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39 Burst results for "Five Year"

Fresh update on "five year" discussed on WAOK Saturday Morning

WAOK Saturday Morning

00:55 min | 28 min ago

Fresh update on "five year" discussed on WAOK Saturday Morning

"Assistant Lionel Hollins. Those thing he's staying behind. He was deemed higher risk an underlying medical condition. He also closed their camp after a second positive test of Copan, 19. You are total test for Kobe 19 and baseball. 3185 people 38 Positive Test, 31 of those players seven or staff members. This on the same day camps opened up around the league. My trap was seen wearing a mask while participating and drills and admits he's a little bit uncertain about the whole situation. Honestly, don't feel comfortable. Um Obviously, with the baby coming. There's a lot of stuff going through my mind right now. My wife's mind my family just trying to be the safest and most cautious way to get through a season. Meanwhile, Major league Baseball so now you all Star game officially canceled Dodgers and host a game in 2022 NFL Brown Side and David and joke who requested a trade college football coma State finished off the review of head coach Mike Gundy. They sighted they found no racism. They did admit, though he didn't have enough of a personal relationship with his players. His contract has been reduced by $1 million. His buyout was reduced and his five year rollover contract trimmed to four years. NASCAR Jimmy Johnson tested positive for covert 19 not experience any symptoms yet Miss Sunday's radius race in Indianapolis and got halfway home Rocket mortgage Classic..

Lionel Hollins Kobe Dodgers Mike Gundy Major League Baseball Baseball Jimmy Johnson Nascar Copan Indianapolis NFL David
Christina Ricci files for divorce from husband of 7 years

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

Christina Ricci files for divorce from husband of 7 years

"There's another Hollywood divorce to talk about Christina Ricci is doing the split from her husband of seven years the actress has filed documents in Los Angeles Superior Court to dissolve her union with James Hewitt again she cited irreconcilable differences as the reason and apparently cannot reconcile the idea of shared parenthood with her ex partner to beat her divorce filing seeks sole custody of their son who is five years old the couple met when he was running a camera for her TV series Pan Am in twenty eleven they began dating the following year I married in twenty thirteen which is best known for her work as a young starred in movies like Casper and The Addams Family the movie she's done as an adult include black snake moan and buffalo sixty six I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Christina Ricci Los Angeles Superior Court James Hewitt Partner Hollywood Oscar Wells Gabriel
Fresh update on "five year" discussed on CBS Sports Radio

CBS Sports Radio

00:27 sec | 29 min ago

Fresh update on "five year" discussed on CBS Sports Radio

"Whole situation. Honestly, still feel comfortable. Um You know, obviously, with the baby coming, there's a lot of stuff going through my mind Right now. My wife's mind my family just Trying to be the safest and most cautious way to get through a season. Meanwhile, Major league Baseball so now you all Star game officially canceled Dodgers and host a game in 2022 NFL Brown Side and David and joke who requested a trade college football coma State finished off the review of head coach Mike Gundy. They sighted they found no racism. They did admit, though he didn't have enough of a personal relationship with his players. Is contract has been reduced by $1 million. His buyout was reduced and his five year rollover contract trimmed to four years. NASCAR Jimmy Johnson tested positive for covert 19 not experience any symptoms yet Miss Sunday's race race in Indianapolis and got halfway home Rocket mortgage Classic. Webb.

Dodgers Mike Gundy Major League Baseball Jimmy Johnson Nascar Indianapolis Webb NFL David
Game Scoop

Game Scoop!

04:42 min | 1 d ago

Game Scoop

"What's up everybody welcome game. Joining me this week is Tina Amini Stein and Stein Stein like. Stein I like. Which means one Stein? Exactly same flavored is here. Everybody and making his inaugural scoop appearance is Michael Swaine Michael Walker show swain scoop. Yes. So. Damon there's been a couple of you didn't host that you wouldn't know Michael was on those or not? Just put that up. Think there's only two. Really. I didn't host. You had one without me right when she was in Germany. And then Kim knows stole my spotlight one time. Yeah Yep. That's true. Swim. He's been working with us for a while now, but we've been wanting to game on Gamecube. We finally wrangled them. Now that some are gaming has come to an end. He actually has some free time. so Michael Tell us about what's your favorite game of all time? Wow. That's a hotter than you probably meant to solicit. Day. They ask us this. When we joined the company I joined about. Game. When you join game scooping and they put the Bar Code on the back of your neck. They ask you. What's your favorite video game? And at the time I said SCICLUNA. And that's. Still Very Near and dear to my heart, but I gotta say right now at this time in my life. You asked me that Damon. I have to be honest. That's stranding. Game of all time it I've had in the middle of a very spiritual experience with it I'm about one hundred fifty hours of put into that game and wow, I've just. It's opening the up in ways I didn't think I was I was thinking a lot this week? Because there's that hint at the sequel and found that strangely comforting, because first of all I had a great time play. It was absolutely favor game last year. What we laughing at what are we getting? He's making united. Here. We didn't close. Einstein has judging our tastes. He's he's like crying out loud about this. It's more. But even though it has some some weirdest, too. I had a really good time playing and I I. Really Really Look back in that time fondly and I like really WanNa kind of. A comfort game like that again it was. That's what I was calling the right word. It was my animal crossing new horizons. It got me through the quarantine instead of building my little house I was walking around. Little Roads Oh. Yeah, my maps complete every road section that can be built as. Sent, brother Yeah when. Curls up in the air as the craziest road Love, so, what was it before that stranding? I cannot. And we played the second ads. VR Game also very in inventive as Tim Schafer in the People Double Oh. I. In that's interesting, it's a very interesting answer destiny. For my like my personal, whenever I'm trying to come up with my favorite of anything of all time, just like my own little sort of a personal. I limit myself to only things that were released at least five years ago. That way I have some hindsight that I can sort of. You know you're absolutely right. There's recency biases in play for sure and the. Okay, we you. You say Yo exclude things from five years ago. No. It's no. It has to be at least five years old. Probably reflects on your in order for it. For me to consider it one of the best of whatever of all time, yeah, for example I have a playlist that I keep updated of my favorite songs of all time. They're called God tears songs, but I won't allow any song. That's less than five years old on that playlist. Okay I think that makes sense. I think the Oscars actually showed work that way. We'd have some perspective on things at that point. That's a great idea that's your. Of. Tina. Do you notice when we do a game of the year? Stuff that our staffs tends to think about things that just came out especially for music. That's when I really noticed an. Fresh on your mind. Exactly, it's also holiday season right so all these games are out, and it's just like I've never been able to separate that out. At the Santa, then towards the end of the year, we have more time to like finally. Catch up on some game, so it gives people an opportunity to play the stuff early in the year that they had. To not throw. Our whole came on the air system under the bus SAM.

Tina Amini Stein Damon Michael Stein Stein KIM Stein Einstein Michael Walker Michael Swaine Tim Schafer Germany
Fresh update on "five year" discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

00:36 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "five year" discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"From the heart if he had made Cleveland fans feel a whole lot better about I gave you seven years, and who knows maybe one day will reunite again if he could have presented it that way, but he didn't. He was cold blooded. SKIP! This was the biggest decision. Lebron never had to make because all these other digits. He got drafted to the cows. That wasn't a decision he had to make he. You gotta go okay with Nike. Okay you got. Got Adidas Nike and and that was off eight. You just make a decision but skill. This is live. You're doing this lie. There are no reduce. It's not no cut. Okay, we go back and do that over or we add. There's no, there's no CG and this was given this. Is this live right now? It's so you're talking about a twenty five year old man. And I get. He's twenty-five, but for less. You do this unless you've done this. And so, what happens if? The? Trailblazer because anytime, Lebron does something goes bad..

Lebron Adidas Nike Nike Cleveland
How Much Equity Should You Give To Your Partners?

Marketing School

04:54 min | 1 d ago

How Much Equity Should You Give To Your Partners?

"To another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil, Patel and today we're gonNA. Talk about how much equity you should give to your partners and I. Think Neil this maybe a good way for us to start this off after we kind of talk about a little bit is to share stories. Yeah, so equity guys just to recap. What percent of the company should you be giving to potential partners and I think the high level answer to that would be depends, but I think it'd be helpful for you guys to get an idea of how Neil I have thought about this historically and how we've done things, so neil you WANNA start. Yes so I'm a big believer and basing on value if you think someone is. Doing a lot of work, carrying majority of the way, or they should get majority of a are doing very little work. She get much lower of equity if they're doing half the work and pulling hathaway fighting half value than give them fifty percent, the reason I would vary it a law and don't always look at it as you deserve the majority or you deserve, the least amount is if someone else is doing the majority of the working. They're carrying the company and you do very little, but you own a big chunk or more than half eventually they're not going to be. Happiness can create friction. And then eventually the business can end up going to zero or does not work out on the flip side. If you own majority an were, you can also think about the opposite way as well right so in essence well I've learned and I've done so many different business partnerships says it has to be equal based on the value and effort that each partner is providing, and that could be one partners, providing more money or do. Do More work or they're bringing more deals are revenue. However, you want to slice dice. Yeah, and one way I think people might be thinking. Hey, like what if I want this to be an exact science? I think it's tough to make an exact science, but if you want to do it, there actually is a way to make it a lot more mathematical. There's a website I, think it's called slicing pie so slicing it. Slicing Piedras actually a book on do and basically you actually have to record how many hours you're putting in for the year and I think at the end of the year it calculates equity you got now. That is much more mathematic, but to Neal's point. Let's say somebody joins a company and they want equi now I think it's good to entertain the conversation, but really it's basically a negotiation. You're having so okay. You want equity in the company. How much do you want? Okay? You want twenty percent. Okay? Why do you want twenty percent? Okay, how? How much work have you put in so far? How much money are you going to put in now? If it's really zero zero, starting out I'm just joining because I'm talented. That's hard to compute because if the companies are doing well, you've been doing it for five years. You put in the sweat equity and you put in the money already and this person just come in and say I want this. I think they're probably being unreasonable, but if they're being reasonable, then continued negotiation. I think you've gotTA. Make all parties. Happy on that front, so I. I think with partnerships in the past. We can just talk about our partnership here. Neil like fifty fifty right down the line, so that's true so in general. What do you do with all your partnerships? Because you have multiple partnerships, some are less than fifty fifty summer more than fifty fifty. How do view it? Yeah, so let's look at the software side of things so originally it was two co founders that this is for click flow so I starting out with sixty percent, and a he started out with forty percent of the company and the reason. Reason for that was because I was using my social capital, so I was getting people to put in money for the company secondly Ozzy Mike Capital as well third was using my social capital to get US customers at the same time, and so he thought that was more valuable, and he also wanted me to handle the recruiting financing division all that kind of stuff, and he was going to handle strictly to technical side of things, so that's how we split it that way and we agreed, and it was fair to really know fights on that front. Have you ever had business partnerships, not out and people are fighting and arguing yeah. I mean Oh single rain. Were you were a partner before two? Yeah years ago. Why didn't it work? Single Green didn't work out I guess or the Partnership Workout Right? There's many reasons why the company didn't work out, but why the partnerships not work out partial didn't work. This is my opinion. I think the level of work was not distributed. Some of the people that had equity were no longer putting in the work, and so that actually caused issues friction, because it was like I'm putting in this world and this person just kind of sitting on the size I. think there. There is kind of that going on, but at the same time the company wasn't doing that while anymore. Period because of all the algorithm updates that google was making so cash was coming in, so that led them more stress and people were just like. Forget it at this point is like the company's not really worth anything that was where I think it landed, and then there were five partners as myself a zoo and there were three other people, and that's what happened. Look, at the end of the day business partnerships are GonNa go to ups and downs, oil and a finding out is equity mainly becomes a problem when you're making money when you're not making money, no one really cares for some reason. Even when partners are all happy when money starts rolling in dozen people get greedy and picky and have issues, and that's why it's not structured fairly at the beginning, it creates issues wants money is trying to be made.

Neil Partner Eric Su Google Hathaway Ozzy Mike Capital Neal Patel United States Green
Fresh update on "five year" discussed on Coast to Coast AM

Coast to Coast AM

00:53 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "five year" discussed on Coast to Coast AM

"As a teacher is to impart knowledge and then be able then for them to take it and turning into wisdom as we teach. I think, okay, five years down the road. How will the material that I am teaching them really affect their lives and their careers. Hi, Todd Starnes here. True. It offers biblically center degree programs. Checkout Truitt dot edu slash Starnes. Medical experts told us to stay at home for two weeks, and the curve would flatten. Then they said, it would be another two weeks and another and then yet another. And here we are three months later, and the medical experts are telling us we still need to stay at home. So here's an honest question for all of us to consider exactly how much longer are we going to allow ourselves to be quarantined for months, six months a year, and how much longer will private businesses be able to survive if they have to shut their doors? Why is it okay for people to protest in the streets? But it's not OK to go to church. Why is it okay for thousands of people to congregate in a big box store, but not in a small mom and pop operation. The truth is, the country cannot stay locked down indefinitely. We simply cannot survive. Businesses will fail. Unemployment will skyrocket The America as we now know it will cease to exist. And maybe that's the point. I'm Todd Starnes Thiss is.

Todd Starnes Todd Starnes Thiss America
Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:50 min | 1 d ago

Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret and the reason he got into the news was because we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and they raise funds for Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division It was It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital and so we sort of went back and forth from the United States indie when I was a kid, but when they were there this mission hospital, its mission was to serve the poor, and so they would take us on rounds or to the hospital on a fairly regular basis because they really wanted us to be sure to see why. Why they were doing what they're doing. Their lives were very busy. They both doctors and so They were at the hospital a lot and you know kids could sort of feel like hey, why aren't you you know here with me? But we never felt that way because we saw what they were doing, and it was important, so that sense of those who have have a responsibility to serve those who have less because none of us earned what we have. It's all just you kind of like what we started with.

Indiana Ryan White United States Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics Ryan White Professor Of Pediat Indiana University School Of M Ryan White Professor Dr Chandi John He Indiana University Dr John Journal Of Medicine India New England Director Of The Division Of In Riley Marty Founder Stewart
Every July 1 Until 2035, Bobby Bonilla Gets A $1.19 Million Check From The New York Mets: Here’s Why

DeaconLive

02:44 min | 2 d ago

Every July 1 Until 2035, Bobby Bonilla Gets A $1.19 Million Check From The New York Mets: Here’s Why

"Today is Bobbi. Baena Day when I say Bobby Baena Day he is on July first. It's time now for fans met fans everywhere. I do wish each other a happy. Bobby Baena Day why why? Why not? On Wednesday today fifty seven year old Bobby Baena will collect a check for one point one, nine, three, one, million, one, hundred, and ninety, three, thousand, two, hundred and forty eight dollars, and twenty cents from the New York mets every July first from two thousand. Thousand Eleven all the way to twenty thirty five, because baseball salary structure Bobby. Bonilla's annual payday is often more than some game current stars are given in one year. Why does he get that kind of money in his contract? Well, so what happened was the NEOM last play for the mets. In nineteen, ninety nine, he played with the majors cardinals. The last time we played in the majors was two thousand one, but he was paid or will be paid all. All the way till twenty thirty five. Here's what happened. Bobby again has a second deferral of contract payment with the mets and Orioles. Pay Him five hundred thousand a year for twenty five years while Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah so what he did was he signed a contract in two thousand. The mets agreed to buy out the remaining five point nine million of bananas contract, however, instead of paying Baena five point nine million at the time, the mets agreed on an annual. Annual payment of nearly one point two million for twenty five years starting on July first two thousand eleven, this included negotiated eight percent interest rate for inflation at the time ready for this. At the time, the mets owner was invested in the Bernie made off account that promised to double digits return the name Thom familiar for you and the mets were poised to make a significant profit, if the made off account delivered, and as we know, it did not this arrangement. Has Left with Bobby Baena making one point two million dollars every July first for the until twenty thirty five, so he he's got another fifteen years. He'll be seventy two seventy two. How much how are you? He will be seventy. Was Age where's age? Where's age? He'll be seventy two and still making one point two MIL now if you play cards, right? A lot of people say well live million dollars. Yeah, but he hasn't played baseball for a while now, and he's still getting one point two million, and so everyone says. That's the first contract of its kind and a lot of people have followed in suit. There's a Max Zhanjiang you're. Some guy the nationals he'll be paid. Away to twenty twenty-eight and many. Ramirez also with the Red Sox will collect all the way till twenty twenty

Bobby Baena Mets Thom Bonilla Bobbi Red Sox Max Zhanjiang Baseball Ramirez Orioles
Rob Garnet One More Wave

