17 Burst results for "Flint Taylor"

"flint taylor" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

05:56 min | 7 months ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"He kept his inward box out on open display at a table in the police station. He trained dozens of other Chicago officers in his techniques which expanded over. Over the years to include electric cattle prods, simulate and simulated executions. BURGE's officers often beat subjects with telephone books. Flashlights battled bats, the burned men with hot radiators and cigarettes. They put plastic bags over the heads of others and suffocated them. This went on for a very very long time. The into began in nineteen, eighty, two, when two police officers were murdered, and Burge, and his team tortured the shit out of a pair of black brothers until they confessed. The injuries, one of them suffered were significant enough that a medical official reported on them, and that was the first crack in the Burj system. Allegations of torture by Burgeon has been though didn't break through the Blue Wall of silence until a nineteen eighty nine civil lawsuit by the law office, one of the attorneys behind this case, who later represented many victims was flint Taylor he described the existence of Burge's unit as an unremitting official cover up, that has implicated a series of police superintendent, numerous prosecutors more than thirty police, detectives and supervisors, and most notably Richard M Daley, the city's former mayor and a previous state's attorney. The whole story came out and bits and pieces through a mix of victims, coming forward and anonymous sources within the department. One of these anonymous sources was a cop who left again. Anonymous voice messages for Flint Taylor, Taylor and his fellows nickname, this guy deep badge, so part of the lesson here is that after seventeen years of torture that was enthusiastically supported at every level of the Chicago PD, a couple of good cops did finally work up the courage to leave anonymous voicemails after a lawyer had figured out the basics of the case and publicize them. That's what good cops get you. Yeah Yeah Yeah like three of them and then and it takes seventeen years to do anything. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah! Burge was eventually accused of torturing more than one hundred people virtually all of whom were black between nineteen, seventy, two and nineteen, ninety one. That seems recent. Yeah! At this point, we know that there's probably over two hundred victims. We will never know the true number of victims of these guys were executed. A lot of them died in prison in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three, the Chicago. Police Board voted to fire John Burge this interrupted plans. The local fraternal order of police had made that same year to honour Burge in for their officers with a parade float. All of the other four officers were also accused of torturing people. By, the time he was fired, Burge had risen to the rank of commander. He was not charged criminally until two thousand eight, and not sent to prison until two thousand eleven, he got out of prison in two thousand, fourteen. Chicago has paid out millions of dollars in reparations to victims, but an unknown number of Burge's victims still remain in prison. Multiple people were released from death row as a result of all of this coming to light, but we will again never know how many innocent men were executed, burge died in. In! Two thousand eighteen four years after he was released from prison Chicago's police. Union issued a statement on their facebook page offering condolences to the Burj family, and insisting it does not believe the full story about the verge cases has ever been told Dean Angelo former head of the Chicago fraternal order of police to reporters. I don't know that John. Burge got a fair shake based on all the years and years of service that he gave the city. He insisted that burge put a lot of bad guys in prison. God who thousand eighteen the cops who believe this are still on the force. Just..

John Burge Chicago flint Taylor Police Board official Burj system Richard M Daley Burgeon facebook superintendent Burj family Union attorney commander Dean Angelo
"flint taylor" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"He requirement filed along brief summarizing the evidence and its power to the people we were sort of an attitude of nothing left to lose and we had an opinion that basically vindicated what we've been saying that there was more than enough evidence to go to the jury on the federal state and city and county conspiracy I went I had both been held in contempt many times those were overturned and it led to of actually to a new trial and a settlement of one point eight five million dollars for some thirteen years after we had filed suit just a magnificent piece of legal perseverance and and skill Jeff hostage to wonder what you did but I wanted to ask you to please talk about Fred Hampton maybe you could read a portion of your book the assassination of Fred Hampton for us well I I I thank you Fred Hampton was framed up on it I screamed Pentium bark of ice cream to the local kids and he ended up with a sense of two to five years and went down the monarch penitentiary we got him out on appeal by then he came back out and gave a speech and this was in the summer August of nineteen sixty nine and Clint and I were both present there and I just want a and I sat there and freight came out my colleague flint Taylor found an opening in a row about halfway back after a few minutes things quieted down there was a hush a moment later Fred emerge from the fat and strode to the pulpit everyone stood up and clapped the words wall shook with the thunder.

Fred Hampton Clint Jeff flint Taylor
"flint taylor" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Attorney Jeff Haas was in a police lock up in Chicago interviewing the fiance of Fred Hampton she was telling him how the police pulled her from the room as Fred Hampton lay unconscious on their bad she heard one officer say he still alive she then heard two shots a second officer said she's good and dead now she looks at Jeff and asks what can you do the assassination of Fred Hampton is Haas's personal account of how he and people's law office partner flint Taylor went after Hamptons assassins they ultimately prevailed over unlimited government resources and an FBI conspiracy his book however isn't just a story of justice delivered it also portrays Hampton in a new light as a dynamic community leader and an inspiration in the fight against injustice Jeff Haas is a long time member of the national lawyers guild who has dedicated his career to working for social justice in nineteen sixty nine he and three other lawyer set up the people's law office in Chicago their clients included the black Panthers SPS members and many other political activist Haas went on to handle cases involving prisoners' rights police torture and the wrongfully accused Jeff welcome back to law and disorder glad to be here glad to be with you you have we both read and love your book I tell us how you came to write it it's really not just only about Fred Hampton's murder but it's also a personal and political biography of sorts well I started to write like a lawyer like you know it's going to prove what happened and bill Ayers talked me into going to graduate school and get an MFA in.

Jeff Haas Chicago Fred Hampton officer community leader murder bill Ayers Attorney partner flint Taylor FBI black Panthers
"flint taylor" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"And made the announcement today during a Senate democratic caucus on the final day of the veto session the announcement comes as to Senate Democrats to target the federal investigations and the seven year old Collison has come under fire for his handling of those investigations hopes to change this year's casino legislation to get more cash for the city Chicago fizzled day at the capitol in the final days of the fall Beato session to go she Asians continued toward re opening this year's casino legislation ultimately there were not enough votes to do it the bill's sponsor state representative Bob Reda owner crafting a gaming Beller crafting any type will you take it slowly and if you put different pieces in place it's like a puzzle filling the puzzled needed to go slow at it if you look at what we did in the spring it was a massive package inner still work people happy so there's always going to be a perfect bill but you keep working at it Rita says twenty twenty we'll see more efforts getting more money for the city from that casino at the Illinois capitol Dave doll newsradio one oh five point nine FM the up the I really some of the files on John birch US Chicago police detective a commander was accused of torturing within two hundred suspects from nineteen seventy two to nineteen ninety one and it was in nineteen ninety one when attorney flint Taylor whose law office Burge allegedly threatened to blow away with a shot gun wrote a letter notifying police in nineteen ninety one about the alleged torture of Andrew Wilson and within a year or two after that he was fired by the police board for that torture at that time we were also on covering a great deal of additional evidence that supported that other men I had been tortured by bird ten people working under command George was eventually centers four and a half years in federal prison he died last year well next week marks the anniversary of a major speech in American history and you can come up commemorate honored to fifty sixth anniversary of Gettysburg in spring two Abraham Lincoln's speech of the commemoration of the soldiers national cemetery in Gettysburg Pennsylvania on November nineteenth eighteen sixty three is one of the most famous in American history the Abraham Lincoln library and museum in Springfield will commemorate the event by putting a hand written copy of the speech on public display communications director Chris will says it can be an emotional experience to see Lincoln's signature speech in his own handwriting people tear up when they see it people actually cried at times because this is a document that really talks about what America is all about the address is on display until December second after that it returns to the library's climate controlled vault rob hard news radio one oh five point nine FM traffic and weather coming up to me to be able to news time seven oh so what.

Senate seven year
"flint taylor" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

