughts and you start to when you observe stuff like with mindfulness when you notice what you're doing actually you can break the habit easier than if you're just at the mercy of it and there's these bots doing there's lots that can you can. They asked questions. What do you think what do you feel. Okay say what what really is going on what you thought was going on and now from one hundred to one. How much bothering you it. It's a questionnaire kinda thing so it's your show. Is it comedy or is it about mostly about throw. I i do comedy and euros okay and evolution and so. When are you having time to write comedy as well with the comedies. In it like this but also you'll just inherently fun. You have to write funny lines in order to be funny. So i'm telling you about where there's you know what's going on in business and education except the stories are fun their stories about me within this okay. That are really funny. So we'll always go my story so i'll tell you the story so a dinner party. I think i know one guests that you would want at that dinner party. If you had five guests not would bill. Bryson be one. Yeah yeah that's my hero. Ya i just love well. We'll try to right close to what he does. Which is you know. What do you think he'd be shy but he is a genius. He'll there's a book called the history of everything and your gripe about everything and physics and the history of the detail but it's fun to become an will live in england now. Yeah his bed. My husband's currently reading the body one. Yeah and he's kind of they're engaging with me about something it makes so accessible online at radiant yes funny is interesting but also so informative yeah. I'm really kind of so okay. Bill bryson who else would be at that dinner table. Well bill bryson. Maybe not because some people are more interesting in their writing. Like i know singers to then their gift but when you meet them don't yeah might be and i don't know what he's like but the books or would okay. Brian cox astrophysicist. I want him because he's a genius to me. He's perfect he's perfect to me. Once met him and couldn't speak. Either i with my mom. Didn't try to be smart brian. If there was infinite parallel universes and there was just one me this was it. How would i eat my dinner with just one four. And he looked at me like something on the bottom of his shoe and then it got worse he says this is. My friend is a cosmologists. He's famous this man. I didn't know so in my shreds. I leant forward and said what's the best facelift you ever did. He's cosmologists. it's not fun. i really fun. Did they not small. They did not. i think. That's pretty would you know that. A cosmetologist knows what happened after the big bang. Well it's not funny. They did not laugh. I'm i'm deeply trauma gene crowd. I'm sorry i think it was. You can't use that with another crowd. So i'd have him probably obama. Yeah michelle coming to you. Just leave her. Yeah i mean. I like her. But you're so that's three no two two because you know having bill we cannot build a build. The book could be their heels book. God who knows any women. Oh yeah do you know. I i never can think of anybody probably Mata hari matahari was attended from the witcher of side. Just i don't know that. Yeah because she says maybe florence nightingale. Let's go a little more kosher. Okay yeah i mean. Let's find a female so you're going to tell the jokes then. Oh you mean who else is funny. Maybe didn't need anybody else. I know i'm not that funny. But i like smarts more than funny if somebody's real smart that i'm excited neuroscientist focus on the john cabot zinn. Who invented mindfulness. I know him. He's sexy him. He's the smartest and so you. Because he's he's he's brilliant and he's enlightened so that you can't get better than that now you can't cleopatra i mean to these tastes bond that good. A lovely camera fit them going down. I'm sorry good really criminal crash. Good table minutes. I don't know what that i ate with my mouth open. So i know that and i usually wish people with mouth today talking. If i don't ever stay goes mom you. She asked the web. Might this naive triple get it all all the way all the way. Yeah so. i'm sorry if i stained and it it's been a pleasure having. I wanted to say yet. But hold on your nerve so listen guys we need to buy and now the good news to the future.

rabi oxford iraq Bryson Bill bryson bill bryson Brian cox Mata hari matahari england brian john cabot zinn florence nightingale michelle obama
"florence nightingale" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Without the ability to live in a life of dignity and a place that protects. You drugs won't work the fool scope of your ability to live. A fruitful life is restricted. Did the plan come together then that you would join him and help his mission through architecture. So in that started a long journey to work with dr farmer and his team in rwanda and the first thing that i did was i met their head engineer. An amazing guy named bruce and bruce was leading all their building projects. Airborne diseases are mitigated by moving more air through the room. So i worked with bruce and his team and came up with the design whose primary goal was to reduce transmission of infections to create all the waiting areas and the exterior to think about airflow basically to remove all hallways to increase the height of the wards So that we got but son and heir movement as the wto prescribes but also had plenty of space for patients to walk around and are precedents. Were tb sanatoriums designed in the twenties and thirties medical facilities designed in the nineteenth century like florence nightingale and alvar aalto and these incredible designers who were thinking about airflow before the advent of hvac. Your mechanical ventilation. They were thinking about. How building cited and oriented to capture and maintain and control as much air as possible in order to make people healthier. And we're thinking about this all the time. i'm sure now. You're thinking about with the coronavirus. The tables that you're touching and the spaces and handle all of that is related to some degree being spatially aware of what is invisible around us. Okay so you. You wrapped up that project in rwanda back in two thousand eleven and since then you have gone on to build more hospitals and schools affordable housing senior homes. And what's amazing to me is that you have been thinking about architecture and airflow for a decade and i mean the rest of us literally just started thinking about this in the last few months. Yeah i think we're we're undergoing a real existential moment in our relationship to the built environment around us sort of recognizing that suddenly the built space around us could really threaten us and while hospitals are designed or at least we hope. They are designed to the mitigation of disease. The apartment building that you live is not designed that way. The restaurant that you go to is not designed to manage disease transfer and so we are suddenly in this moment where we have to think about all buildings as threatening our health and all built spaces as potentially improving protecting us. A little bit more seriously. Do you think even when the pandemic is over that we are going to be forever changed in some ways with our relationship to our homes and to endorse bases. I think so. I hope so. I mean six feet is really a proxy for us to get more airflow and with that understanding we start to see. At least i have started to see buildings really as breathing machines as long themselves if we acknowledge and accept the fact that you know buildings are basically allowing us to breathe freely then it really becomes a question of rights that we have the basic human right to breathe and we then can demanded in our policies and our codes and demand that housing is better that with that demand. How could we allow prisons to exist. The way they do Institutional buildings have to be radically rethought under this rubric of the right to clean air to breathe freely. And i think that's a while challenging and certainly going to be difficult to redesign spaces. I think the public will be demanding. More accountability from the bill world around us which i think is a really good thing. That's michael murphy. He's the founding principal and executive director of mass design group which designs hospitals schools and memorials around the world including the national memorial for peace and justice in alabama. You can see his full talk at ted dot com on the show today the power of spaces. I'm minutia emirati. And you're listening to the ted radio hour from npr this message comes from npr sponsor. Oh do do you run a business or manage a team. Then it's time to switch to odu. Odu is a suite of business. Applications designed to streamline automate and simplify any company odu has apps for crm inventory manufacturing sales accounting. You name it got you covered so stop wasting time and start getting stuff done with odu for free. Trial goto oh o. Dot com slash and pr. This message comes from. npr sponsor. Xfinity fast reliable internet from xfinity can help people stay connected. Head to xfinity dot com. Where you'll find plans to fit any budget with speeds up to a gig. Xfinity will ship you or free self. Install kit that makes setup quick safe and easy no tech visit required and you can manage your account online or with the finnity. My account app xfinity is committed to keeping you connected restrictions apply actual speeds are not guaranteed capitalism touches. Every part of our lives capitalism is a giant fourth. I don't understand. I feel very safe system. I'm constantly in fear. Rougemont job get his biggest success that our biggest failure on this special series from through line capitalism. Listen now to the through line. Podcast from npr radio. Hour from npr. I'm a newsom roti and on the show today. The power of spaces including one that had a huge impact on the history of american music was a small venue on the bowery in new york city. Where a lot of american legends got their start back in the seventy s the space was. Cbgb's cbgb's was not all that different than a lot of other clubs especially ones in new york. It was kind of long narrow in the stage would be or less at the far end. There was a bar and chairs and might have been a brick wall as they're sometimes is in new york. It's not that large. A place name of this band is talking heads. My name's david byrne. I'm a musician and performer. And.

bruce dr farmer rwanda odu alvar aalto florence nightingale tb mass design group national memorial for peace an npr michael murphy Rougemont Xfinity alabama npr radio Cbgb cbgb new york city
"florence nightingale" Discussed on 990 The Answer

990 The Answer

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on 990 The Answer

"Like a nice kept lawn. We're not going to throw a parade for you because you've got a stupid shot. But you should feel good about that. You should feel safe and you should go on about your life. We're going to have to press these people that want to show often lecture about it. Why don't you believe in science? That will drive them crazy. You have to start asking these people. What's what is your lack of belief in science? What? What do you mean? I believe in science. I'm not anti vaccine. I got the shot. Then why are you running around like a crazy person worrying about whether everyone around you got the shot or not? You're safe. You're fine. You're protected. And if they say something stupid in response, like, well, I don't want anybody else getting sick. I then say Oh, When did you become Florence Nightingale? When did you become the nurse of the world? I mean, thank you for your compassion. But you're going to drive yourself to an early grave. If you're new responsibility is policing the health and welfare of 330 Million people in the continental United States like good. If that's your new metric good luck because you're gonna have some sleepless night. I mean, look, I care about my fellow man. To the extent I don't want to see anybody heard her murdered her ill or whatever. But I can't You know, it's me and four others under my roof. I do my best to be responsible for them. And even they when not in my direct purview are out doing things in the course of a day. I pray over them and hope they never get hurt or sick. But I can't control the universe. So I do the best I can for me and those in my immediate care and really, At the end of the day. All I can do is watch out for myself. I wear my seat belt. I would wear a helmet. If I were on a motorcycle. I'll get the vaccine. If I feel I need to, And then that's it. Can't run around. Worried whether fast Eddie in Victoria got their shot. I can't worry about them. I'm good, I'll say, did you and they said No. I said, Hey, well, good on you. Whatever I mean, and if I'm sanctimonious about it, I say idiots. You're going to get real sick. You could die or I say her personal choice, But I rest easy knowing I did what I could to protect myself. That's all this discussion should be seeking ways to signal vaccination status. Why see, we have to start these conversations can't be allowed. We can't allow for news stories like this. We as a as a free people cannot allow this kind of thing to fester. You've gotta push back aggressively against people. That insist you proved them that you're doing the right thing per their demands. I don't live my life that way. Ain't nobody going to come to me and demand I do anything with my person to satisfy them. That's not the way it works. That's not the way it works in the United States. Whatever happened again it is. Where Where are the my body? My choice people. Where are they? Where are the feminists? In this argument? People walking up asking you? Hey, what did you do? Just did you stick that in your body? The way we told you Beg your pardon? Yeah. Did you do? Did you inject that stuff in your system the way we ordered you to? I don't think you get to do that. I'm glad you did it. But you don't. You don't get to demand that I do it. My body. My choice, right? It's just amazing. Now they want to display it. Make shirts and bracelets. I'm good. I stuck myself with the vaccine you and now they're very frustrated over the Enquirer, too, because it slowed to a trickle. Vaccines across Philadelphia have slowed to a trickle, and they're very concerned Now they're confident that it's the vaccine. Hesitant there left for dead vaccine Hesitant, Reckon. Frightened record record. So what do you care? I mean, if you're that confident in your vaccine, then you should say Hey, thinning the herd a little bit. Scougall will be a little less congested when life gets back to normal. If you're that confident that everyone's gonna drop dead from Covid, you're good. Back in a moment, You're listening to the best of Philadelphia's morning answer with Chris Stengel on Philadelphia's AM 9 90 The answer. Dr Sebastian Gorka explains what's happening to the American workforce. It's a double whammy of the unemployment benefits. And then this increased government spending, which is really you know, just for their bodies, isn't it? Alfredo? Oh, my God, It's just It's horrible. I mean, just a handful of years ago, right? The American work ethic in the American worker really was the envy of the World. America first.

Chris Stengel Philadelphia Florence Nightingale Alfredo Sebastian Gorka 330 Million people Covid Eddie four others of years ago first United States Scougall 9 90 American Victoria America feminists AM
"florence nightingale" Discussed on The Jim Brockmire Podcast

The Jim Brockmire Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on The Jim Brockmire Podcast

"Wish you guys. We're seeing all your favorite guys right now. First of all pure rim rest the hell is then break from anal sex. I understand what that phrases. I mean dan. Now that you're a big businessman of your own. Do you have any more sympathy for the nba. Pushing their employees to the breaking point does it relentless pursuit of profit at the expense of human wellbeing. Make more sense to you now that you're rolling in in draftkings cash at least theoretically. I haven't been naive about these things historically but even i have been surprised at the way. The corporate greed has turned these bodies into disposable things that can be thrown into a meat grinder because it has soiled these. Nba playoffs for me. The obvious way that the bodies have been broken by the need to satisfy the television contracts. It's distorted the product the measurement and the champion for me. I'm surprised to say that. Actually folks can't see this because it's a podcast but the whole time dan wearing a top hat and has a monocle and he's not even sitting on a chair he's sitting on the stack of human beings. There's got pound up there. His crew and dan. It's not like these injuries are coming out of nowhere. I mean most of these guys who are heard guys a long history of injuries carry ad. In why i mean maybe it's simply that if these guys spend enough time in the playoffs together their injuries sync up. Like thermo like menstrual cycle. Maybe that's it like a menstrual cycle. Yeah like you know how. We'll get on the same cycle if they're around each other because they're pheromones ramones kick in and all of a sudden you know the kind of going at the same time. Maybe that's what's going on with these. nba injuries. You want to attack the menstrual cycle. I really don't know out to. We are shocked. That corporations jim Don't care about people and only wanna make money. I am shocked. That were shocked by that to be honest with you and the guy. I'm tired of seeing late in. The postseason is lebron. I mean i'm. I'm perfectly fine without these playoffs. Played out kevin durant. I have a new found respect for him. Because he's trotting around with jeff green and and blake griffin and so on perfectly fine like devon booker verse janas in the nba finals to me. That's fantastic totally agree. I'm disappointed in the injuries. I agree with you about the corporate greed. But i can't deny that there's a part of me. That's a little glad we're not going to see the nets in the finals. I mean 'cause that team when healthy was just so undeniably the super the super teams then winning a championship. That just would have been boring. And we like watching. Floyd mayweather beat up on rogan paul. All over again all right before you guys go gotta end the podcast like we always do a little game and the game we're gonna play. Today is directed. Ran stu gods and it's actually inspired by a moment from your podcast. she do. we have this clip. let's play the clip. The best graduating senior is the valedictorian v v. Why is that how you spell it starts with two v.'s. Silent be at the beginning. Oh is that what it. Yeah course everyone knows. What do you mean the v. valedictorian thinks valid vic. They won first place victoria. I spent my whole life in that. So stu gods you believe that. The word for valedictorian was actually valid. Victorian it's a term apparently so familiar with and we're so integrated into your daily vocabulary you needed to shorten it with a v. Said oh avi now stugatz. You're clearly very learned man. I mean it can't be that you're just some kind of blithering blathering idiot. Your mind must have been elsewhere. Specifically the victorian era. I mean that must have been what you were thinking about. So i'm gonna give you a chance to redeem yourself here with this little game which. We call valid victorian okay. That's the game. She is going to name famous historical figures and you will tell us if they were alive. During the victorian era or not in other words are they valid. Victorians or invalid victoria. Are you ready. I am ready all right. What is our first victoria. Oscar wilde oscar wilde the big. Oh to you. Yeah friends to say Valid victorian your rights. To god's he was alive in the victorian era boy. You are you big oscar wilde fan so i want to start you off easy. You do know who he is right on kidding aside. Are you picturing him. Living in a trash can talk and a big bird. You're not doing that as some follow up questions. Let's see if he knows who oscar while. I'm imagining him. Averaging a triple double for season that he's not oscar robertson. That's that's the big. Oh do you know. Oscar wilde is and what did he do what he famous for sculptor. Oh my goodness my goodness should've left it at him. Getting the answer right no. He was He was wonderful. Author and poet playwright. One of the wittiest men ever knew he was this. Do god's in the victorian era all right and number two victorian number two guy fawkes guy. Fawkes oxy boxy. I'm going to say Non valid victorian invalid or invalid of that we understand mustard gas which is part of what's concerning me now on our know what you're talking about through per se. I am with my dad. Just kind of blatter's. I understand what he means. You're right though. He was an invalid. Victorian he died in sixteen o six He was part of the failed. Gunpowder plot to blow up parliament. And i'm surprised you knew him. He didn't come through in the clutch. He's not a stugatz. Kinda guy you guys are gonna do it when it counts. Got guy fawkes. One of history's greatest chokers. I'm stunned. that. Stu gods his two for two right now. On the victorian age while thinking oscar wilde as a scope. i'm trying to figure out if his pauses are him texting or googling. Oh you're not cheating. He's counting his money. He's been doing this since we left. Espn every time you're not paying attention is because he's counting his money or checking his bank. I like my money organized. It has to be in a certain way. You know big bills the small bills stuff like that so now i i'm not trying to be rude. I am counting money and i'm to for to. He's also getting paid where you're not dan levitan. I don't understand what's going on over there right. Victorian number three charles dickens charles dickens nikki ticky we got foxy ago. They go and dickie earls dickens one of the all time greats boy i'm gonna say Dick ins is a valid victorian. I'm almost annoyed that you're right. You know what he did right. Do you know what it did you. Have you heard a charles dickens. My goodness what do you think charles. Dickens was famous for dickey as charles And he was not the round mound of rebound you can eliminate that i think was of me Poet maybe perhaps losing faith in humanity as i listen to gods You know well. He wrote he hilo books. perhaps the greatest novelist ever one of his great novels was great expectations. Mr dance something. I boy did not have going into this game with you. And i was right with no. You weren't right. He has exceeded every single expectation. He's got an everything right thousand while not knowing any of the people. You're talking about or anything about the victorian age much like jeff zucker at cnn. He has failed upwards each time. Let's go to victorian number four by picking a lot of people. This podcast victoria number four. This should be good okay. Florence nightingale florence nightingale.

nba dan devon booker janas rogan paul Oscar wilde oscar wilde jeff green blake griffin kevin durant Floyd mayweather victoria lebron oscar Oscar wilde nets oscar robertson vic jim charles dickens dan levitan
"florence nightingale" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"florence nightingale" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"New song of the week, OK? And after months and months of nonstop, horrible, bad news finally today, okay? Still healing a lot of pretty bad news. But over the last few weeks, there has been a tiny glimmer of hope. With the covert vaccines being rolled out all over the globe, which means some day in the near or not so near future, the pandemic might maybe finally come to an end ish possibly soon. I don't know. You know, You sound like an expert. I'm just gonna say pretty well versed in this coach. It sounds like you've done your research. But you know a twist. I think we're on the right track. I can say that. And of course, the first group of people to get vaccinated were all the medical first responders. Absolutely Thank you for your hard work. Doctors and the nurses, surgeons, medics, all the staff working tirelessly at hospitals and nursing homes all over the place. Who've been fighting on the front line ever since this nightmare began. Oh my gosh. It's like emotional when I see some of my friends who work in the medical field is like one of them is like the only side effect. I have his gratitude like RR Yeah, like my friend had. It's just It's hard, Tonto contemplate everything that they've had to go through. Okay. Imagine physics. Absolutely all of it. By no means is this over yet? But still, I thought now might be a good time to honor those brave souls. Specifically, the nurses of the world who sacrificed everything. Putting their own safety at risk to selflessly helped people that have been affected by the disease. That's just me. Military. I know not gonna lie. Didn't have that effect on people are amazing. Maybe I need to give you a quote by one of the most famous nurses of all time. Florence Nightingale, she said. Booty booty booty booty Rocking everywhere. I'm pretty sure it was in reference to the hospital gowns that everybody wears where the butt sticks.

Florence Nightingale
Queen Elizabeth pays tribute to 'kindness of strangers'

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Queen Elizabeth pays tribute to 'kindness of strangers'

"Today to frontline workers and volunteers during her annual Christmas address during the pandemic. Florence Nightingale Shine a lamp of hope across the world. Today. Our frontline services still shine that lamp for us. Supported by the amazing achievements of modern science. And we owe them a debt of gratitude. The queen says she was inspired by the kindness of strangers and drew comfort that even on the darkest nights, there is hope in the new dawn. I'm Ed Donahue.

Florence Nightingale Ed Donahue
Saying 'thank you' to nurses on International Nurses Day

Charlie Parker

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Saying 'thank you' to nurses on International Nurses Day

"Today is international nurses day honoring the woman considered the mother of nursing Florence Nightingale on this the anniversary of her birth if you were around today she'd probably be leading the president's White House task force loosely research and writing smart worldwide healthcare reform in eighteen sixty she established St Thomas's hospital and the nightingale training school for nurses revered hero at our time she died on August thirteenth nineteen ten in London happy international nurses day to all

Nursing Florence Nightingale President Trump St Thomas White House London
200 years of change started by one woman

Second Opinion

03:23 min | 2 years ago

200 years of change started by one woman

"Also marks the birthday of an amazing woman who in many ways transformed healthcare two hundred years ago this week. Florence Nightingale was born in Florence Italy to British parents. Her name may be familiar to you. What is less well known is how this Amazing Woman Changed Medicine Nursing and hospital care and drove us to use evidence to improve healthcare quality in other words. Looking at whether what we actually do improves health nightingale was born to a wealthy family and was exceedingly well educated. She spoke English French. German Italian Greek and Latin and was a skilled mathematician and statistician. In fact she was the first woman elected to the Royal Statistical Society. Now two hundred years ago there was no germ theory no understanding of bacteria or viruses but there was lots of infectious disease smallpox measles whooping cough diptheria kill thousands of people. Sick people were cared for at home. By family members hospitals were crude dirty smelly and dangerous places in fact one paper ninety gale wrote. It may seem a strange principle to enunciate as very first requirement of a hospital that it should do the sick. No harm well without antibiotics or vaccinations. Nightingales weapons were isolation hygiene and hydration hospitals. Were not built to nor did they function to prevent the spread of disease. Patients were placed in large windowless wards with no ventilation and no sanitation. Nurses often had no formal training and they worked only during daylight hours. Patients were left alone at night. Nightingales drive was to improve safety and care at the hospital. She Championed Pavilion Style Hospital. That's the type. We are all familiar with today. There are separate wings different so as to reduce the spread of disease there are windows provided fresh air and walls with smooth surfaces that allow for cleaning she also developed nursing into a learned profession with a defined curriculum and a rigorously trained skill set. More importantly she was passionate about nurturing the values that she felt were foundational to nursing including being honest sober and loyal as she professionalized nursing. She also felt. Nurses were best supervised by other nurses rather than male doctors later in life. She caused a social uproar. When published a paper documenting. That more men died. In hospitals of infections then died in battle. She insisted that hospitals change people. Listen to her because she was an experienced health expert. Perhaps this is a lesson for our government today. Listen to those around you who have expertise.

Gale Florence Nightingale Florence Italy Pavilion Style Hospital Royal Statistical Society Smallpox
Hands!

The Past and the Curious

06:42 min | 2 years ago

Hands!

"Ignace. Similize was a showman but when he truly believes something he fought through the feelings that might have otherwise nope back his voice one of the few things that he was outspoken and confrontational about was the simple act of handwashing. He was certain it was necessary but only after much observation getting other people to believe him was a different story born in Hungary in the city known as Buddha which would one day join its neighboring city across the river to become Budapest. Similize started law school but he wound up becoming a doctor in the end in Eighteen. Forty seven just three years after earning his medical license. The methodical and intelligent fellow was given a notable position at a maternity ward in Vienna Austria. His job was basically as the chief resident which gave him a lot of responsibility and power over the staff at his hospital. There were actually two maternity wards which is where women go to give birth. The first word was staffed by doctors called obstetricians the other word was staffed by midwives trained health professionals whose main concern as caring for women during before and after the Labor of childbirth more on the difference later when some of I started he noticed two things one. All the women admitted for delivery wanted to go to the ward staffed by midwives and to ten percent of the women who went to his word the obstetrician. Stafford died while they were there. Well no wonder everyone wanted to go to the other word right. The unfortunate women died from thing called child bed fever which we now know to be caused by an infection. Women wanted to go with the midwives because well they weren't done living yet and fair enough but ignace wanted to know why there was a difference in the fate of the patients in the two wards and more importantly how to solve it so he made some methodical observations. I he noted women gave birth in two different positions in the two different words so he had the doctors deliver babies the same way as the Midwest. No difference same fevers same tragic results then he noticed that when someone died a priest walk through the halls ringing a bell in solemn honor of the women who passed he thought maybe this played psychological tricks on the women in the word. Perhaps they realized that someone had died in that they very well could be next. The suggestion alone might make someone gets sick. Meanwhile of course no one died in the other word hence Nobel ringing so do you get as line of thinking. Well he told the priest ago ring his bell somewhere else still no difference with his methodical mind. He tried everything he could think of. No luck of any especially for the poor patients on the ward then. One of the doctors got sick with symptoms similar to the women and before long. He too died at this time. Medical doctors not only took care of living patients but they spent time on cadavers. Or dead bodies. It's kind of gross. When you think about it and it would certainly give me the willies. But what better way is there to learn about the human body than with a real not live human body? It ain't pleasant but it's the truth and we've learned a lot as society in this way anyway. It turns out that this now dead doctor had practised finger while working with a dead body now we know he got an infection and he died eighteen fifties Austria like pretty much everywhere else in the world didn't understand germs or bacteria or viruses or infections yet. There were still plenty of people who most diseases were brought on by miasma which is bad air in shortly idea was that you might smell something really bad and then get sick. It sounds crazy now but you should understand that. Most diseases made a body smell bad You're around some smelly sick person. You might get sick too. We know it's germs now but all they had to go on was that sticky stinky surrounding. The city Sim obese new. They're just had to be a connection between the dead bodies and the sickness. Unlike the midwives who simply dealt with the pregnant women many of the doctor spent time dissecting analyzing and learning from the cadavers which obviously meant touching them then they just hopped on over to the maternity ward when there was a baby to deliver and they did not wash their hands or their tools. Crazy right by today's standards. Yes but two hundred years ago. This was business as usual. The connection had not been made by science. The evidence was pretty clear to some of ice so he made a new rule. Doctors must wash their hands in chlorine and their tools. And guess what happened. The number of deaths fell dramatically. In fact in the obstetricians ward the survival rate was basically the same as the midwives ward so he went around telling everybody about it. Wash your hands. You're bringing gross stuff to a healthy body with your unclean tools and you're unclean fingers and instead of being excited and saying thank you. The doctors were like you're telling me I making my patient sick. Who Do you think you are? I am a good doctor and you know nothing similize before long. He was ridiculed out of existence. It's too bad. They didn't listen to him. Lives could have been saved with some simple handwashing just a few years later. There was a British nurse working in a war zone during the Crimean War who helped revolutionize medical cleanliness Florence Nightingale paid attention to international science. She took her job seriously and was responsible for the lives of thousands of recuperating British soldiers. There's a chance she heard about vices. Observations there's also a good chance that she just figured it out on her own because when she implemented rules about washing hands and tools the same thing started to happen she saved lives but still there were plenty of detractors. The anti hand washers. The dirty hinders the filthy fingered. You know nothing nightingale. They cried but you see these two did know what they were talking about. They might not have understood it on a microscopic level but they could clearly see a relationship between dirty handed doctors and sick or dying patients. The world was changing in the mid eighteen. Hundreds and doctors were doubling as scientists often to determine what was causing serious illnesses.

Ignace. Similize Vienna Austria Budapest Hungary Midwest Ignace Florence Nightingale Buddha Stafford Austria Nobel
STEMinists: Elizabeth Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:23 min | 3 years ago

STEMinists: Elizabeth Blackwell

"Today we're talking about the first woman mentor earn a medical degree in the united states. She went on to become a champion for women in medicine and an important social reformer. Let's meet our stem in the day. Hey dr elizabeth well. Elizabeth was born in eighteen twenty one in bristol england. She was the third of nine children born to samuel blackwell and his wife hannah who were both well known quakers and anti-slavery activists. This was not your average family. Many of elizabeth's close relatives tibbs became well known in their own right including her brother henry who is a famous abolitionist and women's rights activist and was married to fellow activists lucy stone elizabeth sister. Emily followed elizabeth into medicine and their sister-in-law antoinette brown blackwell was the first ordained female minister of a major protestant artist denomination. When elizabeth was eleven years old her family moved to the united states and eventually settled in cincinnati ohio just six years later in eighteen thirty eight elizabeth's father died and left the family practically destitute in the middle of a major national financial crisis in order order to support the family elizabeth her two older sisters and their mother worked as teachers to make ends meet but elizabeth had other career ambitions. She was inspired to go into medicine. While taking care of a dying friend the friend noted that she would have had a less onerous and likely less embarrassing experience cheap intrigued treated by a female doctor at the time there were few medical schools in america and the ones that existed didn't accept women in order to move towards torturing with going into medicine. Elizabeth took private teaching positions with the families of two different southern physicians who mentored her in their profession then elizabeth moved to philadelphia in eighteen forty seven hoping that she could use her quaker connections to gain entrance into any medical school that would have her. She applied to as many schools so she could but was rejected from all except for one geneva college in upstate. New york apparently sent her an acceptance letter meant to be a practical joke but elizabeth is it didn't find it particularly funny and went ahead and accepted her joke. Acceptance was just the beginning of elizabeth's difficulties in medical school not only when she forced by her professors to sit separately from the men during lectures she was often left out of the labs component altogether that menchu is getting significantly less hands hands on practice than her male peers but elizabeth was a genius she won over her professors and classmates time went on with the sheer force her skill and intellect act. She ended up graduating first in her class. In eighteen forty nine making her the first woman to graduate from medical school in the united states and the first modern day woman woman doctor of medicine after graduation she moved to europe to further train under doctors in london and paris elizabeth was subjected to plenty of prejudice she does from european doctors who would often make her play second fiddle to them as nurse or midwife but even then her brain was churning she noticed that male doctors often caused caused disease transmission and sometimes even epidemics because they didn't wash their hands between patients. Elizabeth began emphasizing the importance of personal hygiene in hospitals tolls and pioneered preventative care in eighteen fifty. One elizabeth moved to new york city there. It was even harder to be a woman doctor than it was in europe. She was refused all posts in the city's hospitals and dispensaries and was even unable to rent offices for her own private practice as a result her. The practice was very slow to develop in the interim she wrote a series of lectures called the laws of life with special reference to the physical education of if girls thanks to the assistance of quaker friends and the quaker community elizabeth opened a small dispensary in a very poor under served neighborhood in eighteen fifty three four years later. She was joined by her younger sister dr emily blackwell as well as another woman doctor. The greatly enlarged dispensary was unified as the new york infirmary for women and children. One of its major missions was in providing positions for women doctors. The block while sisters even trained nurses there during the civil. If a war for union hospitals in eighteen sixty eight after perfecting a plan she created in consultation with florence nightingale. Elizabeth open the women's medical college at the infirmary. The medical college operated for thirty one years and was well known for its very high academic and training standards. Elizabeth served as the chair of hygiene for the school until she moved back to england for good in eighteen sixty nine back in england. Elizabeth established a successful private practice. She also helped to create the national health society an eighteen seventy five she was appointed to a professorship at the london school of medicine for women which she held until nineteen o seven when she was forced to retire due to injury while on vacation in scotland elizabeth took a terrible fall down a flight of stairs and was was left mentally and physically disabled in nineteen ten doctor elizabeth blackwell up died at her home in hastings sussex after suffering a stroke that paralyzed realized half her body

Elizabeth Blackwell Dr Elizabeth Paris Elizabeth United States Dr Emily Blackwell Private Practice Antoinette Brown Blackwell Europe London School Of Medicine Samuel Blackwell New York New York Infirmary England Bristol England Ohio Philadelphia Cincinnati Geneva