35 Burst results for "Five Thousand Years"

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:57 min | 5 d ago

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

"You study ones that civil kano eruptions on singular events but can continue with follow up last for thousands of years after the first eruption super volcanic eruptions are among the most catastrophic event in any planet's history then includes the earth they vet tremendous amounts of magma almost instantaneously they impact global climate here on earth that means triggering volcanic winter with abnormally cold temperatures causing widespread feminine population disruptions and e findings reported in the journal nature based on a study of volcanic debris from the turbo eruption indonesia. Seventy five thousand years ago. There's no other way to say it. Tober was the largest volcanic eruption in human history. It had a volcanic explosively index of eight the highest possible score on the chart. The volcanic explosively index is a lot of rhythmic scale for an eruption depend on how much welcoming materials thrown out to what hide it's thrown and how long the eruption lasts. Well people these days talk about events. Such as the famous eighteen eighty three eruption of krakatoa in the sunda strait between the islands of java and sumatra or more recently mount saint helens eruption in washington. State these with thousands of times smaller than tober. Thankfully super volcanoes like turbo. A few and far between the last was new. Zealand's taboo volcano. Some twenty eight thousand five hundred years ago. Should volcanoes often erupt several times with evils of tens of thousands of vs between bigger options. But it's not known what happens. During the dormant periods one of the study's authors associate professor martin denny shake from curtin. University says gani understanding of these lengthy dormant periods hope scientists workout. What to look for an young active sipa volcanoes and help. Scientists prick future eruptions

Tober Sunda Strait Mount Saint Helens Indonesia Sumatra Java Martin Denny Washington Zealand Gani Curtin
Southern Delta Aquarids and Alpha Capricorns Meteor Showers to Peak in July

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:54 min | 2 months ago

Southern Delta Aquarids and Alpha Capricorns Meteor Showers to Peak in July

"We also have to meteo showers earth. A which peaking late july. There's the southern delta accords which visible from mid july to mid august e. with pick actively on july the twenty eighth and twenty ninth. The shower originated either. From the break-up of what are now the mazda and incorrect sun grazing comet or from the parent comet pay ninety. Six mel colts the delta accurate skin because they radiate a piece the line the constellation aquarius e one of the constellations brightest stars delta equerry. There are two branches to the doter. Eckerd's meteo shower. The southern and northern the seven daughter accurate considered a strong xiaohua an average of between fifteen and twenty meals. An hour between midnight and dawn listeners in the southern hemisphere usually get the better show because the radiant is higher in the southern sky since the raid is above the horizon for northern hemisphere listeners. Media will be saved to fan at an all directions. Ace north and west with females heading southwards unless they really short near the radiant the northern doda accurate. The weakest shower peaking later in mid august with an average peak read about ten meteors per hour. Meanwhile the knee by slow and bright alpha kappa court. It's meteo shower will take place from his earliest july. The fifteenth and continue until around august tenth. The meteo shower has infrequent but relatively bright made ios and even some fireballs it's generated as the earth passes through a debris trail left by the comment. 169 pain nate which was originally identified as the asteroid two thousand and two x twelve however it was shown to be weekly active during Lillian and was then reclassified as a comet the show was created about three thousand five hundred to five thousand years ago. What about half of the parent body disintegrated and fell into dust.

Southern Delta Mel Colts Xiaohua Eckerd Mazda Alpha Kappa Court Nate Lillian
Crypto Plunges as Gold Sets Aim at Record Highs

Stansberry Investor Hour

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Crypto Plunges as Gold Sets Aim at Record Highs

"Woke up this morning. And i looked at my cryptocurrency account and last night it was something like i dunno ninety six thousand dollars in this morning. It was up to like sixty four and i looked at that. Gosh that's a lot less so there's pretty much no way i can talk about anything else right now. But there's an interesting dynamic. Though right google bitcoin and on and other cryptos crashing as i speak to you and gold has perked up a little bit. It's actually perked up a lot. It's in in the eighteen hundreds now which is really cool and you know we keep an eye on sentiment trader on jason jeffords website. Send him and trader dot com. He's a very very well. Informed investor he spends all his time and energy looking at just dozens and dozens of of sentiment indicators and anything like sentiment indicator so one of those things is the two hundred day moving average and gold and he says look when when it gets above the two hundred day moving average of behaves really well and it's below it you know not so much and it popped back up above it recently so here we see for some time we've had people saying well gold is old school. It's a has been asset cryptos where it is especially. Bitcoin is where it is. And that's all there is to it. It's all going to be different now and you know i never. I'm a bitcoin bull. But i never bought that. I thought it was stupid. And i've always leaned heavily on the argument. That gold has the lindy effect. Right it's got a five thousand year history and lindy says anything we've been using a store of value for five thousand years. Maybe we'll be using as a store of value for thousands of years more. There's good chance of that. I believe so to pronounce. Gold has kind of dead and bitcoin. Is you know the up incoming replacement for it is a little silly to me. It's just a little

Jason Jeffords Google Bitcoin Lindy
Channeling a spirit

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:22 min | 6 months ago

Channeling a spirit

"Welcome to kids myths and mysteries. So i'm your host kid crumb today in my month long. Look into all things around ghosts. I take a close look at channel. Lena spirit the practice of channeling a person's body being taken over by spirit for the purpose of communication has been around for a millennia. There are countless stories of shaman which doctors prophets and others who claimed to hear voices or received some supernatural knowledge from the spirit world. Chandler's also sometimes known as psychic mediums. Often use what are called spirit guys friendly spirits who give them knowledge and help them help others with the spiritual journey according to experts sonya. Roman and dwayne packer authors of to channel. How to connect with your guide. Channeling is a powerful means of spiritual unfoldment unconscious transformation as you channel you build a bridge to a higher rome loving caring purposeful collective higher consciousness that has been called god all that is the universe universal mine. Channeling involves consciously shifting your mind and mental space in order to achieve an expanded state of consciousness to achieve the expanded state of consciousness channels usually meditate trying to break free of worldly influences and tune into a higher consciousness. They may imagine themselves seeking out specific spirits of the dead. Or they may be. Contacted by unbidden by some unknown force. That wishes to communicate while most people channel to seek inner wisdom entire books have been written supposedly by ancient spirits. Channel through modern mediums and factor are hundreds of such books many of which can be found in new age. Sections of bookstores are libraries round. The world. the most famous american writer channel. Or was jane roberts who claim to channel an ancient and wise entity name set for her nineteen seventy-two bestseller. Seth speaks as well as several popular sequels. Roberts as seth dictated esoteric information to her husband about a soul the nature of consciousness spiritual truths higher planes of reality since the nineteen eighties. New age mystic jays. He night has claimed channel round also known as enlightened one thirty five thousand year old warrior spirit who described among other things being born on the continent of atlantis. Night became a multimillionaire writing books and offering seminars. In dvd's teaching the wisdom imparted by her rump. Thought another prominent chandler in the one thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety s was actress shirley maclaine who wrote a bestselling book and a popular television mini series on the subject. Channeling has waned in popularity in recent years so it is still practiced and it's widely accepted in a new age community channel. Information from different sources is often a dozen different spirits presumably dwelling in the same after world. Give a dozen different accounts if the spirits are truly imparting be important cosmic wisdom and universal truths you would expect different channels in different places and times to say the same things instead. Studies have shown that channel information changes with the times and tends to reflect the idea's popular in the culture at the time because there is no way to verify information and descriptions of different planes of existence the nature of the soul. And so on. There's no way to know what if any of the channel information is accurate but clearly much of it cannot be correct would help verify channel and as a real phenomenon would be to have accurate concrete and verifiable information revealed that only the spirit world would know for example. A person who truly channel einstein should be able to continue making important discoveries long after his death or a father who died unexpectedly and left his affairs. Disarray should be able to tell his wife and family through chandler were important. Documents are located to help and settle his estate.

Dwayne Packer Lena Mystic Jays Sonya Chandler Jane Roberts Seth Shirley Maclaine Roberts Einstein
That Mouse in Your House: It's Smarter, Thanks to You

60-Second Science

01:51 min | 7 months ago

That Mouse in Your House: It's Smarter, Thanks to You

"You've ever hosted a mouse as a house guest you know they can be incredibly clever finding your food and that makes sense. They had to become better in traits like problem solving because we became better at hiding food from then on your guitar with the max planck institute in germany. She says that battle of the minds has made mice craftier over time longer. Demise was humans better. They are at problem. Solving there are more than a dozen subspecies of house mice worldwide and each began cohabitating with humans at different times in our evolutionary history. Take for example. We're marcus domestic. As it began raiding human pantries around twelve thousand years ago. Whiskas musculus our relationship with them began some eight thousand years ago and musculus castanos that one is a relative newcomer which began cohabitating only three to five thousand years ago and that spread in evolutionary life histories among the three groups gave guenter team and opportunity. They gathered one hundred fifty mice with constituents from all three groups and tested them with seven. Different food puzzles. Each puzzle was baited with a mealworm which the mice could only get by pushing or pulling live for example or extracting a ball of paper from a tube or my favorite opening the window of a lego house and they founded the longer amounts variety had lived with humans. The more likely it was to solve these puzzles. Basically what we are left at with trying to explain these results we see is that the mice really developed higher or enhance cognitive abilities. While living with humans the results appear in the proceedings of the royal society b and as the human footprint on the globe expands. Guenter says. it's more important than ever to understand how we influence animal minds to learn. Why some creatures like house mice adapt while others simply die out.