17:31 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Call right now to five six thousand one and make your pledge Harry Richardson called and made his pledge and says keep up the good work. We all appreciate Allen's depth of knowledge and I wanted to second. So if you appreciate Allen's program, I assume you do otherwise, you won't be listening right now. Call two five six two thousand one eight two five six two thousand and one I don't want to take too much of the hour with pledge wrapping primarily, because our guest today has some important stuff to say. He is Flint Taylor. Flint is a founding partner of the Chicago people's law office, which has been dedicated to litigating civil rights. Police violence, government misconduct and death penalty cases for nearly fifty years. He was one of the lawyers who represented the families of murdered Chicago Black Panthers. Fred Hampton and Mark Clark in the landmark civil rights case, a civil suit against the Chicago police. The Cook County state's attorney be is Cohen. Tell pro agents for many for more than thirty years. He's represent numerous survivors of Chicago police torture in criminal, and civil cases, and in campaign seeking reparations for those victims. He's been involved in numerous cases involving wrongful conviction and imprisonment and police. Cover-ups. He was one of the lead lawyers in obtaining a five million dollar settlement for seventy four victims of illegal strip in body. Cavity searches by the Milwaukee police department in his currently representing victims of torture, and abuse, the Chicago police departments secret interrogation site, known as home in square. Flint, Taylor's incredible new book and I do mean incredible. They've been going through it, and it's, it's absolutely must entitled the torture machine, racism, and police violence in Chicago is a wide ranging remarkable work spending five day decades in the career of the windy city's most notable people's lawyer Flint, Taylor. Welcome to w RT. Well, thank you. It's great to be on with you Allen. I'm very pleased to have you. Let's jump right in, in again at you listening listeners, give us a call at six eight two five six two thousand in one to pledge support for what the station does twenty four seven three sixty five what the public affairs all the things we bring you. But again, I've said it before I have people that come up to me on the street and said, gee, you doing great stuff. I love your love your hour on Thursdays show. Your support here at six eight two five six two thousand and one. All right. Fling taylor. Let's start at an essence simple level. Give listeners some brief sketch of this, or the scope of this book, that's a history, but it's also a book for the present. It's an expose of police violence. What did what did you set out to do in this work? Well, when people ask me about the book and asked me, how long it took me to, to ride it. I give two answers one is took a little over three years to ride, and it took fifty years to live it, and, and what I set out to do was to try to document the remarkable cases and events having to do with police violence and racism in Chicago. Over the fifty years, that I had been working first as a law student then for the last forty seven as a lawyer with the people's law here in Chicago, and it starts out with my involvement in the Fred Hampton fascination and going to the apartment, where Fred Hampton was murdered only hours after these events happened, and being involved in their remarkable thirteen year struggle both as a law student and later as a trial. Lawyer uncovering and exposing the realities of Fred Hampton case was not a shootout between the Black Panthers. And, and the police, I was not simply a shoot in, of course, was ninety bullets versus one being fired that it was not simply murder, or murders, even though it was. The murder of Fred Hampton and Mark Clark, but it was a political assassination, political assassination, that came straight from Washington, and FBI, and Hoover's Cohen, tell Pearl program. So I start out with that math. My first chapter it's very telling an important chapter on, then the book goes on to document the some thirty two now years of struggle here in Chicago at which myself and my office has been involved from from that time to the present in fighting against exposing, and attempting, and I think successfully helping to change the narrative about torturing. That was led by commander on the south side of Chicago and span. Twenty years, Flint. We have also here in the studio met Rotschild with the Wisconsin. Democracy campaign formerly of the progressive magazine in asked him to join us today. So I just wanna throw out a question for you. Flint following up on what you're saying about the Hampton and Clark assassinations. You are there. You said at the scene. Shortly thereafter, could you tell right away what was the scene like you tell right away that the story they were tone wasn't the accurate stats. I mean it was it was shocking. I knew Fred Hampton he was our client. And I was basically the same age as he was, I was twenty three it was twenty one I was just a fledgling law student, and he was a dynamic political leader and charismatic speaker and someone who we learned both at the time and later was was targeted by by by police in the FBI. But when we walked in the door as I describe in the book, the shock the show. Doc of seeing the blood and seeing the bullet holes and, and, and just all of that quickly, turn to having an evaluation on the spot that it was a murder a crime saying, and it was the next ten days, we spent taking the evidence lining up all the bullet holes documenting through photographs and film, and just picking up the all the pieces of the bullets and, and, and, and, and all of that, and the bloody bad and all bad, I should say, just, yes, all of that was, it was a documented and documental crime scene murder scene, and what the pampers did, which was really remarkable was to have tours of the apartment, every every day because the police had less. Left. It open and thousands of people from the community came through, and they walk walk through, and the Panthers show them the bed, where for at Hampton was was murdered with the blood on it. They showed the book bullet riddled walls, and they talked about the murders. And at one point an African American older woman walk through and just happen to be where I was standing, and she shook her head and she said, ain't nothing but a northern lynching, and that's always stuck with me and and was very good. Character say Shen of, of what people saw when they went through that apartment. And what we saw. And, and analyzed no Flint tailored. The clearly that moment. Reads it stands as a preface to it comes in, in the next fifty years, clearly, a formative experience for you. Let's get into the meat of the story that is the decades long reign of terror carried out by police in a broader and broader criminal Justice system that continues right up to the moment, used the phrase, systemic, and systematic racism and brutality, institutionalized torture, and so on talk about the torture machine, the, the actual device that sits on the front cover of your book, as well as in addition, of course, the broader metaphor. There's the torture machine that these police use in, in forcing confessions of crimes, not committed, but also a much broader apparatus of repression. Yes there, there is a double meaning to the torture machine. In the name of the book, they, they boxed that you see with the wires. In the generator in the box on the cover is affect simile of the box, which was one of the torture devices that the that the Lieutenant who became commander, Jon Burge used along with his men on the south side of Chicago at I detective area, and to torture people into giving confessions so that is one part of torture machine. And as you pointed out, as well that torture machine also represents and the machine here in Chicago, the political machine the Daley machine as its as, as has been quite rightly known for, for decades most of that, fifty years, that, that, that the book spans the democratic machine, whatever terminology, is used political machine that is part and parcel. Of the reason that it was and is his stomach and systematic, the racist torture, the racist, tally, this couldn't have happened without the cooperation without the acquiescence without the cover up of the power structure. And when we talk about it, we're, we're looking at power structure, that was for so many of these years, headed up by Richard m Daley, both as the head prosecutor in the eighties, and then as the mayor in the nineties and two thousands, so that one of the thrust of the book, not only is to show that torture itself to give voice to the men, African American men who were tortured some one hundred twenty or thirty have been documented to this point. But also to track not only bird. But detract daily and the superintendents and, and the power structure, and how they were involved in a very deep way in in pattern and practice of torture gives a call at six away, two five six two thousand one make a pledge to this hour. Make a pledge to the station. Matter of fact, we have. The book here as a premium today. So give us a call. If you wanna pick up a copy of this important book by Flint, Taylor six oh, eight two five six two thousand and one. No. There, those, of course, Flynn Taylor, who would say, well, this is a story of bad apples did. It's renegade cops that were running this, you know, run out of the precinct couple of precincts, of course headquarters, but that that it's not reflective of that systemic insisted Matic. Institutionalized racist violence that we've alluded to what do you say to those folks? I think that they the book and, and the evidence speaks for itself, that if it were wanted to bad apples, that, if this was somehow against the flow of, of what the power structure, and the machine wanted to accomplish than they would have been rooted out that wouldn't have happened over a twenty year period. The man who was at the vortex of it, and who led it on Jon Burge wouldn't have gone from a patrolman to a detective to a sergeant to Lieutenant to commander in the shortest time period in, in the history of the Chicago police department. He not only was covered for an encouraged, but this is what they wanted. You have to remember the political era, not only in Chicago, but also across the country. It was a it was a law and order. Period. I'm period of mass incarceration where where a lot of the roots of the current mass incarceration started during the Reagan era. Of course, we can go all the way back to the Nixon era on that. But that if you've got the, the arrest if you've got the conviction if you send people to penitentiary, if you send people to death row, particularly African American men who were allegedly gang leaders or califor-, other people that, that were marginalized in this society. Then you, you were didn't matter how you did it. And in fact, those premium put on that. So it had to be system, and as as, as it came on covered. And what's interesting about the book among other things, as we started out with one big case of torture of a man, too. Men who are charged optimally convicted of killing killing two white Kat, and they would torture, particularly the one who is alleged to be the trigger man on on on killing the cops to within an inch of his life, but nobody cared. He went to death row that evidence came out. And we ended up representing him in a civil case in, in federal court, alleging his constitutional rights have been violated not during that case. And it was build in the media, as you know, cop killer black cop killer versus a decorated Vietnam, veteran commander John Birch. And but during that I started to get anonymous letters from someone within the police department who worked with Burge, he was too afraid to put his face or name to it. He was an honest. We ended up calling him d badge and but he laid it all. All out. He laid out that this was systemic that this was racist daily knew about it that all of his daily spot. Prosecutors knew about it, and that the superintendent about it, and that they, they covered it, and they encouraged it and that became the blueprint for what we were able to prove the next twenty to twenty five years. So we went from one outrageous case, case bet, the was no chance really going in to win given the odds of, of, of a poor black man convicted of a double-murder the cop this is commander to where we stand now where the narrative quite rightly talks about an Torius police commander who is aided and abetted by the power structure, and Richard m Daley, and. In particular, to commit this systemic torture in order to obtain convictions, and send people to jail in the penitentiary end to be part and parcel of mass incarceration. Give us a call at two five six two thousand and one with a pledge this hour because you're not gonna hear Trent excuse me, Flint, Taylor or any other guests that we strive to bring you here on W, R T..

Chicago Flint Taylor Flint Fred Hampton commander Chicago police department Jon Burge murder Mark Clark Allen Chicago Black Panthers Richard m Daley Hampton Flynn Taylor Harry Richardson Cohen superintendent Cook County
"flint taylor" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Ordered it from Samsung the components are actually, on the circuit board, but it's modified, so you can't use the software to use the radio built into it. And there's been a few peeps here near on the internet about trying to get legislation affected that would require manufacturers to leave those circuits functional. So smart phones could pick up FM radio. Wow. There's a circuitry there. Yeah. It's just different carriers disable it because they want you to stream. They want you to use minutes. They want you to pay money to them, right? Well, if you enjoyed hearing that information. Not you Terry. But the listeners. Realize that you're listening to w our t- about ten minutes. We're almost done with the show. We'd like to. Hey, I haven't mentioned Kathy Warren. Fatty, and Elizabeth lately. Sometimes when I mentioned their names, somehow. Door and a wild. Dave. No, they no. They haven't and Kathy hasn't wrapped on the glass. Real hard either to make me think there's an earthquake going on. The point is Teri to five six two thousand one is the number to call donate the w RT, if you like to ask if you like the noontime show. Public affair. If you like letters, politics, string, sounds strictly jazz sounds, and then the war news. And if you like psycho acoustics. And then the shows after that, and the next day and the next day works on all the time. So there's so much to choose from in terms of music, and information talk, you can back and forth. You can call in talk to Flint, Taylor or anybody. So two five six two thousand one. If you wanna support that..

