20 Burst results for "Fleischmann"

"fleischmann" Discussed on Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller

"Fleischmann and the coffee breakers crew. Boy steve yoki. Someone offered my boy. Dan thirty five thousand dollars for my project. Twenty twenty one. Oh one gold. Mike trout card and he said no not ferguson ended up or whatever but it was crazy he said no. It's pretty impressive. But more importantly there were at least sixty thousand people inside that convention. At any given time k i would say maybe ten fifteen percent at most had masks on it was insane k. I guarantee that they never had a turn out like that before. In fact the from the national did they said that they never. This was the biggest national ever k. Wednesday was even crazier than thursday. But i got so shook die left after ten minutes. I didn't even take my mouth off for one second and even on thursday right before my event i got to the fucking convention center. I got such bad anxiety. That i ran to the bathroom. Haida fucking wiped out whole motherfucker. Donald clorox wipes and i had diarrhea k. Yeah i know. Tmi but friday was craziest fuck to at the national by the way trying to get an uber in rosemont okay or chicago period was just impossible. I it took me over an hour just to get from o'hare to the hotel while hotels on the mile right at one. Pm in the afternoon on fucking wednesdays. I've never seen traffic that bad before. The average wait time for an uber or lift at most of the times was like an hour to ninety minutes at the convention. Forget about it. Downtown chicago real bad thirty minutes on a fucking at whatever time. Get just to get a fucking car to go wherever okay. I could have got a.

steve yoki Mike trout Fleischmann Donald clorox ferguson rosemont diarrhea chicago
"fleischmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:55 min | 4 months ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I hand over my passport and the soldier who greets me see that the passport in South African and starts speaking to me in Africans, Jesse says. Here was an Israeli soldier demanding his identification papers speaking the same language as the authorities back home who caused decides families so much pain that was a stuck Remainder of the apartheid South African regime and of Israel's own, um, complicity with apartheid South Africa. Israel became a friend of the South African apartheid regime in the 19 seventies, and it was one of the last Western nations to sever ties with the country after global sanctions were imposed in the late eighties. On the flip side, Nelson Mandela and Yasser Arafat were friends are fat was the chairman of the P L O. The Palestine Liberation Organization, which provided military support to the African National Congress in the 19 seventies. And that's why it dis I says today. Many black South Africans identify with the Palestinians and are active in the anti Israel boycott, Divestment and sanctions movement, which, incidentally, has been organizing Israel apartheid week on college campuses since 2005 long before it was fashionable long before it was attractive or sexy. It was a Palestinians who gave us financial resources that gave us military training they gave us Various other forms of solidarity. So in some ways, it's paying back for that. The debate over the A word isn't just about rhetoric. It's about consequences. Whether you call the situation, apartheid, occupation or conflict will determine the particular roles and responsibilities of those involved. Leonie Fleischmann teaches international politics at City University of London when it's defined as the Israeli Palestinian conflict. It's a case of two equal sides who need to come together on the negotiation table, Um, in order to resolve the conflict. That's the framework used in the nineties with the Oslo peace process. Now, Fleischmann says. The international community calls Israel's controls over Gaza, the West Bank and East Jerusalem, a military occupation, Fleischman says. Under this framework, the occupier Israel has certain obligations towards the occupied people, the Palestinians, but at the same time, Israel can legally take its security into account. So they could argue, for example, that's something that we're doing. Yes, it may be an abuse of rights, but it's necessary in order to protect the security of Israelis, but as soon as you start talking about the situation in terms of apartheid The idea of balancing interest is no longer applicable. Apartheid is defined as a crime against humanity. Under international law. We have a case where a certain group are privileged over another group, and there's a clear oppressor and oppressed such that those who are oppressed me to be freed from this oppression. When groups like Human Rights Watch used the term apartheid its strategic. They're emphasizing the need for a paradigm shift when it comes to the Israeli Palestinian conflict. Eric Goldstein of Human Rights Watch says he wants the international community to talk less about one state or two. And more about how to secure equal rights for everyone between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea. Let's move away from the illusion that human rights abuses are the unfortunate symptom of no resolution to the conflict and that it's best to reach a solution and then the rights will fall into place. Let's start with giving everybody their rights and then we can all work for a resolution to the outstanding political issues. Goldstein hopes that's a vision. Most people can get behind whether they use the word apartheid or not. For the world. I'm Sarah Birnbaum. When it comes to Russia. There's a tendency to talk about the opposition to President Vladimir Putin as if it is one man Alexei Navalny and his movement. But Navalny is in jail and not a week goes by without the arrests of more activists and independent journalist Even as speaking out has become increasingly dangerous. A young Russian artist is using her work to make sure anti Kremlin voices keep getting heard from Moscow reporter Theo Mertz has a story. Vince. A vote is a former wine factory in the center of Moscow. The factory has been converted into a space for contemporary art cafes and shops. It's a beautiful early summer day, and there's a young crowd here. But the mood changes when you walk into an exhibition by catamarans of, uh,.

