17 Burst results for "Flinders University"

"flinders university" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:18 min | Last month

"flinders university" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Flinders University has revealed that the critically endangered parrots visual system is not as well adapted for life in the dark as what one would expect from an arc tunnel bird, and that's race concerns that might adversely be impacted by things like fencing Australian outback, the findings published in the journal scientific reports based on computer. Tomography Scans of the only known intact skull of this exceedingly rare species, and then comparing it to scouts from other closely related parrots. Geologists have found what for now at least is the earliest and largest non structure ever built by the mind civilization. In the journal Nature. Claims scientists used able in remote sensing laser technology to create three dimensional maps, which uncovered the previously unknown site in Tabasco, Mexico, the site consist of massive one point four kilometre long by zero point, four kilometer, wide platform, standing some ten to fifteen meters above the surrounding landscape, unlike other archaeological sites from around the same period in central, America, this newly discovered side doesn't appear to have any clear indication of social inequality, such as sculptures of high status individuals, athropologists say this suggests the importance of communal work in the initial development of the Maya civilization. Lacrosse the interwebs at funny memes videos were show you that men tend to dialogue early than women, because well, because they do some really stupid staff, but now east that is examined exactly how six really does influence the lifespan an ageing of mammals. We all know that women typically live longer than men, but determining whether the same phenomenon also occurs in other species is being challenging. Scientists developed demographic data and eight specific mortality estimates for more than one hundred and thirty four populations of one hundred and one different species of mammals, whereas the lifespan of females is on average seven point, eight percent longer than that of males in humans, while female mammals had on average, an eighteen point, six percent longer life span than their male counterparts and female mammals had longer lifespans compared with mel mammals in some sixty percent of all the analyzed populations. However, the author's didn't find significant six dependent differences aging rates. The results suggest that it's local environmental conditions which influence differences in Mortality Patents Controversial Cook Paid Evans is back in the news with therapeutic. Goods Administration finding him twenty five thousand dollars, proclaiming his so called bio charger can fight the coronavirus Evans. Who has just parted ways with longtime employee channel seven has been heavily slammed for promotion of an interview with racist conspiracy theorist and British Holocaust denier dirty Dave. An individual with a reputation for never letting if you get in the way of a good story. There's no suggestion that Evans himself holds any additional medical racist views bike simultanously covid nineteen is a fake pandemic with no actual virus at the same time linking the virus, the five G. Saltire installations, the therapeutic goods administration found claims made by Evans a bodies by a charger in reality, just a glorified fifteen grand land were likely to take advantage of the vulnerability of consumers who are. Are Ill likely to resolving consumers, not seeking medical advice in an appropriate time, and will likely they'll have a negative impact on Public Health Evans won the Australian Skeptics Twenty fifteen bent spoon award for promoting pseudoscientific piffle for his diet promotions campaigns against fluoridation and support for evacuees. A year earlier in twenty fourteen Evans claimed the circle of pelley. Dot could prevent autism. It can't and in. In, Twenty Sixteen, Evans was widely condemned by medical professionals after giving advice to an osteoporosis suffered to stop consuming dairy products, wrongly claiming that calcium from dairy can remove the calcium in your bones. In two thousand eighteen evans again outraged medical expert after promoting the idea that instead of using sunscreens you should simply look directly at the sun during sunrise and sunset without any means protection again. Again totally wrong and also extremely dangerous. You should never look directly at the Sun..

Evans Flinders University Tabasco Mexico Goods Administration British Holocaust America Dot
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