Kathy Warren Samsung Teri Elizabeth Flint Dave Taylor ten minutes
"flint taylor" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"I don't think that you couldn't you couldn't hire your relatives Terry. That's called nepotism. But if you're on the air, and they want to donate to the show that you're doing that's fine. But can I take my kids over to meet to Queen of England? That's a good question. I don't I don't think you're gonna be doing anything like that anytime soon as they say, speaking of anytime soon, Terry, the in about nineteen minutes, you and I are, are outta here. So we've got a sort of step up the game. And thank. Mark Dana donated by telephone, I believe, and then Amy last person to have donated online and everybody else that we've mentioned already. And hey, the people that we're going to mention because you're about to donate in the next. Third of an hour or so two five six two thousand and one or online W RTFM dot ORG Kerry. Why should people even donate? Well, I mean, you know, we, we talk a lot about all these different things like the two different t shirts pint mugs of beer and all that other stuff. But you and I, both know the main reason to contribute WHAT it, so that when you go to your radio and turn it on your favorite radio station. Is there for you? Doing something playing music, and Ebeling volunteers to come in and play their favorite music, bringing you tobacco see now putting crackpots like like Helen rough on the air so they can pontificate about all the ills of this wonderful country in some kind of unpatriotic, wave while I wonder, what who Allen's gusts is going to be today, but I can tell you that host, Alan rough guests will be noted civil rights, litigator, Chicago, and Chicago attorney Flint Taylor. They'll be discussing his important book that torture, machine, racism, and police violence in Chicago. And you're invited to call an participate or pledge during that program at two five six two thousand one. All right. See you don't. I don't think you're gonna hear Flint Taylor on to too many other stations, Terry. Maybe not you know he might end up on democracy now with but democracy now. Is here on wwl. Yeah, I feel like democracy now and VRT or about the same. So we are we are. Yeah. Politically, this kind of align. Yes. Okay. So five six thousand one or are you? Well, if you are a fan of Flint, Taylor, you might wanna wait. About twenty five minutes and call in during the actual show. But if you're a fan of tarot, and you like the kind of music that he plays all over the map, some of it's sort of far out there, and some of it is stuff that you're going to want to hear over and over, like Chris, so. And so, from Belgium, played the saxophone or something and has sung with the words street in it. Chris Joris on children's street. Yeah. Used to play that almost every week. I bet you got sick of it. Did not. That's a real good one. That's right up there with down in the in the in the. In the boondocks totally different song. I don't even know what happened to Chris Joris I've hollowed his career for a while. And then he just disappeared. He did sort of like a challenge grant. Well, he started stopped recording. I don't know whether you know, like he and his wife had kids, and he had to stop playing or maybe retired to write a book about some scary topic that is all hush hush nut would do that. Two six two thousand one that's the number to call right now. And Jerry, there are a lot of people. We haven't heard from, of course. We haven't heard from.

Chris Joris Flint Taylor Terry Chicago Queen of England Mark Dana Helen rough Jerry Ebeling Amy Belgium attorney Allen Alan twenty five minutes nineteen minutes
"flint taylor" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

11:13 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Join us shortly as we talk about this historic win in Chicago this past week. Lori Lightfoot Mary lacked came out of nowhere the past year and some change and she won in a line landslide. Seventy five percent of the vote. What happened? What's next? Yes. It was depressed turnout, but she one out of a field of fourteen people who were running, and it's one of the big big surprises really of our political time. First African American woman mayor of the city of Chicago, I openly gay mayor. She's married. She has a beautiful daughter who we saw envy's campaign commercials. She was the cutest thing in the world. And this it's going to be a lot of change because she has a tremendous background and she's already getting pushback, but she said to one of the aldermen who pushed back on Harold Washington thirty years ago, she said, oh, no. You're not going to do that to me. Wow. What's going to be? It's interesting because although alderman, alderman, Edward Burke. Freudian. I guess is a very powerful figure. He's also under indictment. And so it'll be interesting to see. But who still very powerful guy? In fact, his wife sits on the state supreme court. So we'll see where all of this goes tomorrow night. We're going to be talking about this and more at pearls thirty nine zero one south Michigan nine ninety nine. All you can eat buffet, Chicago mayoral election. It's been hot over the past few weeks because in Chicago and around the country and around the world, we take our politics seriously Lightfoot landslide win, what is next and Cook County state's attorney Kim FOX's fights to keep her seat. Did you see the March by Chicago police union on her this past week? Did you see that? Well, yeah. That happened. And there was a counter protest Reverend Jackson. Of course was part of that. And it's just really fascinating I was living in New York more than twenty years ago. When I saw the same thing happened to the first black mayor of New York, David Dinkins. In fact, Rudolph Giuliani who had been the US attorney for the very powerful southern district of New York lead the F O P on a really racially charged. It was a racist rally, and it was an almost became violent. It certainly was violent in in terms of their aggressiveness as they marched on mayor Dinkins and called him the N word and other such niceties call wherever Jackson call us. We want to hear from you at one eight six six five nine four hope when he took six five nine four four six seven three. And we want to talk about prosecutorial discretion. We want to talk about the Jacobo police union mayor elect Lory Lightfoot historic win all of that. That so much and what it means to you all around the country to see so many African American women in particular winning these races. Tweet Reverend Jackson at Jay Jackson and at Santita. You can tweet me as well. Facebook live. We are streaming live. Hey, everybody on the Reverend Jesse Jackson your page. I'm going to hop over to my page in a minute. If you want to hear us, very clearly you can go to heart and get your app iheartradio app. Patriot AM eleven fifty at patriot AM eleven fifty or at real talk nine ten so let us discuss this historic land light Vic landslide victory of Chicago's first African American woman mayor mayor elect Lori Lightfoot what does her victory mean? What does it mean that although Illinois is only fifteenth in terms of African American population the United States, most African Americans live in the south black women occupy nine of the seventeen executive position. In Illinois, Cook County and Chicago the number rises to eleven of seventeen. If you add the secretary of state Jesse white who's an African American and attorney general Kwami, Raoul was also African American and we're going to be talking about Kim FOX was at the rainbow push. Forum yesterday broadcast on the impact on network, of course. Streamed live on Facebook on the Reverend Jesse Jackson seniors page as well Reverend the Reverend Jesse Jackson senior page excuse me as well as the rainbow push page. She has been really in a firestorm Reverend Jackson as she has been fighting to keep her job, the F O P, the police union marched on her along with suburban police officers being they said, look, we want her remove why because of the Jesse small case and the Jesse small cases very very interesting because he reluctantly reported the attack as we reported she last week surveillance footage captured two persons of interest. However a failed to capture the attack itself. The three investigating officers on the smile at case have thirty five thirty five civilian complaints against them. Two of the three. Officers have more complaints against him than seventy nine percent of the force. And yet, no one's questioning their credibility and in the ensuing weeks since this story first came out, the only person story who has not changed is that of Jessie smile at the police change this story the brothers who allegedly attacked him. They changed their story. Everybody's changes story everybody, but Jesse small latte, and he has been charged by the city of Chicago by the outgoing mayor Rahm Emanuel with a Bill for one hundred thirty thousand dollars. But what about prosecutorial discretion after running and having been elected on the promise that she would prosecute criminals whether or not that person is a cop or not Baltimore state attorney Maryland Moesby was attacked by the Baltimore police union for doing what Kim FOX did for seeking the prosecutions of the six officers involved in the killing of Freddie, gray. But there's a deafening silence about what just happened in Waco, Texas in the Waco biker case on may fifteenth as many of you may recall a brawl erupted in the parking lot of a bar of a club club members and innocent bystanders were caught in the crossfire literally they were wounded in the end nine bikers were dead. Nine. Four were killed by police who justified the shooting by stating that they were trying to protect themselves and others because bystanders and bikers or caught in the ball more than one hundred bikers everybody, if you recall were indicted on charges rating ranging from assault to murder after three years all but twenty four of them had their charges dropped this past week. All of them were dropped. Wow. Reverend jackson. What do you make of all of this? Well, you know, the will when rules transparent as one so the rules. Case in Texas, really the decision to burn the people Waco in Maryland in Baltimore. Police have the right live outside the city police it as as an occupying force. Live is the cancer live in one Warner's extreme in the town, Nixon suburb. So they kind of occupant in the protests and. Kwan? Mcdonald's been shot sixteen time one belief. They should have been they time. Relations back to the case of this magnificent victory by Lor Lightfoot, she ran non-south. Most governors runs out most ran from the white man as both do. She want all fifty wards. Six percent of the vote four as you can live with the mandate, and she has the capacity to govern strength to go. She can see giants was the lawyers or judges that she can be because the triple Menard she's black. She's female she's gay and she's on and she's fair. We look forward with those down through the years. Why is his victory? So significant Reverend I mean that you said that she went from north to south as opposed from south to north and east to west. What does that saying about our politics one? Three. So for the unfounded to to the convert balkanize community mayor the city councils control about wise and. The mayor took an election before we found that it was able to get enough votes in the council began to govern that that is behind us. Now Ular on the woman who ran in a Republican congressional district and won an African American Democrats only on the healthcare issue, a one c change in America that to'sign and strange enough ended and the dog is our posed by Trump the lights of hope burn bright, divide reminders of the congress and Latinos and twenty years in the congress, you see blacks in the house and New York we in the face of dogs because the run the run home, we're fighting back. I'm proud of was about struggled Vickers game during this this little Caesar. Well, you know, we're going to be talking about this with quite an array of guest today. Reverend Jackson, we've got Karl west who has a very popular blog here in Chicago truth. Be told we've got Dell Marie Kabul becoming on at the bottom of the hour who used to be your press secretary in the in the Jackson eighty eight campaign. She's the founder of a black women's pack called ida's legacy Edward McClellan from Chicago magazine has written. He's really covered this whole campaign. And he has a very interesting article that I've tweeted out a why ill annoy the mecca of political black power, the SIM very interesting things to tell us about that. And about this campaign. Attorney g Flint Taylor. One of the great civil rights freedom fighting attorneys of all time. In fact, he sought Justice for the Fred Hampton family, founder of the people's law office, author of a new book that we would urge you to get. We gotta get him on here. Reverend Jackson to talk about it, the torture, machine racism and police violence in Chicago, Dr Robert Stark's, political issues adviser he's worked for you. With you down to the years work with mayor, Harold Washington. Professor emeritus from northeastern Illinois university, Reverend attorney Janette Wilson of rainbow-push very shortly. She's an attorney and educator.