Eric Goldstein Sarah Birnbaum Theo Mertz Nelson Mandela Alexei Navalny Jordan River Navalny Leonie Fleischmann Yasser Arafat Mediterranean Sea 19 seventies Jesse Fleischman Fleischmann African National Congress East Jerusalem two Goldstein one state West Bank
"fleischmann" Discussed on Mute Button Podcast

Mute Button Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on Mute Button Podcast

"Arden, Fleischmann Mentally Mr Boston. We talk about very old Barton. The! For about twenty bucks. This particular Bourbon has astonished following fans who rely. Ovarian bargains, their house or table Burbot at and rightly so. Thorough bargain especially. When bottled in bond, version, one hundred Peru, his imminently smooth. And enjoyable. In terms of its value tired as he had can do. What are the very? Can't be when the very top Bergen picks at his press writes in fact. The only reason that purchased it is because. Twenty Bucks there was quite a bit of it. I like the bottle. The bottle has A. Distinctive old school Bourbon bottle look in so for that very reason acid. Hey of this sucks. I've got a really cool bottle. I can make laugh at of or something like that. But in terms of Value Tara, see I can't one of the favorites. When I. I took a drink of it I was. Overtaken actually. by. The kick that he gave me in any I. I wasn't quite sure if I was been like it. However, the more I'm began to allow it to air out the more out to the gases to come off of this Bourbon A. The the smoother found it to be in. It's a great mixer with a Co Colo back Dr Pepper. Anything that you can imagine. In therefore recommend variable Barton one.

Barton Arden Dr Pepper Mr Boston Bergen Peru Fleischmann Burbot
"fleischmann" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Fusion Pons and Fleischmann two chemists from Utah as they can make few we can make fusion in a test tube scientists of that era <hes> <hes> from M._I._T.. And even the government said that's not impossible that try to reproduce it inconsistent results they held a panel they voted to stop work on it and it basically case Coz. It's a fraud. That's the back story to this. Meanwhile meanwhile in the steps of Pennsylvania courthouse. I believe there's a man named Randall Mills who says he actually understands what's going on but no one really paying attention I mean some did but it was basically so out of band with the thinking of that era chirp that he basically was ignored. There's a book about him. You can read call America's noon. We wrote a book about him called Randall Mills in the search Figino Energy and it basically weekly tells that story in depth about his journey and this and people say it's the greatest scientific story ever period so I'll I'll bring it down to the energy because that's what you guys are interested in the energy is basically a chemical local reaction anytime atomic hydrogen is around a catalyst and there's many catalysts it will actually naturally want to fall to a smaller form of hydrogen and when electrons move them back to what his energy chemical energy the H. Two plus two is water. H is in those they don't really go anywhere right you still have them off and what happens is the electrons shifting closer and release potential energy that was in that electron attracted to that just like if I took took something off a shelf in a pushed it catalyze down that energy comes out and hits the floor. That's you know but it wasn't in the water bottle off on the shelf. It wasn't in the earth right between those two same thing with the electron the Proton so we talk about free energy energy. There's no such thing what it is is energy. That's unexplained and that's been going on in history and I can name Stanley Meyer the water power cards on sixty minutes..

Randall Mills Pennsylvania courthouse Pons Stanley Meyer Utah fraud Fleischmann America sixty minutes
Remembering versatile musician Andre Previn

The Frame

06:17 min | 2 years ago

Remembering versatile musician Andre Previn

"People who have been attending concerts by the L A fill for a while. No the name Andre Previn. He led the orchestra from nineteen eighty five to nineteen Eighty-nine before as a Pekka Solomon took over as its music director. But Previn who died in New York today at the age of eighty nine did far more than carry a baton like Leonard Bernstein to whom Previn has been favorably compared Previn wrote movie scores played piano and composed both operas and Broadway. Musicals I asked Dockery wolf, the classical music editor at the New York Times to weigh in on Previn eclectic musical career only really kind of Leonard Bernstein comes to mind as a sort of parallel in terms of one of these these mid-century Americans who as sort of classical music, achieved this unbelievably wide audience, the recordings and the rise of jazz musical theatre. Film. I mean, everything kind of sort of collided, and maybe sort of explosion coming out of the US. And there were a couple of people who had the versatility and the talent. And president was definitely one of them. I wanna play Andre Previn plane piano for a piece called just in time. Let's listen to it. So how did his work in jazz and film scoring make him a different conductor when he was with the baton the read on him. And I agree with was that. There was always I kind of amazing sense of spontaneity and rhythm and a lot of poise. And I mean, he did wonderful recordings of French music. I mean, and this was not necessarily that was jazzy per se. But I think that there must have been think taste for rhythmic flair and for certain spirit and vitality throughout the recordings that he made as a conductor of the music pearly times. There's a great little piece in the New York Times. Obituary says eh senior in high school he was called in to help with holiday in Mexico and MGM musical that starred Walter Pidgeon, and in which Fidel Castro was an extra sounds as if Andre Previn from a very early. Early age had a lot of talent. And that talent was recognized talk about his early career. And you know, when he was recognized as something of a prodigy. I mean, he was really studying music from very very early age. And when they left Berlin to escape the, Nazis, they were first in Paris. And then he was in LA and through all of that was advancing by leaps and bounds as a performer, and I think quickly the composer. And he could just even wanna be prodigies could just do anything. And I mean that gave a certain sense of him being. I mean, this was a read on Leonard Bernstein as well that he was a bit of a dilatot that he could do everything pause ably and often way more so defined himself in competition with Leonard Bernstein, or was it more that he saw his career trajectory and thought that there was a good model to follow their. I think that was the sense that I've always had. I mean, I don't know that they were in sort of direct competition, and you're inside was very New York based and I mean had made his first Mark and musical theater, and then was doing way more conducting kind of on the European continent, though, Previn obviously ended up at the Monday symphony early in his career. So they overlapped, but Previn was a creature of Hollywood. And I mean and located there and Bernstein was more New York. I think like a lot of music directors. He occasionally found himself in conflict with people with whom he was working. He had a falling out with Ernest Fleischmann at the LA philharmonic. And I'm wondering if you think back and his legacy in the podium as a conductor. What was he most remembered for and what we're his skills leading an orchestra. Yeah. I mean, my sense. I mean having never seen him as a conductor. I mean, I think the sense was he was excellent musician and had a real kind of taste for the repertoire, I mean. Given that he was a composer. I mean, he wasn't sort of famous for fostering, new music, and I think that there was a sense of certainly in LA of wanting to broaden the lineup by bringing us a pet as a principal guest. Whether or not that was intended to send a signal that it was sort of time for him to go. I don't know. I mean, I think probably politically it was a bit of a mess. But I think that there were certainly things that he was leaving out or things that I mean other emphases that Fleishman wanted, and, but I think that he was always extremely well respected at the podium and the recordings attest to this. They're extremely vibrance. And by kind of extremely polished. So Andre Previn was the music director or principal conductor for about a half dozen orchestras. He composed a variety of film scores including one for Elmer gantry. He was a jazz pianist, he wrote operas, can you think of any? Temporary of his living today who could cover such a broad spectrum of musical performance and styles and leadership roles. I don't think that it exists. I mean, these different strands of music have in a way become a little more professionalized over the past couple of decades. And while there's a lot of collaboration between them people. Stay I think in their lanes a little bit more. I mean, this came up last year when we here at the times were talking about it was a centennary of Bernstein's birth. And we were thinking about parallels today and people we might even want to have comment on that. And it is awfully hard to think about people of younger generation who are having that kind of career, but they weren't so many people even in the heyday of Bernstein and prevent I mean, they were always exceptional