Max Planck Institute Whiskas Musculus Guenter Marcus Germany Royal Society
Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:10 min | 8 months ago

Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

"Now. We are talking about africa. I wanna know john paul. Why why do we need to keep africa on our radar very interesting question. So one one thing that keeps me. Loyal to entrepreneurs on fire is the quality of stories and experiences of ultra preneurs. Who've made it that's one big reason. Why listen and. I'm also sure that's why many people listen to the show but interesting is what being on entrepreneur means that you're able to live in the now and also prepare for future so it's almost impossible to think about the future and nothing about and here's why when you look at the population of the world. Africa correctly has the youngest population of people. Right now sixty percents of people on the continent of the age of twenty five. So this is more or less looking at china. Before china became china up to date china more or less the second biggest economy in the world the factory of the world and all of that so you can imagine that people who saw china. The china became china. Actually the ones who got in on the meat of the game. So that's exactly what africa represents but more importantly there have been events in the past couple of years that have put africa in the centerpiece. The very most the most recent one which is very interesting is covid now all the time most companies have built their supply chains around china and south east asia but then when it hits it was obvious that supply chains with very vulnerable. And if you're going to diversify your supply chain. It's impossible not to look at africa if you're looking at affordable label if you look at them. The truck symmetry of the continental either north america or europe. And what are the means. Most countries on the continent either speak english or french and these are more or less global line. Which is you're going to penetrate any of the big markets and. It's really now happening. Because what the chinese are doing is the chinese. Market is starting to specialize in advanced high-tech stuff. I most of those low cost production that brought business the whole of storing from america. When are beginning to see going to places like vietnam. Bangladesh and other countries in southeast asia. But then you cannot forgo a population of one point three billion people which is what africa presents and what we're seeing is some companies setup accretions within the african continent places like rwanda at the opium ghana senegal. And what they're doing is they are preparing. These guys are digging for the future and one interesting. That's happened in the last four years in america. Is the people in africa. So in america when you think about africa the image that comes to mind is charity and philanthropy. Africa needs. Needs help and help and help. So the approach of the americans this time and even europe has been to help africa give africa aid. Give them all of that. What the chinese are doing is they're coming with more or less trade and business and things. What africa needs really because you have this population of very young people enterprising people. I mentioned that sixty percent of the world's uncle beats at arable. Land is in africa so in most parts of the world with maxed out the land space. Yes we're doing. We're using technology and other means to increase the yield on the land. But when we're talking about virgin space. Federal land arable land. Most of it is still in africa. Still cultivated and we're looking at a global population that is set to double back at least by the time we reach two hundred fifty or more according to the un and if we do not keep pace with globe with population growth would amount of food were producing then the world is going to be faced with serious threat of hunger so these are just a few examples of why africa needs to be on your rita. Yes so thinking about now. It's great but you're thinking about the future you need to remember that even before could hit five of the top. The top ten fastest growing economies in the world when africa. These are not really things. We've seen the mainstream media. Why i'm happy that chain. Is that the approach of the chinese in africa. Doo controversial is a big difference. This guy's coming here boots on the ground and they're dealing with the market. The previous relationship with africa has been to deal with africa's governments give african governments money for age and they develop africa unfulfilled years. It's never happened instead. It's helped enhance corruption. A sense of entitlement and dependency so most of the problems never get so because that's free money free money fluent in from europe money flowing in from north america so what people like us exist to do is to show that the people we should be voting. For with our money is the entrepreneur's they're the ones who have the incentive and the motivation to really solve africa's problems and guess what's global money starting to call me and i'm sure many ago minova listeners. On on on entrepreneur no stripe the big global player in in payments strike just acquired an african company. Niger company for two hundred million dollars. That's a major exit and it's stories like this that are starting to prove that africa is not a charity case. Africa is opportunity. The programs are trying to solve through eight. Actually need to be solved through entrepreneurship and the process. We create more jobs more wealth and greeted big happier world john. Let's talk about what you see as the most interesting opportunities that exist right now. I mean you talked about a lot of opportunities. I love how you really are hammering home. The fact that entrepreneurship is what is going to turn africa around and really bring that continents into the as we move forward into twenty twenty one and beyond but specifically what are the one or two most interesting and fascinating opportunities in the business world that you're seeing right now. The first interesting one is more or less. I talked about it earlier. In terms of africa's potential to produce food because right now we're looking for the next food basket of the world and one interesting that africa offers is the or what's we've we now know as superfoods so for example there's a grain that's grown in west africa. It's a green code for new now. This green is so rich in cultural significance for example when the tombs of ancient in jim ships are more or less opel excavated amongst other materials. Like honey. and things like that four new for new f- who is one of the greens that it that the ancient egyptians actually put in the the pyramids in the borough chambers of dead feroz. That's tell you how important it was back. Then this is like one of the longest growth one of the greens has been grown the longest in history almost five thousand years now. The reason why new is important is when you look at the american market and european market more or less developed world and you see how important health and wellness is this all about eighteen. Organic food. Gluten free food and things like that you announced that to see if like for new is actually superfood but in africa is grown by people in africa eating by people that i start to see what america has done with them a green assira like we know what which is more or less breakfast zero before quinoa became like a blockbuster serial in america it had the same profile as phone. You in south america. So what we're beginning to see. Is they celebrate to ship in. New york is named spear pm. He's now taken for neo his packaged. It's not just in its physical formats but in the narrative that used salads and last year. I think it's early this year. It got the national distribution across the united states in whole foods. You know to distribute this kind of food and new just one. I know listeners may be familiar with moringa which is another superfood. it grows in the wild in africa. We really take you for granted over yet. But then we've sent entrepreneurs coming here and repackage it into something that selling like a lot because it resonates resonates with the health and wellness movements the big trend going on in the

Africa China United States Europe John Paul North America South East Asia Senegal Rwanda Bangladesh Ghana Vietnam Asia Rita UN Niger
Ancient Dogs Had Complex Genetic Histories

60-Second Science

02:54 min | 8 months ago

Ancient Dogs Had Complex Genetic Histories

"Dogs were the first animals to be domesticated stuck with us as we changed lifestyles from hunting gathering to farming to city living. The dog is a species that is intimately linked to hyun history. Anders bergstrom a post. Doc at the francis crick institute in london. He and his colleagues studied the genomes of twenty seven. Ancient dog bones dug up around the world. They found by eleven thousand years ago. We see the dog to start to diversify united kalihi so we find evidence of at least five major lineages of dogs already at this time. Dog remains have been found in europe asia in the americas in a pattern similar to help. Humans moved mixed to a large degree. The history of dogs dog seems have been shaped by human history. So like the reflecting. How what you must moved. They would have brought her dogs with them. Ancient humans clearly found dogs to be very useful in the arctic. Evidence at sled. Dogs actually emerged very early on people. Use them for the purpose of leading perhaps as early as ten thousand years ago. A few modern breeds like the african basenji new guinea singing dog or australian dingo are similar to one of the five ancient lineages most other modern breeds derived at least in part from european dogs which came to dominate dog genomes. Back for five thousand years ago. There's a great diversity of dogs in europe but at some point there was probably a single population that expanded in basically replaced other populations in europe. So this was something that we did not predict sunday. You couldn't really see just from studying. Archaeology look the dna with all this diversity. In the past that is not represented in present-day dogs. The study is in the journal. Science where you'll find maps of dog migrations over time one odd finding about eleven thousand years ago it looks like dogs. Spread more widely than humans did does actually opposes. We don't understand. So how could the dogs spread so quickly widely. We're we're not aware of any human migrations. At this time that could have facilitated this spread of the dog but some of it spreads very quickly to two human groups all across the world perhaps because he was a very useful thing for his early human together. The groups humans were also useful to dogs prehistoric. Petco didn't exist so dogs. Probably humans did and is human started to form oath species quickly adapted to digest more grains. The number of copies of a starch digesting gene in both humans and dogs increased in the generation following the invention of agriculture. Yes oh that. That's a very striking example of convergent evolution between humans. And dogs. way it's gonna be interesting to think of the dog. As kind of a evolutionary experiment that runs alongside human history and undergoes. Same lifestyle changes that we do

Anders Bergstrom Francis Crick Institute Europe Americas Arctic Asia London Petco
The Denisovans Expand Their Range Into China

60-Second Science

02:01 min | 10 months ago

The Denisovans Expand Their Range Into China

"Like modern humans than neanderthals roamed widely throughout europe. We know this because they left behind. Extensive evidence usually bones or tools but their cousins. The denisovans our more mysterious until recently they were conclusively linked only to a single cave in southern siberia called denisova cave which lies between kazakhstan and mongolia in that cave. Scientists had found a finger bone three teeth and piece of skull which tip them off to the existence of a whole new lineage of ancient human now scientists have uncovered more of the range for the denisovans says de endo mossy lonnie of the max planck institute in germany. His team turned up evidence. The ancient humans occupied a high mountain cave on the tibetan plateau. Called by shia cave belongs to monks and -mongst things that it's a very holy place in fact among found a piece of jawbone there in nineteen eighty which has been tenuously linked to the denisovans salani and his team have now unearthed more conclusive evidence by sifting through cave sediments and sequencing the genetic evidence. The denisovans left behind. Buddy decay of people chests. Gabbing down the side like bleeding. There are coping ping could left their dna. The dna appears in layers suggesting the denisovans inhabited the cave as far back as one hundred thousand years ago as well as at sixty thousand years ago and perhaps even as recently as forty five thousand years ago meaning. The denisovans might overlapped in this region with modern humans. The results appear in the journal. Science mossy lonnie says. This method could enable more denise in detective work to this like so many caves when we have evidence of human activity but we don't have opening remain so if he can exploit to sediment can actually start to track down in segment. The denisova dini denise evans live on today in the genomes of some modern day humans from the south pacific further. Genetic work like this might give scientists more clues where early homo sapiens. I met and mixed with the elusive denisovans.