07:39 min | 4 months ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"The SANCHO ON R N and so two dead fish a paper just published. You may have heard discussed in breakfast on our in Dr John. Long from flinders and the origins of your hands and fingers three hundred eighty million years ago. He's with David Fisher now recovered from all that GROG L. Pistole sticky was an ancient fish that lived in the Devonian period in Canada about three hundred eighty million years ago. And its remains were first discovered in nineteen thirty eight and described by a very famous British palaeontologist call Stanley Westall who from this fragment of a skull roof thought it must belong to an amphibian and this of course was exciting. Nine thirty eight. Because we didn't really have many amphibians in the Devonian period later on Nineteen Eighty S. More of this beast was found a snapped in fact just the front part of the skull and a very famous fish pining tallest described the specimen and then decided it was actually the remains of a fish but not just any fish a really advanced fish officials skull roof. Patton looked more like an amphibian than any other fish. I've seen a picture of it it's fragmented I don't know fifteen twenty or more or paste together. I think it's about a major and a half long isn't it. That's correct and this fantastic. New Specimen was uncovered in two thousand and ten my colleague Professor Richard Cloutier from the universe. You've Quebec studied this man. And he part of the team that excavated it from the shores of Lake. Mega Washer and Canada will heritage site thing. And you've honed in on the FIEN. Yes well this so much fascinating information out of this new specimen as I said ninety ninety five all we had was the snout and then this whole news specimen has recently turned up but in two thousand and six a very exciting find from Arctic. Canada was tectonic and tectonic bridge the gap between advanced fishers with fleshy lobe fins. And the first amphibians and it was a big discovery was in all the newspapers it was on the cover of night but tectonic even did tell us a lot about that gap between fishes and land. Animals was still an incomplete specimen. So enter the new discovery. This fantastic new specimen is the very first example from anywhere in the world of this advanced type of fish. That's complete from tip of snout to tip of tail and such information in it that in the very first paper. That's just come out in nature. We find that we've had to focus on one aspect of the anatomy. And that is the picture of Finn because when fishes made the big step forward from swimming in water to invading land wasn't the head that changed much at all was really the limbs because the fin to walk on land needs to become a set of arms and legs and so we're seeing the transition of a fish fin into a fully functional kind of limb and to take the white of the fish. Exactly this film could Bear White. So the field was beautifully preserved hundred percent complete in every way except we couldn't see the internal bones of the skeleton because on both sides of the you could just see the scales and fin rays complete perfect ffynnon both aspects so we put it through a synchrotron and Richard Cloudier than met me back in two thousand thirteen at a palaeontology conference in the US and we got together. We're we're all friends. We've known each other for over twenty five years and we decided to collaborate on this because he had the wonderful specimen and my lab at flinders was set up to process this kind of data in a very modern and efficient kind of way and so by teaming up together we were able to produce this paper which revealed for the first time the complete fin skeleton of one of these very advanced vicious. And you know what we found the most amazing thing about it was. That didn't just have a regular fiend. Like a fish with a whole row of fin rays and scales covering the ended the Finn but once you analyze the bones inside the fin. We saw that. It had the typical humorous on radius. That many of the fish of this age have but then he had a series of advanced coppell bones and then right at the end of the Phoenix had some rows of what we call digits the same bones that form the fingers in your hand and this is the very first time unequivocally we have the evidence of rows of digits or finger bones inside the fien of advanced fish. Why do you think that this is the only specimen to have been found? It's a very big fish and also topping predator. There was the Apex Predator of this ancient ecosystem and apex. Predators are always pretty rare because the the top of the food chain being so rare and so important is it on display in. Canada was locked up. Now it's been on display for many years at the packed. Amigo Asha Museum in Quebec and does even t shirts made. It should L. pissed King of the DEVONIAN which I was wearing around long before the paper was written now. Congratulations are in order. Your this year's recipient of the better season and James Award a fifty thousand dollar acknowledgement of your lifetime of work in paleontology and vertebrate evolution plans. Thank you David was a bit left of center. I didn't expect to win this prize. But I do have plans to use this award to develop a project which I've been working on a book and potential documentary about the parallels we see with the evolution of life and automotive designers shine through the history of motorcycles motorcycles. Yeah I ride motorbikes. I've been writing ever since I was seventeen and I've written a book about all the parallels that one finds in automotive design and the trains in like engines getting bigger over time and the same dinosaurs got bigger through the era of dinosaurs. The rules of evolution are very much replied and the history of automotive design and many of us that like to communicate science. We do it in the same way all the time you know. We break down the science. But I'm trying a different metaphor if you like. And I think it will hopefully interest people that don't normally read popular science but might be interested in automotive design engines and motorbikes and you hope to produce some television yet mentors. I've written the manuscript which outlines the concepts and we've already received funding from the South Australian Film Corporation. Because I interested a couple of film produces in this idea. And we've already shot some footage in the spectacular flinders ranges with me on my Motoguzzi riding through this stunning ranges. They're through to the dawn of time. We'll animal Y I evolved in the Akron. And so the whole idea of this is to keep alive the concept of how did life I evolve had it engines first of all the spark of life that we get in an engine is like seeing the very first animals appear in the Akron and very steamy prototypes of life resemble the kinds of prototypes? We have in the first motorbikes. So it's kind of wacky idea but people love it. We've already done some filming and we're hoping to now use this award to get some further filming in animations made to interest some of the produces the multitalented professor John Long from Flinders University with David Fisher Geno Wiley by the way has a report on that in ABC Science Online Lincoln the Sancho website..

Canada flinders Quebec David Fisher Stanley Westall Akron Flinders University Dr John Professor Richard Cloutier R N Finn Patton Phoenix David Fisher Geno Wiley Richard Cloudier Bear White Lake Motoguzzi US Amigo Asha Museum
"flinders university" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:18 min | 8 months ago

"flinders university" Discussed on Science Friday

"This is science Friday. I'm IRA flow later in the hour. We'll talk about circadian rhythms and the biology of time but I last month SPACEX. Hey sex launched sixty satellites into low earth orbit as part of its starling project. Which Elon Musk's ambitious goal to provide satellite based broadband and he'll need to launch forty two thousand total satellites to complete the project but each of those satellites is program to Deorbit and burn up in the atmosphere? And unless there is a problem then the satellites will burn up in Earth's atmosphere within one one to five years and you add to that the roughly two thousand satellites lights already in low earth orbit and well spaces getting pretty crowded with our stuff and all our stuff is creating a lot of junk estimates for of the big pieces of trash about ten centimeters. That's about the size of your palm about twenty thousand of those objects. The real tiny stuff over a hundred rid million particles floating around above our heads. How can we clean up the planet's atmospheric attic? And what questions should we be thinking about. As as more and more satellites and companies are getting into the game. My next guests are here to talk about that. More by JR is an associate professor of aerospace engineering in engineering mechanics at the University of Texas. At Austin Welcome to science Friday. Hey how's it going brother good to be nice to have you alice. Gorman is a space archaeologist. Gist associate professor in the humanities arts and Social Sciences at Flinders University Adelaide South Australia. Her new book is called Dr Space Junk versus the universe archaeology and a future. Welcome to science Friday. Alex I want. I want to read from your book about. Just what is up there in space. You say Orbiting Earth right now satellites that work satellites that don't work. The rocket stages that delivered did them. Bolts canisters. Faring exploded fragments. Flexible paint shrapnel tools fuel and possibly a remnant organic waste from human spaceflight missions. I guess I mean space Pu Is there any way to keep track of all of this Alice. Well we have.

