35 Burst results for "Five Ten Years Ago"

How to Create Great Thought Leadership with Andrew Rogerson

Marketing for Consultants

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Create Great Thought Leadership with Andrew Rogerson

"Andrew. Thank you so much for being with us here today. So the first thing i want to ask you about is a Leadership and some people have a really negative reaction to that term. Some people love the the concept of taught leadership they see it as a as a kind of something to be respected on admired. And this kind of it. Somewhere in the middle. I think is where it's really atkin. You talk to us a little bit of bike. What leadership means to you and how you go about creating leadership should to be honest with we could probably spend the next hour talking about definition Leadership whether thought leadership is content marketing or own fits in our view thought leadership is three things it's authoritative it is original and it's insightful. Say it needs to carry song authority. And typically that as evidence led so it needs to be backed by by research of on it needs to be original so it needs to add something to the composition rather than just the noise and it needs to be insightful. I e your clients need to be able to do something with the information that you've given if those three things that then i think we can safely call thought leadership. If it doesn't much doesn't let's visit that. then. I don't think you can okay so so insightful. And able to do so the senior Is what you're saying there. Is it to actually be actionable. Yeah absolutely if you to look at one of the magic changes of thought leadership over the last five ten years five to ten years ago we were much more interested in so leadership around brand awareness and in the very beginning of the funnel. Neither is moving much more towards the middle of the funnel and helping clients solve problems. So decisions undo something useful to absolutely.

Atkin Andrew
Rabbi Yehudah Glick on Worshiping in Peace at the Temple Mount

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Rabbi Yehudah Glick on Worshiping in Peace at the Temple Mount

"You are the head of the temple institute as a christian and somebody who recently i'm i have. I'm coming out with a book where i talked about biblical archaeology and i have been so fascinated with a archaeology in jerusalem and israel and particularly the temple. Mount the history there so what what is going on with the temple. Mount with the idea of building. A third temple i mean most americans know nothing about this and i'm just fascinated me here from somebody who may give me some answers so as you said. I was the director of the temple institute. I'm now the. Ceo of the jerusalem foundation and the mission of the foundation is actually the forge path in which people who love god can freely of course regardless of their religion persuasions can freely and respectfully worship in peace at the temple. Mount and by providing equal access to the holiest of the holy places. We symbolically rebuild. The temple which strengthens the communities worshippers sham and strengthens the values. The value system the mankind and unfortunately in the temple mount for the past fifty years only muslims were allowed to worship. And we don't believe that that that definitely in western society who believes in freedom of worship that this continue and therefore thank god. We've made a major change on the temple mount and We've turned the place into place where thousands and even hundreds of thousands of tourists of believers in god who are not not that don't have to be muslim. Could come and pray and our goal is to turn the place into a house of prayer for all nations as i said. Well let me ask you. Just because i need the fact when i mean if i had visited jerusalem in the last ten years was would i be allowed on the temple. Mount yet you you would be allowed in the temple. Mount but if you've come here Five ten years ago on the temple. Mount you'd have policeman following you checking your lips. Make sure you don't move till tonight. You cannot bring by bible onto the temple mount. You cannot carry any other religious article on the temple mount today. If you're not muslim you have. You can walk on

Temple Institute Jerusalem Foundation Jerusalem Israel
Inflation, Bitcoin, and Monetary Policy With Lyn Alden