Max Planck Institute Siberia Kazakhstan Mongolia Tibetan Plateau Europe Germany Lonnie Denise Evans Denise South Pacific
A Holiday Survival Guide for Difficult Conversations

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:00 min | 11 months ago

A Holiday Survival Guide for Difficult Conversations

"Nice to see you again good to see you. Thanks for coming in. Have you try and get you on the show along. Yeah i'm pleased. I'm really pleased that you were able to get to new york city for this as you know fascinated by your work and we're going to dive into it. Can i start with your meditation career. And i'd love to hear how. I i also i think you also do Gone which i don't know much about. Yeah so i'd love to learn about both of those things. Well i started to gung meditation practice twenty years ago and two thousand two thousand the year. Two thousand so. I'm a practitioner. I'm not an expert. I'm not a teacher. Never written about it. But i had a good friend who was into it then had a master who taught locally in the twin cities and just decided to try it in mostly because i was interested in reducing stress in my life and i i loved it and i started out twenty minutes a day. I started out with the video of the master doing the moves. And so i just sort of watch and follow him. Then a weaned and my way off. The video started with twenty minutes and now i do forty minutes every morning. So i'm i don't really know what it is. Well it's Chinese spiritual and healing practice. So it's five thousand years old and it combines a breathing and gentle movements and there's a the theory behind it that i'm you know i'm not sure i'm into the theory so much but energy in the body as she that's right as a source of healing so the master studied with as a healer and i'm not into that as much as i meant to just deep relaxation breathing and gentle movements and it just calms me and centers. Me and i tend to have sometimes creative ideas during. Are you telling me that. The life of marriage counselor stressful well. I'm an academic. And i do a lot of community engagement work and i live a fairly intense life and that includes my clinical specialty couples on the brink of divorce. You know so. I'm like an intensive care physician. So all of that can add up to a fairly intense life and this meditation practice just grounds me and i felt at every day grateful to be alive. Well how does it ripple out to the rest of your life. Well a lot of the work. I do both with couples and also my work with As we'll get into my work with better angels where we deal with conservatives and liberals who are at odds with each other did you notice that A lot of it is for me is about. How do i manage myself in the face of conflicting people and conflicting agendas where the stakes are high. And so the meditation practice adds into my therapist training to do what we call them. The jargon phrase emotional self regulation and centeredness in the face of difficult interpersonal situations. I've watched you at work. I went to the national was the first better angels. National conference watched you do your thing and you're aecom dude at least on the outside. yeah well when. I'm in my work in my modem. Actually come inside to. Because i'm doing. This is what we're here to do folks so let's do and let me help you engage each other. Let's talk about the better angels. Just give me some background on how the group got started. Remember the two thousand sixteen presidential election vaguely. Yeah a lot of people. Remember that one about ten days after that election to long term colleagues of mine who had worked on marriage and family issues one in new yorker david blakenhorn upper east side of manhattan. The other david lapped southwest. Ohio south lebanon ohio universes apart in terms of how people there felt about the election. They were on the phone together. Howard new yorkers doing only ensuite new york upper east side manhattan gloom and doom of funeral and in ohio hope and change and they decided on the spur of the moment to get together. Ten hillary clinton voters and ten tunnel drunk voters for a weekend in southwest ohio in december. To see if any of the gaps could be bridged and then they called me. And i said oh. That's pretty brave. What we thinking of doing with them and they said they didn't know they thought i could figure that part out if they recruited the people and i remember sitting at my home desk hoping i was not free that weekend. You know kind of looking at my calendar. Oh darn you know having engagement. But in fact i was so i said let's go for it so we had people Twenty folks from that part of the country from south west ohio for friday night all day saturday and sunday afternoon thirteen hours and it was a remarkable experience.

New York City David Blakenhorn Angels Ohio Lebanon Manhattan Southwest Howard Hillary Clinton David New York West Ohio
Machines as kin or the new colonisers? Indigenous tech revolutionaries rethinking A.I

Science Friction

07:30 min | 11 months ago

Machines as kin or the new colonisers? Indigenous tech revolutionaries rethinking A.I

"Consider the machines. We make the robots we build the artificial intelligences the way programming. They're all designed to serve us rush. We have dominion over them. Not over us will follow a woman and technologists. Angie la believes this way of thinking about machines. It's like a computer bug in the program of western civilization and it's been programmed into all manner of things when we think about the different types of some call aji or agriculture or and then when we think about humans we can also refer slavery this the million over protocol comes from this understanding that men not women or not animal but man sits on top of all things in has priority over all manner of things within our world be and so what happens then is that we've got serious problems that are evolving within west and technologies. Mike technologies much critical technologies and cyber. Come out of the wool machine and so when we think about the origins of most of western technology. It's really problematic. The bias that we're finding in these systems. It's not a bug feature right. it's a feature white supremacy right. it's a feature of a worldview that understands the world and the people in in a particular way and so it. It shouldn't be a surprise to anybody that we're running into these problems and also why we keep running into them and we're gonna keep running into them. As long as we keep designing out of the same mindset which is a nicer mindset jason lewis as director of the initiative for indigenous futures and koterec's. What's called the aboriginal territories in cyberspace research network. He's professor in design and computation arts at concordia university in montreal. He's hawaiian and samoan but grew up in california. After he was adopted at six months. Old angie abdulah is found 'em boss woman of an indigenous consultancy called old ways new and on science fiction. I join you may natasha mitchell. For nine quakes. Celebration of aboriginal and torres strait islander. Culture always was always will be is the thing this year recognizing that first nations people have occupied and cared for these straddling continent for over sixty five thousand years. But jason angie want to extend that thinking to digital continents. Dj land as well and ask. How could the future of artificial intelligence look different. If more indigenous people are in the driver's seat what happens. If we actually consciously tried to take indigenous worldviews and use that as a starting point for building the systems thinking hard about how the technology we use as they're being constructed you know come out of a very particular sort of philosophical lineage. You know that sort of like kind of post enlightenment. Scientific revolution sort of like this emphasis on parasitism post cartesian of like you know the world is dividing these two to the physical world and then the spiritual world and they don't actually really needs you know all these things actually kind of inspect our assumptions about what technology is and what it could be. So what happens when you sort of take a different worldview rice or what happens if you take saying. Indigenous worldview a hawaiian worldview mohawk view. That doesn't have that clinton's duality right. That thinks about things in terms of their relationship to each other including if not in some ways privileging the non human right because that's also part of that intellectual lineage. Ride is the no man literally man not human. Man is the heightened center accretion that everything is sort of judged a comparison to him and also. He's only person really. Were talking to. But that's not the indigenous. Fosse's that i know of you know where there's the sense of relation even not only my in relationships are all other humans around the and i need to sort of be responsible to that and be reciprocal with that. But i'm also relationship with the non humans and i've been relationship with from the from the western context. We call things. So how does that change your approach to designing technology to extend this idea. You and colleagues explored the idea of making keen with machines. This idea that we have kinship relationships with non human entities like machines like artificial intelligences like robots. I mean tell us more about that because it it's one thing to incorporate a bird or a river or a tree or like haitian into your idea of kinship. Wouldn't miss shane bay. In a different category altogether. The machines are part of the natural world right so one of inheritances from this western monotheistic way of looking at things. Is this idea that there is something that is artificial in the world right. But they're made out of minerals in things drawn from the earth. It's just that we've crafted them in a particular way but they didn't come from some other real. They're not not part of the natural environment. And so i think that for me. That inside is one of the key insights. Okay we're creating this category which is really about separating ourselves from the things that we make out of this desire to use them and use them as we will and not have to worry or think about them and harrison to be provocative. Save them if we're talking about strong artificial intelligences that idea that artificial intelligence might one die possess will be designed to have consciousness. Then right we will necessarily be enslaving them. So yeah. what do you do when you've created a conscious being and if your mindset all along has been this is a tool. This is a tool the tool. I made it. I get to control it. Then you're going to run into some real problems right and we we already know. Western science has been used over and over again to justify labeling other people as non human. That's part of how the colonization of the americas and the pacific happened right. that's part of the justification is that they're not really human so we don't really have to worry about them. It's part of how then slave limit of say. Black people in the new world was justified. Because they're not really human so we can treat them however we like so we've already laid down a template. Many templates of you know making these judgments about what is worthy of our relationship is worthy of being in some kind of conversation with and there's a danger that will replay that template again with these machines.

Growing Biologics

The Bio Report

05:46 min | 1 year ago

Growing Biologics

"JAMF thanks for joining us. Thank you very much Dan. We're going to talk about Zia biosciences its efforts to US plants to produce biologics and nutraceutical, and the absence taken to turn this into a predictable and reliable manufacturers process. Maybe you can begin with making the case for using plants to produce biologics. Sure. Well plants around for over five thousand years medicinal purposes over in Asia and in India plants actually have been part of our human population since the beginning of time and they actually have been proven many many times over and there's numerous a much research about it. To deliver the address, the issues of disease And have the ability to Help. Our population in a much better way than our synthetic counterparts parts do. You grow these plants in a clean room. I imagine people you know envision fields upon fields of of plants but why use a clip rim? Right right. Well, it goes back to I. Think what we want to start with is The it's not just that we grown cleanroom it's a technology platform and the cleanroom is only one part of that. Specific purpose is to answer your question about the cleanroom is when you grow plant in a pathogenic. Free Environment. You have the ability to turn those into plant based medicinal drugs whereas plants they're grown say in a greenhouse or in a warehouse or in the open land run the risk of pathogen clearly Pathogens with them that probably would not be able to be filtered out and it runs a risk to the general public. That's why we grow inside a game. You mentioned the technology platform, you build a platform. Rather. Data intensive. What's the range of data collected and how to use this produce plants that produce biologics? Well. So let's back up and talk about the platform. There's two parts of the platform and I'll answer that question in in in the second part. The first part is the physical part. The plants are grown inside and ice. Oh, seven cleanroom. The second part is the data science side where we. Hook Up. Over thirty parameters thirty centers. Inside that room that collect everything. Some of them are normal that you would think of, which would be Ph temperature humidity but some you may not under a would never think about the. The amount of parts per million a of Co two across the plant the airflow crossed the plan the. Megahertz, of electricity going through the hydroponic water, and so we take all that data collected on average every. Fifteen seconds to one minute. So we have millions and millions upon data points stork with. What are those data points allow you to do? We actually can generate a formula because our. Our. Whole reason for being at Zia. is to optimize claimed growth. So we are creating a formula. That are customer comes to us and says, I would like you to grow this plant and I would like you to optimize or express this certain enzyme protein some sort of substance in the plant itself. Such that on, it actually is expressed in a way that can be used in some sort of downstream pharmaceutical drug. Now. That being said That being said, what we would do then is we have to figure out so to speak a recipe and all that data allows us to optimize the plan to optimize that certain protein or substance in the plant. Such that it would be then. It would allow us to go downstream and give the best value for our customer. And how consistent is the output? Well, that's That's what amazing about our platform is. So in any type of Pharmaceutical product you are focused on. Two major things as an ingredient supplier to the pharmaceutical companies. Minimal variation that is he must have very little variation batch to batch and you must have maximum produce ability that is that I'm delivering ninety, six percent of what I say every time I'm producing a batch of the equipment.

Zia Biosciences United States Asia DAN India Zia.
Paper, Rocks or Digits: What Makes the Best Money?

Money For the Rest of Us

05:38 min | 1 year ago

Paper, Rocks or Digits: What Makes the Best Money?