Andre Previn Leonard Bernstein Previn New York New York Times Director LA Pekka Solomon Dockery Wolf United States Ernest Fleischmann Fidel Castro MGM Walter Pidgeon President Trump La Philharmonic Editor Mexico Elmer Gantry Berlin
"fleischmann" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Now, I know because I remember the first time I met Paul actually we were at a bar, and I didn't know him at all. And he's he he launched into this sort of rant about how parents have no influence on their kids. Like how you what your kids? Character is going to be like doesn't like how you are is is totally meaningless what really matters is their peer group. And and a lot of people had a where pushing back on it. And you know, now that I have a fourteen year old. I also push back against that idea. And I wanna know what he's basing that on. So actually there is a book called the nurture assumption. That was written by by Judith, rich, Harris who recently passed away, actually, it is interest. She's just an interesting person. She was just a textbook writer who had who'd never sort of made made it in the world of of academics. I I don't know if she wanted to or not, but she was just plugging. Away writing textbooks. And and in writing these textbooks. She was like, you know, all this work on parenting is just so it's just correlation and bullshit like good parents have, you know, fit boil down a good parents have good kids. Then it's genetics. But then if environment it's pretty clear that that the parents aren't really doing the most of the work. It's the peers, so so we we could dive into that book. Like, I want to know what the research is. We have Paul on for this. Maybe I I wanna know what makes people who say this so confident that it's true. And what they really mean. Because obviously, you know, you see a lot of fucked up people in this world adults and often it seems to trace to parenting issues when they were growing up anxiety and a lot of or at least it appears that way. Two UN from my unscientific is so so I want I would talk about that. And then, you know, I think one of them said, you know, this could lead into a discussion of parenting in gen or in general, and maybe some dilemmas that we've each faced. But yeah, I I want to dive into this. Because I go in probably with motivated skepticism. Right. And and I felt like I was influenced very much by my mom, and I know that that's like correlation, and it could be my jeans, and that's that's the that's the the big, you know, the two the two pronged argument of of the braver. So you'd have to go into maybe some of the behavioral genetics stuff, and that almost be my list for the very reason that I was like, oh man would require require actually read it. But you know, what like on like, you know, the some of the other stuff where it's so clear that you're the. The one that has to do it. I think that I would take this on. Well, I don't know if I'd fully take it on. But I would do my part, you know. Well, then that's made my top five. Let's narrow this down to five. So where are we good for that one? Yeah, we're good without of parenting, and how much do parents make a difference. Yup. Think. Yeah. So hypocrisy or did that when make our list? Oh, wait. So let's just for sure the ones that we think both. So I think the parenting one I think the feminists to piss them all Judy. Care. I think that the dial of death or just that existential ecology in general, those were the three that were on your list that I would would put that I can think of I liked self-deception self-deception for sure I think that would be fun. So that's four right. Yeah. I mean, if the poly-amorous and adultery and versus if there's a literature about that it could be a main segment and not a jokey opening segment. You know, that actually might be really good to have a guest for like somebody who actually. Does an open relationship or or research is it that stuff? Dinah Fleischmann actually and someone suggested I mean, we've thought about having her on. I think that might be fun. She's really great. With that beat out animal ethics expandable. I think if we put Kafka on it won't win like we can just do not talked about it. So I could I could move that out. I think if we wanna do it. We'll do it. We clearly seem to do these literature stuff. We're having fun in said episode..