Reverend Jackson Chicago attorney Jesse Jackson Lory Lightfoot Illinois Kim FOX Jesse Harold Washington New York Lori Lightfoot Mary Facebook Waco Baltimore Texas Cook County Edward Burke supreme court David Dinkins Rudolph Giuliani
"flint taylor" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:02 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Hey, everybody. Welcome to keep up alive with Reverend. Jesse jackson. I am Santita. Jackson Reverend Jackson. We'll be joined shortly as we talk about this historic win in Chicago this past week. Lori Lightfoot Mary lacked came out of nowhere the past year and some change and she won in a line landslide. Seventy five percent of the vote. What happened? What's next? Yes. It was depressed turnout, but she one out of a field of fourteen people who were running, and it's one of the big big surprises really of our political time. First African American woman mayor of the city of Chicago, I openly gay mayor. She's married. She has a beautiful daughter who we saw envy's campaign commercials. She was cutest thing in the world. And this it's going to be a lot of change because she has a tremendous background and she's already getting pushback, but she said to one of the aldermen who. Who pushed back on Harold Washington thirty years ago? She said, oh, no. And you're not going to do that to me. Wow. What's going to be? It's interesting because although Alterman alderman, Edward Burke. Freudian. I guess is a very powerful figure. He's also under indictment. And so it'll be interesting to see. But who still very powerful guy? In fact, his wife sits on the state supreme court. So we'll see where all of this goes tomorrow night. We're going to be talking about this and more at pearls thirty nine zero one south Michigan nine ninety nine. All you can eat buffet, Chicago mayoral election. It's been hot over the past few weeks because in Chicago and around the country and around the world, and we take our politics seriously Lightfoot landslide win, what is next and Cook County state's attorney Kim FOX's fights to keep her seat. Did you see the March by Chicago police union on her this past week? Did you see that? Well, yeah. That happened. And there was a counter protest Reverend Jackson. Of course was part of that. And it's just really fascinating I was living in New York more than twenty years ago. When I saw the same thing happened to the first black mayor of New York, David Dinkins. In fact, Rudolph Giuliani who had been the US attorney for the very powerful southern district of New York lead the F O P on a really racially charged. It was a racist rally, and it was an almost became violent. It certainly was violent in in terms of their aggressiveness as they marched on mayor Dinkins and called him the N word and other such niceties. Call Reverend Jackson call us we want to hear from you at one eight six six five nine four hope when he took six five nine four four six seven three. And we want to talk about prosecutorial discretion. We want to talk about the cargo police union mayor elect Lory Lightfoot historic when all of that. That so much and what it means to you all around the country to see so many African American women in particular winning these races. Tweet Reverend Jackson at Jay Jackson and at Santita. You can tweet me as well. Facebook live. We are streaming live. Hey, everybody on the Reverend. Jesse Jackson your page. I'm going to hop it over to my page in a minute. If you want to hear us, very clearly you can go to I heart and get your app. Iheart radio app. Patriot AM eleven fifty at patriot AM eleven fifty or real talk nine ten. So let us discuss this historic land light Vic landslide victory of Chicago's first African American woman mayor mayor elect Lori Lightfoot what does her victory mean? What does it mean that although Illinois is only fifteenth in terms of African American population the United States, most African Americans live in the south black women occupy nine of the seventeen executive position. In Illinois, Cook County and Chicago the number rises to eleven of seventeen. If you add the secretary of state, Jesse white who's an African American and attorney general Kwami, Raoul was also African American, and we're gonna be talking about Kim FOX who was at the rainbow push forum yesterday broadcast on the impact network, of course. Streamed live on Facebook on the Reverend Jesse Jackson seniors page as well Reverend the Reverend Jesse Jackson senior page excuse me as well as the rainbow push page. She has been really in a firestorm Reverend Jackson as she has been fighting to keep her job, the F O P, the police union marched on her along with suburban police officers being they said, look, we want her remove why because of the Jesse small case and the Jesse small cases very very interesting because he will. Electorally reported the attack as we reported she last week surveillance footage captured two persons of interest. However a failed to capture the attack itself. The three investigating officers on the smile at case have thirty five thirty five civilian complaints against them. Two of the three officers have more complaints against him than seventy nine percent of the force. And yet, no one's questioning their credibility and in the ensuing weeks since this story first came out, the only person story who has not changed is that of Jessie smell lets the police change this story the brothers who allegedly attacked him. They changed their story. Everybody's changes story everybody, but jussie small let and he has been charged by the city of Chicago by the outgoing mayor Rahm Emanuel with a Bill for one hundred thirty thousand dollars. But what about prosecutorial discretion after running and having been elected? On the promise that she would prosecute criminals whether or not that person is a copper, not Baltimore state. Attorney Maryland Moesby was attacked by the Baltimore police union for doing what Kim FOX did for seeking the prosecutions of six officers involved in the killing of Freddie, gray. But there's a deafening silence about what just happened in Waco, Texas in the Waco biker case on may fifteenth as many of you may recall a brawl erupted in the parking lot of a bar of a club club. Members and innocent bystanders were caught in the crossfire literally they were wounded in the end nine bikers were dead nine four were killed by police who justified the shooting by stating that they were trying to protect themselves and others because bystanders and bikers or caught in the brawl more than one hundred bikers everybody, if you recall were indicted on charges ranging ranging from a salt. To murder after three years all but twenty four of them had their charges dropped this past week. All of them were dropped. Wow. Reverend jackson. What do you make of all of this? Well, you know, the will when the rules are transparent as one so the rules. Well, the case in Texas really the decision to burn the people Waco in Maryland Moseman in Baltimore. Now, the situation there police have the right live outside the city police it as as event occupying force, Chicago, they want to live outside the cancer live this in one warrants on extreme in the town next to the suburb. So they kind of occupied who of they in the protest and Kwan. Mcdonald's been shot sixteen time one should have been here. They came time. Mhm relations, but back to the case of this magnificent victory by Lor Lightfoot, she ran non-south. Most governors runs out most he ran from the White House as both do. No, she won all fifty wards in the six percent of the vote twenty four as you can live with the mandate, and she has the capacity to govern strength to go. She can say giants was their lawyers judges as she can be ten to camp. She's a triple Menards that she's black. She's female she's gay. She's honest and she's fair. We look for the rig with down through the years. Why is his victory? So significant Reverend I mean that you said that she ran from north to south as opposed from south to north and east to west. What does that saying about our politics? One eighty three. This is so polarized. So full of unfounded to to the convert balkanize community mayor the city council control about Why's and era was the mayor took an election before we finally that was able to get enough votes in the council there the began to govern that that is behind the snout Ular on the woman who ran in a Republican congressional district and one Democrats on the healthcare issue. One see the change in America that to'sign and strange enough ending. And the dog is our posed by Trump do the lights of hope burning bright divide reminders in the congress and through the Latinos twenty years in the congress, you see blacks in the house in New York. We in the face of dogs because runs the and run home. We're fighting back. I'm probably about struggle and Vickers gained during this this season. Well, you know, we're going to be talking about this with quite an array of guest today. Reverend Jackson, we've got Karl west who has a very popular blog here in Chicago truth be told we've got Dell Marie Kabul becoming on at the bottom of the hour who used to be your press secretary in the in the Jackson Eighty-eight campaign. She's the founder of a black women's pack called ida's legacy Edward McClellan from Chicago magazine has written. He's really covered this whole campaign. And he has a very interesting article that I've tweeted out why Illinois is the mecca of political black power. The very interesting things to tell us about that. And about this campaign. Attorney g Flint Taylor one of the great civil rights freedom fighting attorneys of all time. In fact, he sought Justice for the Fred Hampton family, founder of the people's law office, author of a new book that we would urge you to get. We gotta get him on here. Reverend Jackson to talk about it the torture, machine racism and police violence in Chicago. Dr Robert Stark's political.