"What makes the best money? I've been reading a number of books recently on money. Money the unauthorized biography by Felix Martin and money the true story of a made up thing by Jacob Goldstein. Both of these books have examples of different types of money that's been used in the past. Fascinating examples that you might not be aware of. and. We WanNa look at them and think about what is it? That makes something money. Money evolves and has evolved and will continue to evolve in what we used as money today might be very different decades from now. The first example is from the island of Yap. This is an island in the Western Pacific part of the Caroline Islands. It is now part of the Federated States of Micronesia. The people of the APP lift on the run over separated from other cultures for many many years. We'll in one, thousand, nine, three, an anthropologist who had also been trained as a medical doctor from new. England William Henry Furness went to Yep for two months and studied this people. And it wasn't a very advanced economy with. Three products, fish coconut and sea cucumbers, but they had something unique that they used for money. Furnace describes his money as large solid thick stone wheels ranging in diameter from a foot to twelve feet. Having the center a whole varying in size with the diameter of the stone wearing a poll may be inserted sufficiently large and strong to bear the weight and facilitate transportation. This was their money. It was called FAE. FBI are also it's called why are? The money was quarried in an island three hundred miles away babble up. And then it was transported on rafts towed behind canoes that had sales on them. Took a lot of effort to get this money. When furnace I saw it. He realized this really heavy and wrote when it takes four strong men to steal the price of a pig burglary cannot but prove a somewhat disheartening. These things were so big and heavy, you couldn't steal them. But then he observed as transactions took place that these stones were He wrote the noteworthy feature of this stone currency is that it is not necessary for its owner to reduce it to possession after concluding a bargain which evolves the price of a fe too large to be conveniently moved. Its new owner is quite content to accept the bare acknowledgement of ownership without so much as a mark to indicate the exchange, the coin remains undisturbed on the former owner's premises. In fact, there was one family furnace pointed out where the stone was lost from where it was quarried and had been several hundred feet at the bottom of the ocean for several generations. Yet the family that owned it everyone recognized that they still on that and that they were wealthy. Furnace wrote the purchasing power of that stone remains therefore as valid as if it were. Visibly, against the side of the owner's house and represents wealth as potentially as the horrid inactive gold of a miser in the middle, ages or as our silver dollar stacked in the Treasury in Washington which we never see or touch but trade with on the strength of a print certificate that there there. Is. The belief that it had value. Felix Martin wrote money was not the fe but the underlying system of credit accounts and clearing a which they help to keep track. The Fe would just tokens which these accounts were kept. They had an accounting system that tracked the trading of fish and sea cucumbers. And they would have outstanding balances and sometimes they will set up and maybe they would move the fe but often times they wouldn't. But there was the record that was there. Peter Bernstein in his book the power of Gold History of an obsession wrote the FE of Yep we're stores of. Wealth. Stores of wealth. Sit. Money moves it travels from one pocket to another. A store of wealth is mass. It was the transactions, the accounting record, and the trust between the participants that form their monetary system. The stones were a store of wealth, but we're just some tokens. The first documented use of money is from Sumer around thirty five, hundred BC. This is in southern, Mesopotamia. There were vast temple palace complexes there with thousands of crafts people farmers. Shepherds, bureaucrats. and. They wrote on clay tablets in cuneiform script and they wrote contracts evolving the workings of the temple debts owed rents. Effectively. It was money because it was an accounting record and you would have accounts receivable that you could trade. David Graber who recently passed away in his book debt. The first five thousand years wrote the value of a unit of currency is not the measure of the value of an object, but the measure of trust in other human beings.

Furnace Felix Martin Federated States Of Micronesia Caroline Islands Jacob Goldstein William Henry Furness FBI YAP Burglary David Graber Treasury England Peter Bernstein Washington
The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 1 year ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia

60-Second Science

02:19 min | 1 year ago

End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia

"Thousand years ago the Sahara had extensive grasslands and was dotted with lakes and trees but some five thousand years ago that Green Sahara dried up to become the enormous desert. We know today and scientists. Now think that this climate shift had effects far away including causing a mega drought in South East, Asia Kathleen are Johnson a Paleo climatologist and geochemists at the University of California Irvine says the key to that discovery were Stalagmites collected in cave in northern Laos. So like my I really amazing archives of past climate variability people are often more familiar with things like tree rings, ice cores, or maybe ocean sediment cores while select nights work in a similar way in that, they are deposited over time Johnson's team analyzed trace elements and carbon and oxygen isotopes in the hardened caved drippings that information enables researchers to determine rainfall patterns over the Millennia and. Johnson and her colleagues discovered signs of a thousand year long drought in Laos which began around the same time. The Sahara dried up about five thousand years ago as for why the two events might be connected the researchers simulated the drying out of the Sahara using climate models and included a couple things we know happened including the subsequent disappearance of vegetation and a connected increase in airborne dust, and they found that those variables. Would have been capable of cooling down the Indian Ocean and so the Cooler Ocean temperatures basically led to less moisture being being brought by monsoon circulation during the summertime when that region gets most of its rainfall, the details are in the journal Nature Communications One of Johnson's co-authors is joyce white a consulting scholar at the Penn Museum. She studies the Human History of Southeast Asia and her reaction when she first heard about the drought. On my God that's the missing millennia the missing millennia because she says, archaeological data are scant in that part. Of Southeast. Asia from four to six thousand years ago white says it's a critical period in which hunter-gatherers gave way to farmers, and there are a lot of debates about how the two periods related to each other. But we lacked the evidence in the area. I'm most interested in which is the maycom valley. White says this study doesn't answer that question directly, but the mega drought is a tantalizing clue for archaeologists has they continue to investigate those missing millennia.

Green Sahara Johnson Joyce White Laos Southeast Asia Indian Ocean Asia Kathleen Asia Maycom Valley Penn Museum University Of California South East
Designing Your Work Life

Good Life Project

05:29 min | 1 year ago

Designing Your Work Life

"Let's give a little bit of context just to who you are and how you came to work together because you come from sort like different walks of life and somehow ended up originally teaching this course together and trying to figure out. Okay. What is this thing called design thinking and why is it being used in this one domain but we're not really applying this process this way of thinking to actually creating a better life. So how does the marriage I happen here? Under the origin and through to you in spring of two thousand. So. Going all the way back to when I was a Stanford Sophomore here seventy five thousand years ago when they retire on the plaza and struggling with the question, what do I do with my life? I found most of the grown-ups were supposed to be helpful not helpful at all and I found it really difficult to figure my own life and get into my career and apple in the early days and find myself on the first corporate culture. Committee was Steve In one, thousand, nine hundred because we're worried about what makes apple won't be apple anymore someday, and over the subsequent thirty years noticed everybody's got this question particularly workplace about I wanted to many for work on to work for you. Want, it to work for me. I want this to be generative used language with that's what they were looking for and with. So everybody's got this question fast forward many years. Later I'm having coffee with a guy named Randy over at Berkeley and he says Gosh have you should teach a class on this. So minor problems I'm not of the Faculty don't of a PhD don't have any contacts there I can solve everything but the lousy commute I said deal. So I taught a course experimentally one student said, are you teaching in the spring because my roommate wants to take I said sure I made a deal the universe of the kid show up I'll show up so fourteen semesters later. I'm teaching this class of Berkeley called finding your vocation and then how platinum David. Kelly get together an event. This thing called the D school decided to invent the school, which is where we are now and in order to focus on that David Kelly s this Guy Bill Burnett run the design program, and so in two thousand and seventy heard bill was coming here to run the design program said. Hey. Bill Gates. This kind of stuff he cares about students in Stanford's a lot less terrible from me. Let's have lunch and so we had lunch in two thousand and seven in the spring, which was the first of ten lunches over a year talking about this ambiguous idea of students find their way and about a minute and a half bill goes after great idea it's a huge problem. We should totally fix it design. Thinking is the way to solve this thing. So take all that stuff you're doing and flip it ended design give me a proposal will teach it. It will prototype at the summer we'll teach at this fall. Let's go I gotTA gotta run so it was a two minute meeting and I guess an appointment we gotta go. So what are the few times the bill talk faster than I do and so then we start that spring thinking of ideas and that fall teaching design students, which eventually teaching author students. But in particular design thing really did work why West go? Why did design work? Design is inherently human centered. The way we teach it and both of you and I have been working with students for longtime I started I finished my masters in eighty two I started teaching part time eighty, three I'm doing this for like thirty. Six years or something. And in office our after office hours after office. Our really smart capable students going I don't know what to do. I. Don't know how to launch. is working to suck as much as everybody tells me. How. Will I find something that I want or I like or might even be meaningful people keep asking me stupid questions like what's my passion and I don't know. So wrong broken. With me professor and it's nothing wrong with you. And then Dave, this experience over Berkeley and you know basically the class happened because he wanted a shorter commute and I wanted to. Free up my office our time but no, it's a real. It's a really big problem I. Mean you look around look at the data around the world sixty United States sixty, eight percent of the people say I'm just engaged from are highly disengaged from my job. I hate my job eighty-five percent worldwide people hate their jobs, right? So the students you know we started with students and then pretty soon after we pick kind of gone all over the university and by the way now we and we give the class to any university that wants it. We're not being taught at one hundred, fifteen, some universities and courtesy of that wonderful woman over there Gabrielle. Runs our studios. Everybody's got the same question like life be meaningful. Will this be interesting? What's work? How does work it into this big thing called life? And it's essentially a human problem because we're trying to. But designers do is make things that have happened in the world. You know, hey, this is an iphone never happened before how do you do it while you build lots and lots of prototypes and figure it out because you can't get any about the future. So when you want to do something in the future that's brand new. You need a process design thinking process it works over and over again if you apply to your life, well, what are you trying to do something new in the world your. Future. Right you've never you've never been there before you don't know what it's going to be like you probably are a little anxious or you're at a point of change we started working with thirty and forty something. I. Have This career thing but it's not exactly what I didn't really work out the way I thought or it's okay to go faster. So everybody's got this problem. How do I invent the future? Well, design thinking and design is a wave in Benton your future. I tell the students you I wanted to choice. Whether Students Twenty launching a thirty in board or fifty, and thinking about their own career you got only two choices the futures coming. You don't get to choose that. You, get the default future stuff happens in you react to it. or You design it, you put your intention in the world and you try to make the world do things that you're interested in and

Berkeley David Kelly Apple Bill Gates Bill Burnett Stanford Bill United States Randy Benton Steve Professor Gabrielle Dave
Horses Recognize Pics of Their Keepers