The Coastal Athlete Program

06:12 min | 2 d ago

Rob Garnet One More Wave

"Welcome back to the coastal. Athlete. Program I'm your host. Shep today. We are joined by very special guests. We are joined by the record surf operations a US Navy veteran. Therapy advocate, a waterman, a good friend of Joe and be good friend of mine, because we're all part of the one more way, family, Ladies and Gentlemen, please welcome to the show Rob Garnett Rob. How're you doing? Then fantastic thanks for having me am. Champ and Danny Danny met you before but SHEP. We've talked a couple of times on the phone, so it's cool to be some of the zoom. At least on Zoom. Danny is our producer, and so he's going to be helping out doing the editing and mixing the episode down and things like that Joe is going to be joining the podcast just a minute. He was transitioning from from pork. Chop actually up to his apartment. He's coming back doing some surf therapy sessions. My guess would be out of Pendleton or something like that. As usual on Wednesdays, Joe is on the road living the mission so rob. Before. We get too deep into asking you. Questions I just have to ask when it came time to transition out of your career in the military, did you? When did you know that you wanted to get into surf therapies specifically? And when did you know that like this was going to be a special moment? I. Think when I was so I retired from the navy and two thousand fifteen and so that was kind of win Wave, actually becoming nonprofit, and so I had a couple of buddies Alex and Kyle. We can talk about later. That were trying to get going. They've been doing it kind of. guerrilla-style for before getting official, and so I kind of knew about it before retiring. And then it kind of kicked off. For ME I. I was volunteering here and there with more ways. I had some other gigs so right when I retired I started doing government contracting jobs I did that for a couple years before spending a lot more time volunteering than later coming on. As employees. So, Joe I just ask some general questions. Trying to do is cut those questions and stuff at the back, so feel free to take the lead, and you have the floor sounds it sounds like you talked a bit about something about diving for the navy and then sports. Now we're talking about why I came the navy. Sorry to repeat it, but. I came in hoping to be Navy diver. I've been a commercial diver for about six months in Galveston. Texas after drop Nettie. Collagen thought that'd be a good transition and When I tried to join the navy, they said the Dow closed and that they dove at butts that I should go try that. Sounds like a good idea and so. They had me take a job. That would allow me to go to buds. became a parachute rigger, so I went to school i. By Mos got my. Parachute rigger on. And then off to buds I, not really no one else doing. My parents were hippies so military people. No one wants to be joined. The Navy so really did not get into. So I imagine was a little bit of a surprise to show to buds. Learn what that school was or. Just just the suffer faster not quite ready for nicely. I imagine imagine that's quite interesting. SUFFER FEST! I also can imagine that doing the work that you did. Know you and I kind of a little bit of your background. I've imagine that really helps. Set you up for the mission at one more wave and getting on top of things and getting things moving. You maybe talk a little bit about that. Of maybe some things you learn from the Navy that you apply now at one more. Share just. Learned a lot towards the last couple of years at Miami my time in the service. How can help people in much really from? I've been injured several times while on active duty at spent time at the. At Naiko which I know, you're not talking about for jokes. The National Intrepid Center of Excellence Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic says Maryland runs, and so I started my treatment probably. This is probably two thousand ten zero five years before I retired, and so I have a lot of time to spend time with other folks that had had you know whether it was PGA s or All the kind of things that were happening to people are not super physical, but burying paxil sleep issues, and so I got exposed to lots of different therapies, and I just knew man. This is can't wait to spend more time doing this. And, so I was really excited because I learned all these things in the navy, but how can help other people at learned a lot about the va have across his work for compensation took care people how some days are better than others. Some states are Oracle, and and what? I didn't realize. Your percentage rate affects how you get treated to I was treated well, but I'm on a different ratings on people's. It's tough so I definitely learned a lot, you know. Early on about how to help other people do this and it really as you've seen Joe out. Watch people's faces. When you get to give him some equipment whether it's a board or a boogie board or people that have had nothing. He's got a wet suit like our friends in. Santa Cruz just the amazing transformation that happens. Not only from equipment, but from the community that step we all share the Melcher that we love. Not Picking up cigarette, butts or cleaning off the flight deck, but you know going out von and be talking a little trash, each other encouraging each other and just share. That shared experiences is powerful so. Yeah I definitely can attest that shared experience than to be fair. No ship Naidoo usually pick up cigarette butts, but easily on the beach and they drive us nuts, so that's why. It's quite funny. Were you a surfer before you've got out of the military and got with one more way? Has. Started at middle, school on off and then did it alter the teens long morning. And then took several years off and then kind of into it later on, so yes. We're always at the beaches, kids. We're always bodysurfing. Trying to collect fins like my friend Joe Against. Debbie me and my fin collecting hoarding abilities. That I have for quite

Navy JOE Shep Danny Danny Joe I United States Rob Garnett Joe Against Pendleton Naidoo National Intrepid Center Of Ex Santa Cruz Galveston MOS Official Debbie Maryland Nettie Texas
Man accused of Ohio State threat pleads guilty

Mark Blazor

00:29 sec | 2 d ago

Man accused of Ohio State threat pleads guilty

"And a man who used to Facebook to threaten a shooting at the Ohio State University and vowed to hurt players on the football team and then head coach Urban Meyer has pled guilty today. An indictment unsealed late last year in federal court in Columbus accused Daniel Rippy of making the electronic communication threat from California during the game between Ohio State and the University of Michigan in 2018. A face is five years in prison and a $250,000 fine and sentencing, though that sentencing has not yet been

Ohio State University Daniel Rippy Urban Meyer Facebook University Of Michigan Ohio Columbus Football California
Man accused of Ohio State threat pleads guilty

Lewis and Logan

01:02 min | 2 d ago

Man accused of Ohio State threat pleads guilty

"Who used Facebook to threaten a shooting. At Ohio State and bowed to hurt players in the football team and the head coach. At that point, it was urban Meyer pleaded guilty. Today to making a threat in interstate communications. Evidently, uh, he did this. He was out in California made an electronic communication of threat during the Ohio State Michigan game back in 2018. He threatened a shooting at the school, saying in a Facebook message to the university. I'm seriously gonna hurt the students and all the players from the football team. In separate messages. Rippy also threatened Inger kill specific players, their family members and the head coach. So he faces five years and president of $250,000 fine at sentencing. But he was arrested December 28th in California, released on bond but then failed to report to the court. He also didn't report to a halfway house has required. He then was rearrested in January and ordered sent to Ohio.

Facebook Meyer Ohio Ohio State Football California Rippy President Trump Inger Michigan
Positive tests force Nuggets to close practice facilities

Get Up!

00:24 sec | 2 d ago

Positive tests force Nuggets to close practice facilities

"To the NBA Pelicans executive VP. David Griffin sold reporters yesterday three Pelicans. Players have tested positive for the corona virus. He also said the status of sixty five year old head coach Alvin Gentry had yet to be determined for the bubble. Elsewhere the nuggets were forced to temporarily closed their practice facility after a round of positive tests among the teams thirty five person Traveling Party for Orlando

David Griffin Alvin Gentry Executive Vp NBA Nuggets Orlando
U.N. Security Council Rebuffs Pompeo on Iran Arms Ban

Rush Limbaugh

00:49 sec | 3 d ago

U.N. Security Council Rebuffs Pompeo on Iran Arms Ban

"Nations weapons embargo on Iran is about to expire, raising concerns that Tehran could threaten the security of the Middle East by becoming the most popular arms dealer for terrorist organizations worldwide. U S Secretary of STATE Mike Pompeo, speaking today at the United Nations Security Council with song from Iran's actions While implementing the J C. J c P L A that the regime doesn't moderate. When we lift sanctions or weaken accountability. In fact, it does just the opposite. While still claiming to remain in the deal. Iran by his own admission. And it's confirmed by the IAEA showing no signs of slowing its destabilising nuclear escalation. The 13 year old ban on Iran from the U. N will expire in October under the terms of Tehran's nuclear deal from five years ago with world powers.

Iran Tehran United Nations Security Counci Mike Pompeo Middle East Iaea J C. J C P L U. N
Comedy legend Carl Reiner dies

Newell Normand

00:57 sec | 3 d ago

Comedy legend Carl Reiner dies

"Heaven. CBS News Special Report. One of Hollywood's Kings of comedy has died. Carl Reiner, He did it all. He was an Emmy winning actor, director and writer. Reiner created the Dick Van Dyke Show and started the vein boss, Alan Brady. Where's the adoration that usually greets me when I run into a room, Alan, you know, I felt these people are supposed to be my friends. The little people. Reiner and Mel Brooks gave us the 2000 year old man. Is it true that you are 2000 years old? Oh, boy. Among his movie credits the Jerk with Steve Martin. They're the new power here. I wish I could get that excited about five years ago. He said he still enjoyed working. I wake up every morning. Anxious to get to my Equality We used to call it a typewriter on my computer and Carl Reiner was 98 years old CBS News Special Report. I'm Steve

Carl Reiner Alan Brady Steve Martin CBS Hollywood Emmy Mel Brooks Director Writer
Carl Reiner, beloved creator of 'Dick Van Dyke Show,' dies

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 d ago

Carl Reiner, beloved creator of 'Dick Van Dyke Show,' dies

"Actor comedian and director Carl Reiner has died of natural causes at his home in Beverly hills California he was ninety eight I Margie's our letter with a look at his life although Carl Reiner was known for playing the ego centric Ellen Brady on the Dick Van **** show he was known as one of the nicest guys in Hollywood writer created that show based on his time working on the sid Caesar show he said in a two thousand four A. P. interview even when he didn't get recognized people know the Dick Van **** show what your doors worldwide then the big band I hope you did the Dick Van **** show defines me the last five years of my life he also played the straight man to Mel Brooks in the two thousand year old man and directed the films oh god and all of me his son is actor director rob Reiner

Director Carl Reiner Dick Van Writer Mel Brooks Rob Reiner Beverly Hills California Ellen Brady Hollywood Sid Caesar A. P.
Carl Reiner, driving force in American comedy, dies at 98

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:51 sec | 3 d ago

Carl Reiner, driving force in American comedy, dies at 98

"Has died. Carl Reiner, He did it all. He was an Emmy winning actor, director and writer. Reiner created the Dick Van Dyke Show and started the vein boss, Alan Brady. Where's the adoration that usually greets me when I run into a room, Alan, you know, I felt these people are supposed to be my friends. The little people. Reiner and Mel Brooks gave us the 2000 year old man. Is it true that you are 2000 years old? Oh, boy. Among his movie credits the Jerk with Steve Martin. Here in the new year. I wish I could get that excited about five years ago. He said he still enjoyed working. I wake up every morning. Anxious to get to my Quote we used to call it a typewriter on my computer and Carl Reiner was 98 years old CBS News Special

Carl Reiner Alan Brady Steve Martin Mel Brooks Emmy CBS Director Writer
Look, I Made a Hat! (Stephen Sondheim)

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:44 min | 4 d ago

Look, I Made a Hat! (Stephen Sondheim)

"Hello and welcome to misinformation Trivia podcast for ladies and Gents, and whoever who? what I lost my train of vodka. Feed Trivia Quiz Yeah like Trivia. Teams in Trivia. Listened this podcast. We are hosts I'm Lauren Julia. Yeah when you. Layered half to oh, God. We've been doing this for like almost three years now. I know it's kind of amazing. So good that we're both organized. People are else. This would not have happened for as long as. Know. Basically doing a book report every week for three years. Who knew that we loved book reports so much, so we decided to like a side hobby. So speaking of book reports actually mine is a pretty today my topic is. As Book Report he is. It's GONNA get for the most part this weekend next and my next topic the week after next I think is going to be very very like middle school. This is my. This is my report on so and so. But. Today I decided to do a little a little something different for all Lt. I've I'm expanding my my my mind and my different areas, and like going back in time to where where I was like where I wasn't high school, and what my where my interest lied, so. Today my topic is going to be on Sondheim. is to make. DIS lunch everybody La. So. Caveat. About Sante time. Your girl Lauren is recovering musical theater nerd. I cannot sing which I think. Where a lot of my resentment lies about musical theater, so I used to be super musical theater, and then I was not, and I am to this day like very uncomfortable with musicals, so I am not super familiar with Sondheim like the nitty gritty about it so I will not be. You know giving you personal stories about things, but I will say son. Heim has been involved with both one of my favorite musicals and my most hated musical, the musical I hate more than anything in the whole wide World Flint. Let's just get into it. Shall we please? Stephen Joshua Sondheim was born march twenty, second, nineteen thirty. He is still alive. He's ninety this year. Yep and we'll talk about that in a minute, but He was born into a Jewish family in new. York City the son of Janet and Herbert Sondheim. His father manufactured dresses designed by his mother. and. The composer grew up on the upper west side of Manhattan and after his parents divorced on a farm near Doylestown Pennsylvania so he was an only child of well-to-do parents, and he lived in the San. Remo on Central Park West and was described in Merrill. seacrest biography, which is called Stephen Sondheim a life. He was an isolated, emotionally neglected child. Perfect for. Perfect for musical theatre Yep he traces his interest in theater to warm for May, which was a broadway musical. He saw when he was nine quote. The curtain went up and reveal the piano. sondheim recalled a Butler to the duster and brushed it up tinkling the keys. I thought that was thrilling. He attended the New York. Military Academy and George School, which was a private quaker preparatory school in Bucks County Pennsylvania. When Sondheim was ten years old, his father already, a distant figure had left his mother for another woman. Herbert sought custody of Steven, but was unsuccessful. sondheim explained it biographer secrets that he was what they called an institutionalized child, meaning one who had no contact with any kind of family. You're in though its luxurious, you're in an environment that supplies you with everything, but human contact, no brothers and sisters, no parents, and yet plenty to eat and friends to play with and a warm bed, you know. SONDHEIM detested his mother, who is said to be psychologically abusive and projected her anger from her failed marriage onto her son. He said when my father left her. She substituted me for him and she used me the way she used him to. Come onto and berate. beat up on. You see what she did for five years is treat me like dirt, but come on to me at the same time. She wants wrote him a letter I know. She wants wrote him a letter, saying that the quote only regrets, she ever had was giving him birth.