Reverend Jackson Chicago Jesse jackson attorney Kim FOX Lori Lightfoot Lori Lightfoot Mary New York Facebook Illinois Waco Santita Baltimore Texas Cook County Jackson cargo police Harold Washington supreme court David Dinkins
"flint taylor" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Was on the documentary. The weather underground directed by Sam green and Bill Siegel and Flint. The reality was has as you documented in your book that this was actually a a direct assassination, and then and that was a long struggle on on on your part to because you were there you were able to get to the house the the very day that that happened was killed could you could you talk about this conspiracy to kill one of the the rising radical leaders of the black community. Well, we see now, and it was uncovered during our trial in the seventies. That the coin tell pro program targeted black liberation organizations and leaders, and they specifically named targets Dr king Stokely Carmichael rap Brown allows your Mohammed pointed to Malcolm X as well. And as the Panthers rose and became powerful first in Oakland and later in Chicago, whereas you can see from the clip what a charismatic young leader at twenty one. Fred Hampton was Hoover and his people focused on the Black Panther party. I'm specifically in Chicago on Fred Hampton, they hadn't formed in the Black Panther party by name of William O'Neil. He sketched out a floor plan that showed we're Hampton would be sleeping. They went to the apartment. They supply. Applied that floor plan to the police the FBI did they went to the apartment in the early morning hours, and Fred was asleep. It appeared that he had been drugged by O'neil or some other agent, and he was murdered in his bed. Over the years. We uncovered documents that showed this floor plan that was all covered up as well. It showed that the FBI took credit for this rate is part of its Cohen tell pro program, and it showed even that O'neil. After the raid was given by Hoover and the people in Chicago a three hundred dollar bonus. What we later called the thirty pieces of silver for the informative O'neil for setting up the raid. So he was receiving from Hoover a bonus for the success of the raid at the same time. He was serving as a pallbearer in. Fred Hampton's funeral Taylor. You pursued this case civilly for thirteen years. What came out of it? Well, a lot of what I've just mentioned came out of it. The narrative shifted over the years, thanks to the community. Thanks to the Panthers. And thanks to the lawsuit that we filed, and as as you could hear from the clip the position that the police took and they thought they were gonna get away with Scot free. Was that this was a shootout that these were vicious Black Panthers all of that? Well, because we in the Panthers went to that apartment. We were able to show that it was a shoot in. We were able to change the narrative to the fact that it was an unjustified in a violent shoot in by the police, but over the years as we were able to join the FBI in the case, we were able to uncover this these FBI documents that showed that yes, it was not just a murder. It was not just a shoot in. But it was an assassination. It was a political. Nation straight from Washington and the FBI and slit very shortly. After the the murderer of Fred Hampton, you got involved in another case of the Wilson brothers, and which began the uncovering of the Jon Burge scandal that again would take you decades really to finally get some measure of Justice. Could you talk about that the Wilson? Wasn't case. Yes. The Wilson case arose in February of nineteen eighty to two white police officers were shot and killed the two black perpetrators had escaped and the city of Chicago under Jane Byrne and police superintendent breeze Zach set out on the most vicious and terroristic manhunt in the history of the city, they terrorized the black community they kicked in doors. They drag people out of their houses, if they if they thought that they had some information about the killings are they tortured them, they tortured them with with suffocation. They tortured them with with all kinds of of medieval types of torture. They finally found the two people who the eyewitness identified as the persons who were involved in the crime and the person who was identified as the shooter was. Andrew wilson. Andrew Wilson was taken back to the police headquarters on this outside of Chicago. And this notorious commander who at that time was a Lieutenant in charge of the manhunt by the name of John Burge, led a torture of Andrew Wilson that included electric-shock with the torture machine that that has mentioned and depicted in my book are and suffocation with a bag they handcuffed him across an old a steam, radiator an electric shock him. So that he was burned across his chest. And they also burned him with cigarettes beat him and got a confession from him. And the came out at that time, but nobody really cared. The state's attorney of Cook County, Richard Daley was informed specifically by a doctor and the police superintendent about this, torture, and he chose to do nothing about it. Because he did nothing about it. Burge was able to in the next ten years torture. Another seventy five individuals all African American men and a few years after that Andrew Wilson who had been sentenced to death filed a pro se complaint in federal court challenging his torture and and suing Burge that's how we got involved during his trial. The an anonymous police source who we later dubbed is deep badge. Started to give me information that laid out exactly the map of what had happened the systemic nature of the torture. The fact. That daily and and his surrogates are involved at the police superintendents at the mayor all involved, and we followed that map basically for the next twenty thirty years, even as we sit here today to uncover evidence that supported the idea that that this was a sustained torture. This was something that sent people to death row. This was something that that convicted innocent people, and ultimately all of this led to Burge's firing. It led to many many years later his conviction for obstruction of Justice for lying about the torture. And of course, it led to the remarkable reparations that the city of Chicago are granted to the survivors of police, torture and their families here a couple of years ago. Plen- taylor. We're gonna break and then come back to this conversation. We'll also be joined by Lilia Fernandez. This is democracy. Now, Flint Taylor attorney with people's law office known as the PLO has represented survivors of police torture in Chicago for nearly half a century has new book the torture, machine racism and police violence in Chicago when we come back. Lilia Fernandez will join us as well. Stay with us..

Chicago Andrew wilson Fred Hampton FBI John Burge Black Panther party Panthers William O'Neil superintendent black community Hoover Jon Burge Lilia Fernandez Dr king Stokely Carmichael attorney Flint Oakland Plen- taylor
"flint taylor" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Brown's pacifica. This is democracy now. Donbass conclusion may I say Brazil and the United States stand side by side in their efforts to ensure liberties in respect to traditional family lifestyles respect to God creator against the gender ideology or the politically correct. Attitudes and against fake news, Brazil's far-right precedent. Former army captain bolt sonata makes his first trip to the White House where he was warmly received by President Trump. You look at the networks. You look at the news. You look at the news casts. I call it fake news. I'm very proud to hear the president used the term fake news. Trump vowed to strengthen economic and military ties with Brazil as the two leaders discussed their push for a game change in Venezuela to topple nNcholas Maduro. We'll get the latest then we look at the torture machine. Racism and police violence in Chicago. We cannot countenance torture in this country or by this country, and until all people who torture and all those people who are responsible for torturing brought to Justice, the conscience of Chicago, and the conscience of this country cannot be Clinton soil speak to longtime civil rights. Attorney Flint Taylor of the people's law office in Chicago about his new book, the torture machine will also speak with Rutgers professor Lilia Fernandez, author of Brown in the windy city. All that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy. Now democracy, now dot ORG. The Warren peace.

Brazil President Trump Chicago Brown president nNcholas Maduro White House Lilia Fernandez United States Flint Taylor Venezuela Rutgers Clinton Attorney professor
"flint taylor" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"With people's law office, who's represented survivors police. Tortured Chicago for nearly half a century, his new book, the torture, machine racism and police violence in Chicago, professor Fernandez. It's great to have you with us. Can you talk about how the torture machine dealing with racism and police violence in Chicago the significance of it and the work that you've done highlighting brutality against the Latino community in Chicago in Chicago, so often seen police brutality is a black and white issue. Yes. Thank you so much Amy and one first let me start by commending, Flint Taylor for this really incredible account of decades of fighting against the brutality of the Burj jumper torture machine and trying to seek Justice, particularly for many men who wrongfully convicted on the basis of confessions extracted by torture. But yes, one of the things that a lot of people don't realize I think in the because police abuse and brutality often does get frame within a black and white racial framing is the fact that let those were very frequently the victims of police misconduct abuse brutality throughout these same years. That Flint covers going back to the nineteen sixties when maximum Puerto Ricans fish..

Chicago Flint Taylor Puerto Ricans professor Fernandez Amy
"flint taylor" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"The. Brown. Pacifica. This is democracy now. News Donbass conclusion may I say that Brazil and the United States stand side by side in their efforts to Scher liberties in respect to traditional family lifestyles respect to God, our creator against gender ideology, or the politically correct attitudes and against fake news, Brazil's far-right precedent. Former army captain j or sonata makes his first trip to the White House where he was warmly received by President Trump. You look at the network. You look at the news. You look at the news casts. I call it fake news. Very proud to hear the president used the term fake news. Trump vowed to strengthen economic and military ties with Brazil as the two leaders discussed their push for gene change in. Venezuela. To topple nNcholas Maduro. We'll get the latest then we look at the torture, machine racism and police violence in Chicago, we cannot count it's torture in this country, or by this country, and intil all people who torture and all those people who are responsible for torturing brought to Justice, the conscience of Chicago and the conscience of this country cannot be cleanse we'll speak to longtime civil rights Turney, Flint Taylor of the people's law office in Chicago about his new book, the torture machine will also speak with Rutgers professor Lilia Fernandez, author of Brown in the windy city. All that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I made me Goodman, President Trump hosted bristles far-right precedent. Former army captain j your Bill sonata with the White House, Tuesday sonata has been dubbed the Trump of the tropics Trump announced he would designate Brazil, a major non-nato ally. Opening the door for Brazil to receive more US military aid. Trump also suggested Brazil could even become a member of NATO the two leaders. Both criticized what they call the fake news and discussed increasing efforts to topple Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro from office, President Trump threaten to further intensify crippling US sanctions on Venezuela, which is already facing a humanitarian crisis. But we really haven't done the really tough sanctions yet. We can do the tough sanctions at all options are open. So we may be doing that. But we haven't done the toughest of sanctions as you know. We'll have more on Brazil after headlines major blow for immigrant rights. The supreme court ruled the governor. Can detain immigrants with past criminal records indefinitely without due process. Even decades after their convictions, the five to four ruling Tuesday in favor of the government centers around a nineteen ninety six law that allows him Gration officials to take immigrants into custody after they're released from jail, but without specifying timeframe, the you which brought the case on behalf of immigrants affected by the law said, quote, the supreme court has endorsed the most extreme interpretation of immigration detention statutes allowing mass incarceration of people without any hearing simply because they're defending themselves against deportation charge will continue to fight the gross overuse of detention in the immigration system. Unquote, forty year old Mexican migrant died in L Paso, Texas, while in the custody of customs and border protection. Monday officials say the unnamed man was brought in for medical care and diagnosed with flu like symptoms liver and.