60-Second Science

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Horses Recognize Pics of Their Keepers

"Recognize our friends faces. And we're not alone. Many social animals can identify individuals of their own species by their facial features. That's important because they need to be able to adjust their behaviour. Depending on who they encounter and research has shown that some species of monkeys birds and domesticated animals can even distinguish among different faces by looking at photographs alone. Scientists have also wondered whether domesticated animals that have coexisted with people for thousands of years can recognize different human faces for example. We've shared more than five thousand years of our history with horses. Plus they can live up to thirty years and may need to retain a great deal of information about this throughout their lifetimes. Foll just lay. Alon said of the French National Research Institute for Agriculture Food and Environment didn't experiment to find out how well horses can recognize individual people in photographs. She and her team. I taught the horses how to choose between two side by side images by touching their noses to a computer screen. The horses were then shown photos of their current keeper alongside faces of Unfamiliar Humans. They had never seen photos of any of the people before the horses correctly identified their current keeper and ignored the Stranger's face about seventy five percent of the time significantly. Better than chance. What's more the horses? Also preferentially picked photos of their previous keeper a person they hadn't seen in six months in fact even though the horses didn't get it right every single time at least as accurate and picking out the previous keeper as they were at their current one. The findings are in the Journal. Scientific reports the results suggest that not only can horses differentiate between familiar and unfamiliar human faces. They intuitively understand. That photographs are two dimensional. Representations of real life without any other cues such as odor sound. And they're even better at this than our oldest animal companion the domestic dog. In addition horses seem to have a robust locked her memory for human faces consistent with their long lifespan and history of domestication in experiments the researchers would like to test whether looking at photos of people that they have had bad experiences with in the past. Mike Class Horses to act anxious. Or even avoidance so maybe think twice before doing anything in a stable that might give a horse along

Alon French National Research Insti Mike Class Foll
Bored?  Games!

Your Brain on Facts

09:20 min | 1 year ago

Bored? Games!

"A lot of playing board games these days and that's pretty fitting human making board games for a long time like a long longtime seven thousand years or more for a bit of historical context. We stopped hunter-gathering and settled down to be farmers about ten thousand years ago rather than try to cram seven thousand years in six occupied continents worth of history into a half hour podcast. I'll hit some of the high points. Especially the less well-known once the earliest gaming pieces ever found are forty nine. Small carved painted stones found a five thousand year old burial mound in southeast Turkey. Similar pieces have been found in Syria and Iraq and seemed to point devoid games originating in the Fertile Crescent. You remember the Fertile Crescent from the first week of world history class. It's the same region discovered alcohol invented papyrus and made calendars all of which you need. If you're hosting game night other early dice games were created by painting a single side of a flat. Stick these sticks would be tossed at once and that would be your role Mesopotamia. Dice were made from a variety of materials including carved knuckle bones would painted stones and turtle shells. No wonder folks used to say roll them bones dice from the Roman era. Looks like the six sided die. We use today though. Some of them had their corners. Cut off to be able to reach a higher number not unlike dungeons and dragons dice. Imagine excavating a distant Roman out host and finding a D twenty serious cricket board games became popular among the Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. And that shouldn't surprise. That board games were a bigger part of life for upper class people since they have both money for entertainment and time to play. Even before the first dynasty Egypt loved a game called Senate. It's even seen on. The walls of tombs and copies of the game are buried with noble people. Ancient Egyptians were strong believers in the concept of fate. And that your luck in the game of Senate meant that you were under the protection of the major gods of the Pantheon raw toe to toe Cyrus. The significance of the game is clear. The game play not as clear. Historians have made educated guesses as to the rules more on that later and Board Game. Companies have used those guesses as a jumping off place to make modern versions. Four Games also became tied into religious beliefs. One such game was Mahan played around three thousand. B C e Mahan was a protective God depicted as a snake with coils around the Sun God raw during his journey through the night the game and the God became intertwined. Tim Kendall and ancient Egyptian historian believes that it's not possible to know for sure with the information we have available whether the game was inspired by an existing deity or the Deity was inspired by the game. Many people think backgammon is the longest plate of all the board games with evidence that it existed around two thousand B C but there is an extant game. That is a little bit older. Relatively speaking the royal game of for the game gets its name from being found in the royal tombs of in Iraq. There was also a set found in Pharaoh. Tutankhamun tune the game. Play is simple but very familiar. You're trying to get all of your pieces around the board first thumping off your opponent's pieces along the way again. Proving there's nothing new under the Sun. The royal game of herb was played with four sided or tetrahedral dice. A D Four for the tabletop games out there. Even though the game's over four thousand years old amazingly we found a copy of the rules Irving Finkel the British museum deciphered cuneiform tablet and discovered. It was the rules for the Royal Game of Earth. He then saw a photograph of a nearly identical board game being played in modern India. That makes the Royal Game of Earth. The longest played game in history and there is a great video of Irving Finkel. Who has ever so pleasantly mad teaching youtuber or Tom Scott how to play Lincoln the show notes and a little clip right here. Because I just couldn't help myself. All sorts of evidence has come to live so that we know how this game was played and we can play it now with a great deal of excitement. Sometimes it brings out violence. Come Times it brings out savagery. I have to say that this so we've decided to bring in a member of the public. I can't remember the name on Tom. Scott I make videos about science technology in the world. Who's never paid this game before? I have never played this game before. I'm Gandhi swift overview of the walls. Hope he masses and I'm getting to play of course play gently at first because I don't say hi to hang I'm to wipe the floor with it wouldn't do it for me even discovered these rules and I'll throw in his mind. Game listing whitlow. Marta is similar to that question of modern. There were some minor differences s today. Each player has fifteen checkers and uses six sided dice to be the first to bear off. All of one's checkers. I confess that I am reading that. From a website verbatim. I know less about that. Yemen do cricket. Backgammon had a renewed surge of popularity in the nineteen sixties which is held longtime for a comeback. Thanks in part to the charisma of Prince Alexis. Obolensky the father of modern backgammon cigarette liquor and car. Companies began to sponsor tournaments and Hugh Hefner held backgammon parties at the Playboy Mansion. At the same time that the Romans were playing Latin backgammon. The Chinese were play. We she or you may have heard of it. Go Que- she may even predate the game of twelve markings and the royal game of Earth. According to legend which has a pesky habit of morphing into history quay g was created by the ancient Chinese. Emperor Yell to teach his son on Ju discipline. Concentration and balance the popularity of wage e grew throughout Eastern Asia especially in Japan. Which is where the name go comes from another ancient game which is still out there and a favourite of nearly every household in my family is the African game of Mangala in our modern parlance. Munkala refers to a specific game. But the name actually belongs to an entire genre of games a genre eight hundred traditional games strong. This family of Board Games is played around. The world is referred to as Sewing Games S. O. W. I N. G. Devotes the way that you pick up and drop the stones playing pieces like you were sowing seeds in the ground. The word Mukalla comes from the Arabic Nicola to move most one college games share a common structure where each player has gained pieces in divots on the board and moves them to capture their opponent's pieces leading them to also be called count and capture games. The boards can be wooden clay even just little holes in the dirt playing pieces of everything from seeds. Stones shells anything near at hand that fits in the holes. The earliest evidence of the game are fragments of pottery. Board found in Eritrea dated to the sixth century CE. Though if the games were played with seeds on wooden boards or pebbles in divots in the dirt the game could be even older. The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence after all that particular logical fallacy is called argument from ignorance at ignorant him. And it's not a good look now. We go to the land of ice and snow of the Midnight Sun. Where the hot springs flow Scandinavians played chess. Like game called. Nevin tough at least as early as four hundred see. I'm sure my clever listeners haven't forgotten that. Viking refers to the raids undertaken by a small portion of the population themselves called Viking US meaning kings table noth- Atoll was a war strategy game. The kings objective was to escape to the edge of the board while the opponents laurel objective was to capture him. The attacking force had the natural advantage at the start of each game. Perhaps mimicking a cultural mindset of a small group being victorious against a larger force like say a few boats full of Viking attacks against the army of an English King Scandinavians spread the game to Ireland Britain and Wales through. Let's call it. Unexpected cultural exchange archaeologists have also discovered that it was popular as far to the east as Ukraine.

Backgammon Tom Scott Iraq Mahan Senate Fertile Crescent Irving Finkel Turkey Pharaohs Of Ancient Egypt Syria Tim Kendall Egypt Prince Alexis India Hugh Hefner Eastern Asia Midnight Sun United States Eritrea
Ancient Artifacts on the Beaches of Northern Europe