associate professor Dr Space Junk Elon Musk SPACEX Gorman Deorbit Flinders University Adelaide S Alex University of Texas Social Sciences
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:27 min | 11 months ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"Now we're standing on the campus of Work University and Having Front Nick and tournaments car which is very neat introduce it for me well this is he's pulled zero so we call them pods and the teases you say you don't WanNa Miss Self driving vehicle takes up to four passengers on the first or last mile of their journey. We tend to put this in assisted living facilities university campuses labile hit today at University of work or other areas that it could be beneficial shopping centers in such like and it will carry four passengers say on a journey or tournaments without needing to drive or steer Nick. What's your role in this compliment. I'm engineering manager for the company so I have a small team that we developed systems on here on campus. No we're a local company. Coventry based yeah. We're just up the right mack time. Climb inside your support you I. You're going to go with me on you. Thank you very much in the Komo Maria another pestle. Maria isn't high and the UN engineers well yes. Did you design this as well. Part of there are many engineers who part of this so yeah. I'm one of them and you'll pressing the door to close and and how nick does the Khanda where to go the will use a number of senses that have all been scanning the area. They've mapped the area and they will be locating against that and using the dormitory imagery to take the route via replant map. Will you tell it to go just for the press of a button so that's a dead manhandled so it's just to start and stop the poured it removing. It doesn't stop in case it sees an object and you can maneuver slowly as yes well if you want do if you see an object and it does distance keeping so if it sees an object and it will move according to pace well. There's an object coming towards awards in fact a pedestrian in Doa very graciously avoiding him so and spitting up again. Has this actually gone to main roads in the public now. This is not a road transport. It is only for the last distance is cover up like in university campus or industrial estates four uses like that so no it's not doing a useful job won't be campuses like this. Whether as a safe ish road yeah the already been using an industrial estates in Australia and also in Canada uh-huh we have used apart in Finland Pori. It's a corporate state so it is for the transportation of the people for the last mile bike going past and of of course elegantly the pod stops and now I think we're gained Chuck E. U. E. You understand chucky. I I sorta get it u-turn yeah. That's that's the technical jargon we use an engineering you know in the southern part that we also have a facility running in Brighton the blind veterans facility there and we take person's from the city of the talk down to the seafront it down to the bond or to the chapel and so they're using this on a daily basis to transport themselves around the facility and Brighton have you come across anything it goes in front of the part that it hasn't recognized yet who are surrounded by about two hundred geese Canadian Geese and grey geese who might suddenly tape across well. We have a number light is on the vehicle including a safety lighter which is at a low level which would identify any foreign object. If you like something that would interfere with the safety beam area safety zone. I should say and that would just stop the pod excellent now again very elegantly and quite slowly. I watched top speed you might reach at the moment is seven point five meters per second the top speed because it's a university campus and be have a lot of people moving around taught me to keep it low today just to have a smooth ride so we are currently doing like one point five meters per second to two meters per second you very very comfortable wonderfully silent and what really say. Nick because major possibility in ten years time for the sort of equal well this who'll become commonplace. I believe you'll be able to call upon on your mobile phone or APP or whatever it'll be able to turn up to wherever you need it accurately take Kiana on a short journey in the comfort of a vehicle rather than in extreme weather that you might get one snow and in Australia. You said you've been been trying might as well do you know where about spending add laid and his universe finish flinders university university yes. Elliot Park is also in Australia where they did assisted living facility so they took people on long journeys kilometer around in about they really enjoyed it. Thanks the trip very welcome. Thank you thank get a ride in the POD and you'll find them as you heard at flinders university at Tunceli with poignantly some may recall call the car factory complex now transformed into the Innovation Center for Engineering Medical R._N._D. and much else..

Nick flinders university university Komo Maria Australia Work University University of work Brighton engineering manager UN Elliot Park mack Tunceli Innovation Center for Engineer Kiana Finland Pori Chuck E. U. Canada five meters per second
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"Well, I'll ask you a question that relate takes you to zebra finches in a straight yet. And it's something that I found at plea fascinating work done at Flinders university. And that is that the mother sings a song to eggs and the chicks in the hangs. Learn that soem and professor Sonja kind off tested that by swapping around the eggs and having recordings different recordings or so anyway. She found out that there's no question that these chicks do learn that particular song to Rennes to the same thing. They do. Yes. Superb barrier incidents shown to do the same thing where females will sing to their chicks. That are still in the epic Bill sort of give them with researchers have been calling like a pass code that those chicks than us to beg with once they've hatched the and the female recognizes those is her chicks and their -eckognize the female as their mom or their parent. And so she feeds them based on that passcode. Yeah. It's almost inconceivable chicks, barely got brains. Let alone the capacity to learn a song. Yeah. They're very little, but they can still it's in the late stages of the epic before they hatched last couple of days at their learning that code or that call and this show tiny as well, they come out of the being very very tiny doll Ferrier in itself a superb barrier in its probably eight or nine grams, maybe up to ten. But the chicks when they come out of the eggs. Yeah. They're going to be three or four probably cramped finger. Exactly. If. Since your testosterone years. How have you continued that research now, I've moved a little bit into citizen science where a friend, and I started this project. We're calling the fairy Wren project crossed Australia. We're we're really interested in how ecological differences such as rainfall or temperature across populations of Ferrier ends influence win these different populations molting into their bright plumage new doing this with Kelly Andrews's in science unit..