Stephen Joshua Sondheim Lauren Julia Manhattan Middle School Sante Pennsylvania Heim Central Park West LA Sondheim. York City Bucks County Pennsylvania George School Merrill. Seacrest Herbert Military Academy SAN Janet Steven
Sachia Vickery on raising positive awareness

The Tennis.com Podcast

06:08 min | 4 d ago

Sachia Vickery on raising positive awareness

"ALL RIGHT WELCOME TO TENNIS DOT COM podcast I'm one of your host. Nina Pantic joined as always with Reno, Falconi. Hey, guys. How's it going? Our special guests is w pro Sasha Victory Sasha welcome. It's awesome to have you here. You're just twenty five years old. You've been ranked as high as number seventy three currently around one fifty eight winner of three i-if titles, and you know you've been sounding off a lot on twitter. You've been on active on instagram. We have a lot of stuff we want to cover with you, but first of all. Where in the world are you? And how has the shutdown Ben for you? I'm actually at home in Boca. Raton Florida right now. and it's been really nice gone to spend time with my family but I'm kind of at the point where I'm ready to get back out there. Playing at you know practicing normal again. I love being home, which is such a great change, but I've just been trying to train as much as I can. just hit with some girls that are in the area, and that's pretty much it. Do. You have a coach right now that you're kind of working with is one of those things that you're slowly getting back into practice mode, or have you already been practicing a lot? Yeah I have I have a coach I work with. He's He's French and he's come down to work with me all the time. and yeah, just slowly getting back into it I played a couple of exhibitions in Atlanta last month I got to kind of. Play in a feel for where I was and be on court again. Play matches so been doing that. Was it wild without any fans and stuff like that. What's restrictions the same as kind of what we're expecting from upcoming tournaments? Yeah. I think probably exactly the same. It was really weird, and it just felt like I was literally playing a practice match. which is what which is what it was was it was? Very Weird. There was a there was one empire, but he was sitting Super Far Away. We couldn't really come that close futuristic on opposite sides. Side did kind of get a feel like what will be in the tournament coming up in. It was definitely a little strange. So one of the things that I've noticed with a few players and is their motivation. Level can kind of go like this enduring the quarantine. It's just been up and down. You know like we've been told two months two months from now two months from now. Yeah, what's your motivation been like for the last couple of months? Yeah well general motivation it is a little bit up and down with the tactic of the tour just in general, but for the past few months. Yeah I! Think the hardest part. was just you know knowing how much I should train like how much I should do if I should? Maybe less because I'll. Then I'll be more fresh when I start playing again or do more than I'll be. You know in super good shape, so it's just finding the balance between that. With no exact Kinda, start date and no calendar it's. Up in the air, so I'm just doing the best I can just like. Everybody is I'm sure? There's been somebody announcements about the tourist coming back in August and the US. Open has gotten some flak because there's not going to be a qualifying event at least as of now in June. Everything is changing by the day, but the initial initial plan is no qualifying. What was your reaction because it's kind of? A grossly unfair. Yeah no I'll just. I'll just speak really freely. I'll say I think it was the total slap in the face to so many players who depend on playing slam and you know that really depend on that. You know the competition and the prize money and you know everybody's been going through this rough time, but I just feel like. Prioritizing. The top players, which of course they deserve to be there. They deserve to play these tournaments but I just feel it was just really a hard low for the players that worked so hard to be in qualities, and they really depend on that time of the year for a lot in their career so I personally think it's it's a little bit unfair, and I think now. I read something where they're allowed to bring. Two or three people with them, so that potentially could have been an entire qualities drought. You would have just cut back by one person each flare so. I'm not obviously I. Don't really agree with it and I. Think definitely a little bit more could have been done for. The lower ranked players. I've also been hearing A few people talk about how qualifiers are still like. If you would have been in qualities, you're actually going to get a check yet. So what? What is what's the amount? Do you know the amount of that check? So I think like the first round qualifying. It's normally maybe ten thousand, five hundred somewhere around that range. But I've also read stuff wear. Maybe if we don't play, they may Give us some of the prize. Money I'm not really sure how it's to be I've been reading the W. T. updates that they email us every week. so I think that's the amount but I'm not really sure about the specific so what they're planning to do. From a personal level I'm curious. How excited are you to go back on tour? Not knowing that you know there's going to be not only changes Day In and day out, but just having the US Open like actually no qualifiers in the French Open I think there will be qualifiers yet. We still don't know really ITF Calendar. How are you excited to go back or part of us? Just like what the heck is happening. I think yeah, it's a little bit mix of both I. I am excited to get back playing, but you know like I said earlier just we have no direction really I don't know. There's no it calendars I. Don't know if I can start with the lower level tournaments and then play French Open they'll be a warm up or I. Don't know what's going to happen, but I think. I think the WPA T. A.. They have been doing a good job. You know trying their best to manage everything, but I think one thing that they've kind of lacked was update in the players. With things going like there I feel like they've been very favorable to the higher end players and they get information a lot quicker than we do like. I had to read somewhere on somebody's tweet. That wasn't going to be equality's before. We've got emails So you know a lot of people they start planning for that? You know they people need time to plan and prepare to arrange coaches. Book things so I think that's one part where definitely? They should try and do a little bit better.

United States Twitter Nina Pantic Raton Florida Boca BEN Reno Falconi Atlanta W. T.
Punit Soni Founder and CEO of Suki the Voice Assistant for Healthcare

The Voicebot Podcast

03:53 min | 5 d ago

Punit Soni Founder and CEO of Suki the Voice Assistant for Healthcare

"It's really an interesting perspective. You say that we're time as a superpower in fact. I think you can tell me if I'm correctly interpreting this where you're saying that the intent to be in it for the long haul is your superpower. Whereas a lot of other areas, people are just looking to get in quick and flip or exit, or whatever it is, they might be trying to do. You assumed it was going to take awhile in that by it. Taking awhile, you would build advantage over time. Yeah. It's a little bit more of the latter than the former. You know a lot of people's dot companies, not necessarily thinking. some do by all means, but it's a little bit less to do with what others perspectives. Motivations with mine. I am absolutely interested in building a very very large important company I want in a large part of this motivation who being healthcare, also pure ambition but. I do believe there are certain sectors. Let it takes a much longer time and. A multiyear strategy where you know phase the first three or four years based might be the next three or four years, and so on so forth, and then there are others where you're building a smaller feature, or you're attacking a area, or you're trying to do a slightly different vivid into five years. You kind of been there done that and you can actually Uber. An exit healthcare is a much more of the latter especially, if you WANNA been ambitious, big company it's it's possible to build something on the edges in healthcare, but it's never going to be very meaningful and impactful, because healthcare is so complicated so so then if I know I have ten fifteen years at my disposal through the next thing, and if I. I know that somehow I can pull together the right kind of people and resources to help me do that. It becomes a an incredible boat because everybody has prompted thinking about food. How do I survive the next quarter? And you know what metric should be i. can't about those things too But on the other hand? I'm also thinking about the fact that you know in. Twenty five. If you're lucky to be standing, we would be a completely different company. You know that would be interesting and important, so it's a little bit of perspective and time in some of the advantages. Time can actually give you. That's exaggerated in healthcare that another sectors. made it takes about five years just to be trusted. Even very basic level in the industry, and it typically takes that long to build an all the features that are expected it's. It's an industry that's. That it's very hard to do just a pure MVP model not the ad, certain extent, but the expectation level. Of An. MVP is really high because the. The risks are very high. No, you're exactly right, and you know it's actually interesting. A lot of people ask me. You know what are you? Why would you know you win? Are Sukey been and build it? I typically tell them okay. If I WANNA build the wise based digital, assisting offered legacy odor, will assistant. Alexa or doctors than I have been to a natural language You know a speech recognition system than language understanding system, a natural language parsing system than I bill intend extract Wrap it around in a stack the name to build a mobile APP than I need to. To actually figure out how to make that Super Privacy Aligned with you know privacy compliance than mediate need to have a high level of security that we need to multi tendency ended Indi- in major infrastructure is like that of a mid size, enterprise, company and Menu. All of these things than you can pilot in a

MVP Alexa
Jaws 45th Anniversary And Power Ranking Spielberg

Filmspotting

04:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Jaws 45th Anniversary And Power Ranking Spielberg

"Welcome to film spotting. Josh, we've done our share of top five over the years five hundred or so, but when it comes to power rankings, we are mere novices. We did this for the first time two years ago. Almost to the day, we power ranked the Chris's Anna the. Moments history of film spot right episode six, Eighty six Oh, surely one of our more significant shows. And this week we're going to power rank the five decades of Steven Spielberg's career. Maybe someday will power rank our power rankings. Come to that. So little preview. Was this tougher than you thought you know? There's two ways to go about this I think initially we both thought just of look at the filmography, and and get on the mic and kind of riff where we think things are, or you sit down and chart things you move them around. You have tears. Which of course is what I think? We both ended up doing so yeah. It was a little bit more of a project than I anticipated, but a rewarding one. Yeah, I put in the work on it. Because I knew it was going to be hard enough deciding which decade put first. and which would slot right behind it? I didn't think it would be so hard with the other decades actually, and then after spending a good deal of time on it I actually ended up flipping two decades around that I thought were set in stone. So I'm excited to get to that, and we'll share listeners power rankings of the Spielberg decades as well we have. Their poll results a bit later I though the beaches are open, so let's talk ause. There is a creature alive today. WHO has survived millions of years of evolution? Without Change. Without Passion. And without logic. It lives to kill a mindless eating machine. It will attack. And Devour. Anything. It is as if God. Created the devil. Gaping. Jaws. Sometimes. Probably often we have a convenient hook for one of these setups that doesn't really reflect the whole substance of our conversation about a movie, but a convenient hook is a convenient hook, which is all to say for those of you who aren't particularly interested in hearing a discussion of jaws framed around our current administration. Just give us a little wiggle room. Here I'm pretty confident, were both more excited to talk about Steven Spielberg's camera tricks then his politics, but it's a little. Little Eerie how prescient his game changing nineteen seventy-five blockbuster is forty five years later. The movie The promise will never go in the water again also presents an all too dangerously familiar type of huckster politician, a crisis who fails to heed the warnings of scientists dramatically downplays and dismisses the potential loss of life can't wait to pat himself, and his cronies on the back loves to PREEN FOR A TV camera and who demands those beaches be open because business demands. They be open. Sorry even the scary shark movie is actually about Corona. Virus and I'm far from the only one who noticed my twitter timeline has jumped the snark over the past couple of months including this from frank rich just a few nights ago. Commenting on a New York Times breaking news tweet read Vice President Mike Pence encourage governors to repeat a misleading claim about corona virus outbreaks rich wrote. Pence makes the jaws mayor look like Churchill. Mayor. Von is played with a pen. See an affable smugness by Murray Hamilton and one line I'd always kind of overlooked. This struck me on. This rewatch is when he's spurning. The please of Roy Scheider is chief Martin Brody and Richard Dreyfuss is Matt. Hooper to keep the beaches closed on July Fourth America's Day, to celebrate its independence and preeminence. Any explains I. Don't think either one of you are familiar with our problems.

Steven Spielberg Mike Pence Murray Hamilton Spielberg Martin Brody Corona Josh Chris Frank Rich Twitter Hooper New York Times PAT Vice President America Roy Scheider Richard Dreyfuss Churchill Matt
Power to the People

Lost Notes

03:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Power to the People

"In nineteen seventy-three Michael. Torrance a twenty two year old Black Panther he's dedicated himself to the cause and obeyed every command. He's a true soldier, but five years of complete devotion to the panthers has taken a toll now torrance's. Focus on his personal life just for a while, but to do this. He needs to get permission and it's gotta come from the top. Torn shows up at the lamppost. It's bar in West Oakland. Where Panther. Leader Bobby Seale is having a birthday party. The two men huddle in a corner and talk for a while, but it's all good seal gives Torrance's blessing for some time off. Torrance's relieved, but as is making his way out of the bar. Someone tells him that Huey. Newton wants to see him. And he wants to see him now. Newton is seals, comrade and Co founder of the Panthers for Years Newton has been a strong and charismatic leader. The reasonably his moods have been unstable tonight for whatever reason he's agitated. Torrance's into a back room in their flanked by a couple of serious enforcers is Newton and he says. You WanNa. Leave us. He's well. Do you WANNA leave bad enough to die. Do. You really want really bad enough to on the question. Is. My. Man On. Sale. So, this is what's GonNa Happen. You State. But at up. Would you elizabeth than at Awkward Talking and so? You give me a boot how? To correct it? Okay. So. You say. I'll Palette. So, Michael Torrens has just been persuaded to rethink his request for some time off. An epistle to the head. It's hard to argue with. Route. Then the. TORRENCE's five years in the panthers have been intense. It's been a roller coaster. Live of extremes many times. He's picked up a gun, but he's also picked up a microphone. Now, turns didn't join the panthers to sing, but the movements minister of Culture gave him and three other young soldiers, especial assignment for the 'cause it was a musical Qadri whose mission was to spread the seed of Social Revolution through the Trojan horse of funk and soul. It was an rn be group called. The London's music is explosive. Band is powerful, and so is the message. The lumpen work. For the cause killing it wherever they perform San Francisco La. New York Philly and throughout the Midwest, but it only lasts eleven months. Then things in the black, Panther party begin to implode. which you're about to hear is the story of the rise and fall of an unlikely aren't be grew born out of social upheaval. But why did the Black Panthers even need a musical act? Why did they need a band? WHO's militant agenda? Put them up against the forces of prejudice and law and order with every downbeat. The thing is the lumpen were not out to make hit records. There were out to change American culture.

Torrance Panthers Newton Black Panthers Michael Torrens Torrence Bobby Seale Oakland Huey London Michael Co Founder Elizabeth Midwest San Francisco La New York Philly
"five year" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:58 min | 6 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Frame

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> This <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is Monica Bushman <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> producer on the frame <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and I'm also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a cryer. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I cry at the movies <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and watching. TV <Speech_Music_Female> shows even <Speech_Female> during some commercials. <Speech_Female> I try not to <Speech_Female> cry at work but <Speech_Female> one of the things that <Speech_Female> I really enjoy about working <Speech_Female> on the frame <Speech_Female> is that John Horn born <Speech_Music_Female> is a prior <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to he <Speech_Female> cries at work and <Speech_Female> he's not at all ashamed <Speech_Music_Female> about it attended <Speech_Female> stands out for me was <Speech_Female> when he was talking with my <Speech_Female> erskine ankle <Speech_Female> there the creators <Speech_Female> and stars <SpeakerChange> of the Hulu. Blue <Speech_Male> Show Penn.. Fifteen <Speech_Male> it's a <Speech_Male> beautiful scene <Speech_Male> but it's <SpeakerChange> really <Speech_Male> I mean it's <Speech_Female> I mean <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's Real <Speech_Female> Jonathan Shift shift <Speech_Female> one or the other producers <Speech_Female> here remember <Speech_Female> this moment from John's <Speech_Female> interview <SpeakerChange> with Randy <Speech_Music_Female> Newman <Music> When she <Music> was <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I was <Music> <Advertisement> drying tips? <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Male> didn't make <Speech_Male> didn't make <SpeakerChange> throw without <Speech_Female> crying <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> Julia. Paskhin recalled <Speech_Female> this moment from an <Speech_Female> interview. She <SpeakerChange> produced with with <Speech_Music_Male> Mahershala Ali <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> little <Speech_Music_Female> world <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> when he and John <Speech_Female> talked about the powerful <Speech_Male> swimming lessons <Speech_Male> seen <SpeakerChange> from moonlight. <Speech_Male> It's all I can <Speech_Male> do to cry <Speech_Male> Eh <Speech_Male> up so <Speech_Male> much for me. <Speech_Music_Male> It really <SpeakerChange> does <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> John <Speech_Music_Female> Horn. Go ahead <Speech_Music_Female> and shed a tear and <Speech_Music_Female> don't feel bad <SpeakerChange> about it <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and that'll do it. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I want <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to thank everybody. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Who is tuned in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> over the years? I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the frame. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I also want to thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Colin Campbell. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Who hired us to start <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this show back in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> two thousand fourteen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and our current program <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> director Sallow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Curto who <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> guides us now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Budo span <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> which supplied our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> original theme music? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And a Taylor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mcferrin who <Speech_Music_Male> wrote our current <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> theme song. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The frame is produced by Darby <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Maloney. Jonathan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shiftless <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Monica Bushmen <Speech_Music_Male> and Julia. Paskhin <Speech_Music_Male> our news <Speech_Music_Male> clerk is Andrea <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Gutierrez and our <Speech_Music_Male> intern is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Paul ratliff. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our original regional <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producers <Speech_Music_Male> are Michelle Lands <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and James Ken <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Edward <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Up. Res- is our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> engineer. And we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> say goodbye this month. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> To our longtime <Speech_Music_Male> engineer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Valentino Rivera. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you val <Speech_Music_Male> get some sleep. <Speech_Music_Male> Our senior producer <Speech_Music_Male> is Oscar Garza. <Speech_Music_Male> And I'm <Speech_Music_Male> John Horn <Speech_Music_Male> from the MON broadcast <Speech_Music_Male> center at KPCC. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for being part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of our frame <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> family. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll see you back here for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the daily version of <Speech_Music_Male> the frame on <Music> Monday. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> KPCC deep <Speech_Female> podcasts are supported <Speech_Female> by Warner <Speech_Female> brothers presenting <Speech_Female> Joker Todd <Speech_Female> Phillips Cinematic <Speech_Female> Vision See <Speech_Female> Joaquin Phoenix <Speech_Female> Golden Globe and screen <Speech_Female> actors guild <Speech_Female> nominated performance hence <Speech_Female> winner of the Venice <Speech_Female> Film. Festival's <Speech_Female> top prize <Speech_Female> and one of the AF <Speech_Female> is top films <Speech_Female> of two thousand Nineteen <Speech_Female> Varieties <Speech_Female> Owen. Gleiberman <Speech_Female> named joker the best <Speech_Female> film of the year <Speech_Female> describing it as <Speech_Female> a movie that can <Speech_Female> and will stand <Speech_Female> the test of time <Speech_Female> for consideration <Speech_Female> in all categories including best picture director and actor.