Judith Paul UN Dinah Fleischmann Kafka Judy Harris fourteen year
"fleischmann" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Now, I know because I remember the first time I met Paul actually we were at a bar, and I didn't know him at all. And he's he he launched into this sort of rant about how parents have no influence on their kids. Like how you what your kids? Character is going to be like doesn't like how you are is is totally meaningless what really matters is their peer group. And and a lot of people had a where pushing back on it. And you know, now that I have a fourteen year old. I also push back against that idea. And I wanna know what he's basing that on. So actually there is a book called the nurture assumption. That was written by by Judith, rich, Harris who recently passed away, actually, it is interest. She's just an interesting person. She was just a textbook writer who had who'd never sort of made made it in the world of of academics. I I don't know if she wanted to or not, but she was just plugging. Away writing textbooks. And and in writing these textbooks. She was like, you know, all this work on parenting is just so it's just correlation and bullshit like good parents have, you know, fit boil down a good parents have good kids. Then it's genetics. But then if environment it's pretty clear that that the parents aren't really doing the most of the work. It's the peers, so so we we could dive into that book. Like, I want to know what the research is. We have Paul on for this. Maybe I I wanna know what makes people who say this so confident that it's true. And what they really mean. Because obviously, you know, you see a lot of fucked up people in this world adults and often it seems to trace to parenting issues when they were growing up anxiety and a lot of or at least it appears that way. Two UN from my unscientific is so so I want I would talk about that. And then, you know, I think one of them said, you know, this could lead into a discussion of parenting in gen or in general, and maybe some dilemmas that we've each faced. But yeah, I I want to dive into this. Because I go in probably with motivated skepticism. Right. And and I felt like I was influenced very much by my mom, and I know that that's like correlation, and it could be my jeans, and that's that's the that's the the big, you know, the two the two pronged argument of of the braver. So you'd have to go into maybe some of the behavioral genetics stuff, and that almost be my list for the very reason that I was like, oh man would require require actually read it. But you know, what like on like, you know, the some of the other stuff where it's so clear that you're the. The one that has to do it. I think that I would take this on. Well, I don't know if I'd fully take it on. But I would do my part, you know. Well, then that's made my top five. Let's narrow this down to five. So where are we good for that one? Yeah, we're good without of parenting, and how much do parents make a difference. Yup. Think. Yeah. So hypocrisy or did that when make our list? Oh, wait. So let's just for sure the ones that we think both. So I think the parenting one I think the feminists to piss them all Judy. Care. I think that the dial of death or just that existential ecology in general, those were the three that were on your list that I would would put that I can think of I liked self-deception self-deception for sure I think that would be fun. So that's four right. Yeah. I mean, if the poly-amorous and adultery and versus if there's a literature about that it could be a main segment and not a jokey opening segment. You know, that actually might be really good to have a guest for like somebody who actually. Does an open relationship or or research is it that stuff? Dinah Fleischmann actually and someone suggested I mean, we've thought about having her on. I think that might be fun. She's really great. With that beat out animal ethics expandable. I think if we put Kafka on it won't win like we can just do not talked about it. So I could I could move that out. I think if we wanna do it. We'll do it. We clearly seem to do these literature stuff. We're having fun in said episode..

Judith Paul UN Dinah Fleischmann Kafka Judy Harris fourteen year
"fleischmann" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"He represents the radio and surrounding areas there, and he showed the board many places on the border there. There are. There's a river and the that. And there's. Six hundred miles of something three hundred are normally defensive they go like this have you. Three hundred miles of this. So that cars apple by the president wants to call that wall. You can call it. A in Representative Chuck Fleischmann is a Republican from Tennessee. And he says that the talks are going, and they are reasonably cordial, and he's cautiously optimistic a bipartisan group of lawmakers working to hammer out the border security deal in hopes of a burning another shutdown President Trump sideline from these talks. At least for now joining us now is Republican congressman Chuck Fleischmann. He is a member of the border wall conference committee also on the house appropriations committee, congressman thank you so much for being with us. John good morning as they say, the musical Hamilton, you need to be in the room where it happens, and you were so what did happen in that room yesterday? Jonah was very good. I entered the room with a lot of optimism, and a lot of hope that we could actually sit down and work through our issues and the tone in the rum really from every member whether they were Republican or democratic senators or house members was very positive, very cordial. I think we've set the tone for a very good good good time for negotiations. I think it's very positive. We come back. We're gonna be talking with comedian Terrance Wilson Williams involved in deplorable comedies tour, but they have run into some roadblocks. Some dare.

Chuck Fleischmann president congressman Terrance Wilson Williams Jonah apple Representative Tennessee Hamilton John
"fleischmann" Discussed on Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

"This is where you learn how to publish books that cell and build and on stoppable brand and every Thursday night right here on YouTube dot com slash self publishing. With Dale we meet up we have a little bit of a self publishing subscriber. Hang out those that are watching this on the replays. Listen to this on the podcast, give us exactly one minute. So we can say what's up to the people that have joined us hose here. How you doing? And if you knew here put hashtag new reset. How are you my friend Zouqi? How are you Zouqi? Thank you for stopping by it and joining us Audrey Levy MO Joe what's up, my Powell, Mark Brownless? What's up Anthony Fleischmann junior? How's it going? Let me scroll to the top. And anyone lurk in about? Thank you for joining us on this beautiful Thursday. Appreciate y'all. Join and man that was faster than one minute. So hopefully, we don't just blaze through things. That's okay. We've got a lot of stuff. We're gonna talk about some really cool news. And some of you may not know about actually I've been kind of hoard all the information bring it in and hoard the self publishing information have heard anything new by the way in Girondins live right now are watching this on the replay. Let me know what the news you've heard over the past week that you thought has most been most exciting in the world of self publishing. So here we go. Published Dr man publicize, the aggregate publisher, and they continue to really step up their game, by the way, big what's up to Adam woods and king? Genetics of published drive. You guys are the best came literally just sent me an Email just before I went on the air to find out that hair fishery rolling out the feature for Amazon advertising. So now, if you do publish through published drive you can have access to Amazon advertising. There's more details in the Email. They sent out today. So just log into your county. You probably get some good information. They have a digital pro features. This is kind of cool..