Ferrier Flinders university Rennes Kelly Andrews testosterone Sonja Australia professor nine grams
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"You cannot describe your role you need to take it seriously. Somehow, what do you think about the role of strategy in this regard? I think there's definitely a really good potential this startups. I know quite well some of them I think that as long as you guys sure that these new startups, which are creating the space of tomorrow, by the way, turn into what I call SME's on small and medium businesses that are long-term businesses. I think you'll be a stronger in Australia the role of the studium we're responsible for one of the surface when it comes to traffic control search and rescue meteorologist Affleck this. We had the second lowest population density in the world after Namibia. We should be number one in space. Not where we are. Should be number. Maybe number. Tell us about ova view. This is a really interesting thing. So when the first humans went into office and eventually Haya looking down at the earth from the outside and often saying the whole they experienced a strong emotional effect. That's come to be known as the overview affect and this made them, very aware that was a complete ecosystem that the atmosphere was just this little thin bobble protecting soul from the space outside and that it was a fragile and beautiful and precious thing that needed to be protected and sometimes along with that went the feeling that conflicts and national boundaries on earth were main listen pity, and sometimes people say that well, if we could send our politicians up into Spicer might be Chemi wanna leave them there. But if they could have been. Of experiencing this sort of emotional consciousness rising it would contribute to grace a pace on. And I think this is a really interesting concept. I'm a little bit skeptical because there's I think five hundred thirty people have been in spice outside the it's pretty small sample of reactions. And once of course, someone said just wait to an all, but you can say the outside you're gonna experience the overview if you come back and say, well, actually, I didn't experience like the narrative has been written. So we'd be very difficult to come back and say, none of that happened for me. There are some experiences such as the transit of Venus. I remember when Aaron tire building stopped because the small dot was going across. And we thought you scientists predicted it and there it is. Then you go back to the expiration of Europeans in this region straight, especially on the famous trick. And so you got Yechury thirty. Assignment coming to the state being well impressed, by the fact that people bloody clever. I work things out come back. I am skeptical the faked, but the thing I really take from it, which I think is important is that space isn't cold hard on the live stuff out there that we only media with interact with technology. This stuff is also about our emotions and our actions, and I'll feelings this stuff is also important. So well, yeah, I think it would be really interesting to have it because some people of people who get outside the earth and can report back what they feel. I think Noah djing that. We not only have these emotional reactions, but we're allowed to have them. And this is part of our experience space that actually is the thing I think is most important about considering the overview, thank you very much. Then thank the panel. I was Gorman from Flinders university space ocular gist. Jennifer Weisman from Nasr's gout space Flight Center, Andrew Dempster from the university of New South, Wales and Muriel Richard from the space center in Switzerland and manager of the clean space one mission next week on the sign show. Professor marina mccarter from the university. College London on how the state that is public enterprise should be recognized and fostered as sensual our indeed, I'm Williams.

gout space Flight Center Namibia Flinders university Haya London Noah djing marina mccarter Aaron tire Gorman Affleck Professor Jennifer Weisman Australia Spicer Andrew Dempster university of New South Switzerland Muriel Richard Williams Wales
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"You cannot describe your role you need to take it seriously. Somehow, what do you think about the role of strategy in this regard? I think there's definitely a really good potential this startups. I know quite well some of them I think that as long as you guys sure that these new startups, which are creating the space of tomorrow, by the way, turn into what I call SME's on small and medium businesses that are long-term businesses. I think you'll be a stronger in Australia the role of the studium we're responsible for one of the surface when it comes to traffic control search and rescue meteorologist Affleck this. We had the second lowest population density in the world after Namibia. We should be number one in space. Not where we are. Should be number. Maybe number. Tell us about ova view. This is a really interesting thing. So when the first humans went into office and eventually Haya looking down at the earth from the outside and often saying the whole they experienced a strong emotional effect. That's come to be known as the overview affect and this made them, very aware that was a complete ecosystem that the atmosphere was just this little thin bobble protecting soul from the space outside and that it was a fragile and beautiful and precious thing that needed to be protected and sometimes along with that went the feeling that conflicts and national boundaries on earth were main listen pity, and sometimes people say that well, if we could send our politicians up into Spicer might be Chemi wanna leave them there. But if they could have been. Of experiencing this sort of emotional consciousness rising it would contribute to grace a pace on. And I think this is a really interesting concept. I'm a little bit skeptical because there's I think five hundred thirty people have been in spice outside the it's pretty small sample of reactions. And once of course, someone said just wait to an all, but you can say the outside you're gonna experience the overview if you come back and say, well, actually, I didn't experience like the narrative has been written. So we'd be very difficult to come back and say, none of that happened for me. There are some experiences such as the transit of Venus. I remember when Aaron tire building stopped because the small dot was going across. And we thought you scientists predicted it and there it is. Then you go back to the expiration of Europeans in this region straight, especially on the famous trick. And so you got Yechury thirty. Assignment coming to the state being well impressed, by the fact that people bloody clever. I work things out come back. I am skeptical the faked, but the thing I really take from it, which I think is important is that space isn't cold hard on the live stuff out there that we only media with interact with technology. This stuff is also about our emotions and our actions, and I'll feelings this stuff is also important. So well, yeah, I think it would be really interesting to have it because some people of people who get outside the earth and can report back what they feel. I think Noah djing that. We not only have these emotional reactions, but we're allowed to have them. And this is part of our experience space that actually is the thing I think is most important about considering the overview, thank you very much. Then thank the panel. I was Gorman from Flinders university space ocular gist. Jennifer Weisman from Nasr's gout space Flight Center, Andrew Dempster from the university of New South, Wales and Muriel Richard from the space center in Switzerland and manager of the clean space one mission next week on the sign show. Professor marina mccarter from the university. College London on how the state that is public enterprise should be recognized and fostered as sensual our indeed, I'm Williams.