"five year" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:00 min | 6 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Frame

"This is Philip. Glasses candyman what do you think about that. I was unbelievable anything about that. It's unbelievable another memorable. Moment was when Tanya Saracho creator of the star series Vida demonstrated the vocal talent. She used on her day jobs as her writing career got going. I was for ten years. I was voice in Spanish for Special K and the tag was Special Gate the various interior. Komo to care like you'd still friendly and then ten years for Walgreens Raines is still see mining walgreens with compared to those Nova nine wavy tenure. That's how I was able to write plays and not star in Chicago because I I was doing voices and when Tom Hanks and Clint Eastwood made a movie about the pilot Sully Sullivan Burger. I ask them about what it means to be a hero and to play one onscreen screen Tom. I think the other day gave a definition of of hero that I thought was A spot on it was it to me. It's is somebody who does US something extraordinary and yet he doesn't think it's extraordinary. He may think well I. I was on my game that that week there is this projection objection that is put upon you that because you play these guys. You actually have some of the attributes that that you do and believe me. My skill set is to make it appear as though I have these attributes without having any of the actual attributes that being said the power of the cinema and the power of the heroic visions the guy that Ukraine lie on in in motion. Pictures makes you feel as though you have to be dedicated and you have to. You have to be trained and you have to follow through and if you get that lesson from literature richer from opera from theater from Shakespeare cinema rates as one of those great One of those great art forms and so yes you. You actually do become enlightened in a way by the heroic portrayals big and small this is the frame fifth anniversary special revisiting moments from our first five years on the air..

Sully Sullivan Burger Walgreens Tom Hanks Vida Special Gate Philip Tanya Saracho Chicago Raines Clint Eastwood Ukraine
"five year" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:56 min | 6 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Frame

"Weinstein. The New York Times Reporting Ronan Farrow has written a frankly harrowing account of the Herat. Missed the Weinstein did not invent the casting couch in Hollywood. We're going to need a new Oscar category. This you best actor whose movies we can't watch anymore. Following the Weinstein News. We ran ran numerous segments on multiple aspects of the story from the toxic use of nondisclosure agreements to safety on movie and TV sets. Here's a part of our conversation with the actress and writer Zoe Kazan. I think that the history of our industry of the movie industry is has a history in which women have been sexually harassed raped. Coerced treated like objects treated dispose supposedly treated as if we're not perennials. You know treat it as if every season they need to plant a new crop of bulbs and once you cut those flowers. There's IT's no more use for the plant Like even the fact that we have the concept of a casting couch the people use colloquially is meaningful I had a lot of fear when these allegations came out against Harvey Weinstein that people were going to treat him like the exception instead of the apotheosis of the problem and These women men who come out women and men who've come out since then about other people I think are like real heroes because they are making it impossible for has to say it is just Harvey Weinstein. Emma Thompson also had something to say about this issue John Lasseter who was forced out of his job as the ahead of Pixar and Walt Disney animation over. His Treatment of women was hired by an animation company. That Thomson was going to make a film with. When they hired lassiter her she spoke out thought too old not to walk my own talk? Time is very much shaw's marching on and because I had spoken before when the Weinstein thing blew up and I've always spoken up about this since I was a young woman. I'm there was absolutely no choice. Really and the clever thing about anybody who's going to bully is that they'll do it nor or in front of someone who's going to say you can't do that. They'll do it in secret or in quiet or in private and it's very difficult for instance for someone on who's a runner and who can be replaced in five minutes to say anything bad about someone who it will cost a lot of money to replace. I'm GonNa ask you a favor right now now and this is not part of your letter. That's Pacific disguised. Answer John lasseter. I'm asking me to paragraphs from it because I think it's something that everybody needs to hear. If a man has speen touching women inappropriately for decades. Why would a woman want to work for him? If the only reason he's not touching them inappropriately now is that it says in his contract that he must behave professionally. If a man has made women at his companies feel undervalued and and disrespected for decades. Why should the woman at his new company think that any respect he shows them anything other than an act that he's required it to perform by his coach his therapist and his employment agreement? The message seems to be. I am learning to feel respect for women so please be patient patient while I work on it. It's not easy that was Emma Thompson reading from her letter to Sky Dance Animation about John. LASSETER you're listening listening to the frame fifth anniversary special and we're taking a trip down memory lane like this visit with Jordan Peele when he released get out. This movie movie had to feel cinematic in a way. That only a handful of my favorite or movies pull off a year. We would approach approach this like a an elevated art like it was high art we would try to approach this with Kubrick in Precision and of course fall short but Die Trying unlike Stanley Kubrick. You made the movie a little faster than he typically works. That's right you clearly pay a a lot of attention to music We have some horror. Music Cues lined up for you. I'm going to test to see how much of a horror movie music nerd. You really are you ready to play. Let's it's here the The I q John Carpenter's Halloween. That's the tubular bells from exorcists. Okay one on for one next cue. Carpenter's Halloween I knew it was coming. I knew it was coming. Okay next cue very good three per three and Herman and the last one.

Harvey Weinstein John Lasseter Weinstein News Emma Thompson Stanley Kubrick John Carpenter Ronan Farrow Oscar Zoe Kazan Thomson Herat Jordan Peele Hollywood The New York Times Walt Disney Weinstein. writer Pixar
"five year" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

07:32 min | 6 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Frame

"I'm Darby Maloney editor of the frame on November tenth two thousand and sixteen the day. After the presidential election Lizardo Lizardo performed on full-frontal with Samantha. B and I was floored. Only they celebrate after that I was determined to get her on the show almost a year later. John and I went out to her studio up a winding road near Dodger Stadium. And that's what I like about the studios that like I feel like I'm in nature. Sure I wanna ask you about something that happened. Almost I think exactly a year ago we are going to get up. Change our pampers brush off our shoulders and push Ashok through together. Please welcome Liz. Oh and you began your performance by singing lift every voice in saying which is also known as the Black National National Anthem insane to let them have marine ring in with the needs of the Birdseye we were on the plane. Flying New York and I was washing the election election on the back of someone's head and I went to sleep woke up in New York and I woke up in a trump presidency and I have been thinking about the whole drive there. And then Samantha came in my dressing room and she asked me she was like crying. She was so devastated and she was like whatever you WanNa do. Would you WANNA they do. And we're GONNA continue to do good as hell because I have a job to do and like part of that job is to uplift people so when I thought of lift every voice I asked her I was like well. Can you see if this cleared. Can I sing this on television. And they just were like. We don't even care if you can't and they did the research and they're like you can and then and I was like okay horns just play this one note and I'll sing over that sing song full of faith that the past Esau. I realize there's two things you can watch history happen or you can choose to be a part of it and and instead of ignoring I chose to engage in it and it worked. That was liz so in two thousand seventeen. You're listening to the frame anniversary special. I'm John Horn. And we're celebrating our fifth year on the air one issue. We've always covered on. The show is equality and inclusion. Especially in Hollywood. Here's Meryl Streep from two thousand and fifteen it's important portent that women's stories and the things that interest them concern them confound them are on our screens. That's important important because it's it will define us. I think it's easy for people to assume that this issue or the broader issue of equality has been resolved. I I suspect a lot of people including yourself have a very different opinion. Yeah I think it's It's a fight that's not over but I I probably shouldn't say a fight. I think it should be an agreement. It should be an agreement within the human family that both sides are important and it seems to be very very difficult to get that agreement. I just think that somehow it's an interior change change in the minds of men. I still when you bring up anything that sort of has the rosy at cast of feminism them to it even the most enlightened men I can even my husband Kinda go. They're exhausted by this subject because because it's not their subject but I wanted to be I wanted to be everyone's I don't want women's rights to be a women's issue. Yeah that was Meryl Streep from our show in two thousand fifteen. You're listening to the frame anniversary special. I'm John Horn and we're celebrating five years. Here's on the air. Let's see if we're on the right place. We're here to see a filmmaker. Eva Juve Rene is a founding member of times up and through her company array. She's a tireless champion for new voices and expanding who gets included in Hollywood. What La Means to me is is it is true educational experience to me Because there's a little bit of everyone here and they have space that's the difference between La and New York. You can be who you are and have the space to be. This is a sprawl and so whether you're in spaces where large Persian community you know. I love driving through behind melrose because I always see beautiful families Orthodox Jewish families walking walking together in then I go a little bit further. And I'm in Korea town and then and it's not just a block like it's a full little city you know what I you mean. People can really put their roots down here and it grows into these beautiful and of flowers of of an array of people. That's what I love about it and and And I grew up in Compton which is was not just a black space Compton Lynwood longbridge southgate. It's black it was black and browns Filipino. Guatemalan Mexican EXA can black American African. And that's that's the kind of city this is it starts to get very modulus when you get into quote unquote Hollywood. But that's it's not really La and hate it when people come here and they go to Beverly Hills and like it's kind of fake like do you didn't go anywhere you went from lax. Like the Beverly Hilton. That's you didn't experience it that was from a visit with director and producer Eva devante earlier this year. Coming up on the frame Fifth Anniversary History Special Emma Thompson. Tom Hanks and Jordan Peele. That's next stay with us. KPCC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner Brothers. Michael B Jordan Jamie Fox and Brie Larson and star in just mercy based on the true story of attorney Brian. Stevenson's heroic fight to save an innocent man's life every generation has its hero made ours this variety raved. Just mercy will shake you to your soul nominated by the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a supporting role for Jamie Foxx walks for consideration in all categories including best picture and best supporting actor from Ramon broadcast all costs. And this is the free daily report on the world of art entertainment and culture. And here's your host John. Thank you Professor Xavier. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame fifth anniversary special. There been a lot of news events over over the frames. I five years but one that has really shaped our coverage with reporting in October of two thousand seventeen about Harvey Weinstein's long history history of alleged sexual abuse and assault to the latest on Harvey.

John Horn Hollywood Meryl Streep New York Samantha Liz La Dodger Stadium Black National National Anthem Darby Maloney Lizardo Lizardo Jamie Foxx Harvey Weinstein Compton Beverly Hilton Eva Juve Rene editor Ashok Warner Brothers
"five year" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:13 min | 6 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Frame

"Breath. KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting Ford Versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best best picture of the year. KPCC's supporters include. Fox searchlight presenting Joe Joe Rabbit from writer director. TYCO not included on both AF. Is the National Board reviews ten best pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven in critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. He's hello it's Bryan Cranston. And you're listening to the frame on eighty eighty nine point three k. PCC and now. Here's John Horn. Thank you Brian. Welcome back to the frame. Fifth Anniversary. Special producing the daily show can sometimes make it hard to get out of the studio but we do it. I'm a cyclist and I've actually done interviews on bicycles. The first one didn't go so well. You know twenty therapist. That was me trying to interview. TV Rider. Tom Smuts in two thousand and fourteen a couple of days later he safely wrote his bike to the MA's probably because I wasn't with him this trip to the L. A. River with filmmaker Karn Kasama went a lot better. Maybe maybe because we were on foot depending on where the light was. When we would scout you could look into the river and just see giant fish? A key scene from her twenty eighteen to call Kidman movie destroyer was shot along the banks of the river. It's a collision of natural troll and human ecosystem and there is something about this like wild green landscape coming up against these like concrete eight slopes that felt. I don't know like we haven't seen much of that yet. That was filmmaker Carin Kusaba on the frame in two thousand eighteen. Another memorable time out of the office was when we went to visit with Mel del Toro he invited us to tour his creative layer. The House is a library every of images a library of sounds on a library of ideas. He calls it bleak house. There's a secret room. Inspired by Disney's haunted had mansion complete with Gargoyles and some ten thousand items. I am the caretaker and like Jack Nicholson in the shining. I've been here forever so so. I pulled the book shelves. I clean I dost and the house is truly truly an installation if you would is not a hoarder. House is not a house where things are out of order they have an order. They have a reason in on and what is important is that it's he speaks intimate legitimate. So do you ever spend the night here again. The first Lord. Yeah the second floor is kind of scary. What does that mean? A there was a there have been stranger noises in the second Florida. And I don't believe in anything but we in Mexico go we have a saying. I don't believe in which is but they're real. Okay now. We're entering one more room. Yeah this is the film will rump film film book room so this is kind of history of general film but in the projection room. I have my favorite filmmakers whereas that room. I'm seeing I have to say. There's a bathtub with a writing desk in the bath. There's there's A. There's actually a desk in front of the toilet. And there's a desk in front of the Tortoise Del Toro thank you so much for your.

Mel del Toro KPCC Christian Bale Fox searchlight Tortoise Del Toro L. A. River Scarlett Johansson Joe Joe Rabbit James Mangold Bryan Cranston TYCO Tom Smuts PCC Fox Matt Damon Jack Nicholson Carin Kusaba John Horn
"five year" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:44 min | 6 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Frame

"I'm John Horn. You're listening to the frames. Fifth Anniversary special on the show were always interested in in how and why artists do what they do especially if they're working a little bit outside the norm like this. Game of thrones sound designer. I'm Paula Fairfield. And I I do all the kind of fantastical stuff on the show. The white walkers the dire wolves mammoths but one of the biggest things. Obviously that I do is dragon. Well the funniest part about this with the purse sounds I hunted and hunted for just the right sound. And while I was was trolling around I found a sound of two giant tortoises having sex and I'm not kidding. And and the Mon from the mail is what I took for for as the basis for the purring of young drove on. And what's funny about it is that I I remember watching people watch it and every time that sound would come up. People would giggle and it was just funny. It was just automatic because it has a prime element still in there so knowing that as I proceeded through the seasons I have actively we looked for Sounds of larger animals. Having that piece was produced by James. Kim Who is one of our original producers. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame. Fifth Anniversary special over the years have shared how the changing political climate has affected their work. One example is the playwright John Robin Bates before the two thousand sixteen election. He wrote a play called the Kunia with a trump like character actor he mounted it in La a year later he launched a revised version in Washington. You know people asked me last night at a talk back here in DC. What's the answer to all this because the play in its epilogue ends with the question now and the answer is numbers and in a weird way I thought I could justified getting back to the play because it brings us together? I'm very corny about what the theater is still and I do believe it's a sort of gathering gathering an a church and a communal act and that it has a deep social relevance and resonance are also. It's nothing nothing and so it brought me back to working on it and and doing it in. DC felt like the right place a year later. Let me ask you about the question in the epilogue. It's what are you doing to prevent this. So why was that the question that you felt needed to be asked in the epilogue. It's the only question I think I live with is. What are you doing to prevent this? What are you doing to counter it? What are you doing to answer it? When will you not remained remain silent? Can you remain silent. And it's time to ask that question all the time. Now you know I have friends and family who are Trans and people of Color and immigrants and they are under under constant threat and so so it's up to people like me and maybe most of our listeners that can be an opposition to it vocally actively.

John Horn DC John Robin Bates Paula Fairfield Kim Who La James Washington
"five year" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:22 min | 6 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Frame

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories. You have some degree of greater confidence that you belong to something bigger than yourself. You can like watch. History happened or you can choose to be a part of it. I just like that feeling of making people feel. The frame is five years old and today we celebrate. Celebrate that with some of our favorite frame moments we travel back to memorable interviews dynamic guests strange location some tears and a few. There's a bathtub with a writing desk in the bath. Now there's there's a there's a frontal toilet that's the difference between La and New York. You convenient you are and have the space to be on thought who old not to walk tool bad day when that happened it I still feel that page on from the broadcast center at KABC. I'm John Horn today. We celebrate the first five years of the show. What was some of our favorite moments covering the cultural world and spending time with the people who inhabited when we launched the frame? We were doing something for the very first time I had been a print reporter my entire life so we ask our guests for stories when they first succeeded or failed failed. We have a thirty second request so in two weeks everybody who comes on is saying the first thing that something happened hi. I'm Gina Davis and the first time I got cast in a movie was in tootsie on twelve. Few the first job did I failed in actually got fired on was American gangster eastern. I'm John Stewart. The first time I bob on stage funnily enough was the first time I was on stage. For some reason I was absolutely not nervous at all what my first scene was with. Dustin Hoffman in my underwear. What I learned from that was Is Not all about meal and you have to learn how to navigate sometimes as filmmaker The Bitter End New York City. One o'clock in the morning following three doors cover bands. I had a good five minutes prepared about two two minutes into it. The audience realized I might suck at this but the funniest thing was. I didn't know you're only supposed to come on the days that you're working and nobody bothered. Can you tell me for six weeks. I showed up at six and went home when everybody else did. I'd get a chair and put it right next to Sydney Pollack and sit there and bad day they wouldn't have. I still feel that page on field. I walked into the night I thought to myself you know. There are a lot of law schools. I could I could go to them. And our first guest in two thousand fourteen was Christopher Nolan. He was about to release his movie. Interstellar a lot of people are saying that this is your most personal film. How do you respond to that? You take it as a compliment. Do you think they might be right I six. They don't know me. How would they know I? I don't know myself when either mm-hmm there been a lot of real world events that have driven our coverage over the years but the one that coincided with our launch was a Sony Hack today the. US government pointed the finger of blame directly at North Korea for the devastating cyber tech against the only pictures taken down the movie. The interview that poked fund the North Korean dictator whole. They cost a lot of damage. The cyber attack of Sony pictures which allegedly was conducted by North Korea came in response to who a movie it was called the interview. It Starts Seth Rogan and James Franco. It was a crazy story. It evolved every day and in the middle of it. Dan Sterling Elaine. who was the screenwriter of the interview was with us in studio? Hi thanks for having me. It's very rare that a screenwriter is like with us to talk about breaking news news so I guess my breaking news question is what the Hell's going on today. Well I just know what's going on in my email inbox which is an increasing flood of people asking me if I'm okay. Both emotionally physically and financially was your answer. What are you telling you know I was at a party on Saturday? Night where the host was introducing me to everybody buddy at the party as this guy that brought down Sony the first four or five hundred times the joke was made it was funny except The one thing that I know that I'm not happy about is actually the real suffering that is going on at Sony. Not just by the person who green that my I film so bravely but also by all the people affected by the hack quite concerned about them that was screenwriter. Dan Sterling on our show in two thousand fourteen. I'm John Horn and you're listening to the frames fifth anniversary special for music fans. This is one of those days that you will probably always remember. Where are you were when you heard the news that Prince had died? This is Oscar Garza senior producer of the frame. One of the memories that sticks out for me from our first five years is the day we had to report on the death of one of my musical heroes. There have been reports at Prince wasn't well but certainly no indication that he was hooked on opioids so so it was a shock that he was gone but like every day we simply put our heads down and focused on producing the show once. We were done though. I started thinking of The Times that I witnessed his electric live shows and it was incredibly sad to realize that he'd never take the stage again.