President Trump Brazil president supreme court United States Venezuela White House nNcholas Maduro Chicago Pacifica Nicolas Maduro Gration L Paso Lilia Fernandez Texas Goodman Rutgers
"flint taylor" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

15:10 min | 1 year ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"International law. The USA has practice torture for the last half century for Vietnam Afghanistan from Iraq to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and here at home in Chicago. President Obama refused to prosecute the tortures of the Bush era Bush's Vice President Dick Cheney greenlighted the torture saying we must go over to the dark side, President Trump who approves of waterboarding and worse said during his campaign that torture works. It doesn't tortured people will say anything to relieve their agony. Over one hundred black men in Chicago, which Richard in the nineteen seventies nineteen eighties. They confess to crimes although many of them were innocent. But in Chicago, unlike under President Obama who refused to enforce the law saying that we must look forward not backward. Something was done about it. Our guest attorney Flint Taylor his office. The people's law office, many groups in the community several dedicated journalists law students, and even Amnesty International work together in one and historic victory. What they did. And how they did. It is the story told in Flint Taylor's new book tour to force published by Haymarket books called the torture machine. Racism and police violence in Chicago. For the first time in American history reparations were paid to black person's the torture ringleader. Police commander Jon Burge was sent to prison every Chicago public school student is now taught about what happened in their city a monument for the victims, maybe put up and free college tuition, and psychological counseling are available to the victims Flint Taylor is a founding partner of the people's law office. He was one of the lawyers for the families of the assassinated, Black Panther leaders. Fred Hampton and Mark Clark. He's represented many survivors of Chicago police torture over the past thirty years and was also trial console in the landmark civil rights case against the KKK, Nazis and the Greensboro North Carolina police in the murder of five anti clan. Demonstrators. Attorney Flint Taylor. Welcome back to law and disorder. Thank you for having me back. Let's start off with how you got involved in this thing when and how did you first get involved in the Chicago police department torture cases, talk about the massive manhunt which Jesse Jackson characterize like the Nazi Kristallnacht. What happened then when the Wilson brothers who were arrested and accused of killing two police officers what happened? Well, two white police officers were killed in February nineteen eighty two the perpetrators escaped and the greatest manhunt in Chicago history as it was termed. And as you characterized the result of that man, hunters just Jesse Jackson characterized it ensued. And so for five days a search for two African American men in the black communities of Chicago because it was a witness who saw it happen. They just terrorize the community. They not only kick down doors beat people dragged people out of their homes, but also the people that they suspected of either having any information or perhaps being connected to the crime, they tortured, and and the person who was the in charge of this manhunt and terrorize ation was a Lieutenant at a outside detective headquarters named John Birch. And he ran. And the whole show, and and and at one point about three days into it. They thought they had the two two guys and a brought them and and other friends of theirs to the police headquarters and tortured them with electric shock with with bags over their heads beatings. And this was reportedly done not only by Burge, but in the presence of the cheaper detectives. And and and right in the same building and perhaps on the same floor. Police superintendent's office. It turns out that the eyewitness said that these guys didn't do it. These weren't the guy. So they kept looking and ultimately by they found Andrew Wilson and his brother Jackie they brought them back to area to head headquarters on the south side and ninety first street and tortured them particularly Andrew because he was identified as the trigger man on the two cop killings, and they tortured him. Him with electric shock repeatedly with this black box and with another elect- electrical device and again with the beatings, and and supplication with the bag, and they also tortured. Jackie not quite as extensively or offer as long, and ultimately, they got confessions from them, the the the torture left marks all over Andrew's body. But the courts totally ignored that he was convicted. And given the death penalty is brother Jackie was given to life sentences because he was only the accomplice to the crime the case wound through the courts at the same time. Andrew filed a pro se complaint alleging torture by Burge. It went to the federal courts. Several lawyers are appointed. And for one reason or another duct the case because they didn't want to represent cop killers so alternately because of our work in the Fred. Hampton case Andrew contacted us people's lives in Chicago. And we took on his case. Because obviously we felt that torture of anyone whether you're an alleged or even convicted cop killer or an innocent person wrong elite charged made no matter in terms of human rights, and constitutional rights. So we took on the case in nineteen eighty seven which is five years after the torture, and the and and the terrorizing manhunt at that point. Andrew's case was reversed because and the Eleanor supreme court has death penalty case because he the torture was so blatant. It left so many physical marks he was burned on radiator as well. While he was being electric shocked that the court had no choice but to throw out his confession. Ultimately, Andrew was retried and one juror held out against the death penalty. And he got a life in prison rather than was executed. In any event, we then that started our thirty one or so thirty two years of being involved in the police torture scandal nineteen eighty seven when we got involved in. Andrew Wilson's case and by lodge. That's what my book traces, the book is the torture, machine racism and police violence in Chicago magnificent book just came out I urge everybody to get it Flint talk about the pattern. What we what we lawyers call a pattern and practice of torture in Chicago who was involved. What did they do? How long did it last? How high up did it? Go. Those are several very important questions which I try to answer. An and documenting the book the at first as much as it seemed unlikely all we really had with this one horrendous torture case and evidence of it. But at during the civil rights trials of of the Andrew Wilson case in federal court in nineteen eighty nine. We started to get letters from an anonymous police source and each started to tell us there's more people. There's more people involved that quote from some of the letters that we got clandestinely during the trial. We dubbed this source a deep badge sort of after the deep throat Watergate fame, and he turned us on by name to some other torture survivors, who we found e- also by correct? He said that it went very high up. He mentioned the fact that this torture of the whites the ones I mentioned who were wrongfully picked up for the for the murders of the police had happened at police headquarters he said that the state's attorneys, including the state's attorney of Cook County, Richard Daley was was aware of this. So he or she we'd never found out who the identity of this person was was laying out a roadmap for us. And over the next thirty years, we filled in all the blanks in the roadmap. Yes. It was a pattern and practice of torture. Yes. It turned out over the years. We got case after case that was documented that it happened during this reign of terror not only that the short reign of terror, but the long reign of terror that being the twenty years of torture under this man, John Burgess command, and that we uncovered a lot of evidence that that. Daily both has state's attorney and later as mayor was involved in covering it up and refusing to prosecute Burge or any of the officers that had engaged in this pattern of torture, and it turned out that this pattern of torture. And and I should say that the torture where we're using it in a very precise international kind of view of torture here. We're talking about electric-shock we're talking about what's called dry submarine. Oh that is suffocation with a bag or plastic material over the face and head to simulate shop occasion, we're talking about mock executions, putting guns and people's mouths, and and playing Russian roulette with them, and we're talking about just a tremendously racist type of retaliatory that that accompanies these forms of torture in order to get confessions sometimes spots, sometimes maybe not far, but always illegal. And unconstitutional, and in violation of of all Amanda national law school made up the citywide coalition against police abuse. And what did they do? Well, there were two different coalitions. Actually, they work together. There was one more traditional organization or or coalition of organizations church groups that group that spirit edited called citizens alert, which was a police anti police brutality organization that had been in the city ever since the murder of Fred Hampton and taken up so many many causes in terms of police brutality, and they were very active and taking the evidence that we were uncovering. And and unfortunately, the judge is not allowing into that Wilson trial, and and taking it publicly and demanding that the that Burge be fired. And that there be Justice. In the case. And then there was a younger more activist in the group that also was focused on the torture cases and did more kind of actions. They went, you know, the city council and sat in and and disrupted and and fought for I know what that and a hearing in front of city council, but they were all taking the evidence that we were covering thanks to deep patch, and they were taking it to the streets into that to the politicians and raising the cry in the early nineties for Burgess firing what was the importance of truly independent journalism in exposing these crimes can't over emphasize the importance, and and underscore independent and courageous in terms of journalism because as you know, the importance of the people's narrative of dealing with the truth of these kind. Cases in the face of the official cover up is extremely important and lawyers who fighting courts, I originally unique position of being able to uncover and expose this kind of evidence. But if journalists don't write about it and don't put it on TV. And and and now, of course, there's other medium to to put it on as well. But back in the day, when we were fighting these cases, it we were definitely calling it torture. We we we were trying to change the narrative in terms of that it wasn't just police brutality. This was torture. Slowly, thanks, primarily to a journalist named John Conroy who covered these two long Wilson civil trials. John Conroy was sitting in the courtroom through the entire two trials the Wilson trials in nineteen eighty nine. He covered those cases, and he then came out with a a story. In the Chicago reader called the house of streams, which was a remarkable story, and expose of all this evidence that we were uncovering during the trials, but it really was not covered by the mainstream media. So for very long time. This was a dirty secret to the public in Chicago here, but other journalists some home were in the the straight media, but Conroy in particular continued to right over the years. Various other exposes the evidence that we uncovered and he also was investigating came to light in answer to your question. Yes. Independent journalism and the media and the narrative is are so crucial in in these cases, particularly in the cases of police, torture and police. Vacination with regard to Fred Hampton here in the city of Chicago. Chicago police detective commander, Jon Burge was a military policeman in Vietnam. That's where he learns his torture techniques. They call the Vietnamese Gook said slopes, he attached his electric box to them over there. And then he brought it back to Chicago. I wanted to ask you, what do you see as the connection between racism and torture? Well, I think there are two strands here. The the international connection that you just mentioned the kinda dehumanisation that was practicing Vietnam and later in Iraq and Afghanistan and continues to this day Guantanamo Bay..