Amazon stoppable Anthony Fleischmann Audrey Levy Dale Girondins Adam woods publisher Powell Mark Brownless one minute
"fleischmann" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on AP News

"AP radio news. I'm Tim McGuire. A house Senate conference committee holds its first meeting on finding a way to fund border security all the members say their goal is to find a solution as President Trump and says he's not backing away from his demand for five point seven billion dollars for border walls. Tennessee, Republican Chuck Fleischmann. I believe that we need a physical barrier. I want to be candid with my friends. I do think we need a wall a physical barrier where the barrier works. But that's only one part of it. We need all of the above. If a deal isn't reached by February fifteenth that could be another partial government shutdown Illinois Democrat Senator dick Durbin says President Trump has a stay out of the talk choices between shut up or shut down. We've got to do our constitutional responsibility and avoid a shutdown and make sure we take a careful look at every president's request an estimated one hundred thirty nine million people are dealing with subzero temperatures across the country. The most bitter cold is in the midwest. Heading east Rita Foley with more. The temperature dropped a twenty below in Chicago this morning twenty eight below in Minneapolis governors in Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin declared emergencies some airline flights and train service was cancelled the postal service said it was too cold deliver mail to many areas. Several people have died in this Arctic cold, including Milwaukee man, found frozen in a garage. I'm Rita Foley. Stocks got a big. Boost today when the Federal Reserve Board stood Pat on interest rates chairman Jerome Powell, global economic and financial developments and muted inflation pressures. The committee will be patient as it determines what future judgment adjustments to the target range for the federal funds rate may be appropriate. The Dow gained four hundred thirty four points clue clubs about twenty five thousand for the first time since December. This is AP radio news. A Taiwanese tech company. Backs off plans to build a plant in Wisconsin saga megani. With more when he announced Foxconn plans to build a massive site for making liquid crystal displays a year and a half ago, the president touted the job creation possibilities more manufacturing jobs than we've seen in many many decades. But Foxconn now says it's shifting focus in Wisconsin from blue collar manufacturing to a research hub and will not build a factory there. The state and local governments had promised to pay Foxconn roughly four billion dollars in exchange for investment commitments at a requirement that it create thirteen thousand jobs, which the company says it will still honor saga megani at the White House candidate has recalling up to half of its diplomats at its embassy in Cuba after another fell mysteriously ill. There have been fourteen cases of unexplained health problems at that embassy in two years. I'm Tim Maguire AP radio news. News..

President Trump Foxconn AP Rita Foley Wisconsin president Tim McGuire Illinois Senate Chuck Fleischmann Senator dick Durbin Tim Maguire Tennessee Milwaukee Federal Reserve Board Chicago Minneapolis Cuba
"fleischmann" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on AP News

"AP radio news. I'm Tim McGuire. A house Senate conference committee holds its first meeting on finding a way to fund border security all the members say their goal is to find a solution as President Trump and says he's not backing away from his demand for five point seven billion dollars for border walls. Tennessee, Republican Chuck Fleischmann. I believe that we need a physical barrier. I want to be candid with my friends. I do think we need a wall a physical barrier where the barrier works. But that's only one part of it. We need all of the above. If a deal is reached by February fifteenth that could be another partial government shutdown Illinois Democrat Senator dick Durbin says President Trump has a stay out of the talk choices between shut up or shut down. We've got to do our constitutional responsibility and avoid a shutdown and make sure we take a careful look at every president's request an estimated one hundred thirty nine million people are dealing with subzero temperatures across the country. The most bitter cold is in the midwest. Heading east Rita Foley with more. The temperature dropped a twenty below in Chicago this morning twenty eight below in Minneapolis governors in Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin declared emergencies some airline flights and train service was cancelled the postal service said it was too cold to deliver mail to many areas. Several people have died in this Arctic cold, including Milwaukee man, found frozen in a garage. I'm Rita Foley. Stocks got a big. Boost today when the Federal Reserve Board stood Pat on interest rates chairman Jerome Powell of global economic and financial developments and muted inflation pressures. The committee will be patient as it determines what future judgment adjustments to the target range for the federal funds rate may be appropriate. The Dow gained four hundred thirty four points closed above twenty five thousand for the first time since December. This is AP radio news. A Taiwanese tech company. Backs off plans to build a plant in Wisconsin saga megani. With more when he announced Foxconn plans to build a massive site for making liquid crystal displays a year and a half ago, the president touted the job creation possibilities more manufacturing jobs than we've seen in many many decades. But Foxconn now says it's shifting focus in Wisconsin from blue collar manufacturing to a research hub, bad will not build a factory there. The state and local governments had promised to pay Foxconn roughly four billion dollars in exchange for investment commitments and a requirement that it create thirteen thousand jobs, which the company says it will still honor saga megani at the White House candidate is recalling up to half of its diplomats at its embassy in Cuba after another fell mysteriously ill. There have been fourteen cases of unexplained health problems at that embassy in two years. I'm Tim Maguire AP radio news. News. Seventy percent off..

President Trump Foxconn AP Rita Foley Wisconsin president Tim McGuire Illinois Senate Chuck Fleischmann Senator dick Durbin Tim Maguire Tennessee Milwaukee Federal Reserve Board Chicago Minneapolis Jerome Powell
"fleischmann" Discussed on The MFCEO Project