Sony New York City John Horn North Korea Christian Bale KPCC Best Ensemble Fox searchlight James Mangold Dan Sterling Prince Joe Rabbit Dustin Hoffman Fox Gina Davis Sydney Pollack Matt Damon Christopher Nolan Ferrari John Stewart
"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

"Go there and check your interests too so if a a new group comes up near you geographically. Let's say my interests are javascript. And Ruby will anytime anything touch those two areas that. I'm GonNa get notified defied it. You wouldn't want to just prop up your tent without an audience and no opportunity for discovery. Yeah I mean this could eventually come to a displaced meet up and a lot of respect for. That's not our goal at this point. Even though initially it was like so angry at meet up. Let's create a killer. But that's not how I think like when I'm thinking clear-headedly and I don't see red I think I think practically what can we do for our organization. What can we do for our community? And this is the right scope rate skill tool that. It's GonNa work for them. What's been five years force since we last time five since the inception this is your fifth year anniversary Similar question in the companion podcast. You asked us which was hey. What's what's the next five years like field? What what's the future hold for you are you lack of is near like I am currently or are you visionary and you've got lots of ambition? I have an incredible amount of things. I'd I'd like to do. A lot of it comes down to how much we have in our budget because we don't want to overextend ourselves we're a tiny organization. We WanNa make sure everything we do. We do properly and that we're not spreading ourselves too thin so If we can continue to grow our budget we'd like to do a lot more explanatory journalism and and Explain a lot more about technology and put Tech News in context Through really in-depth Primers We'd like to create a lot more really good first party courses and we'd like to create a lot more interactive curricula. We'd love to be able to figure out a way that we could pay for service of could actually have Lennox Focus Challenges Get focused challenges. All these things that require like foul systems essentially you can only do so much in the browser just You know for example. We're able to do python because Mozilla released a giant library. That's a significant update from like breath on or some of the other browser-based Python tools. What's but we'd really like to be able to actually have full development environment on a server that is showing up on Free Co camp that you yourself have your own little mini compartment on? The server costs a lot of money. Yeah so yeah if we were able to increase the budget. We're going to just keep doing what we do. Those three pillars. We're GONNA keep growing the number of people on the forum and by extension in Ir L. Events and We're also going to just keep creating articles and videos IOS and we're GONNA keep expanding the curriculum even talked about this other publication your Youtube Channel. I mean we're on their theoretically so we do have a youtube channel. Donald timing subscribe the bell. That's right youtubers. Always subscribe and the a Bell Right. Why why did you do that twice? I've never hit the bell was actually. It's Kinda Double Optin. You subscribe because you're interested. What's the bill gave you like? I don't care that much that you know video like all come watch it on my own terms that important. Well that's where the double opt in is they get it from the side. I would love to have the bell for my channel but I don't WANNA have you're bill for my feet. Keep your bell right keep your bell. WHOA Quincy Man? It's it's been. It's been fun watching you over these last five years The numbers speak for themselves. I think the fact that you're you can educate as such a efficient rate makes it total sense for people who are who have have you know the funds and have benefited from Free Code. Gamble people have in that five bucks. Seems like it makes a lot of sense so you know one more time to his to our listeners. If if you appreciate the work they're doing and you want to help. Educate the next generation of coders out there whether they're young whether they're young or old. Or what part of the world there in yeah.

Quincy Man Youtube Mozilla Donald five years
"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

12:37 min | 8 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

"Okay and You know all those metrics matters so and I kind of a traditional business background in addition to my education background So I can understand the physics of business so to speak and that's really helpful because that gives me some perspective and it's kind of like if you're a jazz musician if you don't know how to play you can just do due chromatic scale play whatever it doesn't sound good but if you do know how to play you know exactly how to break the rules and how to bend the rules to make it sound really cool So that's like to some extent effect on older. I'm you know I'm going to turn forty next year. That gives me a huge edge because of the life experience since I run a lot of organizations before co camp so I knew the people part of it and part of it so I I guess in some respects is one of the reasons I'm more patient is more confident in the state of the world and how things work in fit together and also you know I had my wife who has the patience the job and she had a job with benefits and and we had health insurance for arcade and ourselves. And so I didn't need to run out and buy that Ferrari or whatever is that you know start up people do and they when they exit like free coke will hopefully go on forever and hope hopefully hopefully at least for the rest of my life which I'm hoping to live to be you know ninety one hundred like Hopefully I can continue to be involved in leading. Were helping hoping somebody else lead the Organization for the rest of my life so everything is long-term this is not a problem is going to magically solve itself. You look at how long has taken to get get people to you. Know to even get literacy to the rate it is. Yeah after four Hundred Years Right. This is going to be an ongoing challenge to teach people about technology. We probably have people coming into developer land at a faster rate than the birth rate at this point just a thought a thought exercise. I think sure which ones actually having faster so I think maybe we converted more developers that were burning them at this point so huge massive forward-looking opportunity opportunity as well and impact. So let's do a hard cut to a question before the Harkat. Yes have. Have you gotten offers offers or people venture capital anybody. That's come to you and said Quincy I will buy what you got I would have. You had some like. How often do you get? Say the names but we we've had some companies that like have approached us Akwa Higher. I guess I don't know how it work. I mean this is before we we got a taxi. Some status Once we got that people just left us alone because you can in theory unwind an NGO like if somebody wanted to acquire the Red Red Cross. It'd be like this bureaucratic nightmare so much time. I'm sure it is possible but that's never going to happen here And I'm grateful that those organizations saw value in Free Co camp. But that's not where we're like. We don't want to be Free Co camp by Acme Corporation operation or something like that right. I would imagine the offers are a plentiful and the temptation is is is very. I mean he's not really for me. Maybe I mean for some depends. Yeah I'm just a simple dude. Hang on my kids. I like reading books and going fronts. You know I mean I don't know because I'm in this very fortunate position where I live in a really advanced country with rule of law and order like you get more money. It's almost like an insurance policy right like if I get cancer. I'll be able to pay all my chemotherapy and my radiotherapy or any surgeries necessary right. If my kids get cancer. I'll be able to pay for that. So money at some point just becomes the score a number that In theory are you can dip into if you really need to. I don't think that really applies to me. I'd much rather just be a normal person and have a normal kind of middle class Middle American Life Nathan be cruising around Ferrari in San Francisco or something. Yeah yeah are left okay. Hard left turn so closing closing enclosing. We're going to talk about this topic because you're not busy enough a free coat camp. You decide you know what we WANNA do. We want to disrupt. We want to disrupt meet up with an open source event planning platform for not just for developers for everybody to be able to just set up their own instance with docker container tells about Yeah Chapter Chapter and why you're doing this and How it relates to at least relates to the current into the recent changes in me on the survey was actually inspired by that? If you're already working on it and you're like like Oh this is opportunistic. Tell us the story of Chapter Real Quick. Yeah so was acquired by. We were a couple of years ago. We work as we all. Well no was not worth as much as they said it was pretty disastrous reversal reverse. Yeah it's one for the history books but anyway anyway we work of course As of October when I mean this announcement was a few hours after meet up in announced that they were enacting acting this new policy that they were going to charge everybody a two dollar. RSVP fee whenever they are CPI for an event now free Co camp readily as fortyish meet UPS on meet up. Most of our said groups are organized on facebook because free but some meet ups. We'll pay the twenty dollars a month to have a a meet up page which I think is ridiculous that it cost that much money but it does and people are willing to pay for it so we quickly did some pack of the envelope calculations based on the number of events we had it would cost twenty thousand dollars extra every the year not just us but to our community and aggregate if they were all painting Alexes essentially yours to potentially get donations. So just yeah does your money in their pocket that they shouldn't have to spend rs the organizer. It's yeah people who meet up for the platform the infrastructure. That hasn't changed. The only notable the thing that meet up has done in the past ten years was acquired by we work. They have been active in terms of product in my humble opinion and I say so this is somebody who's been using me to say that as well because there's like I recently as part of this was like I thought I closed my account double checked on it. I did and I was like I'm closed because I thought I did before I think when when required but we work it was just like I never knew they got acquired. I just this was the first I had heard. I mean I just been a grudging meet up user as well just more from. I'm nick and some other stuff too. I can't call web. It was like you know what I you know if I'm if it wasn't like oh I'm canceling you know Meet up from my. It was more like I don't use the platform anymore. I don't find value in it and I'm like wow if I if you leave a profile or at least your data still there so there's still this this Opportunity for them to use you when you've since Ma gone away so my thought was like I'm going to pull my account and not do that anymore. I love all about the open source. Community is like we don't have to put up with that stuff if we don't want to that being said somebody has to step up. Throw them code on the table or a SPEC on the table You you know. That's one of the things you've talked with siege. Bought about what they're doing with the Federated Replacement for the package management Remember the name of it contribute and trump and just the fact that there's like well we could all sit around complain. Hey as people. Who Talk in the microphones? A lot some something that we do is just I to do is to complain implant. We complained quite a bit but in the open source world. It's like hey we can actually also means problems. And that's why I was just impressed by the announcement and you guys at least begins of an effort to you. Say you know what meet up has value these. This is the thing that needs to exist but it's not like it's a replicable replaceable. So yeah we quickly made an announcement like I thought about it really hard. I just decided yes. This is important enough. This is going to make a big enough difference for just us that it is worth having self hosted chapter management tool. I mean that's what it is is for multilateral organizations so we're not trying to boil the ocean and just say okay. We're all events everywhere just like his right. We're just focused on like the YMCA or the boys and Girls Club of America or Rotary Club. Lions club some of these other organizations that have lots of chapters like you just have their own server they can have full control of the data and people can go there and set up events and they can have chapter organizers and then they can have some discovery within their own organization and they just have a little sub domain or sub directory. That's like you know. Ymca Dot com slash chapter women who code dot org slash chapters right So as far as I was coming along I tweeted out this kind of somewhat. Angry tweet by Quincy Larson relatively emotionless tweet standards and a lot of people were like. Yeah that's messed stop. I think it was a tweet of the screen shot of the meet up. There is men. Oh great news everybody right. Yeah this is actually good a slightly reduce. Your cost is an organism past like massive costs onto the community. But anyway a lot of people re tweet it and I had a little link to discord room which dischord is not open source of course but it is pretty convenient for organizing an impromptu thing I've used it for headlines and stuff So every jumped in there and we get like thousand people jump in most of them just discourse promptly lesson forgot about it but some of them stayed and we started brainstorming like what kind of tools renews. What was the user story you know? What are they gonNA look like? Who are the roles and we quickly got a lot of stuff ironed out like Schema got like an API documentation up got an API up So now we're just building a lot of the additional functionality. We need for MVP but soon it'll be up and of course it won't be amazing right off the bat but eventually it'll be they love this of course it won't using there's a theme eventually it'd be great that's right theme for the show eventual greatness. So how do people get involved. aww typical flow like Find Chapter in the show notes and like get involved because this a thing that We all could use and if you could use it and you want to have seems like to me pretty easy entry. low-hanging like collaborator fruit. Like hey here's a pretty open project that is still getting itself figured out. That's the best time to get involved because a huge impact like you can be. You can be a big contributor early on Check out chapter from the Free Camp crew is it. Would you say it's a meet up alternative though well for our purposes as a as an NGO that has lots of chapters around the world. Absolutely Louis. We're not gonNA use me up anymore. I and hopefully the problem you have is is multiplied by many others. Yeah yeah sure but even even if only we used it internally still be as twenty thousand dollars in savings and also the pride of us being able to go in and tweak things and not having user data just be like owned work and they're desperate you know catch squeezing efforts so what about more traditional meet ups so we have the Nebraska jobs goes up it just a very typical javascript. Meet up is chapter. It's not multi chapter. It's just like well. We'd do a meet up every and you can run like a you can run your own instance twenty bucks for whatever five bucks to get it like a tiny little server. That will run it. We're we're trying to like make it as compact as possible like instead of using Elastic search for example. We're just GONNA use post gress queries. So little tweaks that reduced the number of services we have running docker container. Has the idea of federated ever made it into into an. How'd that go on that show? I mean not necessarily from a technological perspective but just like a way that you can opt into being part of chair discovery network right exactly is the main benefit. NFL Meet Up. Yeah exactly right. That's the that's the only and I mean if you if you have your own organization you already have a mailing list of tons of people. Your people no your website. And they're visiting it already then. You don't need to worry as much about discovery but it's it's still a nice thing you still.

Ferrari Quincy Larson developer Akwa Higher facebook Harkat Free Camp Red Red Cross Acme Corporation Lions San Francisco NFL Nathan nick Ma
"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