gout space Flight Center Namibia Flinders university Haya London Noah djing marina mccarter Aaron tire Gorman Affleck Professor Jennifer Weisman Australia Spicer Andrew Dempster university of New South Switzerland Muriel Richard Williams Wales
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"Home on the moon school excursions will consist of flies to Venus or two with Alice around the opening space junk museum excited may be just a little bit apprehensive don't worry because we have a symbol an international panel of experts to put all of these wild and not so wild ideas in context and talk through the probabilities and possibilities of humans going to Infinity and beyond what's beyond Infinity. The ALPHA's panelists is a leader in the field of space technology and Oculus and the heritage of space exploration, including planetary landing sites and of earth mining she teaches in the international space, universities southern hemisphere space program and Flinders university. Adelaide these welcome Alice goal and. Mixed. We percent to senior stra physicists Nashes Dowd space Flight Center where she serves as the senior project. Scientist for the Hubble space telescope primary responsibility is to ensure that the Hubble mission is as scientifically productive as possible. Welcome Jennifer Weisman. Now next guest is director of the center for space engineering research at the university of New South Wales. He was system engineer for the first GPS receiver developed industry in the nineteen eighties and has been involved in satellite navigation, ever since he was also a leading advocate for an Australian space agency. Welcome Andrew them STA. And final guest worked at NASA Jet Propulsion lab for twelve years before moving to the space center in Switzerland to manage the Swiss cube satellite bridge ached since January twenty twelve she's managed the clean space. One mission technology designed actively.

Flight Center Alice director NASA Jet Propulsion Flinders university Jennifer Weisman Nashes Dowd Adelaide university of New South Wales ALPHA Switzerland Scientist Andrew twelve years
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"Home on the moon school excursions will consist of flies to Venus or two with Alice around the opening space junk museum excited may be just a little bit apprehensive don't worry because we have a symbol an international panel of experts to put all of these wild and not so wild ideas in context and talk through the probabilities and possibilities of humans going to Infinity and beyond what's beyond Infinity. The ALPHA's panelists is a leader in the field of space technology and Oculus and the heritage of space exploration, including planetary landing sites and of earth mining she teaches in the international space, universities southern hemisphere space program and Flinders university. Adelaide these welcome Alice goal and. Mixed. We percent to senior stra physicists Nashes Dowd space Flight Center where she serves as the senior project. Scientist for the Hubble space telescope primary responsibility is to ensure that the Hubble mission is as scientifically productive as possible. Welcome Jennifer Weisman. Now next guest is director of the center for space engineering research at the university of New South Wales. He was system engineer for the first GPS receiver developed industry in the nineteen eighties and has been involved in satellite navigation, ever since he was also a leading advocate for an Australian space agency. Welcome Andrew them STA. And final guest worked at NASA Jet Propulsion lab for twelve years before moving to the space center in Switzerland to manage the Swiss cube satellite bridge ached since January twenty twelve she's managed the clean space. One mission technology designed actively.

Flight Center Alice director NASA Jet Propulsion Flinders university Jennifer Weisman Nashes Dowd Adelaide university of New South Wales ALPHA Switzerland Scientist Andrew twelve years
"flinders university" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"flinders university" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"I'm Mark garrison. Sarah for you talk, Ted at ninety nine three WBZ. So how are your New Year's resolutions gone? Did you make one? To do with food. Talking to TJ. When you went to fifteen months one time or something like that without hitting a fast food restaurant. You're doing that again. I've gone. Technically, I've gone since whatever a year ago last July was no ice cream. No fast food. I have stopped at a Jack in the box twice in that time period. Which would be what eighteen? Eighteen months. And bought two. Yes. The whole dollar to Jack in the box tacos. But no more than two at a time and only twice. And if my wife's still in her car, driving, home I deny all. Don't ask me when the last time was TJ. Wasn't recent. Depending on how you define that. Most people give up on their New Year's resolutions by. January twelfth. So if you all of a sudden you've come this far. And then you get through tomorrow. It would just make sense that a weekend would be what kills it. Right because it has to do with the weight loss or has to do with. I don't know. What are you? What are you quit smoking or? So if you're thinking about what your New Year's resolution for two thousand nineteen should be a new study suggests that you're you're probably don't want to really commit to it. Because it's going to be all done by January twelfth. Anyway, Strada is a social network for athletes, and they analyzed more than thirty one and a half million online global activities and were able to pinpoint the date when most people said that they hadn't been able to stick to their resolution. And January twelfth is essentially what it came out to the nutritionist and lecturer Dr Carly Moore's of Australia's Flinders university said that you shouldn't try to make too many changes at once suggesting start with small changes and continue to build on those. And and try to tackle some change at a time. The other thing, I guess I heard from the other day was make realistic expectations. Don't. I mean, saying, okay. My New Year's resolution, I'm gonna lose forty eight pounds. Now, don't don't don't. Set small goals set goals that are achievable and then maybe continue to set them. I know one thing people who go to gyms in the YMCA and stuff like that eight this time of year. Because this is the year when all the amateurs come in. So they come in. And they take up all the treadmills, and they take up all the equipment, and they stink up the locker room and so on and so forth, and it has got to weather the storm because by February or March, they'll be gone, and then they can have the place back to themselves again. But. And maybe New Year's Eve, maybe New Year's is not the right time to do that. Because while everybody else has gotta fixated on resolutions. And I I'm not so sure that making a resolution doesn't make it almost inevitable that you're going to fail. Because at some point or another you have to get to the state of mind of. When I quit smoking. It wasn't a New Year's resolution that had to do with. I don't know just circumstances. Still can't believe how easy it was. When I finally got my mind, and I don't know how you do that. But how you when I finally got my mind resolute on is the fact that it was going to quit smoking were they I died diagnosed me with diabetes a year ago last July. I did what everybody else did. I assume. I went in and kicked us. But. And then that's led to this. And then that's led to another. And then that led to a cardiologist, and then that led to so on and so forth. And so all of a sudden now I got down to one ninety five now back up to twenty again. So shame on me. I guess but. I didn't lose that weight. The losing the weight the first time around I hadn't done it in ten or twelve years. And then all of a sudden, I got the. There was a reason I was driven. But then at some point or another you get tired of Turkey wraps than kale salads. And so you basically say, okay. Well, I'm just going to allow myself. We'll just go out for dinner every Friday. But then I'll stay on the program. Granola is good. We'll have granola is good then and I'm still not eating ice cream and pies and cakes and stuff like that. But. I don't know. Hard to stick stuff you've got to change your lifestyle, and and that's just difficult. And especially when it comes to stuff like stuff you like. Losing weight is just terrible. Couldn't fast food restaurants is tough. Because as soon as you decided I'd say, it's no big deal. I can do that. And then you've you've done it for ten or twelve days, and it's all good. And then you sit down to watch TV program. And Burger King comes out with their new super duper. Meat cheese, onions, hot fudge? Strawberry. Sundae. Burger is go on a guy. Well, I gotta have one of those or deep dish pizza delivered by topless people or something like, and you got to have one of those. That's what those fast food restaurants are all about is. Oh, man, Swiss cheese and grilled onions in Philadelphia cheese sandwich. I go, man. I..