The MFCEO Project

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on The MFCEO Project

"Thousand dollars for a ticket to go. Learn some shit, especially whenever the fucking what you're going to learn when you go to most of these events is how to buy more shit, and I call it pitch fess, right? I do not believe in that morally, I do not believe that. It's okay to charge. Somebody thousands of dollars to sell them more shit when they come. I know because I've been there, and I'm not out of touch how important and how valuable a thousand two thousand five thousand ten thousand dollars is. Okay. I haven't forgotten that I remember that. And I think it's morally wrong to charge people that kind of money to come to an event and not learn anything, practical. My my experience has been from my multiple years of doing this is that I usually one of the only speaker that teaches any practical shit everybody else's game is to throw the fucking little bit of info out and say, hey, buy my stuff. Okay. And I'm not done with that. It's not what I'm about. It's not what I wanna do. It's not let's not aligned with who. I am or what I'm about. So when you're looking at why. Not on the list of all these events. That's why I'm fucking. I'm not gonna do it. It's not what I wanna do. It's not my business. Yeah. I do make a couple of million bucks a year from speaking. But it's not worth my integrity to make that. It's just not. It's not what I wanna do. So please stop DMZ mean. Asking me, why the fuck I'm not this and this and this fucking event because I don't wanna be there. That's why here's the other thing. And this leads into a bigger fucking topic. I guess I wasn't going to talk about this. But I guess now that I'm on it. We might as well just stay on it. When is enough enough? All right win is enough. Anof win is gonna be enough programs for you wins going to be enough coaching for you wins going to be enough books for you. I'm all for education. I'm all for spending money to learn from people who have actually done what the fuck they say, they're going. To teach. I'm all for that. That's what you should be doing what I'm not for. And by the way, I'm also for you purchasing tools that will help you do. This was talking to my great friend GAM Fleischmann this morning..

GAM Fleischmann thousand two thousand five tho Thousand dollars
"fleischmann" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on AP News

"To fund border security all the members say their goal is to find a solution as President Trump and says he's not backing away from his demand for five point seven billion dollars for border walls. Tennessee, Republican Chuck Fleischmann. I believe that we need a physical barrier. I want to be candid with my friends. I do think we need a wall a physical barrier where the barrier works. But that's only one part of it. We need all of the above. If a deal isn't reached by February fifteenth that could be another partial government shutdown Illinois Democrat Senator dick Durbin says President Trump has a stay out of the talk choices between shut up or shut down. We've got to do our constitutional responsibility and avoid a shutdown and make sure we take careful look at every president's request an estimated one hundred thirty nine million people are dealing with subzero temperatures across the country. The most bitter cold is in the midwest. Heading east Rita. Fully with more. The temperature dropped a twenty below in Chicago this morning Twenty-eight below in Minneapolis governors in Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin declared emergencies some airline flights and train service was cancelled the postal service said it was too cold deliver mail to many areas. Several people have died in his Arctic cold, including Milwaukee man, found frozen in a garage. I'm Rita Foley age. Stocks got a big boost today when the Federal Reserve Board stood Pat on interest rates chairman Jerome Powell global economic and financial developments and muted inflation pressures. The committee will be patient as it determines what future judgment adjustments to the target range for the federal funds rate may be appropriate. The Dow gained four hundred thirty four points closed above twenty five thousand for the first time since December. This is AP radio news. A Taiwanese tech company. Backs off plans to build a plant in Wisconsin saga megani. With more when he announced Foxconn plans to build a massive site for making liquid crystal displays a year and a half ago, the president touted the job creation possibilities more manufacturing jobs than we've seen in many many decades. But Foxconn now says it's shifting focus in Wisconsin from blue collar manufacturing to a research hub and will not build a factory there. The state and local governments had promised to pay Foxconn roughly four billion dollars in exchange for investment commitments and a requirement that it create thirteen thousand jobs, which the company says it will still honor saga megani at the White House candidate is recalling up to half of its diplomats at its embassy in Cuba after another fell mysteriously ill. There have been fourteen cases.

President Trump Foxconn president Wisconsin Illinois Chuck Fleischmann Senator dick Durbin Rita Foley Tennessee Federal Reserve Board AP Milwaukee Chicago Minneapolis Cuba Jerome Powell White House chairman
"fleischmann" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on AP News

"Security all the members say their goal is to find a solution as President Trump and says he's not backing away from his demand for five point seven billion dollars for border walls. Tennessee, Republican Chuck Fleischmann. I believe that we need a physical barrier. I want to be candid with my friends. I do think we need a wall a physical barrier where the barrier works. But that's only one part of it. We need all of the above. If a deal isn't reached by February fifteenth that could be another partial government shutdown Illinois Democrat Senator dick Durbin says President Trump has a stay out of the talk choices between shut up or shut down. We'd do our constitutional responsibility and avoid a shutdown and make sure we take a careful look at every president's request an estimated one hundred thirty nine million people are dealing with subzero temperatures across the country. The most bitter cold is in the midwest. Heading east Rita Foley with more. The temperature dropped a twenty below in Chicago this morning twenty eight below in Minneapolis governors in Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin declared emergencies some airline flights and train service was cancelled the postal service said it was too cold to deliver mail to many areas. Several people have died in this Arctic cold, including Milwaukee man, found frozen in a garage. I'm Rita Foley. Stocks got a big. AP radio news. I'm Tim McGuire. House Senate conference committee holds first meeting on finding a way.

President Trump Rita Foley Chuck Fleischmann Illinois Senator dick Durbin president Tim McGuire AP Tennessee Senate Milwaukee Chicago Minneapolis Wisconsin Michigan seven billion dollars
Border Security Talks Begin With Signs of Narrow Bipartisan Deal

Radio Night Live with Kevin McCullough

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Border Security Talks Begin With Signs of Narrow Bipartisan Deal

"Lawmakers are discussing bipartisan ways to secure the US Mexico border, USA radio networks Timberg reports Democrats and Republicans sat down on Capitol Hill to discuss border security on Wednesday, Republican congressman Chuck Fleischmann was part of that group. And he tells Fox News things went rather. Well, it was sincere this candid and our friends in the Senate and on both sides were very cordial. So I think we're gonna make some progress metaphorically as you say perhaps this warming up here in Washington

Chuck Fleischmann Congressman Senate United States Fox News Washington Mexico
"fleischmann" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on KFC Radio