13:11 min | 8 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

"Historic context with all the other mediums preceded it the other media that preceded like radio cable stuff like that and so that would be kind of like the archetypal like if I was gonNA lead by example. I'd say we should be writing in depth articles like this And there are plenty of other publications that right like New York Times The Wall Street Journal a lot of them will just have really in-depth articles that put things in a historical context. It's not just like this happen. This happen this happen is like this happened in. Here's why that's significant from a historical perspective. Or here's what that means so explanatory technology journalism that's kind of our spiral. One of our goals is to get people to actually come to a Free Rico Camp Dot. Org every day and have something new and exciting that they can learn right now people just blow through the curriculum and they get a job and they're like awesome free cookie away. He's back in two thousand seventeen. I hear that all the time. We're losing a lot of talk about that because it's one thing to you know if your mission is to educate kate as a primary mission and you mentioned the three pillars. It's going to be very difficult to keep a captive audience because of what you said so. It's very easy for people to be transient and given that their goals and their means have been covered and they're gone. Yeah and there's always more stuff than learn like I learned a lot about quantum competing in the past few weeks weeks. I learned a lot about you. Know Micron length semiconductor manufacturing and stuff like that right There's always new stuff. That's it's coming up. Technology by definition is new. So there's always new stuff and just being able to explain how you know you orchestrate with communities or how a docker container works. What's the difference between a docker image? And a you know a docker container. Right or a docker instance. I can't Corolla different terms this article. Do you have You've mentioned a Free Co camp mission but it seems like the roles of these pillars are distinct. So do they have their own agenda that feeds into a sort of main corporate agenda. Like why these three. Yeah so so. We are strong believers in content. I think that One of the biggest tragedies is that so much of their wards of the web have been crewed the platforms that are basically just aggregating other people's content if you look at like facebook right and all these companies they're benefiting from providing the basic infrastructure. You could argue you know. Medium fits that boat Corre They just create the software. Everybody else comes in as the content and people don't care about the infrastructure that much they really were are there. It'd be like you saying like Netflix should accrue one hundred percent of the vote because they created such a great streaming platform and like the Hollywood movie. Companies shouldn't get anything because hey they just created the content spree right or cheap cotton is it. Content is not a commodity really good content is incredibly valuable. And if you look like there's the information for example it's like this news publication charges like hundreds of dollars a year to get a subscription. The economists historically has always charged one hundred and fifty two hundred dollars a year. Right I and I think we're GONNA see more and more of these publications that are like this is really high quality so we're not going to give it away for free at same time that do give it away for free pro PROPUBLICA and You know the Guardian and places like that and that's because they're fully donor support it. They can do that. And free. Co can't of course being fully donor supported by you know. Small individual donors were grassroots organization. We can do that. We can make everything free and we can provide tons of content from our community the and from ourselves like like paid staffers like me who are writing articles and things like that. So let's talk about the donations real quick and then we'll switch gears to. They do want to talk talk about you mentioned platforms so five bucks a month. Let's just say go and sign up for recurring. I'm in like your mission and I got the cash. I'm GonNa give you five bucks a month. The where's that money. Go great question so I we've got some people okay. I let me talk big numbers so so everybody understands. Free Co camps was twenty. Nine thousand budget was three hundred. Seventy three thousand dollars. That may sound like a lot of money but I know developers in Silicon Valley who personally make more money than Matt a year. Sure that is maybe payroll for like three or four people right And we're figuring out a way to like stretch it across seven people and we're also paying you know tens of thousands of dollars a year in servers so the answer is like one hundred percent of that gets consumed by the by what is traditionally called programs when you analyze a nonprofit fundraising there's administration and there's programs and we don't really have we he just that we have Quincy Larson saying please donate to our dump profit please sir. We don't have a PR firm. We don't have a marketing department You you could argue that we could do better and we raise introduce a lot of complexity the organizations and right now everybody who works for Free Co camp came up through free cokie of rain never. You're kidding right. Yeah I get it and I would say like I know a lot of profit. The do the fundraising side. And of course it's akin to like a bootstrapped company getting VC funding. I mean it's an office there but it's different but you could. I mean but the small the hardest way is the individual recurring donations versus having a person on staff. Maybe it's you maybe it's somebody who's really good at going around to the big donors. Maybe that's the reason y you could get like a one million dollar grant. Maybe yeah but as we into those organizations and also like that would kind of spoil us. That's him fighting in the field to earn people's donations regular people. People who are working day jobs have kids feed and paying mortgages. But they're like. Hey Yeah I can spare five bucks for Free Co Kampe month or yeah at the end of the year and I can just give me a thousand bucks for ten thousand bucks. Well about this companies though. They're reaping the the benefits of your work. That's fine it's like you know a positive extra analogy for them right. This consumer surplus from them. But there's uncaptured opportunity there. I mean you could argue the same thing with Wikipedia I mean. How much value do you think? Wikipedia has bestowed upon the world by making it to where I can get good factual information within seconds from a relatively objective. Arbiter of truth. Yeah there's a whole lot of value that he's not captured. That's that's kind of the point. But then they also have to put Jimmy Wales face on Wikipedia for one month every year in bug the dog out of their users when they could just do these other things. Such as some tasteful ads. You know know you know I. There's no wrong with advertising greet model especially for podcast but but also you know like if you if you don't have the invasive ad networks and stuff I think I think an advertising it could be a lot of US decided to go pretty much ad free across the board. I think it's admirable decision that being said we're back. I cut you off. Donations thing like US pretty much. Oh five bucks is going towards programs yes and there's no fluff. There's no there's nothing else it's all right there we were streaming. We're reliving lean I mean we do. We have in depth discussions about whether to like pay for like a twenty dollar a month service. Because it's like really. Yeah I mean things are we just want to operate really efficiently like a lot of my heroes like you know. Sam Walton for example kind of Walmart on this notion of thrift and and you can argue that like Walmart has not been the best employer the best Patron of of different communities. That has been but you. It's hard to argue argue that it hasn't been good for the consumer because they've managed to drive down the prices so many things absolutely insane people an incredible amount of money like especially families. These these are corporations. That could probably make more money But they're choosing to kind of be broader and more resilient to changes in the economy on me and things like that it's true. Yeah it's a trade off with free camp. We're never going to capture all the value we don't even if we can capture like just to give you you and ideal less than point one percent or I'm sorry I it's it's about point. Five percent of our monthly active users. Don't yeah so it's it's just a fraction. If if I can get a little bit better right. You're going to next question. And so let's talk about scale how do you what are the conversations you have with yourself or anyone else on the team about like okay if you sit here. But it was three hundred seventy five thousand a year. Seventy eight seventy this year this year. This year seventy three 373. So when you talk about growth of revenue or income dollars however you describe it profit senses one of the ways in which you you made that number grow. Yeah so we just get more people. Using free go campus. As simple as that more people use Free Co camp a certain percentage of them will go out and get great job. Donate like sometimes we hit like a windfall like I was saying earlier We had somebody who donated ten thousand dollars. John Wong John Wayne He's he's a He went through Co campy. Works at nullify And he had money at the end of the year any one of the to a high impact charity Free Co camp just to put our efficiency our capital efficiency in perspective we have delivered one point. One billion minutes of instruction action this year. That's equal of two thousand years of learning in one year. We've done that for three hundred. Seventy three thousand dollars. That's the equivalent of fifty hours of instruction for every dollar spent night. You're putting in terms. I like to hear five bucks a lot bigger. So you're five bucks. Each each month is essentially paying for an entire classroom of people to learn one thing that is important to note also is that these people are able to do it for free and the the scale that we're operating at you know it's not only self paced in free and fully interactive. It's just incredibly the cheapest like to put that fifty hours per dollar in perspective in the United States. The average cost of having a child in a public school is ten dollars per hour per child so free co campus. Several orders of magnitude more efficient. Yeah then like they're trying to accomplish totally different things. We don't have a class. We don't have a teacher with a student teacher ratio of like seventeen to one or whatever we just do. Instructional design people work at their own pace. But it's because of those concerns decisions that were able to be dramatically more efficient. These are all conscious decisions nations. We made because our ultimate goal is scale. Our ultimate goal is helping as many people as possible for as little money as absolutely necessary. I like the fact that your focus on those two metrics you grow the number of Free Co camp you know I guess interested people users how you describe it and then then obviously impacts the the ratio of donors and you can sort of like grow that one to grow this one or you can grow this one too. I mean like meeting in a few grew the amount from I'm five percent point nine percent that yeah okay ten percent jeeze if you double that number to one percent right I mean so you can sort of focus on those two metrics the grow the total captive audience or grow the yeah the the ratio of donors I like the simplicity of focusing on two things rather than so many to grow to scale. And that's why I'm reluctant to bring in like you know a fundraising expert or you. You know to try to court personally. Fly around and meet with the CEOS of all these different Saving without it. It's obviously better than not have to do that. And it seems like you're on that path so you have these two numbers. The higher leverage one is honestly the percentage. Yeah but You seem to be pretty good at growing the top funnel at this point all these people using you see them very patient. Based on four years ago he talked to you. And you're also A and I don't use word too loosely but you're not greedy eighty right. There's some people that just and maybe it's I don't know really how you describe greed where it's not Egregious or salt like where it's overly agree. Yeah you know like read right. You can have ballistic ambitions and not be greedy in a you seem to. I have a patient is ankeny what I four that I where it's not not everybody has the kind of patients you have managed for profit offic companies for I started go. Cam Is the school director. Essentially like it was a private Intensive English program and I had to make sure that we had like a good Ebay..

Free Rico Camp Dot US Wikipedia Free Co Kampe Free Co Walmart New York Times Micron Co kate facebook Netflix Ebay Jimmy Wales PROPUBLICA Sam Walton Quincy Larson Matt The Wall Street Journal
"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

12:35 min | 8 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

"Security and quality assurance. So we're going to add four additional python ones. That will be either at the end of that or we'll be we'll kind the break up those but we're adding We're adding scientific competing with python. We're adding data analysis We're adding information security with python and we are adding machine learning using tensor flow carries and potentially second learned so we're adding in lots of tools but these are not tools that are like groundbreaking Lee new. These are things that makes an practitioners in the field have been using for years. What about things like the small things like I think of the job description tax and the updates to the language I mean the Nice thing about web development is mostly additive like new technologies out on top of HTML CSS with trends and javascript? I think the the big change between callback to promises to sink away like those are things that do get outdated dated. You just like churn it out and keep it updated or do you not fight those battles. What do you do there so we we just update like if if one thing like for example see assist variables Probably GonNa rip out our section at this point because he is getting so many of the core features that like those processes and they're taking sass out. Yeah it's about all the time and we have we have section but probably just gonNA teach flex box and grid and stuff like that so so we do go through through an update in like like you just asked specifically as new features are added to Essex or es twenty nineteen or whatever they're calling it this year We'll just go up to the individual essence and we kind of update them in situ and add additional lessons if necessary. The entire curriculum is about about to become completely project-oriented. This is something we started at the beginning of the year where we writing our lessons to all be building projects so instead of learn Java script ripped and here are two hundred lessons that are tangentially related go through them learn Oscar by building a role playing game. Yeah tonight so you'll build like run game you learn basic javascript from that you'll learn typography from building a USDA nutrition label. You know you'll you'll learn all these different things through projects addicts and currently the curriculum is like thirty certification projects in almond lessons soon. It'll be thirty certification projects and also also a whole bunch of practice projects like thirty or forty practice projects so those all be interactive with tests the entire time. And you'll build the projects one line at a time and one passing tests at a time. It's so much easier to learn when you have some sort of like concrete expectation or visual in mind mind in La giving somebody a goal and not just abstract thoughts of like. Oh here's you know as you said. Two hundred different tenja lessons on javascript a script. It's more like here's what we're learning in order to build something like this that you've seen the real world you maybe even used in real world nutrition labels for example was that one for that was tables else Learning typography by your yeah like visual hierarchy. Yeah any sense. Yeah so we've got. I mean this is all of course open source. It's only get up so if you WANNA on CDs our curriculum is coming along. You can check it out And we're GONNA keep plugging away at it. Like I said Chris Christopher Koishikawa and Bo kearns horns are working on this basically full time doing instructional design. They're both trained classroom teachers who've also learned Development on their own through free go camp over the years and through are the resources so should be really really solid and even if it's not totally solid when it launches that's the great thing about open source. It'll gradually really accrue a whole bunch of improvements and eventually it will be great eventually great eventual COSC- exactly tackle rightness so an addition to refresh the curriculum. You also launched a brand new refresh to the learning platform. You're Buzzword compliant because you're on the jam stack talk about some of the new infra and code and what you're doing there absolutely so Jam Stacked off-script. API's markup is what James techstars seems for my friend Matt bilman over it Netla Fi coined that term in a bar at some point. I don't remember these X. Ray but He the He's been a big proponent of just like the security in the performance boost that you can get from just you know doing everything bill time and then just serving like the static files essentially right so now free coq if you go to free cooking at Oregon you go into learn APP Pretty much everything is pre repackaged and you get the entire application It just loads and work off line. It won't work off perfectly right now but we're working on getting it to be the off line first APP so there are a lot of advantages and a lot of those advantages has to do with the fact that we don't have awesome. That little threw me on text message. Okay a lot of those advantages. Just have to do the fact that we want to spend as much money on servers. Yeah we can cash ben like a substantial difference. I mean it's been like five thousand bucks a month servers. What are you spend now that you're on jam? I think we're spending like four thousand but we're still doing optimization Wilma gradually it'll reduce yeah eventual greatness eventual greatness curious. Why in if you have such a massive global audience why and this is just the the the partnership personality becomes out like why you wouldn't reach out to someone in that business to establish some sort of partnership and make that zero or very low so if anybody is listening who's like in a position to grant a hole on her credits or Yeah we'll take a we. We use all that we can get from Amazon. It was on Azure. Google cloud like we use all the credits we we. We just need a lot. Are you Picky on platform pick as long as it's reliable so as you're is where a lot of our stuff is hosted digital oceans. Were some of his hosted. We have to be very mindful about what services we look at. Where like how critical? So far as you're in my experience has been incredibly reliable and paid us really reliable to But we decided intellect locate most of our database and our servers in Azure. Because they gave the most generous credits candidly they give. They give every nonprofit like three thousand five hundred four thousand dollars a year in credits and that's a big big head start and so we we locate everything in the same data center every uses latency So if we had like a significant offer over of credits we might be able to relocate the entire stack for learn over to a different place. But we'd want to. We wouldn't want to do a piecemeal just because the the introduction of latency and national security risks and stuff like that but either way with the new stack. You've definitely been able to shrink said budget. So there's just like this is the very beginning of the point of jam stack as you do it when you well you said most of your stack is we still have like servers that like are they looking like. API's yeah I wonder if you've completed whenever you complete damn lesson for example that writes back and if we can establish a connection with server stores Stores in like local memory or local stories. What we use and then when it raised I was commissioned then pushes so we're building all that kind of redundancy tenancy in in Turkishness right very cool so any drawbacks on the jam stack so far like things that are like? Oh we didn't see this coming in cash allegation is always challenging like you you push a bunch of changes in cashed on cloudflare NETLA FIS. CDN Or something and you just have to wait till it propagates or they try refreshing and we're working on figuring figuring out a way to do that so we don't have to tell people try doing hard refresh your web developers least favorite phrase try refreshing because we hate saying that turn it off and on again right. It's kind of like the I kind of fail at the cache invalidation part hardly fresh these people. How hard refresh versus regular refresh? I've been there. Yeah done that. So that's that's been the biggest drawback but I mean whole and like like I think nullify was like under like Adidas attack the other day we had some some APPTIME issues with that but again like they're doing the best they can. They're pretty small organization compared to like the aws the world we just WANNA be there to support them and We're just grateful that nullify discourse whole lot of other organizations have given us in kind and sponsorship and this is not giving us money but they are giving it servers and services that makes a difference. Yeah so the third third pillar of what you're up to have talked about the learning platform the forums. We touched on at the very beginning. We haven't talked much about the publication. Yeah yeah this is a big a big part of Free Co camp is we have free coq dot org slash news and we have hundreds of authors who are publishing articles there every week not not like act. We don't get hundreds of articles every we're going for quality over quantity it's not an open publishing platform where you can just like sign in its are publishing with With the publication. You have to apply and we're really selective. I think we had five percent selectivity so most people will submit a whole bunch of writing samples samples will force them to read our guide and all that stuff make him jump through all the hoops if they want to badly enough then we'll give them a conditional account contributor account and then they can write drafts and we can look at those and if the the moment we see one of the drafts that were like. Yeah this is ready to go. This is solid. We do a little bit of editing publish it and then we give them full access to our google analytics so they can see exactly who's reading their articles like basically everything Google analytics tracks and we've got a bunch of additional custom filters and stuff and he really simple mm for them That's the only tracking us by the way We use Google because at this point it's the server side. Analytics are great. But you just don't have enough information for the authors to be able to understand the readership this This process of collaboration or lack thereof. If there isn't any on on the edit process how do you handle that do you have sort of baked in processes is where you're giving them feedback and suggesting edits or do you make the edits and say this. This is how it is. How does that? How does that relationship we make the edits for them And then we tell them what we may generally If usually that are seemingly seemingly unimportant but actually really important like the headline is by far the most important thing to the point that I'm practically the phone I was Gonna read the headlines for you because like that's all all ninety percent of the people see especially in the like apple news and read it and all these aggregate. There's people screw scroll through headlines. And that's their news like very few people actually click through. Do you actually say anything anyway. headline is as a suggestion from them. And it is in your hands at the end. What they write may actually become the headline? I am but it's actually just as clear that like essentially they're writing and to save a whole bunch of back and forth and much communication overhead that slows things down we just apply the editor ourselves. Yeah and people understand that they appreciate it because they understand that we care a lot about quality and we you Wanna get their article read by as many people as possible the way we do that of course is after they publish it We publicize it through our twitter account. which I don't know how many followers dollars it has a lot? Is it like a high level engagement. Let's let's say that like generally when we tweet something retweeted like tend of sometimes one hundred times and we also also Have a huge alumni network and we get like two million impressions a month just off like ten posting things Lincoln so and then of course my email blast I send eh and I've got like a mailing list of two point five million people so a lot of people through read those articles that I choose for email blast so it's worth we're we're giving them a megaphone to reach a whole lot of people into really raise their profile in the developer community and they take that opportunity seriously..