The Pomp Podcast

02:19 min | Last month

Inflation, Bitcoin, and Monetary Policy With Lyn Alden

"Lynn thank you so much for doing this. Hey thanks for having me absolutely. Let's maybe start with for those that don't know you maybe give a quick thirty seconds on just what you spend all day doing and then kind of your perspective with the research service that you've got which i think is absolutely fantastic and high suggest people go subscribe to but how do you kind of think of your day to day role and what you spend your time focused on mostly research so my background is initially an engineering and i went into engineering management kind of blended into finance and then now i i work fulltime. Doing investment research as independent analysts as most of my time is research books on individual companies as well as physically major sectors and overall what's happening in the macro space so inflation policy that sort of thing got it and so when you look where we are today it feels like the fed is the most important person in the market and kind of their monetary policy decisions. Some of the fiscal policy decisions that are being made as well. How do you kind of create a framework to evaluate what's happening and what the impact of that will be in the future. Is there a specific framework that you use. The closest thing after a framework is the concept of the long-term debt cycle popularized by radio. And so. that's the idea that you know we go through these five. Ten year business cycles With with rising debt. And you have a recession and then you you go into next cycle but if you string a bunch of those together we actually seen is that. Each cycle doesn't reset to the previous one in terms of debt or industry. Since what you get it's higher and higher debt as a percent of gdp over time and you get lower lower interest rates and that that that happens for decades until industry rates run into roughly zero or some cases mildly negative and so they run out of that policy. Ruin up to pull in other types of tools and so the last time we were in this type of virement in most countries was actually back in the nineteen forties. And so you know. We have a lot of analog to that time obviously with different technology at things like that. So that's that's actually my main probably a model framework But then you know more more tactically. I'm just kind of looking at. What are the bottlenecks in the system. policymakers to do something. and so. because we're at the end of a long term death cycle. We're in a very macro heavy environment. And some of things that people expect the past say thirty four years are behaving very differently this environment that that's how i approach

Lynn FED
How Marketing SMBs Is Different Than Enterprise With Palmer Houchins

MarTech Podcast

02:00 min | 3 months ago

How Marketing SMBs Is Different Than Enterprise With Palmer Houchins

"You've had a long experience working with small to medium size businesses. You previously worked at another sponsor of the marta. Podcast you were at male. Champion came over to call rail. Talk to me a little bit about how you think about helping. Small to medium sized businesses and their challenges different than some larger companies some enterprise companies for a long time. I don't think that marketers did a great job of recognizing how the smb market was different from the enterprise market so especially in technology side. You saw folks who are trying to sell in markets small businesses in the same way that they would from an enterprise perspective. I think over the past five ten years. We've really seen that approach. Change change for the better but from a customer perspective as well from his perspective. I have first hand viewing of that. And they'll jump in. I think we were really successful. Bear and trying to help book see that talking to small businesses. Maybe can look a little bit more like b. two c. marketing versus b. Two b. marketing. What i've seen be really effective in that space is folks who really key in on simplicity. It doesn't mean you have to make it on statistics but really really keying in on simplicity. And how the software can affect innocent be sort of day to day. Because i think to get back to your original point. Smb's i think i've found over my time experience there. Maybe not going to have the bandwidth time to really engage with some of the typical enterprise marketing techniques that we've seen over the years in the software space it's interesting. I think of small and medium-sized businesses. First and foremost being a different target. Not only from a utility and all standpoint but from a personality standpoint. Generally the desires needs and wanted outcomes for people that are running small to medium. Sized businesses are different than people that are working for enterprises.

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

04:09 min | 3 months ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Boston university students but also to community clinic. And so whoever walks through the door is welcome. And i've noticed that the the population that we see skewing younger and younger And so we still get the full range but there are a lot of college kids a lot of young like early twenties and and they're really struggling with feeling anxious about their lives about connection about just existential. Who am i Yeah there's there's there's a lot of that going on. Yeah and i and i do wonder how much of that is related to technology and so many different levels. I'm also curious because so if you have a you you you live and breathe clinic. Where kind of late by. Its very nature where it is and who had served a larger number. Larger percentage of the people who come in and seek help our or young college student range. I wonder whether certainly people outside of that are also just less willing to seek help for something that maybe they perceive is just a part of life as they move further until i. That's a that's a really good point. Yeah i think so. I'm glad you brought that up. Because i think a parallel reason why we see more and more young people is because the stigma of mental illness is slowly eroding. That there is a thanks. Thanks to kind of this online culture of like revealing oneself or being more personal or your of confessing various problems. Or you know or foibles or whatnot. I think a lot of people are able to to look online and redistribute. That actually does sound like them and say. Oh this is oh. This is so validating and if somebody else feels like this that that probably implies that there are a lot of us and and the the stigma is is lifted and it takes stigma being lifted to be able to seek help on i think and i wish i wish it wasn't that way but i think when you realize you're not alone you don't feel so ashamed like if it's if it's so widespread that this has a name. It has a diagnosis. Then that gives hope that makes people seek out some assistance. Yeah and i know. We've seen this just over the years with what i've been doing. People have added an opportunity to sit down with I don't think a lot of this conversation. This would have been had quite so easily so publicly. Five ten years ago. I think even just in that window. There's been a real each agree i agree. I think it's an awesome thing. I love it. Yeah especially these days because you know the thing that we're hearing the news more and more anxiety And depression yassin diagnosis and treatment. But the thing that that has been terrifying for for so many people is the incidents of people who have suicidality and are actually taking their own lives. I don't know whether the numbers are actually going up or whether the focus on reporting revealing the truth about the numbers is just being increased but it seemed like that is an increasing and alarming part of sort of the public conversation around the struggles that so many of us have. Yeah no absolutely..