"I like that. I'm going to get it. I mean, I guess in like a small office if someone comes in literally wearing like this same exact thing. Like right after you did a little bit weird. Kind of like the close wouldn't bother me. It's it would be the hair. Well that so, but even that like, Dave always Dave always made fun of anybody who goes to Fleishman. And it's like there are certain just like white guy haircuts to. I mean, it's not if I had a mohawk and someone everyone came anybody on my God, you're all get Mohawks from Fleischmann's. But it's like, I don't know we all have a little bit of hair, you kinda like home up and over. I think what you want to do with this shit. I'm not gonna come in with like corn rows in a fro-. We we're not that versatile. But I I guess if you if you whatever's going on if it gets to the point to the vibe that you're like, this is weird that that's annoying. I don't think any of it's worth like quitting a job or something though. I mean at a liquor store if you have a better prospect or you can go to another liquor store. I guess so. But if you're you got like a good thing going, I wouldn't rock. I I voted all clearly this guy had doors, I would exploit this. Yeah. It'd be like give me a raise. I need. I need to come in late. I'm going to come in. And I'm gonna leave early. Fuck. The teacher they'll having a fucking. Others. I would actually look it. Like, I would I would prop like poke a little bit. And you're like, yeah. Your hair look good today. Man. Right. Like, oh, man. I had those seem that seems sherpa you look better in it than I do, by the way. Can I get like a bonus or? Yeah. Yes. Exactly. Bottom line is people like you said adoring you or or like following your move is a good thing to be explicit. Yeah. If nobody wants to be like, you that sucks. That guy's hair and his clothes shoes, and his whole persona is so bad. I want no part of it. That ain't good. Good. No one. Style sucks. The best thing in the world. It's like, the, you know, it's awesome. That everybody wants to wear. Kanye, west sneakers is incredible. That everybody wants to wear. I don't fucking the hottest close out. So if you're one of those guys who can inspire that. Walk around with your dick out and also maybe look into a career in the fashion industry. And if it's that good good liquor chic over here. Hey, guys, second time long time. I guess I actually two questions both very wildly different. The first one is kind of just regarding how often the human male actually needs to have sex because I have been dating my boyfriend now for like a year and a half. And I feel like the like honeymoon holiness is just not gone away..

Dave Fleishman Fleischmann Kanye
"fleischmann" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Threes cakes day, presumably, I would imagine for three meals a day, a free pamphlet pushed by Fleischmann's was called yeast therapy and four million were distributed. And here's another ad. I love the festivities successful women today know, how to avoid the damaging effects of clogged intestines, the health effects were said to take months before anything noticeable happen. That's very convenient. It is. Cakes were sometimes advertised as creamy wholesome candy and that people should try illustrious by of. But yet another ad describe the taste as pungent an appetizing. It was everywhere that fresh food was sold like soda, fountains, grocers cafeterias, you could eat them as is or crumble them up into water milk or fruit juice tomato. Juice is the one that I saw specified you could also eat them on crackers peanut butter or jam sandwiches. I suppose you could. I mean, you couldn't not do that. There were options, and it was everywhere. But this push to associate yeast with health was not done. It was not and we will get into that. After we get back from a quick break for word from our sponsor. I can't believe it that Gerald is presenting the quarterly budget report with finger puppets book..

Fleischmann Gerald milk
This Woman Went From Hollywood Startlet to Start-Up Queeno

Business Rockstars

04:42 min | 3 years ago

This Woman Went From Hollywood Startlet to Start-Up Queeno

"Business rockstars. I'm Alex Worley for by Sarah, Michelle Gellar and brag Fleischmann they are the co founders of food stores. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having the children's. So for those who are not familiar if you could explain what food stores. Is a clean comforted company. We started out with baking mixes that you can purchase it anywhere in the country at physical retail or online. And then we also offer a subscription based kit offering that you can get once a month in your house. Huge dessert lover. So love that. It's a little less guilt or a little more guilt free. Very cool. I'm so the next question for you is what would you say is your definition of being an entrepreneur? What does it ultimately take? It takes everything that you have. And then some more I thought that I knew it working hard was until I joined the start up world, and you realize it's harder than having newborn twins that it is full-time nature. Attention your brain doesn't shut off. But it's also the most incredibly rewarding when you actually realize you can hit those milestones. Yeah. Absolutely. I'm curious. How has Hollywood prepared you for this difficult world of startups. It's interesting there are some aspects of it where I think that Hollywood definitely has help in preparing. And I think that mainly has to come with the amount of knows that we got the rejection, I look at most people in their lives, and you graduate college and you look for a job, and maybe you don't get a few. And then you settle in a job. And then maybe five or six years later you switch. But for me, it's constant it's additioning processes such a constant and very personal rejection. That happens so often on a large scale that it makes it a little bit easier in terms of leading the nose in the business world Roloff you a little bit and make you tougher as opposed to really feeling it as a personal rejection. I always said that we know we have a great idea. And we know we're going to kill it. And we'll find the right people, and this one just wasn't it as opposed to really internalizing that. Yeah. There are a lot of mistakes and many failures that happen and entrepreneurship, and I can't imagine being an actress that would prepare you for that. You know, a common fear is of failure. For entrepreneurs you ever deal with that we have a very specific definition and for us fail is just the first attempt and learning it just the first time, we tried something. If that one didn't work, it's only a failure. If we don't learn from it and improve upon what we initially set out to do. And you can't be fearful of failure and run business. If you are. Your perspective about what failure really is. And that's what Sarah Michelle talks about. Yeah. So you guys have been at it for a couple years. Now, if you could go back to those first few months, what advice would you give your early entrepreneurial self goodness. Well, I think the big one would be stamina. So you're going to be putting in long hours, and there's gonna be some sacrifice along the way. So if you go back and talk to yourself you would prepare. They weren't even harder. Well, you'd say, hey, look, there's going to be days like this where you want to quit. And after if you knew that that was coming then you would prepare better for it. And that could be all the things that you would do to decompress. Then that could be exercising hanging out with family, traveling to find those things that will get you through that difficult moments in being an entrepreneur. And if you're prepared for that which most ninety percent of first time entrepreneurs are not and makes it so much easier, and so much more joyful. To be challenging Sascha, which is at all are ultimately doing to really utilize the community to look for people that are facing the same struggles or have experienced the same struggles. And learn and grow from that. And and propel each other up. It's a team sport. Yeah. If you could create a startup toolkit, what would be inside of it. It could be more tangible technology could be intangible like a characteristic of personality trait that you need. So what would be inside my God? But that would be our next startup. We can't tell you that unless you send the not answer that question. Capsule. Okay. The big one is if the for not doing tangible be you gotta be visionary. You got to be strategic got to be creative. You've gotta be relentless. You have to have situational awareness and self awareness. But that in the box, and then you have to have that stamina to be able to work eighty hours a week. I think also stellar interpersonal skills seem to always be a prerequisite for successful entrepreneurs that we ought to communicate sell your idea. Get people to come over to your side do Steph when they don't want to to help you out. And and I think also nice comfortable shoes. How