Google Lee Oregon Oscar USDA twitter apple cloudflare Adidas La James techstars Wilma Chris Christopher Koishikawa Free Co Amazon editor Matt bilman Turkishness
"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

13:11 min | 8 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

"So figuring out the financials is one aspect of sustainability. Another aspect is making. The Quincy doesn't have to do all the work and surely you have a team at this point and lots of people contributing so like to hear the different roles who's involved in the and then as a follow up to that how you inspire them to get involved in frequent transmission absolutely. Yeah so free Co camp. Currently we have a lot of active contributors I'm extremely grateful for all of them. And we're getting ready to move by the time this episode goes live we'll have our top hop contributors for twenty nine thousand nine. We've got some really nice backpacks that we're going to ship them to recognize their efforts. Say Twenty nineteen top contributor instead of Free Co Camp Logo and and these are the same backpacks that we sold a few months ago. We're actually running a second Rana those two since we're going to bring some of these terms but there are seven people who work for Free Co camp fulltime including myself and they are all generalists in the sense that they all wear a lot of hats. everybody comes up through free Co camp as contributors after years of contributing if they seem to be particularly capable or Particularly passionate then and we have the resources Then we will bring them on and so. Currently the team is again me doing just everything like I do support and I also do I'm overseeing a couple different projects within than we have bow kearns who is running the free cocaine youtube channel which recently became came. I think the biggest programming channel on Youtube got one point four million subscribers. Now there's a channel called the new Boston that hasn't been updated like four or five years and they they have more subscribers than we do but other than them I think. We're the biggest Saburo runs that he creates a lot of the videos. He does a lot of the editing for our contributors and Bo also is working with a curriculum suppo- worked as a teacher for I think five or six years prior to joining freak. Oh camp a public schoolteacher up in Michigan we have abby Abigail Renan Meyer. She is based in Portland and she worked as a archaeologist before she has like a totally different background but that she had been editing thousands of articles for the free cocaine publication. And she kept doing it and I was like. Hey you WanNa do this full-time time. So she's been doing that. She also runs the podcast. So if you've listened to the frequent podcast is the chance you've heard her interviewing people and Then we we have Ahmed Adilson hub. He's in Turkey. A recently emigrated to Turkey And he is doing some exciting things over there He does a lot of the design when we overhauled free co camps visual design He did a lot of that work and he also does a lot of just like the day the in and out of code maintenance Then we have ragache Ma tre who who is in Benghazi were Bangalore and he does pretty much everything regarding the core code base and like all the servers and he he He's the person we call if something catastrophic happens and and we have Christopher Queasy Guy Wa who's in South Korea and he was working as a teacher for the last six years and started contributing a whole lot to our To our interview prep section and so we brought him on so he and Bo are working together on the updated curriculum. Which I can talk about a minute and then we also have Mea Lou do who is based in Hong Joe in China and she's running the free cocaine China team and we basically have like a completely parallel organization in China. And we've got chinese-language Forum chinese-language publication and Chinese language curriculum. And that's you know hundreds of thousands of people using that so think I got everybody. It is hard to always remember spot. Yeah as we experienced recently as well. Well so that's amazing. You have a parallel organization in China. Just curious in terms of the Free Code Camp Allom or even just the users I mean your. Your team is spread abroad. And so where's your biggest audience like the foothold in India India and the United States are like neck and neck. Sometimes India. It gets there are more people in India sometimes more people in the US And then Nigeria's third and China And then based on just visits is this or how do you. How do you use the news like Tom? Onsite right. Chinese translation have translation into other languages. As wow yeah great question. What we're trying to do is just really? Make sure that we have everything. rock-solid in Chinese Chinese is bigger than most also the other world languages combined It's second only the English if you look at like wikipedia usage and this is what we used for metrics like to plan internationalization. We looked at how wikipedia was being used and and we looked at the world language usage for different translations of Wikipedia And then we looked at the total number of speakers of those languages that we're using the Internet actively China is just exploding in terms of people adopting technology and they're very enthusiastic about it And a lot of them are getting great jobs. And there's a lot of money going into Just just a lot of different aspects of like Artificial intelligence like machine learning essentially the real machine learning and also the if and then statements and stuff like that and then also there is a whole lot of expertise in China India. A lot of the great Indian engineers stay here in a lot of the Chinese engineers go back to China and Craig companies. So you know I'm trying to think of of some Some names of famous engineers who've left like Google or left like teaching at Stanford who've gone back to China but there are a lot of really promising companies over there so we wanted to China. I I personally maybe Bias because I lived in China for like five years my wife Chinese and I'm just very optimistic about the future China. They've over the course of the past thirty years. They've taken hundreds birds of millions of people from subsistence agriculture and they've transformed into a manufacturing center of the world and now the transforming into much more services and creative based economy and learning to code is going to be a big part of that for sure. He's speech to the the need for native language curriculum. Like specifically with what I've heard at least with China is that there's this desire obviously a massive amount of people people there but most of the documentation a lot of the books tend to be are more likely to be in English. Can you speak to the need for native language curriculum. Yeah well it's always easiest to learn in your native language is one less thing you need to worry about a lot of people more than a billion have Chinese is. They're they're mainland. Yeah Yeah I mean if you include include like written Chinese like there are a lot of right spoken dialect arth six point five seven billion people here behind take seven half and someone pin up into the stats stats machine here. Okay Eh. But the point is is that that's quite a lot of people I mean. That's a mass of my people. It's like what have facebook facebook. But he's we're five billion by crazy. Yeah what makes sense to it. It's interesting to to hear sites on the choice to use a a massive global site like Wikipedia as an example to say smart. You know why did you choose. What did you choose? I under what circumstances because in a lot of ways what you're doing is creating a wikipedia like a better terms for software developers. Curriculum is very much like that wikipedia India's when a huge influence on us of course we compete you shirt. He's mostly open source as well and they're also a nonprofit so in many ways of Wikipedia hadn't proved out the concept that you could have have a donor supported Commons of learning material in their case. More encyclopedic in our case. More procedural skill focused On learning free. Probably we wouldn't have attempted it because we needed that proof of concept. I'm not the kind of person who's GONNA throw their entire livelihood Behind like a totally while. Guess but I sensed I guess correctly. In retrospect that there would be demand there and that people would be people were graduating from free. Co Camping. Going out and getting these jobs would turn around and donate back to the organization it would be sustainable. DC somebody utilizing free code campaign then maybe a boot camp as well or some sort of intensive Azzurri's Ersan where it's only free co camp and now you're not trying to do that because you very community minded and oriented did but is the is the intention to be free co Campbell loners. It's sort of like a companion to other learning opportunities so I've always preko. Camp is a core curriculum. If if you will and a lot of coding bootcamp sees co Camp as either part of their curriculum or they'll use it as their pre coursework and we have a really good relationship with a lot of coding boot camps. And I'm very excited about the the future of cutting boot camps really anything that can drive down. The cost of adult education. Universities are the hardest part about that too is is curriculum development. Yeah I like if you have to start from scratch every time you want to start up another bootcamp opportunity in your neck of the woods whether it's here in the states or elsewhere abroad if you can shrink that time from. I'm in a desire to teach teaching. It's a leg up on on Opportunity I would agree. It's the hardest part but it's not the most important part the most important important part is the the interpersonal relationships that you know. A teacher professor has with their students and the students have with one another and You the counselors that help you prepare for the job search and all the other things that university or coding bootcamp or Any sort of adult education program can Adler the value added the curriculum itself. Really if you think about it very few people actually designed curriculum since that most universities have textbooks right right and like everybody ECON one and everybody. Has You know the texbook regardless which university you're sitting at For the most part so yeah free. Free Co camp can be a free interactive textbook that these organizations can use and of course it can be used on. Its own just like I could go to a library and crack open. Expo can and learn economics. Learn you know programming just from a textbook or from some sort of static resource the the main advantage is with Rico. Camp of course is experiential project focused and things stick a lot better. When you're actually building how do you keep it fresh? How do you keep it? Relevant elephant current. And maybe the naysayers Santo your curriculums not current enough or it doesn't is not idiomatic enough. How do you how how do you push back? The haters. Basically we just focus on fundamentals. We're not going to be covering bleeding edge tools for the most part like I believe that everybody needs you. Just get really strong foundation. I and most of what constitutes foundational knowledge is a developer stuff that was figured out and like the sixties and seventies and in the case as a mathematics sometimes hundreds of years ago thousands of years ago right so what we're teaching is just the most ubiquitous tools that are the most generally applicable the GS is to a large extent one kind of the web server war if you will and javascript is useful for pretty much. which any kind of web development We're getting ready to introduce python as well as a core part of the curriculum. So currently it's six certifications. Each certification requires you to build five projects and get all their test passing. So we're adding four additional python focused certifications Right now our certification just for people who aren't where Front End Specific we have the responsive web responsive web design..

China co Camp cocaine Free Co Camp Logo Youtube wikipedia India Bo Turkey Quincy China India kearns Portland India India facebook Ahmed Adilson Michigan United States abby Abigail Renan Meyer
"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:50 min | 8 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

"Every company's becoming offer company with a lot more competition to work at the a software company right they need developers because they develop software for living but a lot of companies that just need one or two people and maybe their bars a little bit lower. The competition is going to be less. Maybe you have a friend who works there like. There's just lots of those. Would you make concern nontraditional software opportunities where it's like well may they're not software offer company but they have software needs. I bet you can pitch in there. Maybe even more so than you could at the place that has one hundred developers already if getting job Travis hard does that mean that it's got something broken in the system so if it's hard to get a job with it's somewhat of an indicator that there's is a broken system yeah broken processes. Something's broken what makes it so difficult. It's hard here in the US again. I have lots the friends in China and India and places like that where I think has comparatively easy not in every city in those countries but in a lot of markets is just much easier to go out and get a job in the US we have a combination of like benefits like the legal framework and all these things make hiring and firing very difficult perfect so because it's difficult to bring some. It's causing a mistake. Yeah so that makes employers really risk averse even in a field where there's so much demand and also employers to some extent are operating under pattern recognition. So they're like Oh. This person has worked at this company right. That's like the biggest indicator of of your likelihood of success whom have you worked for and do they have similarly stringent hiring requirements. So if you've worked at Google there's a very good chance that you're going to be a good employee at Xyz Corp as well so I and these are things that I think. There's a a great. She writes a lot of articles for publication as well Alien Learner. She does interviewing I O. And she's written a ton of articles that are much more data the driven on this but I wouldn't say hiring is broken. That's kind of a strong word but I would say there are very clear ways and was thinking it'd be approved without having having to completely overhaul you know the way that we handle labor in the United States for example Just pair programming doing more take home assignments rather than doing whiteboard Challenges Challenges would be one. I think fairly obvious improvement because that is heavily biased towards recent college graduates who just spent a whole bunch of time. Basically going ad nauseam through through Algorithms for tests and stuff like that. I it doesn't work as well when you're hiring somebody who's who's been out of the job market for a while. They just had a kid or somebody who has just been working for a long time but hasn't interviewed for jobs recently. Your mission isn't to get people hired. It's to educate. Would you say that. Would you agree with that or is it kind of part besides so are you. Don't really help place so you're not. It's sort of part of its. It's implied by lie. Your efforts so our official mission is just to help as many people as possible Verna Code. I think it's written at the bottom of every single page in our footer. That's our official NGOs mission. That said virtually everybody who uses free kokatay dreams of one day becoming more technical. Now whether that's actually being a software engineer near Or just you know being a designer who can code or marketer who can code or Somebody who who wants to build like a cool interface for their drone that they're flying around as a hobby. Yeah somebody who wants to build an Alexa APP just to impress their kids. You know there are so many any different use cases for programming knowledge. But it's all a net positive. I like to say that back in the sixteen sixteen hundreds. You didn't need to be able to read to go out and work right. But the people who did sit down and take the time to learn to read were infinitely not infinitely but they were dramatically. Better off same thing in the nineteen twenties. If you learn how to drive a car. Suddenly you had all these new opportunities open to you and more recently like the one thousand nine hundred really learn how to use spreadsheets. The learned how to use word processors The learn how to use like these slide bass tools like powerpoint and that opened up so many opportunities for people. So yeah you can get by without it. You could be you know. A Congress Person Congress person in two thousand nine hundred who doesn't know how to type and just relies on the secretary to do the typing for the right but real life like you're better off just gathering in those additional skills and I think that Soon will awake into the fact that being.

United States official Travis Google Alexa Congress software engineer China Xyz Corp Verna Code secretary India one day
"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

11:49 min | 8 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

"Ability to project out budget and for an organization organization like us like we just need to be able to budget. We're not trying to make huge. Fixed cost investments. We're just paying for servers. We're paying for people working off. Rico Kim fulltime let me throw a number as she here. This comes from your five years Free Code Camp Post which is on change news also in the show notes for those who missed it more than forty thousand free code. Camp graduates are now working in tech companies like Apple. Google Microsoft Amazon on spotify Shirley many other companies as yeah well. That's an astronomical number forty thousand those are people who've been certified through the program many of them have gone certifications that includes everybody who's in our linked ten on the network which is like sixty thousand ish. People who are working now in technical roles Not Everybody ultimately he got the certification. Because if you get a job like your graduate graduation certification ends to our means to an end I really really my FCC certification right a lot of people get the job and then they'll come and try to finish it was that not that CC in case of his thinking like what. Yeah when were you. FCC's audio this is the airwaves. The Internet areas. That's right. Yeah okay so but still I mean forty thousand people that is to me a huge amount. I mean what does that feel like. Do you feel numbers. They get so big at a certain point that it's kind of like another drop in the bucket. I mean some some numbers are hard to actually like. I Dunno like refi in your mind. Well I'm extremely blessed and I just feel incredibly grateful that there are so many people out there who bother you know e mailing me or tweeting at me or sharing these stories of their transitions. Sion's from working in counting being trucker working in manufacturing All these different fields that they've gone from to doing software development them and. Yeah so that's interesting it contextualized as those numbers. When you're getting practically every day I get an email from somebody saying? Hey I just was able to do this. You know thanks again and and then I'm able to follow up and say oh. Yeah can you tell me a little bit more about how you You made the transition. Where can you post on the form? Because a whole lot of people are in the process of trying to uh-huh yeah and so the number is an abstract. I mean it's obstructed. Is that large. But I have so many concrete examples of that every day the drive home to me and so for me you know. It's just a dream come true. I never would have imagined that we would have anywhere near the scale of people being able to accomplish things and you know provide for their families and new ways and actualize themselves and be creative. Inoue's so yeah it's just a huge honor and a huge blessing. So one of the challenges that we've seen people facing coming out of nontraditional education background grounds. Such as I have a Free Code Cam certification or some other boot camp or himself taught. Is that that hiring process is difficult for them them for lots of reasons. One of the reasons that companies and organizations aren't always on board with hiring more people are looking for senior developers than junior developers developers and People who are going through recode camp sounds like they're having success getting hired. Do you help them on that side of things or is there like a community unity support. I'm wondering like if there's like tips and tricks. or how are people having that level of success. Yeah I got through the program and I got a job because like you said the job is what most of us are drafter and so. I'm just curious if there's like if the community helps on the job side or just once you're through the program you just are competent enough to get yourself. A job has has a question. We've kind of made a neutrality setup where we don't we don't specifically guide people to specific companies We we we we thought about. We built out of a job board and we were going to have it to where people could apply for jobs directly through free cope. We just thought about like you know if somebody has a negative experience variance or if there are people out there who are you know you read about a lot of these silicon valley companies that basically. Just pretend that they've got all these funding in and things like that. And then the funding never materialized and these people have moved to this expensive city and basically it. stepped on on their paycheck You know we didn't want to be you associated with any sort of like project like that so we just decided you know we're not gonNA WE'RE GONNA leave the job board stuff and the recruitment stuff to to the experts and we're just going to focus on training people now. We do have interview preparation section. That has hundreds of additional out with him challenges We've got like we've updated a lot of the project. Oil Problems. Rosetta Code problems that made them interactive with like tests that you can in writing the browser instead of having to You know the old interface for whether was it's like a twenty year old website But it's just like you enter a number Berg and it tells you whether you're right or wrong it doesn't give you any more feedback than that and it. It just takes a long time to enter it So rather than having to do all that coding locally and then go and paper number into a web form if you're right We just modernized made an interactive experience. But so we've got lots of interview preparation stuff. We've also got this point. Probably hundreds of I got a job type posts on the form and we've got lots of articles from people who transition successfully from other fields into tech who successfully got jobs at Amazon or Google or other places like that telling how they went through that process like especially the thing that people underestimate the most is just the sheer numbers game that the modern job The modern developer job application occasion process constitutes is quite often for somebody. WHO's finished Rico? Camp or somebody who's going to boot camp to have to apply to hundreds jobs and then they'll start to get interviews and they'll start to get offers but we just try to instill in people the notion that this is hard uh-huh this is not easy. Anybody who tells you it's easy to go out and get a developer job. They're probably trying to sell you something because it's not easy that's right so we have all these resources and we have a supportive community. WHO's there to share and your accomplishments and you can just read lots of anecdotes that realized realized the statistics that we all know that there are tremendous number of developer jobs at all different levels Certainly there are a lot of middle tier in and senior jobs in the senior ones are the ones with the recruiters most actively go out and aggressively trying to recruit people but there are definitely tons of small medium level businesses. They just need some. You know the church or the Local Food Bank or the other organizations that want to have a nice website or just need somebody to help set up like a facebook group or configure. Like a wickes website. Or something like that from your vantage point. Can you see trends there. In in terms of Gideon by no means it easy but are we. Is it trending up in terms of the entry level opportunities in your opinion or just kind of been like a steady churn learn. Obviously this would be from your vantage point now like it's like based on numbers but so I could look at the numbers and we do have quite a bit of data that we've made public public we for the last three years. We didn't do it this year just because we already done it so many times already so much. Data is a lot of work We we do. What's called the new coder survey and it shows like how many u s about fifty questions? We like thirty thousand respondents. Says Really Nice huge day to set. Yeah significant significant from statistical standpoint And if you dig into that you can see like how many months of experience people had before they you know asserted applying for jobs or how long they working in for jobs and you can. You can sort of play with the numbers and figure that out. I don't have like a really well informed answer on that a lot of what I hear here is just at the street level. People like saying that they got a job where people saying they haven't gotten a job yet. in reality messy every employer is different every country's different too. Do they know European. I say European. That's really like a collection of city states right and then you know you go to India you go to China in a you know these other countries where free cooking big and and the markets completely different I've been to startups in Shanghai Where I walk in the room and half the people people working in the developable pin our free cocaine grads right so so there are definitely jobs out there For people. It's just a question of what those jobs look like. And how many applications you have to make in. How many people are competing for the same jobs? I will say this though getting a job. I think a lot of people think it's all about your skills but it's really about three things in my opinion. It's about your skills. It's about your reputation and it's about your network whom you know if you know the right people you can get in even with subpar skills subpar radiation. If you have have a great reputation you may not be the best developer but rankle know who you are from your blog posts or from your youtube channel for your podcast. Were or just from your open source projects that you've contributed to. Everyone was saying applies to de risk a choice right and the Rey de risk choices by some sort of assurance or certainty. If you have a decent reputation can kind of Beth. Decent Person De risking is exactly what I think employers are trying to ensure they're just trying to make the catastrophic choice that results in them having to terminate terminate somebody pay severance and then go through the entire job all over again yeah. It's it's costly. It's funny that Who you know come so it makes sense but we try to be in a world where it's not about who you know because it's it's almost seems unfair and yet it totally still is the facts except right right? That's what I mean like so if you don't know the right kind of people you can't build your reputation properly or at least maybe add to an area where you have less reputation you have somebody vouching for you evatt for lack of better terms if you have a network to some degree associated with you. They're they're they're therefore adding reputation the trustworthy you're right somebody worth betting on or taking a risk on and this is why like the local markets are so important people focus so much on silicon valley in like a hyper competitive like trying to get a job offer from Google facebook Amazon. But if you go to a lot of communities like we're here in Houston right and I live in. I live in the Dallas Metropolitan Poyton area and Jerry lives up in Omaha like these are all completely different tech ecosystem with different employers different hiring cultures Different circles of people that meet together for talks and Events and Different professional groups. I mean like if you learn your local Meta and if your content to stay in the city you're you are in. Currently there won't necessarily be like a clear road map for you to get to that job but if you pound the pavement and if you get to meet people I think that things will work out for you because you already doing a lot more work than most any job like you said Many companies. That aren't aren't traditional software. Companies need software people. And so as you know. The old saying goes offer eating the world..