Five ten years ago each agree Boston twenties
Matthew Mangione on the Importance of Being at the Forefront of Voice Tech

VOICE Global 2021

03:04 min | 3 months ago

Matthew Mangione on the Importance of Being at the Forefront of Voice Tech

"I operate under the amazon umbrella. Copper oppression is much larger digital marketing. The coast further that but inside the amazon realm where i exist and i am all things amazon so one thing. I love about amazon. I don't even understand how many betas and involved now but there's so many that are out there And in that amazon pay came into my roles in started talking to him and seeing dade since a report at just about and utilizing voice with amazon. Pay us i got in touch with catherine are rip over there for that and said okay. I want to talk to a couple of companies about points. I don't really understand it but this piqued my interest enough in. I saw the vision that they were speaking of. And it makes it makes sense to me. The friction lists transaction five or ten years down the road where where it will be much more than we go through these learning paints and they'll be that song was one of the companies was suggestion that sorry. John talked a couple of companies in that And once i spoke to two blue tag. I knew i liked the technical part in. You guys had that together some experience. Also the people which was really important to me an established the connection with our representative eric so Incoming into the icy in there. When i speak to mine executive team were making the decisions. I'm fighting for voice. They're still not is clear as i am about it. I'm actually at times. Allocate my time. Something else instead of this. And i'm fighting for all the time and i'm really standing my ground because it is something that might feeling is right now is so important to get involved with it. Because i don't wanna be behind anybody five years from now and ten years from now especially the friction this voice until we implanted in our head to be dolly originalist. We can speak it. And that is the way without ever having to go and type in anything so i see that and i see that across degeneration the late adopters at the end will be when i when i look at my my elderly friends and family and their adoption of facebook connection and now i see their powerhouses on. They're they're getting so much information making decisions on that. I see voice the exact same way once my grandparents as oats knows adapt this over and can realize they can just speak simply and get information. it in really order stuffing in be given services to them on request or reminders sent a reminder set have that system that just makes so much sense to me and i know it's not there so i want to be one of the ones on the front line battling going through learning these things trying things out making mistakes. Having great breakthroughs and be at the forefront as adoption curve continues to over which. I i don't see any other way that it will not just the technology is necessary and i think we'll be essential for everybody that five ten years

Amazon Catherine Eric John Oats Facebook
"five ten years ago" Discussed on Something Who

Something Who

02:45 min | 4 months ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Something Who