Chicago Andrew Wilson Jon Burge Fred Hampton attorney Flint Taylor murder Guantanamo Bay John Conroy President Obama Richard Daley Amnesty International John Burgess commander Jesse Jackson USA Dick Cheney Afghanistan
"flint taylor" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"But even though we have an African American police superintendent who was put in place by Rahm Emanuel after the Liqun McDonalds a tape became public. He came from within the department. He knows where all the bones are buried he. In fact, was part of the culture of. Of the code of silence and of racism, even though he was is African American over all these years. And in fact, he as have several of the prior African American superintendents, basically been connected to that machine. And also been in fact, front men of four the politics of racism and brutality that comes from the democratic machine on down Flynn Taylor. I want to thank you, first and foremost for the tireless work that you've done over these decades and the work that you've done to free people against the odds who were tortured by agents of the state or unjustly imprisoned by agents of the state. Thank you so much Flint Taylor for writing the book and for the work that you have done for so long. Thank you as well. I'm pleased an honor to be on your show and right back at you for all the wonderful work that you do Flynn Taylor is a founding partner of the people's law. Office in Chicago, he spent his life fighting against the torture extrajudicial killings of black people targeted by the Chicago police. His new book is called the torture machine. Racism and police violence in Chicago. It's published by Haymarket books. Just a heads up. I'm going to be a guest this week on deconstructed the podcast hosted by my colleague, Mehdi Hassan. We're gonna be talking about his incredible hour long interview of blackwater founder, Erik prince among other topics gonna talk about what prince was doing at a secret meeting with done junior and his Isreaeli and representatives of some repressive era. Governments you owe whether any communica phone communications contact with the campaign, you said of from writing papers putting up y'all signed..

Rahm Emanuel Flynn Taylor Erik prince Mehdi Hassan Chicago Flint Taylor McDonalds superintendent founding partner founder
"flint taylor" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

15:01 min | 2 years ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and dime. New York City attorney and activist Heidi. Gauchan? Four years ago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke shot seventeen year old Lequan McDonald's sixteen times in the back on October fifth. He was found guilty of second degree murder and sixteen counts of aggravated battery by Chicago jury. This was the first time in fifty years. The Chicago police officer has been found guilty of murdering somebody while on duty nationally there have been no convictions in the murders of Everett garner, Michael Brown or Trayvon Martin. The McDonald murder was covered up beginning with police who were on the job with Van Dyke to commanding officers of the Chicago police department and all the way up to the office of mayor Rahm Emanuel. Key to this conviction was video footage taken by police car. Dash camera. The video was suppressed by the police and the mayor for three years, and it was only revealed after a massive campaign by several Chicago grassroots organizations from two thousand eleven to two thousand sixteen three hundred seventy one million dollars has been spent by the government of Chicago on police misconduct cases, forty percent of the city's budget goes to the police department here to talk with us about the situation in Chicago is returning guest. Attorney Flint Taylor. Taylor is a partner in the renowned Chicago law firm the people's law office, he has been litigating police abuse cases for nearly fifty years starting with his victory in the Fred Hampton case where the FBI and the Chicago police department admitted they assassinated Black Panther party leader. Fred Hampton, Flint Taylor. Welcome back to law and disorder. It's great to be back. Heidi? Well, the Jason Van Dyke. Verdict was really a big deal. Wasn't it? It was and is and will be here in Chicago. And nationally, can you tell us about the cover up starting with the police officers who accompanied Van Dyke how high up did this go. Well, the cover up or Dakota silence. It wasn't unusual. When you look at it or analyze it. What was unusual was that? There was a videotape that showed what actually happened, and we all have seen it or most people have seen it by now that they want and killing of Kwan McDonald was right there for all to see wants to video came out. But before it came out to police officers, the partner, and and the others involved went about their code of silence business in justifying the shooting by making Liquan, the aggressor and all of that kind. Of standard lie. What happened? However was that the videotape expose that line when it came out and it video tape didn't come out for some time. So that cover up went on not only at the level of the street. But also in terms of the supervisors all the way up the chain of command in the police department. And the corporation counsel the lawyer's office. And we think the mayor himself knew of the video as well. And they moved to settle the civil case that really hadn't even been filed yet with the family because they knew that the videotape would come out, and this was a course in the run-up to the two thousand and fifteen mayoral election in which Rahm Emanuel was facing a serious challenge from progressive candidate true, we got so that video the settlement happened right before they mayo runoff and also it happened the same day that reparations were approved for this arrivers of police torture. So it really was a political storm in a sense because Rome had a curried favour and the African American. Immunity by the agreeing to the reparations, but on the other hand was sitting or his people were sitting on this explosive video now, let's talk about standard procedure terms of releasing video. I've always been curious when I see police video shown on TV, for example in the case of excessive use of force there on the body Cam. And then what happens to the actual video? Is there a possibility that the police could alter it in any way? Well, it's interesting that before here in Chicago before Liquan McDonald case or the there was no standard procedure. And now they have to post videos on the police accountability investigative website at certain at the. Earliest possible time their various wage that videos can be not altered not taken. I think what you see very often and particularly in the earlier stages of body camps. It would they would not be working. The batteries would be put in backwards. A batteries would not be in the cameras that kind of thing we had a police and have a police shooting case very sad case where where the police shot and killed a a mentally disturbed woman on the north side of Chicago. And there was a police camera. You know, a security camera right above where the bench where she was shot. But that wasn't working that night dad is the more frequent thing you see that the body Cam wasn't working and also with regard to the release the various places in Japan and USA is have different. Procedures are or regulations are the lack thereof in terms of the release of the of the video and does the officer have to actually turn on the Cam. Or is it automatically on? I think that also depends. I know in Milwaukee, we have a case where a man died in the back of a police car. And it's a it's a well-known case up there called the Derrick Williams was the the man young man who died it's a terrible video and he's squirming around. You can't breathe and he's saying he can't breathe I can't breathe and the cops the detectives. And and and cops are saying you're faking it you just want to go. You just want to go to the hospital rather than to jail. And so for minutes, literally, eight minutes, he is on video writhing as he dies that. Video. The the computer that the police who were sitting in the front seat of the auto that in which the man was in the back had a button if you push the button, you could see what was going on in the back. If you didn't push the button, you would be on the computer would be doing regular police business and these officers claimed they didn't even bother to push the button to see the man riding in the back of the police car for some six or eight minutes, it's a horrendous case, but in that instance, the video went on when they put him in the car, but the audio did not go on for thirty seconds after and so there's various technicalities in terms of when the video goes on when the audio goes on how it's controlled. They're not controlled how it stored how it's released. It's a it's a very in to circumstances. I've been involved in here. In Chicago in Milwaukee. There are their various technicalities or procedures that that apply in this particular case and the verdict. It's the first time in fifty years that if Chicago police officer has been found guilty of murdering someone while on duty were you afraid it might not result in guilty verdict. I had just finished an article for truth out looking at the history of police violence in Chicago through the lens of two of the most important cases that being the murder of Fred Hampton, Mark Clark. The Black Panther leaders in nineteen sixty nine and also the John Birch torture scandal, a police, torture that that went on for twenty years here in the birds case, he was ultimately indicted for -struction of Justice and perjury in two thousand eight and tried in two thousand and ten before a almost exclusively white jury as in the Burj case in the Van Dyke case, we we were of course, nervous and worried that a predominantly white jury would be swayed by the racist defense that was put on by fraternal order of police lawyers. But the. Juries in both instances were able to put aside those pleased to to the base instincts, and to be swayed by the enormity of the crime that was being presented to them and convicted in the case of Burj in two thousand and ten him for perjury and obstruction of Justice and here for of course, second degree murder and sixteen counts of aggravated battery Flint are co hosts Michael Smith can't be with us today. But he wanted to ask you do. You think the evidence showed that Van Dyke was guilty of first degree murder? Well, that's an interesting question. You would probably get different answers from different lawyers and and people from the community. I think it's important to note that by and large the activists that that fought so hard for this trial, and for a verdict of guilty and people in the African community African American community by and large were shit. Not only satisfied by the verdict. But felt that in the fact that he not only was found guilty of second degree murder and of all the counts for each bullet that he fired was a modicum of Justice. You could say looking at the case and comparing it to a regular murder case where the defendant was not a police officer that a regular citizen would probably have been convicted of first degree murder without without much question. But we because it's such a higher standard, both politically socially and legally for a police officer who commits the same kind of misconduct or violence that that an individual citizen might commit that second degree murder, given the defense that leads to it. And that is it was unreal. Reasonable for him to have shoveled quantum McDonald's sixteen time, but he times, but he had a reasonable belief was an unwritten me an unreasonable belief, but he believed it that that led to to second degree rather than to. I agree. Michael Smith, also found a quote from James Baldwin who wrote that quote, the police are simply the hired enemies of black people there present to keep us in our place and to protect white business interests, and they have no other function. And since they know they are hated they're always afraid one cannot possibly arrive at a more. Sure fire formula for cruelty now black lives matter has proposed community control over the police department is that even viable, and what might that look like, well, I have to commend Michael Smith. He's always goes right to the heart of issues. And that certainly is a wonderful quote that he is has put forward here. And I think it's an accurate quoque in terms of the realities some six fifty years after James Baldwin wrote it black lives matter doesn't simply seek can they do seek community control over police, but in, but they really are ultimately calling for the abolishment of police like the movement that calls for the polish boschman of prisons, and you can see here in Chicago. Some of the approaches that they're taking the movement for black lives is taking here in the battle that they're leading against the police academy. They mayor the outgoing now mayor Emanuel wants to have a ninety five million dollar police academy. Now, some reformers would say. Say that's a good idea. Because what we need here is better training for the police now, of course, Baldwin would disagree with that. I think that a lot of people that have been involved in the fight for, you know, for Justice with regard to police violence would would be very skeptical at that would be a meaningful reform. And so what the movement for black lives has done is oppose the cop academy and opposed. It by saying that ninety five million dollars should go to the heart of the problems that we have here that is such things as closing mental health clinics, poverty education that those are the kinds of issues that really underlie the problems in in the African American and other communities of color and poor community..