developer Google Rico Kim Amazon FCC Apple spotify Gideon Inoue Sion facebook Omaha Microsoft Berg Houston Dallas Metropolitan Poyton Local Food Bank youtube
"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

10:49 min | 8 months ago

"five year" Discussed on The Changelog

"Four years ago four years ago talk to you and since then you have literally blown up in many ways happy literally blew up exploded has got some four now. Okay figuratively literally. Jared's always Miami. Technically you're right can mean the exact right. Well it depends on what dictionary right in this case blown up meaning to start over again guys. How digging that flow? Yeah I will keep it keep it keep it but seriously four years ago you had a conversation with you much different free cocaine today then four years ago. What are you doing that so great? What are you doing so well? That has gotten to where you're at not just you but the rest of everyone that contributes tributaries pretty skeptical. Where we're not? I mean we tend to be at times. Skeptical paid to be yeah. We're paying the base skeptical. Well there's lots of stuff that comes out and writings last. I think we're talking about that earlier. In the show by the way kind of a companion podcast going on right here so definitely listen to the other one as well links will be cross posted. Its right soon as chicken out. I mentioned and lots of stuff. It's our radar and some things last and other things don't and I know one of the things we're talking about. Then or years ago now links in the show notes to the original Quincy Larson episode appalled. By the way it's been four years. I get you back. It should have been much faster. Yeah we usually have to be back sooner. You're still here you've blown up. You did not fail to sustain sales and that you agree with you blew up. Do Okay. Good deal well. I think the difference if I'm guessing is that then was just one pillar right now. You've got many anymore. How's that work? Yes so two thousand fourteen almost exactly five years ago. We launched just the curriculum itself itself. We had a chat room and So people would come into Free Co camp and they work through the curriculum and they would ask questions in a chat room which was originally originally hip chat and then it was slack and then it was later we saw us get her but now the main thing is the forum so the curriculum was the the original pillar of free go camping now. Now we have the second pillar which is the form which is growing really rapidly? And we've got a lot of exciting things going on there that I can talk about and then the third pillar is the publication location Free cocaine dot org slash news You Find it interesting. That forums are cool again. They're always cool ish rush. I mean to some degree Shirley essential community of the Internet to a certain degree. Yes but then you have social networks and you've got groups within those has networks. It's like you know what is truly a form. So you're saying in this case a little forum hosted place where people can have threaded discussions right right over long periods of time that's index by Google. That has its own search tools. That has accounts That has moderator tools. All of those things where the the organization WHO's hosting that forum has control play control yet if you contrast this with like you know a suburb it or if you contrast this with a facebook group forum gives a lot more organization a lot more power to the organization also means that data stays on that server with that organization. It's not being used for advertising. Curious how you host it what do you do. Yeah we use discourse which is really popular form tool created by Jeff Atwood and is is a partner. Sam I can't remember last night's Afrin Safran thank you and they are really solid developers. They also know a lot about unlike communities stack overflow being one of the big ones so a lot of the same defaults that they bring to the table are what we use. Yeah what about literal hosting though do you host it yourself. What do you? What's your which architecture w ass or yes so it's it's a docker image and we just we have on digital ocean? Okay Gotcha. So He's a lot we publish this whole organization like visualization of Ricco Camps Architecture and the discourse supports our instant so that eighty bucks a month I say for Cross to have hosted digital ocean. I was asking because discourse discourse does have like a service version right. Yes so you're not hosted by them yesterday but he's got support well in the sense that like we every six months also. There's some huge thing I start on their own medicines course like. Hey Yeah exactly. Yeah and we have as Jackson's but if something catastrophic you you know we can ask them to go. Click flip the switches right so the buck doesn't stop at you in terms of the U. Host. It but you gotta help well Free Co camp. The the form is one of the bigger ones. I think there are probably some like I know blizzard and describe big so we're getting about five million views a month on the nice and big eyes and there's a lot of recurring active you. I mean there's lots of conversations form hit. Some people are just googling. They find a solution in a form. But there's a lot of people are actually like actively part of the community posting answers posing questions on the daily at any given time there might be sixty eight hundred people logged in using the form. Let me go back and clarify the skepticism. Because it wasn't that we were kept the goal of the concept or the idea free code camp. It was really just like the will continue to last. Because you're nonprofit there's lots of startups that are also on profits. They're just they don't want to be nonprofits but they are. But we talked about the sustainability of like you viewpoint yourself into this. We didn't know it was pretty new at the time all you had was curriculum and he was like. How is this going to be around five putting time into and it seemed like a lot of work and anytime you see those those things? It's just a recipe for maybe yeah for burnout or or goat farming in the right. But you're still here. You're still standing. So I guess that's maybe the question is denny's thriving fair enough striving. What have you found what's working what? How did you get to this point so you know you have a probably a team you have lots of people? So what'd you figure out that way. Yeah well last time. I was on Youtube. We're both asking. Lots of have very similar questions about sustainability. Because we do. Yeah and you. Since you've had the whole request commits series which is phenomenal. I recommend recommend everybody. Check it out and listen to that and not all Mike Rogers and That was really helpful for me as well. Just thinking about open source and sustainability Since I visited we finally got five a one. C three status which is the. US government's Tax Exempt ramped satis code. It's the same one that like Doctors Without Borders and the Red Cross and all these big NGOs have right so now if you donate the Free Co camp you can deduct it from your taxes and we ourselves don't have to pay taxes. which is a huge savings? Yeah it makes a big difference so we were able all to shift from just selling merchandise. which was the only way we were sustaining? Free Co camp. which you know spoiler alert? It was barely covering even the servers. Let alone the payroll and other things and I put a lot of my savings INTO IT I put about one hundred fifty thousand dollars in Free Co camp which Q.. Mine I was a teacher in the school director. That's like I was basically saving a half of everything I earned for like ten years. That was the money that I had. We were GONNA use that to get a house or a down payment on on a house in California But they keep you up nights like we're used were you. Were you confident. You're gonNA find that that thing that works or their nights where you're like you know and what. I'm just wasting my savings away so I wasn't. I never thought it was wasted because people were benefiting tremendously but I was worried that I it was not going to work out and I was going to have to go get a job but really. That's like that's a very nice first world problem to have. Oh my gosh if this fails then get. These jobs are suffering right right but I mean ten years of your savings gone is beyond that what he's saying is that that that doesn't outweigh the risk of loss and I guess to some degree the belief in what you were doing enough to keep going what you've done him a nice though that kind of risk that kind of kind of any fear anything like were you really twitching. Oh yeah it was a long in. I had my first child about what here in gets deeper So you know that was we were living in A. We were living in the bay area in a one bedroom apartment. It was like seven hundred square feet and we had a baby in there and I was just on my laptop all day long everyday the day's crunching Trying to reassure my wife That we would pull through and everything would be okay now. She had a job at a company doing the accounting and she as a result we had health insurance so our position was already better than a lot of Americans and we. We both had lots of options. So I just want to emphasize that like we were coming from a position of great flexibility and privilege that a lot of people do not enjoy so I don't want to sound sound like at all Because really I mean worst case scenario I'd like standing offers from different companies. That would probably hired me and all those things. Thanks but free coca was doing great people using it people loved it and I knew that we can make it work. Where there's use there's usefulness? Yeah so what what financially made it work. Finally like it's working now right. We're break even essentially so what we did was Soon as it became clear that we were GonNa get our tax exempt status. Not that we actually got it quite yet but before that we had always been just shifting if you want to support free cocaine okay pure donate money instead to women who code or donate money to heck club or donate money to hacker joe or some of these other nonprofits. That are helping thing because we really wanted to make sure that people are able to duck things in in. The money was going to proper nonprofit so once we got the nonprofit status this retroactively all all the donations to us were tax deductible and I remember just holding my newborn son and holding up the the certification in that I got from the US government and that was kind of the light at the end of the tunnel and from there. We just worked really hard to get a whole lot of people doing monthly recurring donations to us. which is beneficial? Not only because a lot of people can afford you know five twenty even twenty five dollars a few people getting like two hundred fifty dollars a month. A lot of people can afford that and It says it's monthly. It gives us the.

cocaine Free Co US Jared facebook Jeff Atwood Google Miami Quincy Larson Youtube Mike Rogers California Ricco Camps Architecture U. Host Afrin Safran Sam Jackson
"five year" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"five year" Discussed on Reveal

"This is reveal a mallet we've been hearing about the children's stucco. Now rue the tiny island nation in the South Pacific, the refugees asylum seekers who tried to reach Australia by boat, but that country didn't want them and instead sent them to an immigrant attention camp on now rue Olivia Rousse originally reported this story for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation show background briefing their partners on today's episode. Olivia neru is an independent country. So why did it take on all of these refugees from Australia? What's amazing is that? Now rue was once one of the world's richest countries in terms of GDP per capita. But all that money came from one resource phosphate from thousands of years of accumulated guano, basically bird poo from seabirds make guess what happened there. All the bird poop ran out. Yeah. Pretty much strip mining left their whole island environmentally ravaged and broke. Okay. So now, this island has no resources need some way to bring in money. That's exactly right. And a stray Leah pays. Now rue about fifteen hundred dollars per person per month in visa faze alone. That's more than ten million dollars just in the last financial year, which is close to ten percent of the country's GDP. So Australia's been paying now rude to keep hundreds of families in this detention camp for five years in a Livia you've been reporting on how the kids who have almost nothing to do. And no clear future can start to just shut down. Yeah. They do a number of children's stopped eating and drinking and talking and just as one of the doctors on the island, right? Like hold up in a fetal position hidden under blankets in dark rooms unresponsive to anyone they weren't in. A coma. But they may as well have been it's cold resignation syndrome. That is a really horrible name. Just the idea of kids giving up being resigned to their fates. It is and it's one of the most persistent mental health conditions for children on now rue because their situation off is the perfect storm of conditions for it to take hold. They've got histories that marked by trauma. And now this offering from.

Australia Olivia neru Olivia Rousse Australian Broadcasting Corpor South Pacific Leah coma Livia fifteen hundred dollars ten million dollars ten percent five years
"five year" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"five year" Discussed on Reveal

"Now rue all the refugees on now rue tried to reach Australia by boat to claim asylum, but both liberal and conservative politicians in Estrella wanted to stop them. What's really strange is that most asylum seekers come to a strategy by plane, and those people aren't being targeted the fates of just a few thousand people he came by boat have taken over the whole immigration debate here in a stray Ilya kind of like the wall has here in the US. Right. We can't have a wall. Here. We have sixteen thousand miles of coastline. So stopping the boats is how our politicians talk about securing our border. They also claim that they're trying to avoid people dying at sea. Boats sink. So for the past five and a half years ustralia has had a hard line position. No asylum seekers coming by boat will ever be allowed to settle here. Even if they're found to be genuine refugees and most are they fleeing war and political persecution. Instead, they sent a to Pacific islands now. Rue and Mana silent in Papua, New Guinea Australia, Coles as sites offshore processing facilities. There was a moment. Where it seemed like many of these refugees might actually be resettled in the US. Yeah, that's right. In two thousand sixteen US President Barack Obama struck a deal with a stray in prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, the prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, has announced a one off deal to resettle refugees from Madison and narrow in the United States. It is a one of agreement. It will not be repeated up to two thousand refugees was supposed to go to America. But the process hadn't even begun by the time president, Donna. Trump took office. The president is on a Twitter spree this morning, and he is not mincing words diplomacy in one hundred and forty characters or less tweeting. Do you believe it? The Obama administration agreed to take thousands of illegal immigrants from Australia. Why I will study this dumb deal that deal aiming to resettle refugees, not undocumented immigrants from to Pacific islands into the US. After just a week in office. Trump issued abroad executive order that had a huge impact on that deal. Dozens of people remain in detention at airports across America this morning over how US president Donald Trump's order bang entry. Trump's 2017 travel ban targeted citizens of seven majority Muslim countries. And it changed everything for the people on now. Rue around the third of the refugees there were from Iran, and that door largely closed for them as it did for the Somalis, the Syrians the Iraqis and Sudanese people on the island, meaning Australia won't take them. And now the US won't honored steel so kids like Maya are stuck exactly in. Now rue that final rejection was like a trigger that set off this contagion of despair the children in the camp responded in a surreal way. I started to hear from advocates about kids not eighteen or drinking not even responding to voices and falling into these almost catatonic state Olivia. Your story is going to take us inside the laws of these kids and their families. So I want to let listeners know that parts of the story will be tough to. Here. I also should say that Livia originally reported the story with your Augusta Broadcasting Corporation and its show background briefing their partners on this episode. So Livia can you start off telling us how you were able to connect with these kids on now rue sure in August last year..

United States New Guinea Australia Rue Donald Trump president Malcolm Turnbull Livia America Ilya Barack Obama prime minister Obama administration Pacific islands Estrella ustralia Papua Augusta Broadcasting Corporati Twitter Coles