"Film about the challenger disaster. Netflix did a really good job of it gave you the beginning. Just like we do to say his the thing that you know about. Hey and then it goes back to zero and it goes you the story. Step-by-step not messing about with it. Not jumping around. But you're saying this happened and then this happened and then this happened. This happened and we lose that chronology. Sometimes when you look back on a thing you think about let the pandemic or you think. Somebody's career or your own life. You lose a sense of. Oh yeah that was happening at the same time as that. Oh and that was for that house that contributed that was positive. You lose all that and we were so keen sometimes to be miniature quinson town tinos jump around and be expelled. Start with the ending and then go back and wish. I think sometimes power to sign this happen. Then this happened then. This happened and with liz. You've got this perfect story of somebody who gets big becomes a a genuinely loved star and then lose it and through no fault of earn but gets hot casket stuck and gets in the doldrums. I think an an and then comes back in the most of those stories in quite sadly but with lizard. The story where you've got this beautiful loch where she does get happy ending and obviously ultimately we lose a fall too soon. But i think there's something. I don't think john nathan turner story where the first half is up and the second half is down quite quite powerfully strikingly so i think with. It's i think it does end. I think the second off the phone is an up. had death is almost lettuce businessweek frustration. Because your you're you're so sad to lose a friend use upset to lose a friend bigger so glad that she had what she had in those lost. I guess there's lots of five ten years ago. You know she had such a for somebody. Who is i think quite insecure and not really aware of worth or how good she was. I think to get this absolutely winning endorsement to say you know you're wrong. The universe loves you. I think is so powerful. We'd rather still have a. I think he's a amazing story to get stor. Yeah of saint someone the other day that it is. It's such a shame. Sometimes that you don't say the thing that you want to say until somebody dies you know if if it's if it's a eulogy but but again i guess with this people were able to say those things while he was still alive as a result of for turning up in school reunion and then getting around series so he did get to see all of that love in played out beforehand. So so so that..

Netflix john nathan turner first half second half second zero liz five ten years ago quinson town
News Companies $38 Billion Better Off Since Pandemic

Media Voices

01:58 min | 5 months ago

News Companies $38 Billion Better Off Since Pandemic

"The. Us case largest publicly listed news companies are now worth thirty eight billion dollars more than they were before the covid nineteen pandemic. this is golden system research from present. Which found that newscorp new times thompson reuters daily mail polish. The mt and the mirror group owner reach are among those companies have seen that stock market values increase since the end of two thousand nineteen important to know not every media organization has whether this as well include yes they include adver instance i tv which has seen a reduction in its Share price as a result of catastrophic. Drop in tv appetizing. Outspent butts six. They claim will sixteen of the news and information companies examined for the research have recovered from the depths of the corona virus crisis so we have spoken at length about organizations like the f. t. and the mit about why those guys have weathered the pandemic seriously well. Are you surprised that it seems to be assaultive across the board thing for every single one of the companies. They looked up. And this is a thing. The surprise me when i first read that. Actually when you think about it isn't surprising that the ads poice by this massive comeback this year. And you've got all these digital businesses that were re already hit by Got decline over the last like five ten years that ashley suddenly like having all these i think it's like travel alcohol rule these companies that have wasting everything to open over the summer this throwing like a years worth of marketing budget at digital media companies must been spend. I thought my point people may spend money but no one's been responding to advertise in the sense that you will ties to all of the law. How are you going to do Yes it by a car. Well so the traditional arabic ad spend is the. I'll just haven't been able to spend all wanted to spend

Thompson Reuters Outspent United States Ashley
Why mRNA Vaccine Technology is Totally Safe

Today, Explained

02:01 min | 5 months ago

Why mRNA Vaccine Technology is Totally Safe

"Dr deborah fuller. I'm a professor in the department of microbiology. At the university of washington. School of medicine. Dr fuller has spent decades studying the kinds of vaccines were now using to fight. Cove it one of the things that a lot of people don't realize is i think that Amarna vaccines just suddenly appeared as a brand new vaccine when covid nineteen started but there has been research going on in this field for over thirty years and i was one of those people thirty years ago who i started working on the idea of a code into your cells and express a protein that was stimulated immune response. So you're basically the perfect person to tackle a wide range of questions about all these different vaccines are you gain. I am totally game absolutely. Let's give it a shot okay. My buddy was too shy to call our voicemail line and admit that he's scared of 'em are a but this listener was not. Hey sean looking. For the science face evidence that suggests that lab created. Mr rene is not gonna trigger some sort of long-term averse affecting my body and say five twenty forty or sixty years. I feel like. I'm being asked to trust something that does not have published long-term medical research behind it. What school leaves my future. Something unknown risk. What would you say to people like. Dude let's start out with general with vaccines idea that they're gonna cause some sort of issue five ten years from now that's just doesn't happen back us to how vaccines work. They get in. They do their job. They go away. Vaccine does stimulate an immune response. And then when you get exposed to a pathogen that immune response is going to act on it and get rid of that pathogens so they do a very focused directed immune response and once they get inside your cell and they instruct yourself to do that. They disintegrate our body deals with 'em are a all the time we'll eat it were exposed to it were. It's in our environment and knows what to do with marina.