Sarah Michelle Hollywood Alex Worley Michelle Gellar Steph Fleischmann Sascha Ninety Percent Eighty Hours Six Years
"fleischmann" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on TechStuff

"Conference at the university of Utah to announce their results, which again is highly irregular. The scientific community had not had a chance to read and analyze the research, and this press release began to pump up interest in enthusiasm in the public before anyone could even attest to the validity of the claims, which is always dangerous, right? Like to go out to the public and say, we definitely have a thing that's going to transform our world and no one in the scientific community has yet had the chance to to test that claim than the public is going to sit there and think, oh, well, this person is a scientist. Their word is to be trusted, and I can't wait to see this magical science fiction world. We're about to enter the article. Was published without really proper review in the scientific community then began to pick the article apart upon publication and about a month later Pons and Fleischmann would publish two pages of corrections to that article to address some of those criticisms. In addition, even before the article had been published, scientists began to see if they could try and replicate the results because there were scientists who had a copy of the pre published article. You know, they got that early peer review copy that was, you know, a rush through, but they actually had versions of this before it was published. So they started see if they could maybe replicate the same experiment. But they ran to some issues because Fleischmann and Pons did not include all the details about how they actually performed the experiment probably because the university of Utah officials told them to hold back on some details as a way to apply for patents in the future. Then not have someone else just jump ahead of them. The results of the exp. That scientists were conducting, they were trying to produce their own version of ponds and Fleischmann's work based on what little information they had were incredibly inconsistent. Some teams reported that they saw no signs of fusion at all. Some team said, no, we're seeing some evidence for fusion, but there was no real agreement or even alignment of facts among those teams, and some teams that claim that they had found something interesting could not replicate the results with future runs of experiments. Ultimately, that led to a general consensus that cold fusion is not a real thing at least not in this form. And since then there's been a real stigma against the idea of cold fusion respected. Scientific journals are not likely to publish articles claiming to have proof of cold fusion largely because of the fallout that happened from the ponds and Fleischmann incident. But while that might. Dog Matic and probably is to some extent. It's also true that for cold fusion to work for it to be possible. Our understanding of nuclear fusion would have to be off somehow. We would have to have a pretty sizable gap in our knowledge about nuclear fusion, and that is entirely possible that can be true. But if it turns out that called fusion is possible, our scholarship on nuclear fusion would need to be adjusted. It's based on a lot of observations and experimentation that support our ideas and have proven to hold true after numerous experiments. So it would be very extraordinary to have to fit in new information into this into this model. Not that it wouldn't be possible, but that it what it means that requires an extraordinary amount of proof. Because if you have a pretty solid idea of how something works in the universe and your. Observations and experiments all seem to support that idea. Someone coming in with a new idea better have really convincing evidence to tell you, oh, you need your ideas, good, but you need to also include this other part because if you haven't observed it, then it's hard to say that that idea hasn't validity right. That new piece of information seems improbable, but not impossible that cold fusion would work, but there are still people working in the field of low energy nuclear reactions today. There are some really super smart scientists working on this. The spite the fact that the larger scientific community remains skeptical at best that there's anything they're there. Many of the experiments seem to indicate that various processes are producing more heat than you would be able to explain through conventional means. But sometimes that amount is small enough to fit within the margin of error, or it could be due to. Either faulty measuring tools, faulting measuring processes or some other messed step in the procedure..

scientist Fleischmann university of Utah Pons
"fleischmann" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"fleischmann" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"It's really interesting because you would think that this is sort of a product of the internet like retirement with his early message where does the but as it turns out according to a really cool piece written a man dot com which i think started out as like a ecommerce site and then ended up being more of a message board a guy by the name of dave fleischmann kind of delves into the evolution of using all caps as this indicator of shouting and he actually found quite a few examples that date back hundreds of years as it turns out no i propose that as we travel to meet mr fleischmann uh we go the long brute and stop by the roman empire first courtesy of our super producers time machine he's really a jackofalltrades that casey peg grammy produces and its engineers has a segment on the case with kc and as it turns out is a scientific genius and inventor of time machines we are some lucky dudes to be associated with this giant do you notice that he doesn't go with us on these jaunts through time and space no he has to be in the homebase keeping an eye on things and he he pulls us out the next star trek style when things get area to have a man at the switch right here we are roman empire observe all the amazing architecture all this strange dress all the written text i'm doing it observing him and as we're looking at this architecture let's observe all these numerous written inscriptions those your capital letters capital letters evolved in this time during the roman empire.

time machine kc dave fleischmann mr fleischmann casey