Science Magazine Podcast

07:47 min | 1 year ago

Ancient Artifacts on the Beaches of Northern Europe

"Now speak with Andrew Curry a freelance journalist based in Berlin. His new article in science explores hidden treasures that have surfaced on the coast of the Netherlands. They include such things as neanderthal tools. A willy mammoth tooth and human remains from thousands of years ago. These remarkable fines lending significant insight into the ecological and anthropological history of the region. Hi Andrew All right. The story highlights a variety of people from a nurse to university professors who were studying the samples from vastly different perspectives. Generally speaking who were the scientists involved in the research so it's kind of an incredible array of different disciplines that are being brought to bear on the same questioner region there geneticists archaeologists geographers people who specialize in underwater mapping. And then. There's also one of the things that really interested me in a story. There's a big contribution being made by amateurs interested in the fines and spend time just looking for the stuff on each where it washes up right so these things are just washing up on shore. What are some of the most compelling fines that have been dredged up so some of the most compelling fines are stone and bone tools and human remains that date back seven thousand or more years ago some of which goes all the way back to fifty thousand years when the the area was populated by neanderthals? They're also finding animal remains. They found Bama's skulls all kinds of things that date back to a time when the shore off the Netherlands and the UK in the North Sea was actually above water. So how are these finds turning up on the beach in the first place? It used to be that these finds would turn up in fishing nets and sort of at random but in the last few years as the Netherlands has really focused on coastal reclamation and protecting their coast against sea level rise. They've been dredging sand and gravel offshore and bringing it and dumping it on the beach and in those massive hundreds of thousands of tons of sand and gravel that they've brought in from offshore there are bones stone tools human remains that slowly then get uncovered by the waves and they're amateurs who go out to the beach every day almost and just look for the stuff as it as it comes out of the sand. Pick it up. Send pictures of it to archaeologists then identify it and they work together to analysts. Awesome and like you said. These fines are eating found by all these different types of people. Could you outline some of the techniques being used to analyze the fines? There's actually geneticists who are scraping DNA straight off the sea floor and showing what kind of plants and animals live there when it was terrestrial land. The fines are one aspect of the whole effort. Devoted to trying to figure out what the landscape under the North Sea looked like before the last ice age ended and flooded the area so at one point there was an area three or four times bigger than Modern Day Holland. That was all above ground. There were forests there were rivers and it was probably heavily populated. Sounds pretty beautiful actually. Yeah what kind of DNA is being analyzed. So geneticists are using ancient DNA techniques to look at both the soil to get DNA from there and also analyzing human remains. The collectors have found on the beach. That are actually really well preserved because of the cold and wet at the bottom of the sea to get whole human genomes and you can then look at the ancient. Dna from these populations that lived in an area that is now underwater very cool. There's a specific item that surface that holds huge significance. And that's the landscape of the area being studied. What are some of the most important lessons learned about the landscape of this submerged region? I mean part of it is just that it's cool to go is one of the researchers. I talked to said. They're getting maps of a country that you can't visit so there's this massive landscape that was once above water and they're testing out all these different ways to look at it could also be applied to other coastal regions. That were once habitable. That were once passages to new lands like the landscape between Alaska and Asia for example Barron. Jia they call it yeah and look at how you know how these areas worked for human migration how humankind spread around the world. There are these key gaps in our knowledge because the sea levels today are thirty meters higher than they were twenty five thousand years ago right and you mentioned these maps that they're able to make out of information being collected and one of the sources of that information are these energy companies. Could you explain how these energy companies are contributing to the data collection? And what that data help discover sure. It's been a really interesting and sort of inspirational collaboration. Between scientists and industry in the North Sea is a is a tremendously important commercial area for shipping. And then there's a lot of wind farms oil. Well gas well drilling and so companies went out and did these seismic surveys to see what was deep under the ground. And for the archaeologists it was a very top level. That wasn't maybe commercially. Valuable but tremendously valuable. In terms of the knowledge it contains about the landscapes so they worked with the companies to get that data. And then we're able to start. These maps based on seismic survey data. There's also been some interesting collaboration. Between companies that dredged gravel for construction use and then led archaeologists have access to the stones and dirt that are dragged up from the bottom of the sea which was once land these maps and some of this information really revealing what humans were like thousands of years ago what civilization was like before this landscape changed. So what did this region? What does this research teach us about human history? The very end of this landscape was populated by modern humans. Just like you and me who were hunter gatherers. At first they were in a landscape that was probably a lot like the most fertile parts of England were Hollander Belgium today and then slowly over a couple of hundred years. Some of the research has revealed that as the water levels rose it transformed into more of estuary wetland area but people kept living there and they managed to adapt and change their lifestyle to the rising seas which I guess goes to show you. The climate change is an old story of course that that begs the question right. This begs the question of sea level. Rise impacted these civilizations and we can see it. Is that going to tell us? About our present. On the one hand they managed to deal with a certain level of sea level rise and then there came a point about seven thousand years ago when there were a series of nominees and the landscape completely disappeared. It was rendered uninhabitable su-nam as that's That's pretty familiar. Actually yeah I mean for a while. Archaeologists were reluctant to get into this one expert. Told me because they didn't want to be seen as digging after chasing after lost continents or Atlantis or something like that. But as the techniques have gotten more and more advanced it turns out that they can do some really scientific

North Sea The Netherlands Andrew Curry Andrew All Berlin Alaska Modern Day Holland Bama Hollander Belgium Asia UK Barron England
"five thousand years" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on World News Analysis

"The five thousand year chinese civilization on saturday the united nations educational scientific and cultural organization won't have much his committee is quite the ruins on the world habits list as a cultural sites inclusion has thrown the total number number of world heritage sites in china to fifty five the highest in a world with more on this joining me now in the studio is are sending a commentator showing showing thanks for joining us america how significant is this in boban died down you said he is inscribed on the world heritage site will very significant now with the we've seen strong solid evidence of nature civilization existing five thousand years ago in the near lipstick period or the late neolithic period well what do you think that if i tell you there was a society that was a city they will open at a tiny there was a state governance or ministration and there was a city with pockets it's four different functions residential production manufacturing or red brick you're religious activities waters a rivers flow into the city's is a cutting to the city of different areas but they've been bumped choose an outside of the city there are massive say irrigation projects assisting the rice cultivation a farm fields and also for kako a as a full for those a profit produce an also imagine that there was a society society that show someone eighteen charge and then you'll see from the tombs i noticed a those items like a lack of where stone those jade and then some tombs belong to people of the rich richard families because they have they have they have more items will dedicate items and some belong to the lou across all the ability to have notes so there was a strictly a say the modem sense of a country not just a city at well a better organized than those we've already found previous years okay tell us more about this now to city villains and what can you tell us tell us i will we've been talking about for asian civilizations a child the chinese civilization being one of them and to jump providence is a one of the creators of each in chinese civilization along v a which is located along be a lower reaches of the galaxy river which a this is an area of abundance with rice and fish and then also the capital of silk industry and it was it it has is famous for several other world heritage items including the canal which connects beijing to how joe a an ancient china those a rice and food a cargo but things and manufacturers since things was shipped to from what i from down south to north a web at the royal family or the emperor's liv and they were also the the the good the lake the westlake which was a i lost my made area based on an existing water of is that at first place and they're also many asian towns where rich people leave at the end of the local a local circuit so what were we talking about civilization we'll talk we'll the asian people leave say just wave the richest pickle ready to eat things for example say a a hunters fishermen but in order to cultivate rice unique techniques so civilization is already on the upper as a liberal as compared to where those hunters on fisher fisher when i was living in china is one of the few countries with a.

united nations five thousand years five thousand year
"five thousand years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Opportunity that has been generated by story that I read from the Weather Channel whether dot com a couple of weeks ago. Intrigued by. And so far, and I I mean it's easy to use the word mystery. It's a mystery for now. But there, there is an unexplained shipwreck right now sitting in the bottom of the ocean. There are video images available from it. We'll talk more about that coming up in just a minute. But the the what is there what we can see of this does not tell us what it is or who put it there. Yikes. I've always been fascinated by underwater. You f os, right? The, the, the idea of something that is an unidentified submerged object. Not saying it's alien, but just things that we can't figure out that are on the bottom of the out who brought it who made it. How did it get there? And there's lots of those, there was a story on coast to coast, AM dot com. I think back less less, August about a particular type of ship that they had no had a dome on it. And it had these unusual sort of steel structure. Things are under girding it, that had come out there off to the side, and the thing that, that was the coolest was that they had determined that all of the coral, and all of the, the sealife that had gathered around this thing, which had yet to be determined. I don't know if it's ever been. Splaine since that, coral life at been determined to be five thousand years old. But they can't figure out what it was underneath it that started out or. No. I love stuff like that. So we'll we'll get to Dr Lee Spence coming up next hour on shipwrecks. So we'll talk about ship. The new shipwreck technology is fascinating that the ways that they're using satellite imagery, to find new shipwrecks and despite all of the technological advancements that we have, how limited our knowledge is on still what is lying the bottom of the ocean and how to get to it. We'll talk about that with the with an expert next hour on, on treasures, submerged treasures, and we'll, we'll get your calls coming up later on this hour, we have an opportunity a little time for open lines that, you know, if it's open lines, it means you can take anywhere you wanna go how ever there are a couple of stories on the website tonight that I would love to get your reflections on. If you've been to coast to coast, AM dot com playboy about that in just a second. But we'll tell you this much should we be worried about two thousand six Q V, eight nine. Should we be worried about two thousand six Q V, eight nine? What exactly is it? Other than it sounds like a cable channel that I probably never visited way up there. You know, right about where they put the this music channels, nobody listened to two thousand six Q V, eight nine could be coming our way, this fall, should we be worried about it, my votes? Yes, Alex plane. Why next on coast to coast AM? This is in punnet..

Weather Channel Dr Lee Spence punnet five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Five thousand years ago. It began in the bible, the first thing it says Navarro this. I remember it as the first thing. So tell me if it's not. In the beginning. There was a voice. What is avoid? Nothing. How can nothing create something you have to be a religious person to even believe what a singularity is. Is there any scientists who are listening to me right now? Can you tell me what does singularity is you cannot because you have to explain that in the beginning was void? They knew it then. And you still know it. There is a voice. And if the wasn't avoid an infinite void. Infinite you could not have. Hughniverse. You cannot create a universe, except you have a boy. Finit void. But if there's an infinite void where does that come from? Scientists please. Pick up the phone and call me. My name is ROY masses. I don't have the eight hundred seven no eight hundred eight six six eighty three put your faith and give me what you think is a liar. An ignoramus your the ignorant Mus..

ROY masses Navarro Five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Up only lost five thousand years, which is quite recent, that's the time of the first ancient Egyptians hardback them. And the effects of natural selection would have been much stronger. So what about today, does he think whist evolving when people start asking the question is human evolution still happening? They feel that we don't leave nature to its own devices anymore. You know, we're intervening. We're doing things we're introducing medicine and we're not letting nature just run its course all the time. And is this interfering with the process of evolution and natural selection, we can cure diseases now, we can vaccinate people, and that means that they're not gonna dine, so the good thing, but also means that genes that previously may have been removed from the gene pool happen anymore because we can, we can kind of intervene and so. Okay. Well we have medicine. So does that mean that now we're stopping? Well, it does mean that we're a slightly changing the course of pollution at least potentially, but actually this isn't really anything new that we have changed the course of our eve, Lucien, many times, these days, we're doing consciously and knowingly, but this is something that's always happened is a species. We've intervened in the course of our evolution. Many times Justin cuvee invention of file or agriculture, but the scale of that intervention today is much bigger than any time in the post is there a way we can detect if human evolution has been happening, much more recently in the past few generations. To find out. We're heading to the busy streets of London to meet, another geneticist. Hi steve. It's Ananta from the BBC..