Mark garrison Jack in Burger King Sarah Ted Flinders university Strada Philadelphia Turkey lecturer Australia Dr Carly Moore forty eight pounds Eighteen months fifteen months twelve years
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"And why you're looking hesitantly at lunch and breakfast. Think once more of those poor prawns we know that bees are adversely affected by those new pesticides. Could prawns also be at risk. This warning comes from Dorothy hill prize win at Southern Cross university in Lismore. Dr. Kistin Benkin, Dorf pesticides, obviously developed to target specifically insects, but prawns are in the same file Athar oppo. So they have very similar central nervous systems, which is where these pesticides actually target. So it's kind of crazy to think that they weren't impact Commissioner important crustaceans like prawns and crabs as well as the insects that they designed to target and what people nonetheless tries to find this. This was the case. Well, the research actually is a hardly been done at all. People have the seemed that insecticides pesticides used interest real agriculture and don't get into aquatic systems, but the new breed pesticides. The neonicotinoids are actually what soluble and studies from. Right around the world have actually been detecting quite significantly high levels in waters up to two hundred micrograms per liter, even see us IRO studying astray Williams found in some Queensland rivers over one microgram per liter of these pesticides enormous. Eight is when you consider the talk city of them. So the concentrations that are actually required to cause and effect. So you can detect the, you know, around one microgram per liter, but they may be effective at point two micrograms per liter. And that's when you do actually get concerned about the impacts that they may have on the organisms. The levels like in this region in this particular region of the northern rivers, I don't think they're as great as they are in some of the rivers higher up in Queensland with. I are doing more intensive sugar cane farming. A lot of the rivers haven't been sampled however. So to my knowledge, the Clarence refers the only one that Spain's sampled and it had high levels of some other types of pesticides, but not the tonight's specifically. So it probably depends on the type of culture. I would be concerned in areas around with might be turf farms and with there might be blueberries, for example, because it's approved for use in those types of scenarios. What did you find when you went to Vietnam? I was very interested in. In the situation in Vietnam because they're, they do actually co coach prawns or shrimp and rice. They sometimes integrate them and sometimes it's a rotational type system and they are getting really high rates of mortality where sometimes it's actually up to one hundred percent of the prawns or dying. And that's probably an interaction of a whole bunch of stresses and disease causing these problems. But there's no doubt that pesticides would actually contribute. So we are finding the models of farming. They're potentially increasing the susceptibility of the pawns to the pesticides when the entire crop is wiped out, what do they do? What can they do? Often it results in the small scale of femmes becoming unbearable, and they usually taken over by larger scale industry and this often results in digging out mangroves and moving to a new area, huge amount of mangroves being removed over there. It's quite startling. They learn that one yet. I think there's people who know, but there's also that. Sort of level of influence coming in from big business in China, which is basically just buying out big tracts of land and they building these intensive prawn farms. It's just a completely different model. They do use a lot more sterilization of the system and they can have more control over the water quality. So a lot of those proteins are perhaps not as contaminated, but also perhaps not tested to liberals, we would, but the bigger problem is around the con- daughter and other areas where they still have these models of rice prone small-scale farming, and it's the livelihood to people, but also the types of problems that are getting onto the domestic market which are probably containing the contaminants that wouldn't be allowed on the export market. So whatever just from the export market ends up on the local domestic market in Vietnam who your show under colleagues there. I have a number of collaborators in Vietnam. A colleague Dr winding was actually my PHD student at Flinders university, and now is the head of equa coacher at how long university. I have collaborators at your train university, very good relationship with those guys and also at Kanto university where they have a lot of connections into the make on delta. So we're able to take me into visit a few farmers..