Chicago Chicago police department officer Van Dyke police academy second degree murder mayor Emanuel murder Michael Stephen Smith Jason Van Dyke Fred Hampton first degree murder attorney Kwan McDonald Heidi New York City Cam Milwaukee McDonald
"flint taylor" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

10:40 min | 2 years ago

"flint taylor" Discussed on 790 KABC

"KABC talk radio seven ninety organised into a nation divided with Brian Dunne have made John Jason the studio. And here we talk about the issues that divide us as a nation. We want to welcome everyone. And if you missed the first segment or are just tuning in. We're talking about something that is almost never been talked about. And this is the concept of I say without exaggeration police torture. We have probably the primary attorney that absolutely was involved since this incident. First came to light, Mr. Flint Taylor coming to us from Chicago from the people's law as welcome Flint. Hello, tell us a little bit just so our listeners can be oriented a little bit about how it was you came to be doing work for social Justice. That later made you come in contact with this type of situation. Well, back in nineteen sixty nine I was a law student in northwestern here, and I was working with some young lawyers and law students who were concerned with the police repression police violence particularly against unpopular. And revolutionary groups such as Black Panthers and young lords and other organizations that were so strong in the city at that time and on December fourth of nineteen sixty nine one of our clients and one of the one of the best young leaders in the country of the Black Panthers. Fred Hampton, along with Mark Clark were murdered in their beds by the Chicago police department, we were called to come to the apartment the police left the apartment open, I'm for the next ten days as a young student and as young lawyers. We were we saw the murder scene, and we were able to start to rebut the story that that state's attorney of Cook County who's police had led the raid. We're putting out that it was a shootout between the Panthers and the police, of course, this happened four days before the infamous shootout in LA and over the next thirteen years my partners, and I worked on Fred Hampton case. And during that time we were able to show that was not only a police. Raid that was a shoot in and the murder, but also that it was connected to the FBI's Cohen calfo program. And it was part of the FBI and j Edgar Hoover's conspiracy to wipe out the Black Panther party actually in the trenches doing and we to gain the trust in the support of the community when they understand how real the type of work, you're doing is. And there's something to be said for doing as opposed to talking and we try to have individuals. Always that are actually in the process of doing tell us, Mr. Taylor. How does it rap into a situation where you're actually seeing what we've been talking about seeing the real evidence of the level of injustice and just nefarious nece for lack of a better word that is even more widespread than even thought. Well, the we founded the people's law office there in nineteen sixty nine and as I said, we then spent or several of us spent the next thirteen years litigating. Black Panther case. And as you said, we then gained some kind of trust in the community as lawyers who would fight unpopular cases, particularly racist cases that were perpetrated by the police and law enforcement, and so when the torture cases arose in the late eighties. We were contacted by a prisoner who had been charged and convicted and got the death penalty for shooting two white police officers in one of the most notorious cases in the history of the city in terms of there being a huge manhunt, they're being wholesale terrorism of the black community looking for the perpetrators of the crime. Let's man's name was Andrew Wilson. And so when you first were contacted by Mr. Wilson, he had already been convicted he was on death row awaiting his execution, and it was for particularly heinous crime which involved the death of law enforcement officers. What are the circumstances under which you're finally getting this call and well, we're getting the call. Andrew had filed. A pro se case sets the section nineteen Eighty-three civil rights case alleging that he was tortured and no lawyer would touch it. The judge tried to appoint lawyers and lawyer would stay with the case. So he knew of our reputation, and he contacted me and my partners and said will you take on this case? And we looked at it long and hard we knew at that time. What are the odds of winning a case where uneducated African American man doing a death sentence has been convicted of of killing two white police officers and he's saying he was tortured now hold on. Let me stop you real briefly. Do you believe him when you first hearing this? I mean, or is your attitude just well, this is kind of see and let's play this out. But that is a pretty bold allegation. And it actually turned out to be true. But the question is at the time, you got a guy calling you who's on death. And he's. He's been tortured. What's running through your mind? Well, what's running through my mind because he had a motion to suppress back in his criminal case. And for those of you who may not know motion to suppress is a legal vehicle through which a confession, which can be the most central vehicle to the conviction of an individual that actual confession can be thrown out of court under certain circumstances. Not the least of which would be if the confession was obtained by duress. Please continuous. Yes. And intead hearing his lawyers at the time public defender had put on some very strong evidence that he had been tortured this torture. They were so off the charts and torture that win. They electric shock Kim would this box and put the electrodes on him or the or the alligator clips on him they hadn't handcuffed across one of those old rock ribbed radiators that steam radio had I had those apologetic get hot very hot. Yeah. They get very. Hot and he was handcuffed across it. And when they shocked him his chest and leg went up against the hot radiator leaving on his body marks burns that corresponded to the radiator. His lawyer had also taken pictures of his ears where he said they put the alligator clips on. And his nose where he said they put the alligator clips on. And and he had seen these marks. They were these discoloration in in in the form of clips. So when we looked at the evidence, we were convinced that he had been tortured the judge had ignored that evidence. And now pelvic confession. Ultimately Wilson's case was reversed on the basis of all these visible injuries. And how long was that? Just so we can no I mean, how many years after you're figuring this out that you get the call. And when would it have been eighty seven right eighty seven. And when does that conviction finally overturned well about the same time his his conviction is overturned because she is ultimately put back to trial without the confession. He's convicted again, and and given a life sentence that taught so yes, we thought he was tortured. But the question that I think that really compelled us to get involved was we don't care. I don't mean that we don't. Care, but it's irrelevant. Whether he committed these crimes are not no human being should be tortured. And that was the battle that we saw that we were willing to fight that regardless of guilt or innocence. This man did not deserve to be tortured Burge and his people do not deserve to be the not only the person who arrested. But also the person who tried him and who issued the punishment against him. Now. Mister taylor. You are a constitutional scholar. You have taught law students, you are someone that has more legal training and more understanding of legal philosophy than the average. Anyone what do you say? And again, I agree with you one hundred percent. But what would you say if you just met someone on the street met someone in a bar, and they said to you, look the guy's guilty he committed this crime, and it's a terrible crime. What does it matter if there's just a little bit of pain associated with his arrest? I mean is there any harm or is there any foul? I mean, why is it that you're you're getting upset over this guy? First of all, how does anybody know if a person is guilty or innocent, if all you have against him or her confession, that's tortured out of him. Her grand therefore has no credibility. But even more importantly, there are human rights, there are constitutional rights that forbid this kind of activity speaking, and if we're going to live in a society. That's not completely solitaire you, and let's hope to God, we're not headed in that direction. Given what's going on today in the in the halls of power, then we have to fight very vigilantly to defend the constitution to defend the human rights. You have everybody, ladies and gentlemen, that is how civil rights lawyer makes a point. And I agree with you one hundred percent. I just wanted to hear you say it now, you're gonna find out about a lot more of these cases pretty soon, in fact, right? Why don't you tell us about how that went down? Well, after we took over the pro se cases, we'll send meaning for meaning where you're representing individuals for free Keebler on keep going keep going. You're representing individuals who had previously been representing themselves. Yes. So actually, I misspoke was only Andrew at that point. Is he had his case we took over? And so then we aggressively approached the evidence and try uncovers much as we could of the evidence. And we were having a lot of problems because the judge was very unsympathetic. He was a white judge with a racist attitude, and he had the same attitude that you just articulated that some person on the street might have which is what's the difference? This guy kill two cops. Why should we care about his constitutional? So when we come back mister Taylor. We're gonna talk about harvesting broke wide open, and you actually saw Justice absolutely occur, and you dealt with that consciousness that I expressed earlier with wonderful aplomb for lack of a better word. I am going to want to talk about how you actually broke this case open. We get back from the. Break. And once again, thank you. We are a nation divided KBC talk radio seven ninety on with Brian and Megan jaundice and attorney Fred Taylor.

Andrew Wilson Mr. Flint Taylor attorney Black Panthers Brian Dunne Fred Hampton Chicago police department FBI murder Chicago Panthers mister Taylor Flint j Edgar Hoover LA