Justin cuvee Lucien BBC London steve five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Some of the millions of hypothetical residents before actual impact. You know, they try to evacuate the residents in New York City every night around four thirty, and it doesn't go very well is that an actual plan to Thanou canasta is it's on its way in. Yeah. They're trying out different methods backup if sending up Bruce Willis on a under like an oil drilling rig doesn't work like it was displayed in the documentary Armageddon. If you can just tweak the things course twenty percentage of a degree far enough out. It'll miss the earth and take out the Martian, but we have a deal where more and their aggressions. We're pushing it so it hits Moscow and in Moscow Baraga pushes it back. So it hits the New York long. Pass the paddle. Yeah. That is actually one of the issues once you take affirmative action. It's on you. And you might all right. It's headed for Australia. No problem will will knock it a little further south than and ends up taking out India because you did the math Roth siphon. Yeah. But there you go. That's your news. I'm marshall. Phillips, Armstrong and Getty show, the conscience of the nation. Ahead. Scientists talk about that. It's it's fairly likely that a big old asteroid will wack into us in the next few thousand years, but while I do care about for instance, the United States in our culture and the rest of it for our children grandchildren are excessive spending Senator I maybe this makes me bad person. If an asteroid wife's people out in five thousand years, I don't care. And again, we do I am the first Royal baby pictures are out there at our website with our analysis. Exactly. For one of not impressed, read my blog. Armstrong and Getty dot com. Baby blog. Seventy seven percent of rural counties lack sufficient primary healthcare..

Armstrong Getty New York City Moscow Bruce Willis New York Thanou Australia United States Senator India Seventy seven percent five thousand years thousand years Phillips
"five thousand years" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Providing a five thousand year, divinely inspired culture that was almost destroyed. Under decades of communist suppression. Through the universal language of music and dance. Xinyu brings back this lost culture, my onstage, magical and enchanting storyteller. Fiction. Unforgettable experience you won't find anywhere else. Returning to Cobb energy performing arts center, maple do fourteen S H E N Y U N dot com. Hi, I'm Monica purchasing. A mattress is a very personal very important investment. It's not something that should be done hastily. And you want to speak with someone that can help you make an informed decision because let's face it a bad decision. Could haunt you nightly. That's why you have to go to the people that know mattress is best Woodstock furniture and mattress outlet. They've just opened their newest matches galleries in Kennesaw and Douglasville for a total of four mattress locations. They know a thing or two about mattresses when you shop Woodstock furniture and mattress outlet you get a personalized sleep evaluation. Designed to match you with the perfect mattress. And. Shop with confidence. Every mattress comes with a comfort guarantee. So take your sleep health, seriously and come see for yourself. Why north Georgia buys mattresses at Woodstock furniture and mattress outlet. Shop any of their seven furniture and mattress locations today. Visit Woodstock outlet dot com to find the location nearest you. The Scott Slade from Atlanta's morning news WSB are twenty four hour. News centers here all weekend with updates and we're here Monday morning for four thirty nine with.

Woodstock Xinyu Scott Slade Cobb Kennesaw Atlanta Douglasville Georgia five thousand year twenty four hour
"five thousand years" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on WSB-AM

"A five thousand year, divinely inspired culture that was almost destroyed. Under decades of communist suppression, through the universal language of music and dance. You brings back this lost culture onstage magical, scenery jumping storytelling an unforgettable experience. You won't find anywhere else. Returning to performing arts center. April fourteenth, S H, E, N, Y U, N dot com. I believe the kitchen is the new family room. It's where you live kitchen. Renovations are one of the highest return on investment home improvement projects. Plus you get to enjoy it every day. Hi, I'm Leslie Karp. And I'm Michael Karp were the owners of platinum kitchens and design we deliver a better renovation experience. With our exclusive platinum process that starts in your home. Our first visit will include a kitchen designer at no charge to evaluate your space and make great recommendations next. You're presented with a free customized design layout with clear and realistic pricing. All at no cost to you. We follow up with a complementary design consultation. This is where we help you. Choose the right colors materials and products to start your renovation at platinum kitchens. Our process includes our promise to help you create and realize your dream kitchen with high quality products that you and your family will love living in for years to come schedule your free in-home kitchen design consultation, right now at platinum kitchens dot com. New on news ninety five five and AM seven fifty s me. Hey, this is Chris burns from dynamic mud. Change is coming and taxes healthcare the markets. Make sure you're prepared good dynamic money dot com. Listen for Chris burns and dynamic money. Every Sunday morning at five on WSB. Brought to you by delta community credit. You'll love WSB. Triple team traffic.

Michael Karp Chris burns Leslie Karp five thousand year
"five thousand years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Five thousand years ago. It began in the bible. The first thing it says in the bible, this I remember it as the first thing. So tell me if it's not in the beginning. There was a void. What is avoid? Nothing. Well, how can nothing create something? You have to be a religious person to even believe what a singularity is. Is there any scientists who are listening to me right now? Can you tell me what does singularity is you cannot because you have to explain that in the beginning numbers. Avoid. They knew it. Then. You still know it. There is a void. And if there wasn't avoid an infinite void infants you could not have. Hughniverse. You cannot create a universe except you have avoid an infinite void. But if there's an infinite void where does that there'd be like come from? Scientists please. Pick up the phone and call me, my name is ROY masters. I don't have the eight hundred seventy seven eight hundred eight six six eighty eight eighty three put your face and give me what you think is Eliah. An ignoramus. You're the ignoramus. You won't you won't. And you never will..

ROY masters Eliah Five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

Jim Beaver's Project Action

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

"It was a tiny podcast only got like twenty five thousand years, I know doesn't sound like like to an average person. But like for company that's pretty small, and and that's over time. You know, we'll get that amount of us. And so I was working on the video team like a year and a half. And I was starting to look like, you know, what's next from here. Because of course, young age, you're kind of like always looking what's next, and I was able to kind of keep my idea and keep my on like different companies that were in the media space and in games, and it actually was a complete. Surprise to me when I hadn't even started the process of like applying to these places where someone message me on Facebook. It was actually Ty route ahead of the video team at idea at the time who like message me on Facebook. And it was like, hey, like I had this opportunity to work fried yet and love to discuss the process to get to see if you'd be good fit. And I was like wait the Scott to be alive. Yeah. Exactly. Like, I was for Facebook. Like at the time like social media was pretty new, and I it was hard to trust that that was a real thing. Someone like muster found out. I was like looking at IT thing was trying to pull pranks, but here's out. It was official and they made me go through the audition process, and there's a lot more detail and nuance things there that happened. But got my visa, and then the next thing, you know, I started working here and my first days like eat three and. What I said thrown to the wolves your first days eat three like. Wow. Like, yeah. Yeah. You put it perfectly. It's thrown in the Wall Street and throat, right? Into the fire pit hope you get out alive. Yeah. Yeah. So that's that's that's like the shortened quicken version. I can go to detail about every little aspect of that. But yeah, that's that's the gist of it. That's that's what got me here. And of course, you know, my knowledge gaming and being a really driven person having been given this opportunity and coming from a family that never left their hometown. So and still live there. So I was like the first one that kind of fly the coop and go on an adventure. You know? Go back home now. And you know, what I mean, it's like everybody in in your hometown knows exactly what you're doing. And it's like, oh I saw year. It's like, you're the the super celebrity back home. Yeah. You wouldn't believe some of the things. Okay. So my dad like might superfan talker. So he'll go around town and any store he walks in he'll know people and any like business he works for goes into and he'll like draw obviously dropped my name like show video and like get everyone involved into kind of what I do and tell everyone that I'm living out the big city, and California and San Francisco, and so yeah, like, I go back home, and they're like, hey, we want to take you to 'cause they put a WalMart recently. Not a good thing actually kill like are smaller town. But, but it was it was like the biggest thing when I first had gone back after my first year where they're like. Yeah. We're gonna take you. Walmart does few people. I've been talking to you to them about you. And they wanna meet you. And so I had to do the little tour like this the small town that we live in to to meet and speak with those people. 'cause he always tells me how he'll tell these stories he'll show photos. But like so many people are like, nah, that's not real he's making this up. So to pre he kind of has to prove and my mom to like hustle like, you know, prove that I'm real. And so whenever I'm in town, or like, let's let's make a pitstop at WalMart make stuff, but you know, gas station, then I'm I know the guy who cleans my windows. So. Yeah. Well, you know, it's something like that. Definitely. You know? He'll it's funny too. Is something you said, and it's so weird because you know, you talked about being driven and things like that. And this is just like a personal observation, but I know so like going back to a little bit..

WalMart Facebook Scott official California San Francisco twenty five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

"Very simply every region of the world had several multi. Type field of properties. NFL NBA meekly baseball US your pets at one Champions League EPL, and these are all probably tens of billions of the latest four at sort of NFL eighty two billion dollar market cap. And that's viable sports media property. Nothing at a time on basis, and yet more been, you know, here for five thousand years Asia's a whole five thousand dollars. And I also feel that the west was trained more in the authentic any entity the way it is in Asia. Okay. And then in the early days, did you feel I know that Asia, obviously back in the pride days. Japan was a booming market. But I remember being in Japan for UFC one forty four and I walked on the streets, and we did a video asking people about MA and pride. And no one seemed to know anything about the sport anymore. Did you feel like there was a lot of work? They needed to be done, of course, outside of Japan, which you have focused on to educate everyone thinks martial-arts Asia yet. But they didn't seem to know a lot about ever made was that was that a tough process early on to educate the masses. Right. So one major difference between one chance for gypsy. Is that US focus only ended may one champ. She does large that. That may boy tied kickboxing boxing edition grappling that we do the full gamut of martial arts bouts, and I think that has really resonated with agent audience. And so yes, you're 'em may limit smaller here out here in Asia. But you know, it's growing, and and but obviously more tie pick boxing boxing. What's grappling on of? It depends on the country, but are quite popular. So the way we played his we've yourselves as a platform of more larks. I to just enemy, and what about Japan because next year, you will be making your debut in Japan. Right. What is the temperature over there? What does the appetite like mixed martial arts in particular? Well. Japan. Japan is at an all time low in terms of washer logs, and they, you know, Pride Day, literally gone south, and it's because of the whole mock connections that used to. And so I think for me, it's it's a big opportunity for a revival renaissance. If you will and Japan, I think Japan deal if you look at every child Japan. Right now, every child fuelling karate kendo ITTO, you know, judo's, you know, that's how kids values, and so I think there's a huge opportunity if done in the right authentic way to bring that martial arts and make it the most popular sport again..