Dr Deborah Fuller Department Of Microbiology Dr Fuller Mr Rene University Of Washington School Of Medicine Sean Marina
Reams Of Paper (MM #3634)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 7 months ago

Reams Of Paper (MM #3634)

"The with kevin mason. I've talked on this before. But i don't understand how much paper we're using in business anymore. And i realize when. I worked in radio now over a decade ago. We had lots of paper around the place we use. Lots of copy paper had reams and reams of paper around the building because we needed paper logs were needed. Many things to be signed off on so there was a lot of paper. But since i've run my own small business for a long time. I've used less and less paper. I'll be honest with you nowadays. Even the couple of printers. I got laying around the office. I don't use them. Maybe once or twice a month and that's when even having to monitors isn't enough. I'm going to print something on paper to do some cross-checking. I thought the only time i print anything anymore. I may have had one ream of paper. Probably last a good three four five ten years. Maybe couldn't even tell you the last time. I changed paper in the printer but yet three to five times a week from the big supply chains. I get notices about sales on reams of paper. Am i the only small business not using paper anymore. Have we switched off. Are you using less. I know i am. I'm just kind of confused.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Once Three Twice A Month Five Ten Years A Decade Ago Couple Of Printers Five Times A Week One Ream Of Paper Of Paper Over Lots Of Copy Paper Four
Reams Of Paper (MM #3634)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 7 months ago

Reams Of Paper (MM #3634)

"The with kevin mason. I've talked on this before. But i don't understand how much paper we're using in business anymore. And i realize when. I worked in radio now over a decade ago. We had lots of paper around the place we use. Lots of copy paper had reams and reams of paper around the building because we needed paper logs were needed. Many things to be signed off on so there was a lot of paper. But since i've run my own small business for a long time. I've used less and less paper. I'll be honest with you nowadays. Even the couple of printers. I got laying around the office. I don't use them. Maybe once or twice a month and that's when even having to monitors isn't enough. I'm going to print something on paper to do some cross-checking. I thought the only time i print anything anymore. I may have had one ream of paper. Probably last a good three four five ten years. Maybe couldn't even tell you the last time. I changed paper in the printer but yet three to five times a week from the big supply chains. I get notices about sales on reams of paper. Am i the only small business not using paper anymore. Have we switched off. Are you using less. I know i am. I'm just kind of confused.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Once Three Twice A Month Five Ten Years A Decade Ago Couple Of Printers Five Times A Week One Ream Of Paper Of Paper Over Lots Of Copy Paper Four
What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

The Small Business Radio Show

05:29 min | 7 months ago

What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

"The other day announced a new ceo. And so we're is amazon. Going in two thousand twenty one and how can small business owners actually participate hit. Help is jason boys. A season entrepreneur and nationally rise x. nationally recognized expert on amazon. He's considered the world's leading expert in dot com third party sellers. He's the founder and ceo of avenue seven media llc a seller group that harnesses the power of amazon for direct to consumer product brands. He's also the co author of the amazon jungle. The truth about amazon and the sellers guide to thriving on the world's most perilous e commerce marketplace jason. Welcome to the show. Thank you bury. Congratulations to you. Six hundred and twenty six show twelve years you know. He started with just one person. So tell me how you've been doing during this pandemic. Our business has been booming Amazon scott galloway came out and wrote a book about The pandemic amazon a company that was built for something like a worldwide pandemic and they've benefited greatly and frankly so's my business. Because so many small businesses that had regional brick and mortar retail store outlets that. Just shut down on him and folks were were kind of on the fence prior to the pandemic called and said jason get amazon tomorrow. Can you help me so our business has been. I mean we keep up very hits been it's been You know a bittersweet story. It's good news that our businesses doing great as results pandemic. But it's been a really difficult time for everyone. Any recession is always winners. And there's losers. But i tell you one thing jason happen. This year that i never thought could happen in relation to amazon. I couldn't believe they couldn't deliver in two days. Came buried i. I made some predictions in early october. That fda and amazon delivery network was going to break. It ended up not breaking but they broke the post office. They bury them with so met much volume that they literally couldn't couldn't handle it and you're absolutely right. There were very few packages that were delivered to people's doors within two day window within that one day window even still though what they did. This holiday in terms of ramping up delivery final mile warehousing added fifty percent of square footage and like four months. I mean it's historic area. It's pretty incredible what they did so just recently announced. Jeff bezos is going to step down. Ceo and there was a joke on facebook. That says well i guess he's fully invested 401k. Now that's why he's stepping down. But one predictions you have for twenty twenty one with amazon given a new ceo and the hopefully the winding down of the pandemic. Yeah well you know. I hope jeff vases is going to be okay with the pay reduction. Moving from fulltime. Ceo to just executive chairman. You think you'll be okay hope but yeah you look i. I don't think that amazon is going to miss a beat. You know the minute. The announcement came out which by the way was interesting enough announced around the same time as their blow out. Q four earnings call Historic in its own right Potentially to deflect which amazon's pr department is really good at About how great they have benefited in his really tough time for our country But look amazon's not going to miss a beat andy jazzy. Jeff clone bleeds amazon. Blew has been basically attached to jeff bezos hip for more than twenty years. He's an incredibly talented competency. Oh who took. Aws from zero to fifty percent market share in the cloud. Space according to gartner so He's incredibly talented. He will help Execute on jeff bezos division. Basil's we'll take a back seat behind. The curtain is gonna shove jesse in front of congress and answer. All those difficult antitrust questions and basis is going to work on what he loves doing which is invention and future technology. Whatever amazon looks like five ten years from now will have been developed from. Basil's mind so he's not going anywhere. He's just removing himself from some of the shall we say more uncomfortable task. It's going to land on jesse's lap in the next You know one to ten years. As i trust drums or are beating louder and louder. So let's talk about some of the trends that you've been discussing Tell us about how you think. Amazon is getting into healthcare. They are already in healthcare. I mean they're providing primary care for you know scores of their own employees tens of thousands of their employees they They famously removed themselves from joint venture with jamie diamond and berkshire hathaway recently In the rumors from within inside amazon at the reason they did that is because they were holding back and the amazon pharmacy group which spun up recently. we're saying we can't move fast you know. We can't move fast because we're being held up by chasing in berkshire hathaway. So i saw that. A lot of a lot of people in the press came out berry and said oh. This means amazon can't figure out healthcare. It's too difficult. It's too challenging. I didn't see that at all. I just saw that you know amazon. Saw this as cutting weight so that they can really focus on what they do. And that's innovate

Amazon Jason Boys Avenue Seven Media Llc Jason Scott Galloway Jeff Bezos Jeff Vases Andy Jazzy Jeff Clone FDA Basil Jesse Facebook Gartner Jamie Diamond Berkshire Hathaway Congress Amazon Pharmacy Group Berry
"five ten years ago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:22 min | 7 months ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Coffee with bitcoin. That's the problem we're trying to solve this make it. So people can actually use crypto in real life by things and just lipoic you've been implementing the system of. I don't remember an nfc chips where people can use. Dollar tethers correct. Yes basically our thought process is that we've had years in years to try. The traditional crypto currencies and having worked and the future crypto is going to be stable coins. There if you look at the top coin works. It's working great here yeah. I bought my cigarettes earlier today with bitcoin cash. It was smooth. And i also bought my indian dinner with bitcoin cash. Not that the technology doesn't work. It's that it doesn't appeal to the average person. The average person uses pay pal. They used the cash shop they used bengal. They're used to interacting with digital dollars. We wanna do is swap it out from a centralized system a digital dollars to a decentralized system. We know that works. 'cause they're spending new payment app created every there was no cash up five ten years ago. Ultimately you're keeping them in the dollar you're keeping them a victim of the dollar as we all know that the government's going to print more dollars out in the value of that is going down so you're not really doing them that much of a favor. I'm doing them. I'm solving their problem. They do not perceive the dollar to be a problem. There problem is they want more business more customers. They want faster checkout. They want touchless checkup. Those are the problems that they've articulated. And those are the problems we want to solve. Who have to go to someone. