39 Burst results for "Florence"

Fresh "Florence" from Tim Conway Jr.

Tim Conway Jr.

00:43 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Florence" from Tim Conway Jr.

"Of that drizzle in the next couple days. This report about you by Spectrum business from the Southern California Toyota Dealers Traffic Center. We make it easy. Check out Santa Fe Springs 605 North bound transition of five North family headed earlier wreck that was blocking the lanes. They just now got that out of your way. You still see a little bit of slowing, though, from Florence Avenue, Hollywood still on and off. Those breaks from the water went south bound between Vermont Avenue to Glendale Boulevard in Long Beach. Some good news money when West bad after Cherry Avenue. That wreck has cleared from the center divider Cell Fella, one of five you spend for the 1 10 still got a stalled out semi sitting in the Middle Lane's It's stopping Go from Vermont Avenue and input coin of the five North bound right before you get to the 1 18 pretty tough crash here. It is blocking the car pool and the two left lanes. It is stacked up from at least Branford Street. Okay, I find this guy helps get you there faster. I'm Johnny Harmon. Over the past year. I've helped thousands turn their lives around. And today I'm going to tell you the one simple trick that will change everything. All you have to do is and now a message from our sponsor with progressive. You can bundle your boat, RV or other outdoor vehicle for great protection and even more savings progressive and that's it. You'll have that for the rest of your lives. I'm so excited for you. Progressive. There's never a bad.

Johnny Harmon Florence Avenue Vermont Avenue Glendale Boulevard Branford Street Cherry Avenue Today Hollywood Two Left Lanes Long Beach Cell Fella Thousands Toyota Dealers Traffic Center ONE One Simple Trick Spectrum Five Southern California Past Year Santa Fe Springs 605 North
Fresh update on "florence" discussed on Pat Walsh

Pat Walsh

00:50 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "florence" discussed on Pat Walsh

"Our company goals to be a world class employer are four values are positive attitude, integrity as well as family. In a fun dynamic still says that when the employees air happy customers have a better shopping experience, Nugget markets have 16 locations in and around Sacramento, the foothills and Bay Area. I'm Joe Michael's News. 93.1 kfbk Now. Sacramento traffic. Good evening. 7 33 Bob Williams in the Cap trust traffic center reports of a traffic hazard right now, And this isn't the rail over crossing on the Cap City freeway, and they've even called the air unit up to kind of check this out and see exactly what is going on. Whether or not they're going to need to perform any type of traffic break even eye out. Traffic. Has Intel Core Boulevard at what Avenue was like a driveway to a business block and train is broke down in South Sacramento Floren Road at Canelo slave traffic backing up in both directions on Florence, Get yourself around that one, because that's gonna be a bit of a messy and I have Have far enough either north or south to get around that train that word on when that's going to get moving, because well, the railroad does with the railroad will do traffic on the tent. Every 10 minutes mornings and afternoons. Next updated 804 from the Cap. Tres Traffic Center on news 93.1 kfbk Now Sacramento weather Tonight Clear with the lower 47 51 Sunday to burn down his warmers today, but some pleasant high 75 to 79 partly sunny and ice on Wednesday I 73 to 77 Bank you weather meteorologist by Varsity blues 93.1 KFBK. Next update in less than 30 minutes, breaking.

Sacramento Florence Today Less Than 30 Minutes 16 Locations Cap City Joe Michael Canelo Bob Williams 7 33 South Sacramento Floren Road Cap. Tres Traffic Center 77 73 93.1 Kfbk 79 Bay Area Intel Sunday Wednesday I
Fresh "Florence" from The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:41 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "Florence" from The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

"The third week of the Derrick Show Vin Murder trial gets underway Ah woman's body found near the American Ripper bike trail and Kings fans will soon be able to see their team in person right now, Traffic and weather together which we do every 10 minutes. Let's check in with Dana has kidding. And brought you by safe laid right now. Westbound Cab the Archway East on ramp and report about two car crash they were hooking up. CHP is at the scene that was a few minutes ago. Not seeing any slowing there, but really not seeing any slow, much of anyplace except well. South Down 99 between Florence and 47 this week, it's Safeway Shopping Your club card. Get large. Haas avocados. Buy one, Get one free plus get large Fuji apples for 99 cents per pound in large navel oranges for 99 cents per pound, as well. Hurry. And before these deals are gone traffic on the tens, every 10 minutes mornings and afternoons from the cab trust traffic center. Dana has news 93.1 kfbk. Thank you data. Now you're kfbk Forecast Clear Skies tonight Low 48 to 52 Tomorrow Pleasant with planning of sunshine High 75 to 79.

Dana 48 Tonight Florence Tomorrow Tens 79 Third Week 52 47 75 This Week 93.1 Kfbk Derrick Show Vin Murder South Down 99 99 Cents Per Pound ONE Archway East American Ripper Bike Every 10 Minutes
Fresh update on "florence" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:56 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "florence" discussed on All Things Considered

"I'm on all name on our to the point. Podcast, who's most responsible for getting a handle on climate change, the richest 1% of the planet's population produced 100 times more emissions than the poorest 50% of the planet's population. So you know? Yes, We have to make enormous changes, but they don't involve the changes of most people on the planet. Climate change the haves and the have nots Don are to the point podcast. Well, coming up next hour on all things considered the prosecution is wrapping up its case has more medical experts testified during the trial of Derek showman who is charged with the murder of George Floyd. Exactly how many experts is uncertain for the prosecution, but We'll hear what a cardiologists says killed George Floyd. Soon it will be the defense's turn to make its case. We'll have more from the courtroom coming up on the program. Also ahead of conversation with a reporter of the Miami Herald about the alarming rise in kidnappings in Haiti, including seven members of the Catholic clergy taken on Sunday. Look at your roads now. Well, still have this problem in, we'll see. Let's go to Bell Gardens 7 10 north down to Florence Avenue. Crash blocking the off ramp there. That's causing a few delays in the area and lets you tend west at Western Avenue. This is in l. A heading toward or away from downtown. I gotta crash in the right lane. Slow coming away from the five.

Haiti Sunday George Floyd Florence Avenue 50% Western Avenue 100 Times 1% Derek Catholic Five Seven Members Miami Herald Bell Gardens 7 10 North A L.
Race and Remembrance in Hanks Alabama Hometown

Buried Truths

02:01 min | Last week

Race and Remembrance in Hanks Alabama Hometown

"This is very truths. I'm hank clip off. I received an email one day from the library in my hometown. florence alabama. oh boy. I thought they're finally catching up with me. They're looking for that biography of hank. Aaron checked out in elementary school and never returned but the email was actually a lovely invitation to bring berry truth to town my hometown and record episode there. I kind of liked that idea as i chatted with the library. Folks i mentioned something that's often been on my mind in the many years since left florence for college and career. It was something that started as an observation. Actually a memory. That i really couldn't swear was true. In which became a theory that could improve on this special episode recorded before a live audience at the florence lottery. Dale public library. We're going to explore that something. Now let me begin by locating florence. Its way up in the top left hand corner of the state of alabama and sits along the tennessee river. The town probably reached thirty thousand people when i was growing up. And is it about forty thousand. Now there's much to talk and brag about and florence and in the greater muscle shoals region of northwest alabama where florence is situated. And my memory. Which is what we're about to test here. Is that the shoals region of the state and florence in particular on matters of racial attitudes and race relations were by most measures more progressive than the rest of alabama. Now say that with a lot of pride now a wanna be clear about what. I'm not saying. I'm not feeling woozy. From the glint of moonlight in the scent of magnolias. I'm not saying there was no racism or complete absence of racial violence.

Hank Alabama Dale Public Library Florence Aaron Berry Northwest Alabama Tennessee River
Lafayette Hotel Sells for $25.8M

Southern California Real Estate Report

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Lafayette Hotel Sells for $25.8M

"Here in san diego. Yeah a lot of insane news and this one is about the lafayette hotel. Yeah and it's a great location. The lafayette if you don't know is It's kind of a north park. Fixture has a really cool history. So if you've been there it's kind of a. It's an old swanky hotel that was built in nineteen forties. Used to be a kind of a hollywood hang out. It has an olympic sized pool and that olympic size pool has some history of woman. That was the first person to swim. The english channel is a woman by the name of and let me see. If i have her name and i can't find her name right now but she used to train there and so kind of interesting so before she did that. That's where she trained and then the other claim to fame is the guy who was the the lead for tarzan. Kinda of his hang out the hotels been sold. It's been sold at. What is to believe is what is believed to be a pretty good price for twenty five million one hundred and thirty rooms and it was purchased by a group in san diego. The is a pretty good. You know restaurant history in restaurant operations of florence chadwick. Yeah is who the who the was that. Swim that thing danielle. Just point that out to me

Lafayette Hotel North Park San Diego Olympic Hollywood Florence Chadwick Danielle
How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

The Breakdown with NLW

06:02 min | Last month

How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

"All right nick. Welcome to the breakdown. How you doing. I'm doing great. Thank you so much for having me. This should be superfund so as we were just discussing following your writing forever. I loved seeing it. Come together in kind of the the full length form In what i wanted to do today is actually kind of go back through history. And i think what layered money does so well is it gives people the context understand this rather than kind of just being like. Here's why bitcoin is awesome. Bitcoin is amazing. Let's actually dig into the history of money that got us here. And so what. I thought would be really fun. Today is actually walk. The listeners through some of that history of money starting way back at the beginning But before that. I guess like start with defining the kind of the central term here the central concept of layered money since the name of the book. It's obviously a really important concept. What is layered money. Actually meet layered. Money is a new framework. And so what i did was i took this idea of assets and liabilities and in our monetary system the way that the way that the system works is that financial institutions have assets and liabilities. They have relationships with each other and through these relationships come. Monetary instruments and monitoring instruments. Because they are within these relationships between financial institutions there is a natural hierarchy there and so the hierarchy of monetary instruments is not something that is common commonly discussed at term. So my goal with layered money was to bring that to the forefront in instead of talking about liabilities talking about a pyramid of money in which there is a hierarchy and at top of the pyramid are certain financial instruments or commodities and certain financial institutions. Right below them using those assets as the base for a whole monetary system and so the idea for layer money actually came directly from a paper in academia called the inherent hierarchy of money by a economics. Professor merlin. And what he wrote was fat. Money is inherently hierarchy go and he provided this academic framework for this and he had a three layered system gold government currency and deposits so a three layer system and i found that paper so fascinating in. So what i did was. I actually tried to trace the roots of that paper. That paper didn't have a historical context. It was about the hierarchy of sheets in the financial system. What i did with layered money is. I tried to trace the roots of that paper and i ended up starting the story about eight hundred years ago in renaissance florence To describe how. I saw this evolution occurred so i wanna get into florence but you actually start the book even farther back. You kind of pull the earliest experiments with coinage kind of set it in historical context. So let's talk about in the sort of ad era. I guess those early experiments with money with coinage What were the important kind of steps on the journey to get to where we get in that in that kind of renaissance that early period. What were the important parts of the earliest phases that you're looking at. So the transition between gold and gold coins is what identified as the first important transition so before gold coins gold was used golden. Silver were used as mediums of exchange. But it was in the form of non standardized fars jewelry etc these days gold and silver items but not necessarily uniform in their measure in weight. So the coin. The coin did was it. Changed this idea that we can to measure or gold and silver. Every time we transacted with each other. Because now the coin that i that you recognized you have acquired that i recognize. I know how much your coin as you know how much mike ways and so we can change We can exchange a lot quicker than if we didn't have the coin so that was very important advance in that happened for the first time. Several hundred years before a renaissance florence in actually in ancient libya which is in modern day turkey so after the after we start getting gold coins then we actually see the greek in the roman empire's us coins To admit coins and to use these coins in order to expand their empires and exert their influence over their subjects and what we saw the roman empire was really example devaluation so this idea that a government can come in mint coin but then the next year put less gold. Silver in the coin and progressively keep cheapening the currency But tried to really get away with this idea that the currency that the issue this year is the same as the currency that they issued ten years ago which had twice as much silver or golden and so the manipulation of currency at through government started to happen as well Along the signed before we get into the rasul's

Professor Merlin Bitcoin Nick Libya Mike United States Rasul
Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:34 min | Last month

Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

"Verse seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. A podcast where. We explore the who. What when of why we wear. We are fashion stories and your hosts abra callahan and cassidy. Zachary dresses thurs. I know that you will join april. And i when we say that we were both very sad to hear about the fact that miss mary wilson passed away last week at the age of seventy six years old. Yes i was a little heartbroken. I texted you right away. And i was like. Oh so of course miss. Mary was a founding member of the iconic american singing group. The supremes she was there at the beginning of the group in the nineteen fifties and was the last original member in the group when it officially disbanded in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven and she went on to a career as a solo performer motivational speaker author and perhaps unsuspecting archivist. Yes because miss. Mary took it upon herself to preserve the supreme sartorial legacy and her collection of the group's stunning performance ensemble served as the foundation of her two thousand nineteen book co authored with mark. Bego supreme glamour and april. I mean we feel so. Honored chose celebrated fulling episode of dressed with miss mary herself. She came on last season of course to share with us her incredible stories behind the supremes singular style she truly was an inspiring and wonderful woman whose legacy will undoubtedly live on for generations to come. Thank you for joining us stress listeners. In this listen back at our time with the one. The only miss mary wilson. We are super excited to have miss. Mary wilson with us today miss mary. Welcome to dressed. Thank you so much. And i'm glad to be with you. Yeah of this is truly an honor to have you here today. And i have to say i have not been this excited about a book in a very long time. I've i've read a lot of fashion history books and this one is is so beautifully written. It's so beautifully illustrated so many stories so much love and friendship and of course there's so much fashion in this book. It's such a beautiful mosh to your time in the supremes and the clothing. That was part in parcel to that experience. So i'm curious. What inspired you to write this wonderful book. Wow well it was fairly easy. Because i had already written books about the supreme so therefore you know it was one of the things will. My research was not as it didn't take as long because i had so much research from the other books. And you know writing about the supremes and our biography and and talking about how much we had accomplished and our career was a pleasure to actually sit down now and do something not just write about the book but do show pictures and and and the looks and what was behind the singing which was more fashion so it was really a lot of fun. Sort of demonstrating what we did in not just on recording and the music but how we look at how he felt when we were certain count and so was all about the gallons per gallon down to just like we were onto all those years and many of them are in your personal collection cracked. Have i think in the book. There's over twenty four sets of matching onstage on sambas so not just one of the dresses but all three of the dresses. How did you go about comprising this collection. Well First of all we supreme florence ballard diana ross and i would always travel and when we came home from the road we'd have to store the gown and then of course by new gowns or designers with bring us new gowns and some of the old account that we made perhaps worn on television We went to store them. And they accumulated who Throughout all the years right And as you know florence was no longer mcgrew. Diane was no longer in the group. And then we had the seventies supremes And i became sort of like the keeper of of everything and the manager of the trains and all those different things. So i accumulated the gown because of that and whenever anyone would leave As you know a couple of them. Did i ended up with all these counts because no one can take the guy. No one can take the gal with them. You know we the supremes as a group paid for them. And that's how. I ended up with the majority of the gals. Now all other gallons should be in my possession but The reason that i can't tell you how many i have is because many have been not just lost and i won't say stolen you know things have just disappeared. And then some of the places we have them stored you know. I don't i couldn't figure out where everything was stored inside. All these years asked the supreme i have just been Trying to recover those downs that are not in my collection but it really is my collection. Because as i said when i left everything was left to me also should say that even though they were left to me and i had bare instead of three Sometimes i ended up with just one but all three gowns were overset were supposedly with me.

Mary Wilson Abra Callahan Iconic American Singing Group Mary Zachary Cassidy Miss Mary Ballard Diana Ross Mark Mcgrew Diane
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Radio Specials

01:40 min | Last month

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"Be sure you never miss a story subscribed to the selected shorts podcast. And when you do, you'll get episodes of the spinoff podcast selected shorts too hot for radio. All you need do is search for both shows on iTunes and hit subscribe. We have one final piece on today's show celebrating James Baldwin, and it's taken from his work about family, religion and adolescence. Go tell it on the mountain. Though this is a novel Go tell it on the mountain presents the inner monologues of the churchgoing Grimes family as a kaleidoscopic Syria's of short stories. In the section we're about to hear Baldwin considers the false promises of the great migration entering the mind of the Grimes family matriarch. The reader is the always sublime Charlene would, er He had always seemed to Florence, the oldest woman in the world. Where she often spoke of Florence and Gabriel as the Children of her old age. And she'd been born innumerable years ago. During slavery on a plantation in another state. On this plantation. She had grown up one of the field workers for she was very tall and strong and buying by she had married and raised Children. All of whom had been taken from her. One by sickness

Grimes James Baldwin Syria Baldwin Charlene Florence Gabriel
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Radio Specials

01:40 min | Last month

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"Be sure you never miss Be sure a you story never miss subscribed a story to the selected subscribed shorts to podcast. the selected shorts And when you podcast. do, And you'll when you do, get episodes you'll get episodes of the spinoff of podcast the spinoff selected podcast shorts selected too hot shorts too for hot radio. for radio. All you need do is All you need search do is for both search shows on for iTunes both shows on and iTunes hit and hit subscribe. subscribe. We have one We have final one piece final on piece today's show on celebrating today's show James celebrating Baldwin, James Baldwin, and it's taken from and his it's taken work about from family, his work about family, religion religion and adolescence. and adolescence. Go tell it on the mountain. Go tell it on the mountain. Though this Though is a novel this is Go a novel tell it on the mountain Go tell presents it on the mountain the inner presents monologues the inner of monologues the churchgoing of Grimes the churchgoing family Grimes as family a kaleidoscopic as a kaleidoscopic Syria's of short Syria's stories. of short stories. In the section we're about In the section to hear we're about Baldwin to hear considers Baldwin the considers false promises the false promises of the great migration of the great migration entering the entering mind the of mind the Grimes of the family Grimes matriarch. family matriarch. The reader The reader is the always is the sublime always sublime Charlene would, Charlene er would, er He had always seemed He had always to Florence, seemed to Florence, the oldest woman the in oldest the world. woman in the world. Where she often spoke Where she of often Florence spoke and of Gabriel Florence and Gabriel as the Children of her as old the Children age. of her old age. And she'd been born And she'd innumerable been born innumerable years ago. years ago. During slavery During slavery on a plantation on a plantation in another state. in another state. On this plantation. On this She plantation. had grown up one She of had the grown field up workers one of the field workers for she was very tall for she was very and tall strong and strong and buying by and she buying had married by she and had married raised Children. and raised Children. All of whom had All been of taken whom from had her. been taken from her. One by sickness One by sickness

Grimes Baldwin James Baldwin Syria Charlene Er Florence Gabriel Florence James Charlene Gabriel
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Radio Specials

01:40 min | Last month

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"Be sure you never miss Be sure a you story never miss subscribed a story to the selected subscribed shorts to podcast. the selected shorts And when you podcast. do, And you'll when you do, get episodes you'll get episodes of the spinoff of podcast the spinoff selected podcast shorts selected too hot shorts too for hot radio. for radio. All you need do is All you need search do is for both search shows on for iTunes both shows on and iTunes hit and hit subscribe. subscribe. We have one We have final one piece final on piece today's show on celebrating today's show James celebrating Baldwin, James Baldwin, and it's taken from and his it's taken work about from family, his work about family, religion religion and adolescence. and adolescence. Go tell it on the mountain. Go tell it on the mountain. Though this Though is a novel this is Go a novel tell it on the mountain Go tell presents it on the mountain the inner presents monologues the inner of monologues the churchgoing of Grimes the churchgoing family Grimes as family a kaleidoscopic as a kaleidoscopic Syria's of short Syria's stories. of short stories. In the section we're about In the section to hear we're about Baldwin to hear considers Baldwin the considers false promises the false promises of the great migration of the great migration entering the entering mind the of mind the Grimes of the family Grimes matriarch. family matriarch. The reader The reader is the always is the sublime always sublime Charlene would, Charlene er would, er He had always seemed He had always to Florence, seemed to Florence, the oldest woman the in oldest the world. woman in the world. Where she often spoke Where she of often Florence spoke and of Gabriel Florence and Gabriel as the Children of her as old the Children age. of her old age. And she'd been born And she'd innumerable been born innumerable years ago. years ago. During slavery During slavery on a plantation on a plantation in another state. in another state. On this plantation. On this She plantation. had grown up one She of had the grown field up workers one of the field workers for she was very tall for she was very and tall strong and strong and buying by and she buying had married by she and had married raised Children. and raised Children. All of whom had All been of taken whom from had her. been taken from her. One by sickness One by sickness

Grimes Baldwin James Baldwin Syria Charlene Er Florence Gabriel Florence James Charlene Gabriel
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Radio Specials

01:40 min | Last month

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"Be sure you never miss a story subscribed to the selected shorts podcast. And when you do, you'll get episodes of the spinoff podcast selected shorts too hot for radio. All you need do is search for both shows on iTunes and hit subscribe. We have one final piece on today's show celebrating James Baldwin, and it's taken from his work about family, religion and adolescence. Go tell it on the mountain. Though this is a novel Go tell it on the mountain presents the inner monologues of the churchgoing Grimes family as a kaleidoscopic Syria's of short stories. In the section we're about to hear Baldwin considers the false promises of the great migration entering the mind of the Grimes family matriarch. The reader is the always sublime Charlene would, er He had always seemed to Florence, the oldest woman in the world. Where she often spoke of Florence and Gabriel as the Children of her old age. And she'd been born innumerable years ago. During slavery on a plantation in another state. On this plantation. She had grown up one of the field workers for she was very tall and strong and buying by she had married and raised Children. All of whom had been taken from her. One by sickness

Grimes James Baldwin Syria Baldwin Charlene Florence Gabriel
This day in history - NAACP founded

This Day in History Class

06:34 min | 2 months ago

This day in history - NAACP founded

"The day was february twelfth. Nineteen o nine in new york city. A group of black and white people met to talk about the status of black people in the united states. There were sixty people at the meeting including suffrage is philanthropist journalist clergymen educators and people from other traditions in attendance and some of them have been part of the abolitionist movement. Many of the people there had also been part of the niagara movement which was a civil rights group founded in nineteen o five sociologist activists w. e. d. boys and editor an activist william morris. Trotter the date of this meeting was notable because it was the hundredth anniversary of former us. President abraham lincoln's birth which many found meaningful because. Lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation. But anti black violence was still endemic in the united states. And the people who met in new york on this day. We're committed to fighting racism and discrimination in the us. starting what was sometimes called a new abolition movement. At the time. Jim crow laws enforced racial segregation in the south. Though discrimination on the basis of race was constant throughout the united states thousands of black people were being lynched by white mobs at public events that were made into spectacles and deadly race. Riots were taking place across the country. In the period after the reconstruction era interpersonal and institutionalized racism were plaguing american society but activists reformers in revolutionaries were using and fighting to combat rampant racism and violence in the country in august nineteen. Oh eight there was a violent race riots. In springfield illinois where mobs of white people destroyed the homes and businesses of black people in the community and killed in lynched others author and activist. Ns stransky and her husband. William english walling. A socialist journalist went to springfield to investigate the right and in september. A magazine called the independent published an article by walling titled the race war in the north in the article. He wrote that. People must revive the spirit of abolitionist. Entreat black people social and political equals or else the race war would continue to spread across the country and walling went on to write the following the day. These methods become general in the north. Every hope of political democracy will be dead other weaker. Racist in classes will be persecuted in the north. As in the south public education will undergo an eclipse and american civilization. We'll await either a rapid degeneration or another profounder and more revolutionary civil war which sell obliterate not only the remains of slavery but all other obstacles to a free democratic evolution that have grown up in. Its wake who realizes the seriousness of the situation. And what large and powerful body of citizens is ready to come to their aid. Marie white ovington a social worker and writer heated wallin's call and sent him a letter in support so in january nineteen o nine. She met with walling in social worker. Henry moskovitz at wallin's new york apartment to discuss proposing an organization that would fight for the civil and political rights of black people. So oswald garrison villar grandson of abolitionist. William lloyd garrison wrote the call which was a summons for civil rights activists to form an organization that would advocate for ending racial injustice in america and fight for african americans rights the call was endorsed by sixty people including w. e. b. voice journalist and activist ida b wells philosopher and reformer john. Dewey an activist jane addams and on february toldt nineteen o nine a group including mary turks. Tarot charles edward russell in florence kelly among others breath met for a national conference but they didn't hold their first large meeting until may when they organized as the national negro committee. There was some conflict at that first session as leaders tried to get the more conservative but washington to join in on the meetings also tensions rose between white and black members and the press beer the radical nature of the conference but by nineteen ten members of the committee had formed the national association for the advancement of colored people or in double. Acp the n. Double acp mission was quote to promote equality of rights and to eradicate cast a race prejudice among the citizens of the united states to advance the interests of color citizens to secure for them impartial suffrage and to increase their opportunities for securing justice in the courts education for the children employment according to their ability and complete equality before law the organization established is national office in new york city in named a board of directors and president moorefield story at this time w e b d boys was the only black executive in the organization but that same year two boys started the crisis a journal offered discussion on race relations politics and black life and present it black intellectual and artistic work in double. Acp members went on to challenge segregation laws. Stage boycotts start anti lynching campaign in lobby and advocate for new legislation the end ps methods aren't loved by people who use more direct action tactics but the organization did make gains in the movement for black civil rights and is still going today.

United States Stransky William English Springfield President Abraham Lincoln Wallin William Morris Trotter Marie White Ovington Jim Crow Henry Moskovitz New York City Oswald Garrison Villar Walling New York Ida B Wells Lincoln Mary Turks Charles Edward Russell Florence Kelly
Mary Wilson, original member of the Supremes, dead at 76

Bob Sirott

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Mary Wilson, original member of the Supremes, dead at 76

"The Supremes has died, her longtime publicist says willing, Wilson died suddenly last night in her home in the Las Vegas suburb of Henderson, Nevada. She was 76 in 2014. Wilson told The Associated Press. She continued to speak with Diana Ross over the years and loved both her and Florence Ballard, the other original supreme who preceded her in death. We do talk, but not as often as I would like to, but we do and we are The hearts of their You know, we're like sisters. I love flow and Diane to this day, almost as much as I love my own system, Supremes were Motown's most successful act of the 1960 turning out 12 number one singles. Now, with WGN SPORTS Here's David. It took a while for the

Supremes Wilson Florence Ballard Diana Ross Henderson The Associated Press Nevada Las Vegas Diane Motown Wgn Sports David
Mary Wilson, founding member of The Supremes, dies at 76

First Morning News

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Mary Wilson, founding member of The Supremes, dies at 76

"Getting word that Mary Wilson, founding member of the legendary Motown Trail, the Supremes has died. She died suddenly at her home in Las Vegas last night 76 years old. Very well. She was only 15. When she, Diana Ross, Florence Ballard and Betty McCloughan formed a quartet that they called the primates. The Motown Records founder Barry Gordy said they pressured him to sign a recording contract. And he did that in 1961 on Lee because they changed their name to the Supremes, Mary Wilson. At the age of 76.

Mary Wilson Florence Ballard Betty Mccloughan Barry Gordy Diana Ross Las Vegas Motown Records LEE
Experience Traveling By Train

Travel with Rick Steves

04:39 min | 2 months ago

Experience Traveling By Train

"Start today's travel. With rick steves. With other. Eric wanner he recommends seeing the usa from a long distance train. Ride on amtrak. Our interview with eric was recorded just before the covid shutdowns kicked in when we travel. It's fun to see the world from a different perspective eric. Winer believes travel by train offers a rare combination of expansiveness and coziness. He spent a lot of time travelling by train while reading the work of great philosophers and for him. It goes together beautifully. He writes about that in his latest book. The socrates express eric. Thanks for joining us. Happy to be here so you actually took the train from washington dc to portland that sixty four hours. You could have flown in about five hours. There's just nothing rational about that. No it makes no sense. It makes no sense from a time point of view. Obviously it makes no sense from a financial point of view It really doesn't make sense from a mental health point of view. Either but i loved it. What can i say. I love every every minute of every hour of you know. It wasn't always. It's not the most glamorous way to travel but this just something to something awfully compelling about you made a very good case of that first of all you talked about the people you should the platform with. I mean okay. You're standing on the platform with surrounded by twenty or thirty people waiting to get onto that Train who are they okay. I'm going to do this quickly. Therefore determined therefore categories of long distance amtrak travelers. Okay number. One is retired people with lots of time on their hands. Number two is people who are afraid of flying. These are my compatriots to They take the train a number three or foam irs a fomer is a real enthusiasts. Who gets very excited about. Locomotives and other things like that means. They're so excited. They foam at the mouth. That's the idea okay You care to take a guess with the fourth category. As you'll never guess mennonites mennonites lots of minute nights a matter night. You mean like Lou dates are people that don't want modern. Well they apparently they They can fly but they can travel by train long distances. So these are the four categories and then there was me and i don't fit any of those categories. I was a category into myself for your kind of the opposite. Because you mentioned you have criminal phobia which is A fear of lack of time. And and you do just the opposite. It's that some kind of therapy. It was it was sort of this. What are you desensitize yourself to it. Well i always feel that your time is valuable. And i need to be making the best use of it and when you're on the train for some sixty plus hours you're just you're forced to slow down. I mean you're either go crazy or you slow down. Those two choices and i decided to slow down. The train is going to get the portland at its own pace. And there's nothing you can do about it. It will stop occasionally for an hour to for no apparent reason whatsoever and then start up again for no apparent reason and i would ask my fellow passengers if we stopped and they've just laugh at me like We got a new one. We gotta a rookie. Here in amtrak stan. You do not ask why. He thinks he's human. Beings are more important than freight right. We do we. We wait for free trains. Because amtrak does not own most of the tracks across the country the free traits everytime i go to portland derek from seattle and the train. I think i'm doing something nice for the environment. And so on. Or it's just kind of a cool thing to do and it's frustrating. Because i have chronic phobia also and i don't know beiber waiting here and somebody reminded me freight trains get priority over humans in the united states. That's not the case in europe but in the united states. That's the case but for those of us who like you and me have a fear of lack of time where where we schedule things. Its pedal to the metal. It's interesting how a long trip on a train you mentioned. It was like you hit a mother of time. Suddenly you had this big gift. That i guess you got more time just by slowing down right. And it's it's forced right because you can't go off and say we're going to go into into town and in fire up the laptop and get some work done. I mean you're on the train and you stay on the train and it's got through. I went through an interesting cycle. I i thought oh this is great. I've got this time. This is really good. I should do something. And then i just get antsy. And i started rearranging my little room at and moving things around and i started to go a little bonkers. I needed to do something. And eventually i came to acceptance that that he was gonna take a really long time to get to portland and i needed to just go with the flow and It took me a. I think somewhere around montana. I hit acceptance in there.

Eric Eric Wanner Rick Steves Portland Winer United States Washington Dc Phobia LOU Derek Seattle Europe Montana
Arizona inmates caught after breaking out of prison

Gaydos and Chad

00:13 sec | 2 months ago

Arizona inmates caught after breaking out of prison

"Inmates from the Florence prison have been caught in Coolidge, Coolidge police and U. S Marshals office made the arrest Coolidge Police say they found the two men after they got several calls from citizens reporting sightings of the missing criminals.

Florence Prison Coolidge U. S Marshals Office Coolidge Police
Texas Health Plano Sets Up Emergency Tents For Non-COVID-19 Patients, Dallas Area

Chris Salcedo

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Texas Health Plano Sets Up Emergency Tents For Non-COVID-19 Patients, Dallas Area

"Health Presbyterian Hospital in Plano has set up tents in the lobby to treat non covert patients in response to overcrowding in the emergency rooms due to the pandemic. Texas health plan. Oh, President Joshua Florence says Given increased demand, they wanted to be able to expand capacity so those patients can be seen and treated quickly to many of the patients. They're very, very grateful and appreciative that we've given them another opportunity to move to the system or quickly and be seen and certainly that we have them separated. He says. The lobby space is easily accessible, intense offer privacy for the patients.

Health Presbyterian Hospital President Joshua Florence Plano Texas
Olivia Wilde and Harry Styles photographed holding hands amid reports they're dating

Comments By Celebs

04:30 min | 3 months ago

Olivia Wilde and Harry Styles photographed holding hands amid reports they're dating

"This episode ready to go ready to publish and then about thirty minutes ago this news about olivia wilde and harry styles dating broke and we had to kind of. Just come on and talk about it. So we're going to go through a full detailed breakdown of everything we know. And then get into a discussion. But julie do wanna just give it immediate reaction. Yeah i mean whole he should know the skeptic in me isn't one hundred percent convinced yet but let's go through it okay so first off age wise just because everybody's wondering olivia is thirty six in harry's twenty six let's also keep in mind that olivia wilde. Jason seditious announced their split in november. They were never technically married. They were engaged for seven years. I remember at the time we did a pretty lengthy discussion on that. And when you go through their history you find out you know. She a pretty interesting dating history. Previously they have two kids and according to sources they had broken up at the beginning of the pandemic. It's been really amicable. They had great co-parenting and kind of the general consensus was like. There's really no drama here. I also think just as a total side note. I remember when it came out of the time. Everybody was shocked that they weren't married. Because i guess we just forgotten that you know he yeah. I also think the time line here are so important that they split the beginning of the urine. We only found out in november. Yes that is crucial. Also keep in mind olivia's currently directing and also starring the film. Don't worry darling. Harry's in florence was in it so we can kind of that. That is where they've gotten close if this is true but the reason that all this is circulating today is because they were seen holding hands at jeffrey as offs wedding. Jeffrey as off is harry's manager and he's also the son of irving shelley's off that is kim kardashian. Best friend's parents stadler kris jenner. Best friends and jeffries marrying glenn christianson. She is the global head of music partnerships at apple. Are you initiating this wedding and it was super small. There were sixteen people because of covid. And harry brought olivia as his plus one so they were seen holding hands. I'm sure you saw. He looked so handsome. She looked so beautiful she was in this kind of floral maxi dress gown type of thing. They were then seen after the wedding arriving at his house a source told people quote. They weren't montecito california this weekend for wedding. They were affectionate around their friends held hands and look very happy. They've dated for a few weeks. I've so more things to read. But i like. Can we just freak out about this for a second. Yes we can. We can freak out about it really. I have to tell you. This is the last thing i ever saw coming. And i actually remember when we had kind of just hypothesize about what we thought was going to happen. I remember for some reason. We had thought that zach braff and florence few broke up and i think it was said. Yeah you know. I could totally see florence and harry dating not in my wildest dreams. Did i envision a libyan harry. Well at the time the she was still adjacent stake as we had no reason to And even with the knowledge of them breaking up. I don't think i necessarily saw this coming. Although harry's track record liking older women does make sense here not that olivia's old by any means. I just mean older than him But the reason that. I really do believe this. I mean the skeptic in me is obviously like i said before. It's still a little bit hesitant to say. It's fully true because i think holding hands isn't the most incriminating evidence but when you think about a small wedding only sixteen people harry's officiating the wedding to bring a plus one it kind of feels like a big deal may first of all i agree. Second of all it makes sense. You know what. I mean. When i i wasn't i wouldn't have necessarily seen it coming but as i'm looking at him i'm like okay. I could see that she everything we've ever heard about her is that she's so great. He's very mature for his age. Also another reason that points me to believe that this is true is because you can't forget her break up with. Jason apparently was at the beginning of the year. So it's not like this has been one month since this big break up and also it's. He was officiating. The wedding and this was his manager. It's not like he's going to some you know random wedding where he didn't know anyone that's very in my opinion kind of like sacred thing to bring someone do so i i may be wrong and i'm totally fine if i'm wrong but i'm going to put my cards in here. In my official vote on the record is going to say this is actually happening.

Harry Olivia Wilde Olivia Jason Seditious Irving Shelley Glenn Christianson Kris Jenner Julie Jeffries Kim Kardashian Florence Jeffrey Zach Braff Apple California Jason
How to Amplify Your Brand When Live Streaming with Joie Gharrity

Launch Your Live

04:46 min | 3 months ago

How to Amplify Your Brand When Live Streaming with Joie Gharrity

"Joey why is branding important for business. How can i maybe relate that into live streaming for their business as an example. Right so branding is really the heartbeat to any business professional or personal. And i wanna say this to people to out there even if you're working in j. o. B. should really be working on your professional brand. It's a way where people can hook into you out there. Human beings don't like to feel dumb and they don't like to sound and so a lot of times i'll have clan say will no one's talking about me because they don't know how to talk about you. There's nothing to hook into yet. No one wants to say oh judas. Branding is boring. Who cares about that right but when you create a very deep-rooted emotionally connected brand out. There is that i tell people i said you want to lead with your actual heartbe so my heartbeat about visibility influence. I don't care if anyone. I i could care less. If anyone knows. I do branding. Who cares. That's not the point. But i do care that everyone in. There's like hey do you need some more visit billion florence. Joe is the one to go to it something that they can hook into. So i'm just asking the audience members out there. I'm saying sit back with your brand for a second and even if you're streaming if you have a content overall arching content umbrella of what you're streaming about but you don't have a heartbeat where people can hook into it. It can fall flat grio but fine the heartbeat. Not that output from the heartbeat. I am from that. Harvey then other people marketplace can sing. Your song was fantastic. So can't let so speaking sigmund branding. So can you share. Maybe three ways that someone can amplify their brand when they are live streaming. I mean now that the tools are readily available. There's software out there. Music started with just your computer or your smartphone What are some ways that somebody can amplify that brand when they are live streaming without kind of you know just being overly. What's the word i'm looking for. Just just overly complex like are there are some couple ways. You can think people. Yeah i mean first of all. I say that everyone be generous right. Anyone can google anything at this point right. So in order to become the main staple or the go-to influence or near field share. Generously your expertise out there. Don't who back right because that's how people are emotionally connected with you like right now. I just shared one of my top rantings veggies. I didn't hold onto that. I want i. If it was to me. I would have everyone globally spotlight each other right because that is how passionate i am about that right however would also was happening guys. Is that there is not. There's rarely a time that anyone in the marketplace that knows me that's emotionally connected with my brand when they see spotlight. They're not thinking about the right. So generously share your expertise. Make sure that the conversation comes along with some tangible value. Philosophies are great during the roman times when everyone's standing in there and being philosophers on the great steps right but in today's marketplace we people need tangible 's so give people real step-by-step tangible this will help. Elevate your yours that not just that. But you're branding in general because people then will have a reason to show up all the time for you. Because they're like well an joe is gonna give me a tangible so i know i'm gonna walk away with value with real value and then always surrounded always always bubble it and really really good storytelling right. I also believed to two things. Everyone should become an inertial speaker. Guys if you're not win yet become one right and also to everyone should become another it will. It's it's it's just such a tipping point because what it does is it formulates inside of you like wow. My stories are powerful and empowering and sharing. That story is a way you entertain your entertaining but you teaching at the same time right. That's why everyone was around the campfires. Since the beginning of time right is that they were just they were just teaching through storytelling. That's all they were doing. So if you've meyer anyone out there in general there's people that you meyer watch their storytelling techniques.

Joey Sigmund Harvey JOE Google Meyer
'Where Are The Women?': Uncovering The Lost Works Of Female Renaissance Artists

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:22 min | 3 months ago

'Where Are The Women?': Uncovering The Lost Works Of Female Renaissance Artists

"Could not enter art academies in Italy, the cradle of Renaissance masters, no matter how talented Names of a few female artists of that time, and some from the centuries that followed, have often been lost in the mists of history. A Zen prior Sylvia Poggioli reports. There's an effort to bring their names and their work into the light. In this video tour of Florence is famed you Fitzy Museum travel writer Rick Steves list. Some of the highlights the United of Inches enunciation is exquisite. Michelangelo's holy family shows he could do more than carved statues. And Raphael in 2009, a nonprofit group was founded in Florence to see who's missing. I started going into the deposits and the museum storage is and addicts and Checking what was actually there. What works by women? It was something that had never been done before. Because no one had ever before. Asked the question, Where are the women? That's Linda Fanconi, an American writer who helped found a W a advancing women artists. The group has identified some 2000 artworks by women in museum basements and damp churches and finance The restoration of 70 works. Fanconi describes the challenges women artists faced in the Renaissance. Women didn't have citizenship. They couldn't produce art as a profession. They couldn't study anatomy no in the nude figures, for example, because it just wasn't considered appropriate. The inability to study in the same in the same forum as male artists is very significant. A major discovery was a huge canvas 21 ft. Long off 13 life sized men. The only known last supper painted by a woman. She's the 16th century Dominican nun, Clumpy Llanelli who worked inside a convent. Florence has a long last supper tradition. But, says Francona, most of them are static. Whereas Nelly actually chooses sort of the key moment in which Christ announces his betrayal and you have all of the apostles. Feeling the emotion of that very serious news. And so she is able to do. A study of their their responses of their psychological responses Give her time the nuns works were prized because they were believed to be imbued with spirituality. Art restorer, Elizabeth Week says. Like so many female artists, medley was then for gotten It seems to me to be about the middle of the 19th century when these paintings stop being mentioned in the guidebooks. Women artists stop being mentioned. If nobody writes about you, Then you fade from history. Weeks is restoring two large works by the Atlanta Ferrone E an 18th century child prodigy. Little is known of her other than she was born in 17. 20 lived in a period of great change, says writer and Ghaleb. We do know that well educated women. Certainly we're getting much more of a seat at the table, and there were definitely a few women who were achieving much greater. Prominence. Then before hands while still in her twenties, Federal Me was awarded a prestigious commission by a Florence hospital to paint two ovals. The subject matter was usually reserved for men spirituals scenes to help heal the ill. The art of healing has been a constant theme of AWS mission, says director Fanconi. Piece of art has its life. It gets hurt. It gets damaged. It needs renewal. It needs to be talked about and paid attention to accept the restoration as well as exhibits. Advancing women artists has fulfilled its mission, says Falcone, and the organization has announced it's shutting down next June due to insufficient funds. But it's not a sign of failure, she says, because art lovers are now finding answers to the question. Where are the women? Sylvia Poggioli NPR news

Sylvia Poggioli Fitzy Museum Linda Fanconi Fanconi Florence Clumpy Llanelli Rick Steves Michelangelo Raphael Elizabeth Week Italy Francona Ghaleb Nelly United Medley Florence Hospital Director Fanconi Atlanta
The History of Lorenzo de' Medici

This Day in History Class

04:07 min | 3 months ago

The History of Lorenzo de' Medici

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy v wilson and it's january first happy new year. Lorenzo de medici was born on the stay in fourteen forty nine. The medici family of florence was rich and powerful. They had come to florence sometime in the twelfth century although they had started out as just simple tuscan peasants but over a couple of hundred years they became incredibly wealthy and powerful by the middle of the fourteenth century. There were one of florence's leading families and they also had a reputation for being extremely adept at negotiating in the worlds of politics and money and this was through. Legitimate means as well as through things like bribery. Lorenzo domenici was described as the most medici of the medici. He was nicknamed lorenzo. The magnificent he's been described as the most powerful the most famous the most brilliant the most influential in the world of art thanks to his patronage and the most ruthless came to power in florence along with his brother in fourteen sixty nine after the death of their father and the two of them were ruling together and nine years later. There was a conspiracy to assassinate both of them and to take control of the republic of florence away from the medici. This was called the pazzi. Conspiracy the potsy and the medici were basically rival families within florence. One of the things that had led to this whole rivalry in the conspiracy was that the potsy family had taken over the financial affairs of the papacy and that was taking business away from the medici which the medici did not appreciate the ringleader in. This conspiracy was francesco. Potsy and he wasn't the patriarch of the pazzi family. But he was the one that was driving all of this. The fascination was finally set to take place during easter mass. in fourteen. seventy eight and lorenzo's brother giuliano was killed but lorenzo escaped afterward though. Lorenzo sought retro bution against olive his conspirators. There was a lot of hanging people throwing them out windows. A lot of dismemberments overall it was very gruesome and there were more than seventy executions of purported co-conspirators this whole incident though really shaped lorenzo's that his brother was dead so he was on his own in terms of his leadership at the republic and it had also gotten rid of a lot of actors and demonstrated the links that he would go to so after this whole conspiracy and the war that followed food. He had the support of a lot of the people of florence. He ruled almost as a monarch. Although lorenzo really liked to describe himself as just a highly respectable citizen anything special he and others in the family also acted as patrons to writers and artists and architects including people like botticelli and leonardo davinci among many others there was also of course michelangelo. Who was brought up partially in the medici household lorenzo domenici was also a collector of antiquities and of artwork. Basically what they were doing. They couldn't really afford to pay for the most extravagant biggest name artwork so they would find lesser known undiscovered talent of sort of cultivate them by their work for cheap. It's not however totally accurate to say that the medici family single paid for the renaissance. Sometimes they are described that way. Lorenzo was also a poet himself in addition to his patronage of other artists by the fourteen ninety s though lorenzo's health was declining the city of florence. Also becoming less and less enamored with the lifestyle that he had enabled and encouraged. This is a lifestyle that was just full of lavish festivals. in extravagance. He died at the age of only forty three. His son giovanni later became pope. Leo the tenth.

Lorenzo Tracy V Wilson Lorenzo De Medici Lorenzo Domenici Potsy Medici Giuliano Francesco Leonardo Davinci Florence Botticelli Michelangelo Giovanni
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

03:23 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Was a box and the box had a plastic wrap around it and inside the box the seven things that had that a packaging piece right and then so it was like a bag of chips and a little. You know thing you opened up with cheese spread in salami stick that a package around it and an apple sauce was a package and Like a chocolate bar. That had a package around it. And then so my son and i we kind of split this stuff because nothing else eating. We're hungry and then i put everything back into the box. It came in. And i handed it to the flights and he was walking by with a garbage bag it goes. Wow look at all that trash come from like you sold it to me you know and so that that to me is always kind of like you. Think about the idea. Sustainability like eating food. Nece again kind of going back to Buying things that they're they're kind of local and taking the packaging out of it right because it just it's less garbage right. I mean so if you if you had to give somebody some really good advice like just a couple of things that they could do today to live a more sustainable lifestyle like what would you recommend. Well you know I'd love to say that. I had this idea but actually it was an idea that was given by somebody else. I was up in the aca. Tat alaska because Google which is one of our funders had Had supported the most sustainable way to fish for salmon and in the united states which which is the department fish game. They're puts a across the river and they let fish go through the time and account every single fish that's going up to spawn and they know like for example for every three point one sock guide. I'd go through. We're that you can catch one at the base of the river and still maintain the viability of this population of salmon and they radio that down literally just based on the river and they pull only enough fish out every day to match what is being counted. So we went up there documented and and that's actually pulls a terminal fishery so i just even just going to be called terminal degrees moving. Five days of the fishermen make leading right of on the plane. The woman who is a fisherman said. I really hope he don't call fishery. I hope to pollock connected market. And i said Why why do you say that she said because you know there's there's things local to you know know your farmer and all of these things which is good but you can't get but for the things that you can't get local you should at least apply the same value system applied for the things that were local to the things that aren't local. And by doing that you create a connective market. Become much more aware of all the things that you're reading of where it comes from and if the values a practices a person who made that food from faraway whether it's coffee or salmon or anything else and so this idea that connected market is something that i always tell people which is that. It's not only enough to buy locally. Even though our books local only enough to buy locally eyler it's also important to be aware that everything was was made by somebody and there was a value system of that company or that individual. And that when you are purchasing that they're also saying i align myself i agree with your values of stewardship is it could be how you treat workers it could be. The quality of your ingredients could be any number of things but the job of being a consumer is unfortunately..

Google seven things Five days today one one sock guide united states three point every single fish alaska
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

04:22 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"And it's important. And i i lived in new york city for fifteen years and i didn't realize i was actually cooking california food until i moved to california and i just felt like i'd i'd i'd really hit it. I mean this is just the most beautiful place in the world for me. So the book itself like is it. Is it a process that is continuing. Have you guys finished it or where are you. So the book is it now in stores. It's called local the new face of food and farming america harpercollins. And what's really awesome about the book. tyler is that it explains it on the very first page of the book. You can actually take your smartphone or your tablet and you can download an app that we have with harpercollins and you can actually take a picture wherever you say icon for movie as you're moving to the book and suddenly instantaneously are short film. That actually animates all the images that you're seeing in the book. They suddenly come to life in these films. So we had twenty five films that are actually Able to be new directly of your phone or your tablet as you're looking back and that interactive experience was really really enhances Answers the book and so the book is out now as i said and Also on the website. There's additional information that it gives you where Different projects that you can do that. Inspired of that are inspired by either book. And of course you can pick up the book on amazon right. Well you you could pick up the book on amazon It certainly available amazon. But you know you can also go to our website and Type in your zip code and they'll tell you a local bookseller again to continue this theme of really trying to support. I mean listen tyler. you've probably done. I think you've probably half half of the books on those on bookshelves. And cooking section of any store or tyler florence book so you certainly know how powerful it is to have a really great local bookstore in kennedy..

amazon tyler florence fifteen years tyler twenty five films california first page america new york city kennedy books of
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

03:50 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Long everybody tyler florence. Welcome to this week in the test kitchen. It's tuesday july eighth two thousand and fourteen and we've got a fantastic show for you today. Douglas gaitan who is a award. Winning american multimedia is a filmmaker writer photographer and he and his wife are the co founders of the lexicon of sustainability and also another project called localized. They've got a new web series on pbs. And he's also the author of a beautiful book Called slow life and a tuscan town..

Douglas gaitan tyler florence tuesday july eighth Called slow life today this week a tuscan town fourteen american thousand two and
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

01:37 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Chuck and mix them together. So it's well inc and with this you actually have a perfect seventy five to twenty five fat to lean ratio s- perfect seventy five twenty five five point ratio. And then what we're gonna do. Is you take the burger itself. And then we're gonna creep balls and then we're only going to crush this once in our restaurants. This is how our prep guys make hamburgers right there. Eight ounces when they go up on the on the on the line and then our grill guy. We'll take that and press it. Once in flattening wants to go on the grill and it creates is really beautiful like nice fluffy texture on the inside and it kinda crumbles right and a really.

Eight ounces seventy seventy five twenty five fat twenty five five point five once
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

07:38 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"So then we said okay. Here's here's our hypothesis right. We're gonna start over from scratch. We're gonna hit the button. One more time the timer now. This recipe has to at least taste as good house. All the characteristics of a perfect votto yet to be able to count the grains. It has to have that slightly identity bite to the tooth. And if it's anything less than that to bus so we started from scratch. Hit the button and start over. So it's minced onion extra virgin olive oil sauteed onion down. Boyer rice splash of white. Wine gives you could stir and then we took a three one ratio with the rice and the liquid and we just dumped it all in gave it a big stir turn it down and walked away and just let it go right. Here's what happens so the rice as it. Simmers not boiling sensory itself agitates. So you don't have to start. The rice has more contact time with all of the stock so it tastes better right because you're adding at one time when it's one reduction. We took that recipe forty two minutes. We cut down the twenty seven minutes right. That's me is innovation right. So this is where we're at. Because i think if we if we if we figure out a better way to do that i give you another bookstore. And then we'll get in the recipe so our new book coming out in november. It's called inside the test kitchen. It's got a hundred on the coverage. One hundred twenty new recipes perfected right new recipes perfected. So i've written twenty thousand recipes for food network. The last twenty years and all of them are great and timeless. But i think there's a whole new granular nano world of cooking. That i think chef should get into because there's so many things that we just don just because of it right. We've never actually taken the time to go. Hey let's eat a whole cow. Let's just to figure out what the best burger combination possibly is right. I won't introduce you guys air. Carol sonny's or corporate chef coming on eric. Eric makes me look good. From coast to coast so So eric erickson the cookbook. Eric and i when we're not traveling around doing this kind of thing. We were actually in the kitchen. Daily basis working on really great brand. You recipes is brandon concepts. We've come up. What are some doozy's. We've come up with self making macaroni and cheese self maggie mac and cheese ready for this self making macaroni and cheese. We did sell making mac and cheese is good the the. Yeah so we you ready for this so we made y'all ready for this down bound bound so there's two styles macaroni and cheese. Right there is. There is the macaroni and cheese. That you make a basha mel right and then you fold in the cheese and then then you cook the elbow. Macaroni you fold that in bake. It's nice cross on top of it and then there's college style macaroni and cheese which is way more popular by the way that a lot of a lot of people make. I don't think they feel particularly good about it. Because there's i mean if you look at the back of it it's not a ton of nutritional value it's filling it tastes like cheese and salsa kids. Eat it right by the tunnel via so we said okay. Is there an organic version of college. So macaroni and cheese. That's better quicker and faster guy so so if you think. The process again like what is convenient. What is convenient so boiling water. Takes fourteen minutes boiling pasta. Takes another twelve fourteen minutes. So you're a half an hour into this recipe that's basically neon orange goo out of a box. You're thirty minutes into this thing right and so to me. I think there's so much more you could possibly do better espy's so we invented this recipe called self making macaroni and cheese where we took all the ingredients that goes in completely organic. Everything goes into a macaroni and cheese. And we actually made pasta out of it right so inside the pasta. We use organic dehydrated. Parmesan cheese organic dehydrated. Milk powder organic dehydrated monterey jack cheese and then we made this extra pasta dried it out right and then one of my favorite sauces. It's my last story. And we'll get in the recipe. Because i can talk all day so then so then. We came up with this recipe. My favorite italian sauces called burda fuso. Right and it's it's an italian grandmother sauce where you take the starchy pasta water right as the pastas cooking. And you put it into a pan and you reduce it and you mounted with butter. Add some salt and pepper and parmesan cheese. And you've got this really fabulous very simple sauce. Butter food so is one of my favorite salsas on the planet starchy. Pasta water reduced mouth through butter and parmesan cheese awesome. So we said could we make macaroni and cheese based on that particular sauce style. Where it's where you don't have to dump anything so when the policy comes up to a boil the the dishes done. Can we make a one pot dish of this right so so the dehydrate macaroni and cheese. It's a one for one ratio right. So you scoop this macaroni and cheese boom into a pot this pasta and it's a scoop with same same measurement of cold water on top not hot water cold water and you turn it on and the pasta goes through two steps every hydrates and then after that starts to cook and then when it goes to the second process starts extract yummy delicious flavors right from the pasta parmesan cheese the milk and it starts to create this really beautiful gorgeous sauce and the same way that somebody would crack an egg into a box of instant brownie mix. I took a big handful of shredded cheese. Whatever you want. I the fridge and full just kind of right the very end and we made a self making macaroni and cheese. That takes twelve minutes to make versus thirty minute process right so anyway so guys. I think you guys will really love the book. I think the book is loaded with cool stuff that we can kind of get into speaking of this right so we take bring me up. Here is speaking eric. So so what we're gonna make today right so we Eric and i decided that we're going to. We're going to eat an entire cow. wait a whole cow. i'm kidding. I'm not kidding. How many burgers we. We had so many burger two weeks or one. I feel like it was three days. Sorry days burger but what we did is really kind of think through how many different combinations you could possibly come up with right. Because there's a lot of like signature blends when it comes to restaurants. Restaurants have their proprietary blend of what their burgers so we tried every single possible combination including just straight up filet mignon right taking a rib and kind of make sent round taking the chuck mixed with brisket taking pulling the oxtail off of the bone itself. Grinding that down and see if you can make a burger. We tried every single possible combination. And what we found out which was just amazing and you guys can do this when you go to the grocery store. It's it's an even part fifty fifty split between short rib and chuck right so couple of things. You want a burger. You want really good flavor first and foremost and then you want fat because a really good burger house and fat to it and fat melts down and turns into juicy. At at restaurants we prefer higher fat content. Bergerson you'd like it medium. Well we still win. You still win. we win. you're gonna walk away happy if it had a less less fat content you get past medium and you're sort of dehydrating everything anyway right so so we came up with this burger thing and then we took it one step further. Is there a new twist on a hamburger bun.

fourteen minutes Eric twenty seven minutes Carol sonny One hundred forty two minutes two weeks november twelve minutes thirty minutes thirty minute three days eric erickson eric today twelve fourteen minutes one time half an hour two steps two styles
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

08:21 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"And at william sonoma dot com. So i'm really excited about this. We we were here last year and we really made it kind of a deep connection with the festival. And i'm so glad to be in front of you guys today. How many people here for the first time all grant. Wow this an amazing bunch of virgins. I like it so be sure they're hug later. But we're really excited about the so so this is one of those really special events i was. I share a car with a couple coming from the airport last night and it was their first food and wine festival period and a lot of myself and my colleagues. We all kind of show up at the same stuff. So it's pebble beach in your city and south beach in los angeles but something really special about about aspen. There's something really special at the classic such such a small festival. It's really really intimate. Switches off you know where south beach so big so. We're going to get a chance to do something that we've been playing around with and i'm going to show you a recipe. That is just past the aren d stage and but it's really more about an idea so my my twelfth cookbook. Believe it or not. My twelfth cookbook is coming out in november. And it's called inside the test kitchen and it's a whole new frontier for us as a restaurant company. I've been. I have three restaurants northern california. We have wayfair tavern in san francisco couple fair. It's in the former rubicon. Space right underneath the transamerica tower. If you guys from san francisco we'd love to feed you. Apparently we haven't fed everybody yet. So if you guys are in san francisco we you and also we have a steakhouse in downtown mill. Valley called el ceo. And it's been there since nineteen forty seven beautiful restaurant and then we also have a fast casual place at the airport tyler. Florence fresh and thomas keller really likes her joining why he always kind of stop through when he's travelling out so we've got a lot of ways of kind of done it you know. This is my eighteenth year on television right. Started in one thousand nine hundred six games. And we've written twelve cookbooks. We're also a milwaukee maker have been making from ten years now our brand california crush it's available target. It were thirty five thousand case brands in these ideas that have just been off the top of my head. There's a deep level of passion behind this with my winemaking projects as a dishwasher. When i was fifteen years old working in the nicest restaurant in greenville south carolina. I always said to myself that there was something really special about the chef what they were doing. Obviously that way but the way he was just such a great storyteller you know he would bring a bottle of wine and i was fifteen. Be let me drink anyway. And and he would bring it back as the dishwasher. He would really take time to kind of point out. You know the nuances of the label. The hair war the ventnor the location where. It's from and the varietals. And and i. I was just so blown away. By how much how much energy you could actually storm one bottle. That is that. Why makers best intention for that year. You only got one shot at it as a restaurant where you can make a great dish and it could just suck on so many levels on so many reasons why you can always start over again the next day as why you get one yet. One crop one harvest one shot and that's it right so we were very passionate or making and actually we'll be pouring in the tent little but later today but we had the explore a lot of avenues and i always consider myself lucky to be me for living every day because i get a chance to soak it. What what do you wanna do. What tastes good feels good. Where do you wanna go and our new thing is about a granular deep level exploration side recipes. So our retail store in downtown lavallee. People have been to my store in mill valley. Have you been there a couple of people before six people crazy. So we're actually converting the entire space to lab and it's going to be called test kitchen and we're we're turning it into a new multimedia hub that you and i will get to participate in on a daily basis. I'm really excited about this concept so with with current television sitting in front of a couch watching watching. What's on it's not really up to you. What's on television. It's kind of like their whatever is there. but this is a level of integration. That i don't think exists yet because you will be able to talk to each other so through this application. We're going to develop and it's going to be on ios and android blackberry where you can actually contact us. And we'll cook what you want. And we'll film this and then we'll post it and every friday they'll be five six seven ten new videos that we upload right so i'm real so this idea about the test to me is really exciting. We've been going deep with it for almost a year now. We built a small kitchen. And we've outgrown that and now we're taking our tire retail space from being a building a bigger task and we wrote a book about our adventures inside the test kitchen. Including what. We're going to talk about today because i think there's so many lessons yet to be learned and cooking and this is why i've been cooking professionally for thirty years right and i had dinner with michael. Bauer cook them dinner. He's the the publisher for the food. Craig chronicle and he's entitled you ever get bored with cooking. I'm like i can't even think about twenty four seven. I always like how does go with this. And how can we make this better. And what's the science behind. That success story can repeat that success over and over again so we're getting pretty good at it. I think right so wafer and discuss third star in the san francisco. Chronicle alpa ceo has has had three stars for two years now. And i just think we're getting we're getting really tight because we do stuff like this so our mission is really take recipes that we've been cooking for years and really figure out. Okay why do people like the idea of cooking this but they never cook it. I'll give an example risotto right. How many people macro right okay. So it's a small fraction of people who are actually in this room actually make a risotto that they can be proud of how many people like risotto. Right much much different number right so if you take you take the idea of a photo anything okay. Why is why is this complicate. Why it's a sound complicated. Wise feel complicated as because as chefs we sort of follow. Tradition was a recipe that was handed down in handed down handed down. I was talking to michael. Simon about this and i was telling him about our discovery and he was like stop it. I'm the can't hear you. This is not don't want to hear this anymore. This is blast. But it's really interesting what you get into it right. So we decided to take a photo recipe and not complicated fans result or just parmesan risotto. And it right long. It takes to make large hot extra virgin olive oil minced onion sauteed the onion rice. He's toast that in the oil out of splash of white wine. You break the starch. Coding and then you start to dump stock into it right and you dump dump dump and you start so we time this from beginning to end chopping the onion the whole thing right. It takes forty two minutes to make a big pot rosado. Listen i get it. That's a lot of time so after forty two minutes ago and so so. Three fourths of an hour gone by. And what do you have. You have a plate of rice. I don't much stuff. You can make forty five minutes. It's insane right so we said to ourselves. What's the point of this like dumping stir thing. Could you just take all the liquid. If you know for a fact it just seems like untested alchemy of okay. I think i had a little more. But if if i know for a fact it's a three one ratio from liquid to rice. Why can't you stop all at one time. Why not. I mean nobody's lookin' come.

fifteen michael last year san francisco thomas keller thirty years two years november eighteenth year ten years forty five minutes twelfth cookbook today six people Simon los angeles third star one bottle pebble beach one thousand
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

01:39 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Hi everybody this is tyler florence. Thank you so much for listening. You're about to hear a prerecorded. Podcast taped live..

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

15:47 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Like like okay. Where's the food problem coming from this. This lot. this thing and there's get destroy you move on and what it does. It's it's basically It puts us in a position. I was describing somewhat honors. It's not when it comes down to the fact you can actually prove that you're innocent until proven guilty is situation right which is has it should be and so i can identify everything how it's been handled all the way back to. Actually you saw. There's an alphanumeric on seed. I i can identify all the way back to the seed and where it's been how it's been handled. It's very helpful. So let's say there is a problem at a at a facility. We can determine one if it was the food that i produce or somebody else's food cross-contamination whatever whatever have been going on And then if there is a problem somewhere within that chain it helps me identify so this is all a good thing right. Okay good practice practice. That's right so so as you can see. There's color coding in the different bags here got different bins. I've got different areas. That where what we do in these different tanks six tanks. This system was three over there. The three here that basically are all setup for in different retail wholesale catering especially vents And a farmer's market whatever it is and we maintain cars at different times of year and different levels for each one of those distribution. And and tell the people in this. Because i think this might be an interesting to you. Know other restaurants and chefs and voice your bars around the country A bushel of oyster allen wishes. What is it retail for on a on your pricing for the extra small. Just pick one okay so here this is going to be an depends on what the retail outlet is if it's farmers market or. Let's say it's here you know you're talking about something that's going to be Seven dollars eight dollars. Ten dollars a dozen. And then you know when you get into quantities get into discount right right right And and to me like the To have a beautiful picture and that you can sell for two dollars apiece for three dollars a piece. I think this is a really beautiful price for something that that is so well cared for and and to me it's about the quality and what i love about the food northern california because it's so Unadulterated in a way because we always put the process into The source seen in the ranching and farming of where it comes from ended and the perceived quality of the flavor. What has naturally so. It's not like you have to put so much stuff and thoughtless really kinda get the flavor impact but the quality stands for selfish so upset. That's great i think. Also thank you for your time. can we can. We go fashions waitress. Because i wanna talk to you about like where you going. I hope but i didn't just see are always who's being carried a hoover. We'll get over. We'll get some more so so tell me where aqua culture is going since especially here. I know You're working on some pretty high level conversation so what were doing like One of the biggest challenges that are going on right now are the issues associated with climate change. And in this case. It's a level of of how we're seeing the effects of human impacts on the world Right now on the farming side for aquaculture in this case it's with the ability of these organisms to form scheldt. Obviously what we're talking about here is always. There's there's always to shell so made out of calcium carbonate and It's words that come from. It's in the water in solution in the water. Go back to your your You know basic chemistry experiments where you actually were having certain you know densities of certain minerals and temperatures and and Densities that are in that water. And if you just change one of those parameters it'll affect the precipitate the comes out well in this case you're talking about Or an organism. That's needing certain parameters to be able to to to build their shell okay and in with the what's going on. What we've been seeing is on that cd saw earlier. We're having problems with the availability of that seat. That the hatchery level. So the hatchets that are located in this case in the eastern margin the pacific ocean and west coast of north. America are seeing basically up in certain times of the year water. That's older water. Fifth year old water when we had those winds like yesterday that creates upwelling which is an amazing productivity machine. But it also is turning into a time when springing waters that are that older water where we've been dumping co two into the atmosphere since the industrial revolution and rarely large levels large amounts. That's we you know we thought okay. It's going into the atmosphere and maybe the oceans can absorb it while. There's a saturation point literally. That's happening here where we're seeing a tip in the direction where the striving the waters into a p. h. That's very very impactful in a negative way on organisms. And we're seeing on on the in the aquaculture side with these oysters where we just can't the seed is having problems there. The hatcheries are having problems producing the is it is it the is it the shell quality thickness of the shell is a is it. You're saying not to produce the under the certainly said he just touched on on on all the. But all right what's happening at the hatchery level. Is you have In this case A species that's free swimming When it's in the larval stage and then it settles out and it loses the ability to swim in. it starts to form its shell. And and and and become sessile attached to what they let prefer to do as attached to another oyster shells. but you saw those are all singles. Well we only give them shell fragments to settle right. So that's what we want. Because there's obviously we get clusters. Yeah we'll get them here too but it's not what we're going for and and We want the single is because it's easy to shock and put on display or to cook on a grill That's what we want is a single answer so go to this problem that we're talking about here is what we're seeing is in the trend over the past ten fifteen years our ph levels that are going on in the in the Ocean that are coinciding with disease and mortalities. At the hatchery level. So it'll either. The animals themselves become so stressed that they become more susceptible to disease. And you'll have one hundred percent dial or in in some cases you'll have their stunted because you're working too hard to to make that shell so they've been affected their or the shell thickness may be thinner or more fragile. So they won't have the shelf-life so you know there's there's a lot in that opens them up to predation k. Not predation from us necessarily predation from the natural organisms. That go after them. So yeah. there's there's there's this is a problem that we're seeing in because it's like a canary in the coal mine. I hate to use that as a metaphor. But that's basically what it is. We're seeing early on in if you think about it. I i'm in the futures game. I have a harvest. It's got a happen on an organism that might take Two three four years to go through the whole group. And if. I'm needing to plan on that on the business side and i buy based on what my harvest is supposed to be. Because i already know kind of survival. I'm gonna have. Those are all sort of knowns while it's all going up window because if i can't get seed in the first place it's or if all of a sudden hatcheries having to move them out at a smaller size larger quantity i have to position myself to be able to say yes they say. Yes so what you saw over. There was a strategy. That i'm taking to get to that place and i'm taking it to another level here where i'm doing my own trie and i'm building. A hatchery. up in humboldt bay. We're just started. The process finished all the permits. Now we're going to be hopefully breaking ground here in a couple of months. Yeah so that's that's another strategy that it's labor in cost-intensive kay. I'm to do it in area that i know is good disease history for shellfish. That's humboldt bay. Tomasz bay has a lot of diseases because historically there's been waitress brought in from around the united states input in this bay since Basically just after the gold rush Now there's the so there's availability issues. That are going on and then So i'm seeing this and they're already seen this and other organisms other organisms that need to build shelves while because we're out there were running water through our tanks. Were were were pumping. We have the ability to monitor or to get water moving by a monitor on a regular basis so we are now working in collaboration with uc davis and we're we have instrumentation that we put in place almost two years ago. Now i'm the end of my intake that are pool and i've been able to download and clean and click Recalibrate both at the same time about a month ago. I started with That was once a month. It'd be able to do that. Which means if i saw problem in my seed. I know what happens. So i'd be able to put the connect the dots but it wouldn't allow me to do any sort of management strategy changes so other than you create your own hatcheries. You have a little more control over the process. What is what's the strategy behind you know creating lower acidic levels and the oceans in the base around here so you know future generations not just four years from now but one hundred years from now. They'll still be able to have the same great products that we've almost taken for granted. Well hopefully the strategy going to be a ultimately a paradigm shift and behaviors is. What it comes down to. The message should be One that it's not gonna make everybody curl up in the fetal position. It's not a sky is falling kind of thing but we all we. There's a big challenge happening right now. Were on the front. The leading edge of seeing the impacts. So what i have to do. Is i have one. I've decided to take the time the energy and work with academia to go and get something you can quantify okay so we're testing the variables and now we're doing real time. So i can actually take that information and use it to manage my seed you know. Turn off the flows tournament down. Tried to come up with buffering. Genetic for seeing lower oxygen levels. Whatever's going on i can i can. I can adapt in that way as well as go to brood stock. You try to get survivors in the brood stock and get them so that maybe we have species that that We can develop that on a breeding. Then we can get ones. That are a little more than actually adapt. Talking about is yeah. We're talking about changes that are happening so fast. There is nothing in nature that seen this rate of change so we have to step in and try to manage that in the meantime appropriately. Exactly in the meantime get the message out. We can quantify it. And get that to policymakers so that we can start getting monies directed in a way. That's going to research for alternative forms of energy policy shifts. Go from coal. Go to some sort of alternative form you know whatever the strategy is and try to get that messaging out. And that's what a lot of that work like what i was doing yesterday. jared huffman in the comfort of the News conference that we did yesterday. That is very important to get that to congress. Get it to the president and and yeah sure there's the rest of the world but we have to start somewhere. I really think that we not only have to start someplace. But i think we have to be the leading force and what will take for lotteries. I think we have the resources to make those changes. Where a lot of companies like countries. Actually dalton. There'll be tied to fossil fuels for another hundred years. We will start to kind of peel away from us. Those those those shows of of trying to get to be with a such a such a pollutant. I mean it really is me. Think about i mean the idea of like like pulling fossil fuels out of ground and burning. It seem as ludicrous as putting lease on your neck. for for medical purposes seems so ridiculous. We actually did something like that The next levels you know without question our on the horizon. I'm so proud of companies. Like a tesla here in california that are are creating the the the end product and doing it in a really sexy high tech beautiful way. They're like you know i i would. I would absolutely drive a battery operated car. That's that's a beautiful. That's a beautiful car saying that ten years imagine imaginable is it was just. The technology wasn't there but now it is and and as fast as we can flash forward through the process of of of making these things less expensive and more readily available. Not everybody everybody can afford one hundred twenty five thousand dollar car. But i mean if that was a thirty five thousand dollar car carly. I don't know anybody who would want to go to a gas bump. I don't know anybody who would want to necessarily do that. so the next couple of years i think we're we're we're definitely tapping the brakes. Hope we can slam on the brakes. Were these things don't affect our our feud sources are food sources in the future because to me. This is the reason. I wanted to talk about this. You know it's one thing to talk about. Climate change is nothing when you can see the direct direct cause and effect with your food source and your food supply. It's it's all coming down to just sort of common sense and you know there's there's no way. Anybody who's disputing climate change allergist. Just got the either on the payroll or they've got their head and say hey there's proof right there right well the question. Well this. This is fascinating. Thank you for time. A new problem. I think is awesome so so For for people around the country and around the world who has podcast. Where can they find us. Specifically the come to san francisco and of course they're gonna go to the ferry terminal building right good so then in san francisco at the ferry building And then the public market in napa downtown apple intel napa and then right here in marshall Right onto spe a hug allen company at the north end marshall yep so it's If you take the take the sheriff from san francisco. It's about an hour and a half. That's beautiful drive in and literally some of the best wishes of our tastes in my entire life. And i'm not here just just just to just a Play up to you can get a higher allocation for wishers wafer tavern. I'm not doing that. But i'm saying but cause of this. If you happen to throw was a couple of extra bushels we'd appreciate it. We'll see w thank you so much and thank you figure. Let's hop in the bikes sarah. Such a good mood right. Yeah those awesome really fun fun time. Go eat always tres and learn all about him. You can't hear a thing. I'm putting on my helmet but to me that this is what i love about this part of the country but you know how accessible these guys are. Now i mean he. He founded one of the most interesting farm-to-table stories thirty one years ago. And he's still doing. It can walk in the walk and talk and talk and awesome.

jared huffman california thirty five thousand dollar san francisco congress eight dollars marshall two dollars six tanks ten years yesterday three hundred years two years ago Seven dollars thirty one years ago America northern california one hundred twenty five thousa Ten dollars a dozen
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

07:34 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Point about the ice yes mon. You can have them on a bed of ice. I usually don't like if i really to hold for any period of time. Not in direct contact with the ice young thing to do is put a a wet cloth restaurant towel on top of it. And what that does is the seal between the two shells maintained by moisture the integrity that seals moisture. So you keep them Refrigeration designates dry out that sale. And that's another reason why that gaping so dry cold covered with a wet cloth acts the best way to do it right all along with what he said. You're you're right on. The ice starts unless there are sitting in the dream of pan. Yeah is swimming cedar. We think it's a bad call just because like the wishes will go. Hey check it out like we're back in the water always and then another sort of loser. That little last little sim of you want that. Brian wish water exactly. So let's go back to the beginning for a second so you a couple of friends decided that you want to get into the business found this place you know what kind of seed capital would talk about. What kind of capital to start this company so The original was five hundred bucks from from each parent. You know was was the sort of the seed money to go into it and then you know the the really what it takes in this. We're talking thirty one years ago. A lot of hard work okay. You have to put in money that a couple thousand dollars in equipment You gotta find something something that has That can float a boat. That stays afloat in a way of getting there so it has to have a motor k. The other Probably one of the most important things that we talked about this in the beginning is having a good body of water with areas that are available for lease so in california everything from the high tide. Mark down public property. There's certain areas. Where you've you've met all the parameters on on water quality that are only open Certain areas open for aquaculture. So you have sort of work with the regulatory bodies that now. It's extremely expensive to go through the permit process. So it's it's sorta precludes the mom and pop sort of soot style that we're talking about when we first got into it so nowadays hundred thousand dollars just in permits ridiculous justin permits and so what we're working on is on the on. The regulatory side is trying to do programmatic permeating and tried to get it so that you don't have duplicity in in going after permits and we're getting there but we're working different shellfish initiative. There's there's things that we're working on right now to help facilitate people being able that are really wanting to do it to get into the business because there's a need okay. There's a need for not only for us when we turn it over to our kids and whoever whoever's gonna take over the business so we write off in the sunset someday but there's also other people that are gonna come into an area for growing the oysters. There may be an interest and we want to facilitate that. I agree to me that there's a i think. There's a growing group of shops that are taking their passion for very specific genres of of food. And it's either cattle ranching or show coutry salou me and you know what brian with ryan far is doing as far as getting back into barbecue create like different restaurant concepts and even doing something like this which i think is very pure and good and noble honest work and you create like a really beautiful product out of this is the bar too high for a young startup to get into this or you know. That's exactly what it is right now. I would say it is you. It doesn't take a marine biologist to do this. It takes somebody who has passion for food for farming for for wanting to do a amazing experience as far as job goes. I mean look where we work. This is this is really a rough life out here because you saw today. It looks like it's terrible right. It said this is a gorgeous day. Not yesterday yesterday allergies yesterday. It was like you couldn't hardly be out on. That bay was very windy very windy. And that's part of the job is his year out there. Whatever the weather you know and so we're You know you have to be a certain personality like you'd like to be like us. We all like to be wet. You know either. Surfed dove swam. Whatever the water activity we were always in it and Reminds me i've got to get wet. So what was the oyster that you tasted. And where were you when you had it my first officer well not you. I saw what. What was that way should that you tasted and that experience that you have when you felt like okay. This is what. I wanna do this Where was that his obviously. There's if there's a deep passion for wishes specifically came. There was one moment. I would say that it was that were coming off this bay before when john and mike. I started the company that i was already committed to a house and i was working at a great job at the monterey bay aquarium and all that is like okay this is this is this is not something. I can just easily step into taking the risk of farming and all that and the startup. And but i was. I had a chance to help out in the beginning and planting the seed and all that but it was more like. This is what i like to do is you know. Let's just go out and explore that kind of situation. That was different than what i was doing so i was actually able to try the oysters. That were the product of the hard work that we were doing on the plant at an oyster bar that we were doing. It's another way to actually do. Marketing and promotion is to always bar at a restaurant and there is a A restaurant in santa cruz pearl alley bistro. And we do it. We're there was a bar. I was helping out with. And of course if i'm gonna be serving the product i'm going to be tasting that products like going. Wow that is amazing because just exactly that clean cool flavor it's been on ice the flavors that came out of that as like this is this is i saw what went into it and then i got taste the results that point. It's like okay. This is something. I can do and thirty one years later. Here we here. We thirty one years later. And how many different i mean. How many bushels voice. You're gonna ask that question. I have no idea you know. I mean if if i would say that if i had to quantify on a weekly basis a couple dozen oysters that i eat on a weekly basis that may be the case. I don't know But you know there's ten doesn't in a bushel. How many how many restaurants. I mean it just seems rethink what the scale of what you're doing. Yeah well everywhere while the scale is all over the place because it depends on what our inventories are like. And we'll talk about that in a little bit about exactly. We hold everybody on a quota. I don't get me. Oh wait for tavern. So it's it's an. It's not something we're doing intentionally. Those are in saint natural product. Yeah yeah so Can we walk back through the tanks. Yeah you wanna go over there. I wanna see the whole thing from bergen. So what i'm gonna do is i'm going to take you over to the where they start with a seed and some upwelling. I have some of the growing. And then we'll walk up to the tanks and i'll show you how.

california yesterday today john five hundred bucks Brian hundred thousand dollars mike first officer thirty one years ago thirty one years later bergen each parent two shells one moment monterey bay aquarium one first ten cruz pearl alley bistro
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

06:28 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Then and then you know. Tell me the difference between what we have here for komodo or like when when if you could if there's a simple explanation for that boy you challenged me. Well i just i just. I think it's just interesting to me. Like and how many times chance really talk about this stuff like like i would love to know the difference between these very specific choices other than you know size and shape and flavor profile. Most things fairly obvious but like why do some oysters grow like let me tie like what's the we used to live downtown novelli about four years ago I we live right this creek and i right after a big rainstorm. A bunch of trees had fallen twigs and sticks and stuff. I create this artificial damanour backyard and started back to water up. So i put my boots on a walk down the water and i started on clog all of this This this debris that collecting her creek and i looked over in this This hill this bank. And i saw this alabaster piece of shell and then started uncovered. An i pulled out completely perfect intact. Oyster shells probably sixteen inches long. Okay and and and really. I mean just amazing. I mean obviously always should have been dead for a long time. it was. It seemed more like a like a fossil bone but in the in the they say the the the roads san francisco paved on ocean shells When it boils down to this like what are your favorite. And how do you make decisions. I'm looking so this. Oyster is probably the most commonly grown oyster. This species of oyster is most commonly grown oyster on the west coast. K- it's I could even Probably go so far as to say it's probably one of the most commonly grown in the world. Because it's the it's consistent it's got a it's a. It's pretty versatile. It handles the Abuse that. And i'm going to call it abuse the handling of of aquaculture and it's got stairs dun-rite it it's exactly. It's a sturdy oyster But it also has one of my favorite flavor profiles and Compared to let's say you you you talked about royster shell that you found in your your creek bank. I would say that. That was a pacific voice. That means that it probably has only been there. Maybe twenty five thirty years now. They the native oyster is the olympic. Stor it's actually one of my favorite oysters to eat. Because it's just got that little blast of flavors kind of copper metallic kit that you get. But they're very tiny and they're also very difficult to grow at an aquaculture situation there. They're sensitive so this is much more durable hoist spars taking the the handling that it takes for try them. Then you've got a model and a komodos who very Is very well known to a tiny cup. Oyster are smaller stor. If you let it grow will grow to that sixteen inch waster bouquet. Good as big as your foot on the you know. It's it's That's where on the on the farming side. We control those things. Then you have the atlantic waster Obviously to the east coast. We grow that here as well. Very different flavor profile memory. I mentioned earlier that the flavors will change throughout the year There are some sort of common flavor descriptions. I can give you usually avoid giving the description. I usually ask you to get to me well to me. There's there's obviously throughout the different times a year when spawning. It's going to have a different texture. You'll have what they call a creamy sort of finish with. Waste dissolves quicker in your mouth but tell me what that flavor is and so you know the differences between january and july. The oysters are going through different cycles. Waters different actually. So tell me what that does so what it does in this case. Let's just talk about this oyster. Okay the this are are pacific oyster. That you have funny. This is going to be one. That's gonna go towards those july and you know the summer months will actually be creamier oyster. We usually try to steer you to a smaller younger oyster so won't be too creamy or spotty And What is spawning texas. Spiny is actually. It would be a Nine of a it'll have creamy gnocchi in almost a bitter this to it so it's usually not what. Somebody wants the pallet k. The the traditional times are based around when they're in the best condition which is usually in the in the late fall. All the way through the spring in the wintertime is the best time for this especially this in this hemisphere. So what you'll get is sort of that That Kind of cucumber in melon flavor on the other thing that you brought up is is that this will actually have some sweetness to it because it's got hygiene levels in it and it does that because it's a broadcast partner. Has a lot of gang eats and that it has to build those games from Reserves lijun is a reserve so when you say gang meats eggs and sperm eggs experiment. You say they produce in the show and then they will. They broadcast into the water. Okay and so because they broadcast spawn. They'll produce a lot so on smaller. It'll be younger. less con. royster won't have as much as far as gambians go also version this that you can get that we grow as well which is a mule so sterile. It's got an extra set of chromosomes and so That's we can grow those. Those will not get spawning so atlantic. I mentioned that Then we also have the european flats sometimes called the. But it's the the european flat is more accurately describe it. I'm a big fan of those. Those are very to the flavor profiles very similar to the Olympia easter case. It's just it's large oyster. Usually and those we have a very limited basis. It's very hard to get seed. And the shell almost looks like a scallop away. Exactly it's a. It's a flattened moisture. It's it's kind of nice fan shape and when you open those. Are you know you have to handle them in a different way because people ended up having problems when they do that. they'll stick their hands. Or whatever with the shucking knife. I call so. I think this is this is so fascinating we've got About a dozen more issues at that. We're definitely going to get through Walk me through. The process may of course be no shock wishes but not everybody who's listening to Walk me through like an oyster. i'm gonna put on your glover here right and then tell me the fundamentals of getting.

sixteen inch sixteen inches san francisco july january twenty five thirty years Olympia easter About a dozen more issues about four years ago atlantic one favorite oysters one of european favorite flavor coast
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

05:27 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Who should look for as a guide legality of it but golden gate park is like amazing for totally things you think of. I mean it's crazy. How much stuff goes out here. It's basically a three mile long farm I think a lot of those people that the bigger it gets in might even be a little harmful to the situation of taking something out of somebody's yard or you know depleting the resource. That's that's here but i Kind of getting into urban farming is another site. Check off of foraging that's very important As for a guide. I'm i'm not too sure. I know there's a lot of Books written just on foraging in san francisco and kind of give you a little hot spots of where things aren't in the studio and golden gate park and certain areas around the city as well and and this is what i love about the subject matter because there's no definitive place to go because it it still feels like sort of new hobby that a lot of people really get into so it's wild so it's like looking up it's crazy it's like looking up clubs right so that's a that's a i wanna go. Maybe facebook or twitter to see if they're club or an enthusiast group that are playing tickets. You're going in parked to point out there. Let you pick. But they point out where stuff is kind of alluding to the fact that you go back on your own and stuff is kinda coleman what do you what are you looking forward to the summer. I mean what. What's what's out there. it's popping up. Like i just think like you know things like wild edibles like see beans that you know. When i was a chef in new york city we would kind of get in the small low clam shell and these things are. Obviously you know probably four or five. Maybe maybe even more you know days out of the water but you know along the the one a one up from marin county going up towards tomorrow's bay there's just cluster after cluster after closer succulent beautiful bright green beans. That are like interesting green. Bean seawater pop. They're just going to ask. So what are you excited about the summer. What what are you looking forward to There's a lot of stuff coming out of the coast right now. A lot of the kelp is available. do dry using dr combo for dashi or some sort of concentrated vegan broth but to realize that that you don't have to necessarily use it from a dry point guy. She's he's a he's a fresh. When did they really listen. Even cook it eat it that way. The item itself instead of just infusing. That's beautiful yeah. There's like there's like these like big Combo plants that wash up on the beach and stinson all the time. I've taken quite a few times. Rents it really. Well i feel like the the the the big flow leaves off the top of it. 'cause it looks like a gigantic leak almost right but yeah but the stalk neon green. You've got a boil it couple times really going to get the bitter tannin flavor that want to pull out of it but you boil it once or twice I've used it as pickles. And the caller is insane. And it just sort of this this Seawater this this ocean assault. Salt note That i think is just. It's just insane which is beautiful raw fish. Yeah there's a lot of a lot of cool stuff out there the A new zealand spinach which grows right outside the parks la. I always have that kind of has the same like oceanic flavor middle herbal with those little water like cellular pods in the back of it. That's a so juicy and crunchy right. Yeah that's a lot of stuff out there. Yeah i love them. And i guys listen You are listening to one of my favorite chefs in san francisco. Jason from radius You got website where people can Can can check you out were Tell them where you're at restaurants. So radius is located at seven th and folsom. I've been there for about four years. The radios the restaurant has. I've been there for about ten months Our website is radius. Sf dot com and. That's very fantastic. So if you're in the city check it out Jason would've everybody listening. Thanks so much. For being part of the podcast. Thank you all right. Talk to you soon. I guys that's that's going to wrap up another Addition of inside the test kitchen. I really wanted to jump into this. I've got one more week on the road With the great food truck race. We're wrapping up the finale This week starting off in tampa. I can't really divulge that's it. You're not in tampa I'm not in tampa right this second. But i'm northern california but Leaving tomorrow and heading back out on the road we get warmer week of it And then i'm really looking forward to summertime got like about on the road since november. I think you have been. I have been shot Food court wars from early last fall into the spring had three week break and then we jumped into the truck race so i am looking forward to unpacking my suitcase for a very long period of time But so we want to jump into this next week we're going to return to Phone calls and everybody else involved in it and look forward to following us on twitter. Instagram on tyler florence and also on bb m Which would just kinda jumped into which is fantastic user. Experience can eat all techy with you and That's a eric. thanks so much appreciate it. Thank you and guys will zoe's we will talk to you next week an inside the test kitchen..

san francisco Jason tyler florence tampa three mile twitter facebook five november tomorrow three week new york This week radius Instagram twice northern california four seven th and folsom once
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

02:39 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"California has a crush on you moon. Everybody welcome back to this week in the task. We've got chef. Jason winning from radius and san francisco A really talented chef. Who's very passionate about four gene. As matter of fact his entire menu is based off of foraging. I want to get him into the conversation Because we just got off the phone with connie green And she's such a fascinating person. I could literally listen to her all day long..

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

06:18 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Making sheep's milk cheeses right here. We're products many more things for you to tasted picnic. I don't be rude. I'm unsure my much of my project when somebody's You know you guys got biscuits here in the middle. I'm a diversified. It's not it's not a lot it's just leg. Okay so you guys like loaves and fishes you know like what do you get to split up. See now with everything going on. We had in the candlestick maker. We've got the baker for the biscuits the butcher we've almost got a nursery rhyme happening. It's it's definitely. It's definitely fairytale question. Where do you. Where do you see like the future of american cookery going going forward. Is it going backwards as if somewhere in the middle. I personally would like to see it. Be somewhere in the middle and as long as we keep. I mean we just made biscuits from my grandmother made biscuits from can she took the cannon smack an exploded outside of the count to call from biscuits the biscuits out of a can over here. And they're they're pretty awesome. Crowd probably agrees whoever got the taste of biscuits and that she's beautiful so tell me. The process by the sheets has got a little ashwell. This is our mountain may cheese. And it's all based off of the classic. Cambier soft ripened style cheese comedy and this one the grayish bluish that you see in here is a vegetable ash coats the cheese where Let's see this is the magnolia to be more the neutral if you if you went to the store kind of compare it to cam and bear because everybody usually sees it in the gourmet market and stuff. I love. she smoked cheese. They're getting better. they're getting better right. Awesome all right so you guys get the biscuit round. Two of here she gets. What about you guys in the back and somebody gonna come on. These people got the expensive seats. Not i'm going to make some friends. You got to pieces okay. I think eric think you probably going to have to keep going about two or three more hundred more times more biscuit making machine so so so. This is the milk cheese and the other allies. Both of these are sheep's okay. We're we're to the farm to table concept and everything else. i mean. this is sheep's milk season right now. Right the upset spring she seasons. You get that season right because the baby born. I love that mother. nature made it right. We're not doing anything that is not supposed to be happening. I i've been a winemaker from us. Ten years and i had a great opportunity to work with michelman dhabi for six those seniors and tony colton. Who's winemaker and they've had forty harvests together right. So i'm walking the vines and we're ready to harvest soviet soviet-bloc and and tony. How do you know when this is exactly ready. Because he has this little. Obi wan kenobi jedi mind. Trick thing he just knows like you know when you know when you know he just and he said see those little specks on the grape. I'm like actually that because you know what that is. I'm like i mean. I guess i'm not really sure because those are be bites so the bees can smell the sugar and they bite and pierce a hole in the grape and then the birds can smell so he says winemaker harvested grapes somewhere between the bees and the birds. They said that's just how you know like like nature's hooks it up this way making in cheap smoke season. I mean god that was same trying to try the f. The salt is beautiful. So so how long does take to ripen thirty to forty five days so we we. We manufacture hurt. She's making makes three different software cheeses. We actually have another one that i unfortunately couldn't bring it's rubbed with spent grain from beer. Making operation from a brewery wasn't ready. I wasn't ready kind of the same texture and everything else but she really can get the hoppy and grains from and then we manufacturing age cheese. Eric took out passing biscuits. We're we do now has to sit for six months the raw milk cheese. It's not legal for six months anyway but Six to nine month that window. And there's when it's going to be really right so tell me how important the biscuit festival is region and because you do a big brush here Two hundred person brunch yesterday. Anybody was there. Thank you for being there. Well you know. I think i got serious picnic going on a period. I ching breath. I'm sorry some wine. She's cheese and a fried chicken. Romance is awesome. Well biscuit festival. The first we've been involved with it lucky to be involved with it for from the first you're on and it just celebrates to me southern heritage. You know you. You told your stories about biscuits. My grandmother used to again on the side of the counter. Sometimes you know that was biscuits sometimes but my mother was a great biscuit maker. You know still a great biscuit maker terrorism. Sorry mom shouldn't around too early but you know just white lily in knoxville tennessee. A all these things bring back memories. They speak to our heritage. And that's really what food to me is a redneck child in the mountains of east tennessee. We shot stuff too. Yeah yeah.

six months Eric six thirty Ten years east tennessee tony colton nine month yesterday Six michelman forty five days Both Two hundred person knoxville tennessee Two first three forty harvests eric
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

05:48 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Everybody welcome back to the podcast biscuit festival. We're having a great time Erica corporate chef is meaning the biscuit station regretting some of our new innovative biscuits and we here with john. Craig is the founder of the festival and my next guest in somebody who i think has a very unique point of cooking here in the country. Because there's not that. Many people chefs that have access to products that he has and he has a not only life story about how he got to blackberry farm or how he became a chef in his route to get here but he's a fantastic guy has got a really fantastic story guys. Please warm of ram applause for josh brothers. The corporate chef and blackberry farms. Are you doing good to see. What's in the bag. We can't really go anywhere without bringing some project. The fried chicken oven standing this whole to make sure southern border remember ridiculous. You what's project man. Yeah a chair okay. Everybody in the front rows fried chicken coop. Hey so what's coming up. I was in memphis yesterday. Haven't bounced around this weekend. We gotta love memphis. We just found out the california tennessee is as long as california is is is is a very long state As you got there and the to change so this yesterday and every year during memphis in may. I never get a chance to go. I always think about it too late. And this year literally in january when we start talking about this in january We've been talking about for a year a year right since like last year. Because i hate the fact that i miss it. So we've stopped off in memphis on the way to knoxville. And we were just gonna go as civilians and go check out the barbecue but they found that was going and they let me be a judge. Yesterday i was an official judge at the memphis and may barbecue will under the rim category. Let's getting better. I feel like. I was like tep on over here. Real biscuit interface. You can make on your book looking. But anyway the reason. I'm bringing him because we stopped by gusts fried chicken yesterday. You guys not like it's an institution and if you haven't been augusta's into run and don't walk some serious. Most delicious fried chicken number had in my life and every time i walk in the blown away by how warm it is. It's like a joint right and they do you know they got one thing on the menu this fried chicken because why would have to do anything else. You got a couple of side dishes to kinda mix it up a little bit. You know but they do and it's unbelievable. Tell me about your fried chicken. 'cause i'm i'm dying diners. You know you. You mentioned already foreign buttermilk up. Everybody's in the room should be familiar with cruise farnborough by the end of this weekend right. The recipe is simple. I mean you ever complicate fried chicken you end up mocking it up right. So we've got a leg while the best pieces of chicken fry obviously in buttermilk a little bit of hot sauce. Maybe in their few spices and tell me what the bottom chicken well buttermilk gives it certainly gives it a richness right. Oh i'm so. I'm having a moment that we can turn the lights down. We're going to be alone. It certainly gives it a richest. I'll see you get old twang from your all the cultures and everything in the buttermilk brushes. You know it's not so flat on your pal and then simply breaded with some great aunts and mills corneille and whatnot to any on the oil or the temperature or anything that three hundred twenty five degrees a little bit probably a little bit slower than everybody's used to keeps the browning nice even keeps the temperature up this. The cross stays nice some christian at the same time. This is so good. Food is so delicious man and tell me about reforms. because i'm gonna i hate. I've never been there. I'm dying to go. I know i've been busy busy. Food trucks all over the a lot of vacation time. We have three kids. I got three restaurants goats and stuff gets chickens. Goats and chickens b.'s. keeping busy. Tell me about like reforms. Because i think it's the most interesting ecosystem you know. It's a hotel two restaurants experience you go there and just awash with emotion because things are just so right there. You got to go the restaurant flick because we're table earlier and now the idea farm-to-table has been so overuse bistro gourmet. Everybody does it. Because you put baby carrots on. It was farm-to-table necessarily but you guys do it right right. So black reform is a small luxury hotel. You can be defined as that located in just outside of the great smoky mountains national park. We're situated on.

january yesterday california john knoxville last year memphis three kids Yesterday this year three hundred two restaurants Craig one thing this weekend farnborough black reform christian three restaurants twenty five degrees
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

07:49 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Say love biscuits his love. So it's okay to love your biscuit. Just that he loves. He loved his biscuit. I mean i guess you can't do that as international you're like minded people we encourage. You can't do that on the street but the biscuit festival. But there's no biscuit rolls or necessarily so so. Tell me how people here this year we estimate about twenty thousand people biscuit. Lovers came to downtown knoxville thousand. People isn't that crazy. I love that. Yeah and people from all over it. I know we had people from seattle chicago austin florida. I mean draws people from california. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. California group is so brings people from all across the country and hope hopefully someday across the world to knoxville get to share our love for biscuits so we were talking downstairs earlier about biscuits because we because i think a biscuit is the american croissant. Me kind of of the things that it's a defines american cuisine and culture and i think it's something that needs to be preserved and really talked about and perfected and we can do really kind of interesting new versions of what's what you can't like this. Golden biscuit needs to be the goal of biscuit forever. And i think when you have Festivals like this really kind of celebrate the true artistry of great american heritage. Hungry keeps his ideas alive absolutely in one of the things. We say you know when people talk to you about biscuits first thing to do is smile and then they start to tell your story and you even said when you said your grandmother was the one who taught you how to make biscuit and there was a smile across your face when you said it. You know there's something about it. We couldn't predicted that it was gonna people. Were going to react this way. But there's something very fundamental about it that resonates very deeply with people and so it it really is something that everybody shares whether they grew up with it or not so twenty. Thousand people were here. Tell me about the details of the festival. There was a kickoff biscuit baking contest. We drew contestants from all across the country from seattle. One from missouri was in the in the finals They send in recipes and we picked the best ones and invite them come. Baked live so that happened all yesterday afternoon because there for part of the big thing. So we have a student category to kind of encourage the next generation of biscuit makers we have savary sweet and then a special for biscuit recipes. That don't fit into any of the other categories the other kennedy or other category. And and tell me about some of those like what are some wild fiscal. We ended up having a gosh. We had one that was Fried green tomato and cheese biscuit interstate actually stuffed and then it sounds pretty good right. Yeah yeah yeah. Oh yeah yeah. Yeah the winning. This was actually a chesapeake bay. Biscuit inc crab meat and all sorts of now talking. So is this a sandwich. Crab cake was folded. And it was a it was a sandwich that the biscuit itself had some of the ingredients incorporated into it and then it was exactly and then sliced and then had the in inside and this one just one. She the grand champion. Wendy a golden biscuit You biscuits you in a biscuits are out there is. There's only give everybody you guys all going biscuit now. Now you actually actually you. An alton brown are the only two that had the golden biscuits the biscuits they you know or or silver. Yes over sober carries up now. They went hold prize basket. They get a sash a crown they get the honor of being the grand champion of the biscuit bake off. And where do you see festival growing to. Yeah well what we want to do. And we've seen it happen. Is you know the started as a relatively local thing. And we wanted to sort of highlight some of the great producers that we have in this region like crews dairy farm and like mr benton with his country hams. And that's crazy. Yeah i love it. Super smokey really delicious right and then you know. Blackberry farm has been a part of the festival from the very beginning. Your josh later on about that so it was really to bring people here because a lot of people don't know the great Assets that we have here in the food world and so we were able to accomplish that and then over the past five years. We've grown it to draw people from further away so it's more regional but then this past year or two. I mean it's really become national. I'm in terms of the the amount of press that we receive in terms of the participants in the festival and the attendees it's become truly national festival in five years which you we couldn't predict it. That is incredible. You know i. I love stories like this. And where do you see the festival growing to well. We are going to big well. Our goal is not to turn this from a twenty thousand person festival into a fifty thousand person festival. It's really to to maintain the quality of it to continue to expand in terms of where we draw people from and to spread the gospel of the biscuit. You guys thomas as weekends a lot of fun right it comes from a really good place and tell me about your background so you grew up here. I grew up here and Did completely different things as the corporate world for the past ten years of Been fixing up buildings in downtown knoxville. That's why i got involved in doing events and things and was not a food person and through this have have just opened up a whole new world sort of building. This theater studying amazing starting it. I think it's one of the best performing venues in the in the country if not the world kenny. Rogers was here last night he was. Yeah you went. it's good. it's good enough for the gambler. It's gonna for me. Absolutely the way i see it. I i really want to thank you so much for inviting us to be a part of this festival because you know my heart and soul you can take a boy on the south south of the boy and libyan california and being a chef in california and showing my pay chef. I remember and this is just come to me right now. My patients chef. And i were doing an event at the masters in augusta and i had to hogs on the smoker and i was grilling onion and tomato and chili and i was gonna make the sort of like california barbecue sauce thick and pulpy right not salsa. That was assault shirt and we because it was a gossip. We wanna make biscuits in my pastry chef matama. Sarah huckabee unbelievably talented. Pastry chef. did not make biscuit right. That crazy bless his heart was as i say the south eric and i walk over here. He's like oh bless your heart we've got we've got the best that ladies and gentlemen this is. Our biscuit is incredible. You're making you make you make no one so there isn't that well so this is so so having an emotional connection right first of all i wanted to wants to wants to touch my biscuit is i want. I want you to feel it. But i don't squeeze it too hard be gentle. It's warm isn't that wild so so it's super here so you can squeeze my head. I got i got a lot of. I ended up for everybody and.

seattle california Sarah huckabee libyan yesterday afternoon Thousand people this year Rogers last night south eric matama about twenty thousand people knoxville two twenty augusta fifty One California american
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

06:04 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Hey everybody welcome back to inside the test kitchen tyler florence and we are here the two thousand and fourteen biscuit festival the We're raising the roof lazing beautiful tennessee theater and beautiful downtown knoxville and eric harrelson or corporate chef. Coming out eric. And once you guys starting in the podcast you're going to be really character. come on sale. Oh the folks. Eric harrelson's our corporate chapman. He makes good coast to coast. We travel around and we kind of fun demo zoltan. So we're gonna we're gonna dive into this really kind of fun biscuit recipe that we talked about guys ready to see this awesome cool good deal so so what we have here spoil it for anyone here so we know we know. There's no mirrors appear. We know there's no big so we're gonna try to hold stuff up and be very explanatory as far as what we're doing but and this might look a little tacky but trust me. This is really simple when you think about biscuits and i say this all the time when we're sort of thinking about what recipes do we really want pre machine those speakers where psyche secrets. I've never heard of what premature a microphone before it was pretty loud. Felt awkward right. But here's the deal. When you're making a biscuit i mean we have to be real ourselves for second. Like how long does it take making a biscuit. How does take a awhile. How long forty-five minutes she. She's this lady's challenging huge searching fifteen. She's bragging bright she's got a fifteen gold ribbons inner pocket. By the way. How would you take the biscuits. Thirty minutes twenty thirty minutes including women the evidence zach including more than the other which is actually really important so so how many people have a pancake home. You got pancake riddle. Come on you know what's down there in the cat someplace. You may have lost the court to it. You may not be able to give power to it. But she's got one so what we're going to do is we're going to put together a biscuit. That in my opinion has the same emotional connection to a very traditional recipe. But we're going to approach it from a different point of view right so we're using lebane- agent right so using baking powder baking soda. We're using two different kinds of moisture reason water. Is i want a light biscuit. We're using buttermilk for tain. We're going to melt. The butter down to the butter is not necessarily in separated chunks but it has a universal butter flavor from using white lily. Flower joel right. There's an option exactly. I think it makes the best biscuits. So this is where this gets really kind of interesting because to me the floppiness right with a traditional recipe the fluffing from taking coal butter cutting it and small size pieces. It's got to be frozen to write. That gets folded into the flower so the butter gets coated with flour. So those little cell pockets. You won't call them get locked in there and then when you add the moisture. The butter becomes a solid mass. In the buttermilk. Right when you roll the biscuit dough out you cut it you take that biscuit as is you can throw it on a sheet pan to the oven. The heat transfer causes the biscuit to rise. The melting of the butter causes the biscuit to separate into flakes in the different layers. Right so when the butter melts does a couple of things the fat permeates the biscuits has good flavor to it right but then the whole that creates the steam butter pushes the biscuit up. Its steam that pushes a biscuit and causes it to rise. We have made a though that uses a whipped cream canister and the same cartridge used whipped. Cream we're going to inject air into a biscuit dough and then we're going to put it on a pancake riddle and making the biscuit dough and then having a complete cook biscuit i can do it and twelve minutes. Please don't out yourself on paper paper on at twelve minutes so eric talked me through the rest of here. What do you got okay. So we got we ever flower so people can powder soda are yeah sugar. How the hell. Yeah hell yeah butter butter in order to get all this right and then we have butter milk and a little water fifty fifty buttermilk and water role in. So we're all in so. This replaces the idea of freezing the butter and cutting the butter and folding the about iran. Because the day it's going to melt anyway what we wanted air bubbles. We want air bubbles not necessarily melted butter. And you don't have to worry about over mixing it with which is another which another important thing to you know. Sometimes we overwork biscuit and get really tough right which you could see this. Let me see if we can hold it up a little bit so you guys can see this. See this batter. Okay so this batter soft all right so it's incorporated so this this would not be biscuit dough. Whatever hold up right like this is. This does too soft to roll out right. So you'd have to add more flour to this which we create a denser product. And we've actually made a doe that stops right here. The next thing is incorporating air hypo.

forty-five minutes Thirty minutes twelve minutes Eric harrelson tyler florence eric eric harrelson twenty thirty minutes fifteen fifty fifty two different kinds biscuit tennessee theater downtown knoxville one fifteen gold thousand and fourteen second two
"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

07:32 min | 7 years ago

"florence" Discussed on Podcasts – Tyler Florence Test Kitchen

"Please let's at this time. Give a big east tennessee big orange. Welcome to tyler florence knoxville. Wow this beautiful theater this place. You guys have to get time. Did you guys have a couple of biscuits this weekend. You know what. I am really happy to be here. I grew up in greenville south carolina. So it's not too far away. Thank greenville couple of greenland people. Here green vegas they call it the vegas that is greenville. The food culture. Here i think is very important. And i think it's important on a lotta different levels to be preserved. And i think what's happening here in a pockets of the south the really kind of representing what i call. Great american heritage cookery at it's finest and to have the international biscuit festival here in knoxville. Some pretty special. Don't you think so tonight. We got something fun for you. How many people are techy. You listen to podcasts and stuff like that podcast people like podcast so this recording right now as a matter of fact what. We're recording right. The second is actually going to on a podcast called inside the test kitchen. And it's a new multimedia platform that we're working on in marin county california where i live marin and every week as a matter of fact almost every day we're going to be producing great content great recipes video contents and places that we can interact together. And i like this new idea. Lot test. kitchen is really a think tank. Because i want to cook stuff that you guys really want to watch me cook or learn how to cook or cooke yourselves. So we're going to be producing this new multimedia platform that you'll see kind of unraveling and really develop between now and november twelfth. Cookbook called inside. The kitchen comes out in november fourth. And we've got a big coast to coast bookstore coming up. We're definitely gonna try to knoxville for sure. Our good friends from food network of here and the new idea of having this think tank lab bill to create new concepts and create new ideas and food. I think that to me is just fantastic. So we can dive into things like preserving american heritage cookery right and really kind of nailing down great recipes and also giving you guys a place where we can talk to each other so if you if you send me an email and i'm not kidding it'll be the simple. Listen i got this tuna noodle casserole. It'll be like food nine one one back in the day i'm talking about i got this tuna noodle castle can't get it right. Bubba about will actually make that next week. We might be a little twist on it right but we'll make something really kind of fun. So what you listening to tonight. What we're recording tonight. It'll probably be up in a couple of days. We'll be a podcast available on itunes and it's under the new and noteworthy section in the podcast section and also on android right so view the new android gas and play along too so we got a couple of fun things for tonight. We are going to be doing some cooking right. That was a little tricky to figure out this beautiful theater. Don't wanna bring you flames. Although i do here. Kenny rogers has some fireworks. Your last night so smells like the gambler up here. But we're going to be making this kind of cool biscuit tonight because in the spirit of the test kitchen also the biscuit festival. We thought we'd make a new interesting twist on biscuit. What's your favorite part of a biscuit is. The crunch is the soft texture on the inside the crunch top right the butter the butter. You gotta have the butter. So there's a lot of schools and philosophies matter of fact john craig the biscuit boss the founder the festival we were talking for two hours and honestly. He's backstage right now. We could talk for two more about biscuits because to me as far as american heritage. Cookery right a thing like a biscuit. Translate so many different ways right. it's all nuances. i'm also a winemaker. in california cabernet sauvignon. Grapes are technically the same thing. You can get nuances of tear war. Cloning and that kind of thing. But if you've got a alexander valley. Cabernet sauvignon or rutherford cabot. Cabernet sauvignon grape on you. Take it to two different winemakers. You're going to get two different things. And i think it's the same thing with biscuits writes about texture. So we're we've invented a new way to make bread out of a whip cream machine kind coal. No one seen this premiering this tonight and it might even be a little. Thank you very much applaud. When you see when we pull it off might slovene all the drawing room stage but to me if you really think about a biscuit. My grandmother taught me how to make when i was a kid. My grandmother in lincoln county georgia florence. Mama was her name. Name is edith. And she's little lady about this big she. She was taller. When i remember when i was little. But we might. It was a rural part of georgia and my grandfather was a jack of ally different traits. Because back. then you kind of had to be weren't really like there was a town doctor but other than that people did. People survived right so he was a carpenter and he was a farmer right and he and he shared a lot of things so every year we harvest couple of hogs right. And i remember a grapple the house and the back where you'd smoke some ham and my grandmother take the trimmings from the harvest hog and she boil it down and we'd have lord and that's what she made biscuits with. That's what she scrambled eggs as a kid so is delicious. Moisture to me is the secret of a beautiful biscuit. It's gotta be fluffing. It's gotta be light right not necessarily dance because then you sorta tiptoeing into like irish soda bread right when he gets to crunching to debts right. I mean it's when it's too crunchy. It's actually really nice. Be smothered with good sausage gravy in a poached egg. It's kind of nice to have contrast but a biscuit alone if analyzing of biscuit for a biscuit it's gotta have three thinks it's got a good texture on the outside. It's got up a crunch contrast. So i think it's got to have a good fluffy center moist and fluffy center. And then what. This'll you talk about the sooner. It's got like butter right. That's what i want. we've We've come up with a really great recipe for that we're gonna show later and then we have to unbelievable gas tonight. I think you guys are gonna kick off. And also we've set up some microphones here at the end. If i start thinking about your cooking questions now right and if you made somebody some bad clams or if you burn the house down. It won't leave this room except for the podcasts. It won't leave this room. We'll blurp out your name. You can be anonymous but if something happened to you in. The kitchens probably happened somebody else right. And and we'll we'll we'll we'll fix it and so that'll be at the end. We're gonna have john craig. The festival founder of.

android november fourth itunes john craig next week inside the test kitchen Kenny rogers november twelfth two hours tonight edith georgia alexander valley marin second last night couple of hogs tyler florence marin county greenville south carolina