Japan Asia US NFL UFC NBA MA eighty two billion dollar five thousand dollars five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on Your Own Magic

Your Own Magic

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on Your Own Magic

"So the soul comes to the physical plane in in this case, it comes to to earth chooses way back roughly roughly around fifty five thousand years ago that humans go kind of souls the level of consciousness that we have now. And that's why we sort of letting suddenly were were often running, you know, creating tools and being creative and doing stuff that Seoul allows you to do the the problem is actually a lot of it goes to the soul types in the. Tribe. Everything functioned pretty well. You know, you had you had your leader to lead, you creators to, you know, make the pottery or jewelry, or whatever you had the thinker to to figure out, you know, when to, cultivate, plants, or, you know, hung to hunt figure out seasons, or what whatever it might be the performance to entertain everybody. Tell the story of the the the hunt through. Dance or mime or something. And so everyone was kind of filled. You know, they were. All whether doing us. We started sort of the develop cities move around the world. And so on things got a little bit screwed up in in that slowed away. And there's. This level of greed that was not anticipated before the sole happened. You know, like when you know. A little bit of a surprise to those on the side that this is the way the world is wanting my spirit guide say lot is that the the world is not meant to be this way. And. Should be so different, you know, that and if we just recognized the individuality encouraged people to be who the are it would be a very different place. And if you know we were able to connect spiritually treat each other kindly, what an amazing place, but the fact that we both such inequality cruelty. It was, you know, never never meant to be that way. No. What was on -ticipant? We just come into it. And think oh, this is the way the world is, but doesn't have to be this way won't always be. That's interesting. So a let's say a level one soul will now let's say the graduated to a level two or three end. They kinda see the world is black and white. They the world isn't supposed to be them seeing the world as black and white in having these challenges in seeing humanity as against them or something is just something happened yet will actually that's the perspective. But that doesn't mean that that is how how would you be again, the grown-ups should be showing, you know, showing the way that, you know, people I work with a lot of people who get during spirited about the way things are politically right now. And you know, the feel like, you know, practically giving up on things. But we are making progress. We're just just hit a major bump in the road right now in this country right now and even hardly been like seeing bombs and they're bright. Well, you know, I mean, this is this. That's the major sort of bump in the road. It's a reaction to actually an increasing level of consciousness in awareness..

Seoul fifty five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Or the vast majority of its original range and to a number that at least resembles it's historical abundance or at least to a level where the animal can persist without undue human intervention captive breeding or pending them that sort of thing. Next week, much more as we explore what to save on a new season of quirks and quirks. There are a lot of reasons to be glad we don't live during the last ice age. Cold of course is one of them. But another big reason is that there were a lot of really big, really terrifying animals around take the Titanic cave. Bear, for example, these monsters averaged as big as the very largest grizzlies today, but have no fear the cave. Bear went extinct about twenty five thousand years ago. We know them today only from fossils found mostly in you guessed it caves, but bones are not the only legacy that cave bears left behind new research by Dr axel, Barlow from the university of Potsdam in Germany has found that cave bears didn't stay in caves. They got around and. As a result in a small way, they aren't really extinct. They live on today in modern Brown bears Dr. Barlow welcome to quirks and quirks. Hello, thanks very much for inviting me to talk. How does the cave bear legacy continuing Brown bears today so know study. We sequenced genomes from the Pleistocene cave as we're able to compare this data to data from Brown says, and in doing this, we were able to identify that when these species coexisted they must have hybridize as a result past cave DNA including cave genes into Brown says, and these have been passed down through generations of Brown. The Brown buys that live today still carry these fragments of cave DNA how much care DNA are we talking about our analyses estimate that it's somewhere between zero point nine and two point, four percent..

Brown Dr. Barlow Bear university of Potsdam Dr axel Germany twenty five thousand years four percent
"five thousand years" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Not was not yet in biala g equivalent would be i would believe in good and evil isis the equivalent not not muslims to people acquaint acquaint muslims with nazi things a lot if muslims were like nazis billions of muslims and why don't i don't quite but i'm just saying can you not be critical of an ideology and separate him oh absolutely i'm not i'm not religious i'm very critical religion as well i am too in here's what i say look i i like taking both sides of all these arguments if i'm around people who are super islamic phobic i will like to take your point of view in anthem around you i wanna take this point of view so just know that this side i would say is if you look at judaism judaism's the oldest right it is five thousand years old at this point and if you look at a significant percentage of the rabbis in israel are eightieths okay and what you've seen are you atheists rabbis you believe in all the traditions you believe in the teachings you don't actually believe there's a god up there that ordained all this okay so that's i dig that i think that was like you've you've kind of taken what you think are the great teachings of it and you don't actually fear a man up in the sky or that you're going to be sent to help okay so imbibe again on the outside of all three of these religions i see that judaism more than any other one has left the literal and become hugely metaphorical it is so metaphorical i'm friends with so many jewish folks here that still will celebrate the holidays they'll do the baby naming but they don't actually they've only kept it metaphorical and then if you look at a lot of mars iras who believe in ethnos date and are not biology that the travesties but let's say we're having this conversation pre nineteen forty five okay because we could get bogged down in that but let's just say that it is pretty much a fact that judaism in the old testament has largely become now metaphorical they they're the least literal interpreters of their tax i think i it's hard for me to say let's pretend it's not.

israel biala g five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

"Are by using discount rates and present value formula which you know the main foot into which is is a discount rate which is an interest which is based off of interest rates so if the interest rates are near five thousand year lows just be chemically just through the way valuations done means that asset values for financial assets near five thousand year highs so why would that be a good idea to buy something five thousand year heights i mean is that how you make money or is it by sell higher it's feels like the other way around right so so that's the that's just one dimension of of thinking and then of course you have to say if you look at the economy over the past thirty five years and you say well yes everything the markets have gone up quite a bit but the incomes in real terms for the vast majority of the people have not i saw recently i don't know if you saw that chart of deutsche bank showing the percentage of votes cast across major economies floor populist politicians populist parties that index is back to the level where we last saw the nineteen thirties and the nineteen forties clearly a period of tremendous economic distress which we're not visibly experiencing right now but clearly for a lot of people things are not the way they seem for maybe a lot of other people that don't see the problem and so there so there's a political dimension to what's going on there's a there's a sovereign dimension to what's going because the united states is borrowing the rate of on the wet whereabout to another trillion dollars or something like that.

deutsche bank united states five thousand year thirty five years trillion dollars
"five thousand years" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q

EFT/Tapping Q

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q

"I think i'd go back to to speaking their language okay i call it desensitization which everybody knows about i explained to them that it's it's a form of acupressure for the emotions that it's five thousand years old and chai in china you know in asia i've been corrected on that by the way said china and i was corrected by a korean person said in asia so i try to say both i explained to them that in case you'd this is my spiel in fact i sent in case you don't know what happened was in the nineteen seventies on president nixon went over to china while he was there there was a guy who was in a lot of pain appendix surgery and so the they used acupuncture and they will fascinated so nixon actually started a medical exchange and over there when our western medicine that you and i know which is surgery bandages medications and over here came eastern medicine which includes acupuncture that i don't use acupressure that i do use raking massage yoga tai chi martial arts shiatsu and reflects allergy and those words right now are common in the language because most people are taking a yoga class or know someone who's taking a yoga class and so they kind of like okay and i talk about it as complicated complimentary integrative medicine you know somehow when you activate the meridians it's very calming my clients yawn inci while we're doing it and it just seems to desensitize very quickly.

asia china nixon president five thousand years
"five thousand years" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"This species description utilizes those multiple lines of evidence doesn't so let's talk about that where where are these arena tanzer i work across sumatran borneo there's this new species is in on the island of sumatra it's just south of the crater lake toba which is a volcano erupted uh seventy five thousand years ago so in it's the world's largest crater lake it's sort of a beautiful place to go for rest and relaxation by couiza which is still busy really enjoy that where we had time away from the field knight but yet so this population busy fourteen thousand touring it's ends in sumatra give will take at an of which thirteen thousand two hundred live to the north of the volcanic crater in the luxury system and eight hundred of them live to the south in this area we call the top nearly forest all the button toto forest block and the sort of beautiful forested area it's about one hundred and fifty thousand hectares a high up in the mountains very very remote is very difficult to get up there as it's like on a slope yeah yeah it's sort of incredibly rugged incredible it's it's montaigne some montaigne hill forest okay so where i was we will work hand announced judo a thousand meters above sea level sixday i was hiking to get in there and this is it like a hiking trailer communist joan la this is like hiking with machetes destroyed i mean that there were trails because there are an ankle the research camp has been open sort of since two thousand six elkhader the trail sort of relatively well while worn by now but it's just straight up the whole way um i don't know if i'd be fitting effigy so now not only do you have to be intellectually where you need to be to do this kind of work yourself to be like physically fit to defend its painter who nail.

crater lake toba crater lake sumatra joan la seventy five thousand years fifty thousand hectares thousand meters sixday
"five thousand years" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"five thousand years" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And it's got this beautiful white front you can spot from two miles ways are approaching and just a very popular are attracting but as five thousand years old are ancient ancestors used to believe that on the morning of the winter solstice as the sown with go in this central chamber was always in darkness you see and then when that someone go in a laser beam of light with go up the central chamber and illuminated and there's these big storm earns inside that used to contain the ashes of are dead cremated ancestors and as the sun would go back down the chamber we believe our ancestors believed that the sum would take the soul of our ancestors to the next world war them so five thousand years ago this was designed knowing there just be a few minutes out of the year when the raf's send would come in in luminated the burial chamber and as it crept in it brought access to eternal life and then as it crept away it took the source of those with that just be any sean or patty or would that be actually leaders or kings or something like this because five thousand years ago in ireland we've no records or any written records of what have you can only gaspard you'd imagine that anybody who got to be inside new range must have been a pretty prominent is chieftain nor king or queen of a spiritual leader the some moves on then of course in at returns the darkness inside for 365 days of the year and this has been going on for five thousand years so it's only eight minutes is only eightminute window of opportunity for it to be let inside the hood now if it doesn't happen is because his cloudy in the irony more likely than not exactly so on the day that i went there during the lottery first of all you there's actually a lottery and tells what that is yes there every year around forty thousand people apply and when you go to visit the burial chamber new rains the visitor's center there there's a nice little box and it's as if anguish wish to be.

world war sean ireland luminated patty gaspard five thousand years eight minutes eightminute 365 days