Vietnam Queensland Southern Cross university Lismore Dr. Kistin Benkin Kanto university Flinders university Commissioner Dr winding Spain Williams Clarence China one microgram two hundred micrograms one hundred percent two micrograms
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Show

"And so two effectiveness in science. You don't want to be just fussing around making no difference. However, elevated your position and title may be. So how do it? Here's Paul, Willis, my very effective colleague in Adelaide. The irony is that wall and education in science might prepare you for career in science. This good chance that Korea will be spent in academia and there's little or no training for that coming to the rescue of these struggling academics is the Matthew Flinders fellow in globally. Collagen at Flinders university professor Cory Bradshaw with his new book, the effective scientists, a handy guide to a successful academic career. So why do we need such a book? I certainly wish the book had existed when I was in my PHD. So after many conversations with people, the same stage of my career, as I am and younger early Chris researchers, it's sort of. Don't on me the perhaps that collective experience of making a lot of mistakes could be useful to someone starting out in science and perhaps potentially helping them to avoid the same as that I and my colleagues of mate because we were never trained in most of the objects of daily life and academia. And the first third of the book is about writing. One is writing important for scientists. You know, if you'd asked me that question when I started my scientific career would have thought that's a little bit silly to focus so much time on writing yet nearly thirty years Lehto. Most of my time is spent writing. I tend to have a little cliche in the lab about the importance of writing in the sense that you can be the most brilliant person on the planet. But if you can't communicate that brilliance, then you're functionally stupid. So that brilliant says locked away yet. Very few scientists are trained in the art of good communication of the written word. Most of us haven't had proper training in English literature. So the understanding of grammatical structure and the subtleties of the English language and the beautiful array of Tim analogy we can use while trying to remain precise to the point such that we can clarify very complex concepts to not only colleagues, but to the rest of the world that takes an exceptional command of the English language to be able to do properly. But Scholley being taught how to write is a normal part of any scientist training. Because if you can't run a scientific pipe, then that's the backbone, the science one would think that would be the case. But how many English literature classes are there in an undergraduate science degree? I've never seen one how many science students enroll in English literature. And the first year I've never met one. In other words, there's never been an emphasis put on writing skills for scientists such that by the time they come to the end of their degrees. They've. Got the concepts on the scientific method. Hopefully the understanding of what I have policies and experimental design, but most people cannot necessarily right that eloquently and clearly punch me in mind of a friend of house. Tim planetary who's undergrad was actually an English literature, and it was on me in his postgraduate is that he went onto vertebrate palaeontology and he's now the guru. We all know and love, and part of his message also comes through in your book, and that is the importance of being able to keep control of your story in the media. Why is that? Why is it so important to be able to control what it is you've got to save? I think too many times I had been misinterpreted or I had been manipulated even or just play misunderstood when I was speaking to non scientists. Think this is the key and people like Tim Flannery I'll be smashed is at this, but the Tim type is very rare among scientists. I mean, we have to remember that most scientists on capable. Of doing that. Another rather impressive feature level is the beautiful artwork have come about. I tend to say more seriously than facetiously that autistic decline. So those artworks, certainly my own. But I had the very fortunate circumstance of meeting a wonderfully talented scientists and professional artists at Flinders university, Rene Campbell who agreed to help me illustrate some concepts in the book. Not only did she design the beautiful cover, but she included eighteen caption. Lescot tunes that encapsulates some of the main concepts in the book..

Tim Flannery Flinders university Rene Campbell Matthew Flinders Adelaide Korea Lehto Cory Bradshaw Paul Tim Chris Willis Scholley professor scientist thirty years
"flinders university" Discussed on Flash Forward

Flash Forward

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"flinders university" Discussed on Flash Forward

"Of all these rules to old us at the lights and we had even a case where satellite was going to was already the critical design review so in the last review and they have to change very very signif significantly the design because they were not compliant with maximum casualty on ground it's really a whole new way of thinking about satellites and this is a really new field because in the past we have always been designing satellites to survive and now we are trying to design satellite so that in certain conditions they completely disappear they've uprise but not everybody thinks that we should vaporize all of our past satellites and spacecraft i won't be sad because i do want to say this stuff this is rarely the issue into city is at the heart of this throaty elitists touching some ancient artifacts that no person has touched for six thousand years is an incredibly 'push thing being in the presence of a historic ancient satellite like like van godwin all like telstar one big in the presence of real thing not just a model in a museum or a mockup somewhere like that's a session incredibly powerful thing i'm alice skullman senior electra flinders university in adelaide in south australia on kiala gist and the focus of my research is stuff in space yes that's right a space archaeologist i had no clue that this was even a thing until i found allah's work and it's kind of counter intuitive right normally people don't think of contempt rubbish out effects so we know that we look for the the century ceramic silva six thousand year old stone tool but if you look at contemporary rubbish as a source of archaeological information suddenly you see all these other things what alice does is study objects that not only were created in the very near past but also object that are out in space that she can't actually hold or tie now you might be wondering as i did when i first encountered this work wait a minute archaeology is a field where researchers find really old stuff and they try to figure out what that really old stuff is and what it can tell us about a culture or.

telstar electra flinders university adelaide alice van godwin six thousand years six thousand year
"flinders university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"flinders university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To an end after fifteen years in which the country has made a successful transition from war to peace about sixteen thousand personnel for more than ten countries have served in the mission an estimated quarter of a million liberians were killed during the civil bowls between nineteen ninety nine and two thousand and three the chinese spice lab ten going one is on the brink of making an uncontrolled full to earth the space labs propulsion system had been designed to guide the croft into the southern ocean boss chinese ground controllers lost contact with the timing and location of its reentry into the atmosphere are uncertain but experts say it could happen any day now dr goldman a lecturer on space archaeology and heritage at flinders university of south australia says it's most likely to avoid populated areas unfold into water it's eight and a half tons but in terms of space stations it's actually quite small and it's not even one of the biggest satellites we have in space but there is a lot of uncertainty about where it's going to come down this is partially because the chinese dot currently have communication with it so they can't use it stresses to control the white reenters and it's going around the earth you know roughly every couple of hours world news from the bbc south korea has summoned japan's ambassador to seoul over new education guidelines which described disputed islands as japanese the islands known as doctor in south korea and takashimaya in japan have been controlled by seoul since nineteen fortyfive tokyo has instructed high schools to change textbooks to say the islands japanese south korea set the territory was historically geographically and legally there's pubs and bars in ireland will be allowed to sell alcohol on good friday for the first time in more than ninety years the irish parliament banned the sale of intoxicating liquor on the christian religious holiday in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven the band was only overturned two months ago with campaigners arguing that legally enforced abstinence was bad for business and tourism the diocese of the.

lecturer bbc japan south korea seoul fortyfive tokyo ireland irish parliament dr goldman flinders university of south a fifteen years ninety years two months
"flinders university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"flinders university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Country has made a successful transition from water piece about sixteen thousand personnel for more than ten countries have served in the mission an estimated quarter of a million liberians were killed during the civil bowls between nineteen thousand nine and two thousand and three the chinese space lab ten going one is on the brink of making an uncontrolled fall to earth the space labs propulsion system had been designed to guide the croft into the southern ocean boss chinese ground controllers lost contact with it the timing and location of its reentry into the atmosphere are uncertain but experts say it could happen any day now dr goldman a lecturer on space archaeology and heritage at flinders university of south australia says it's most likely to avoid populated areas and fall into water it's eight and a half tons but in terms of space stations it's actually quite small and it's not even one of the biggest satellites have in space but there is a lot of uncertainty about where it's going to come down this is partially because the chinese don't currently have communication with it so they can't use it thrusters to control the white reenters and it's going around the earth you know roughly every couple of hours world news from the bbc south korea has summoned japan's ambassador to seoul over new education guidelines which described disputed islands as japanese the islands known as doctor in south korea and takeshima in japan have been controlled by seoul since nineteen fortyfive tokyo has instructed high schools to change textbooks to say the islands are japanese south korea at the territory was historically geographically and legally there's pubs and bars in ireland will be allowed to sell alcohol on good friday for the first time in more than ninety years the irish parliament banned the sale of intoxicating liquor on the christian religious holiday in nineteen twenty seven the band was only overturned two months ago with campaigners arguing that legally enforced abstinence was bad for business and tourism the.

lecturer bbc japan south korea seoul fortyfive tokyo ireland irish parliament dr goldman flinders university of south a ninety years two months
"flinders university" Discussed on Science Vs

Science Vs

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"flinders university" Discussed on Science Vs

"Gains down nerves in some way making us seek and this could lead to things like asthma or high blood pressure and now not every cairo thinks this way any more but a lot of them still do a study of several hundred canadian cairo's found that almost one in five thought fixing a supplication was the key to health the first behind it is more floor become ghoulish lags behind addition mobu the belief system mission police combed through tour with malaysia physics and chemistry and bolger that's my chile custom he's originally from italy but is a professor of neurology at flinders university in australia and he says that there is no good evidence that problems with your spine ought to blame for many of the diseases that some cairo's claim to fix so take asmat for example now we don't know exactly what causes asmad spin linked to genetics and immune reactions but he is the important thing we don't have any good evidence that manipulating the spine can have any effect on us ma there's no basil bush wherever but again can cure asthma a completion on senseless nor new phone there's no evidence that the one can believe but there's no reason whatsoever to assumed or manipulating the spine will help a dasmal mouth young child endeshaw indices a complete two bunkers is a complete nonsense and maybe this asthma thing is low hanging freight to like it canas seems obvious that it's a bit bunk as but much only says that even if you just zoom out to this idea that a back could be misaligned and afflicted with supplication 's well he says that even that concept is spineless and the supplementation supergroup exist physically they don't exist at all the don't exist at all you simply just than in your complete freedom effect some of them believe this is even more worrying and some of them actually don't believe it and they want to ditch this idea of sub looks stations altogether.

asthma blood pressure cairo professor flinders university basil bush malaysia bolger chile italy australia
"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"flinders university" Discussed on The Science Hour

"And but this is the discovery from flinders university and unlike lots of paleontological discoveries it's kind of eject jigsaw puzzle of lots of old bones that have been in collections all over australia they've been brought together and what they've essentially found is that what they thought were the remains of one extinct bird is actually five and these are a group of birds and cold megapode am so these big ground nesting birds but they the most impressive of which was the kangaroo sized turkey and which his cold procure a gallon acea um which i'm probably going to horribly miss pronounce and which is remarkable not only for its size but in fact it flew as well eight hides they looked at these bones and it had incredibly strong wind bones so it would actually of flown and it would have resulted in trees i liked the way that because it's in australia because the scientists frustrate and it's a kangaroo sized turkey assembly if it was somewhere else it would be auto samper size to big big dogs size labrador labrador that's all i uk compassion true true yes i'm so what happened to these birds what did they go and so they became extinct arum as say that they came they came extinct as recently as about fifty thousand years ago but looking at these collection of burns a little bit more closely is not only showing them that there were more of these megapode than they thought and that they were much more diverse but they've also groups them into two groups now one of which they called the tool turkey's including this prager at gallon acea am and the other group of these shortest out to birds which short sea legs which brilliantly they termed nudity chicken nauseam submit sad i think that title i really like that phrase i can't get enough of it and potentially it's it's all essentially discovery shows just how much more diverse during the pleistoceneage.

flinders university australia prager fifty thousand years eight hides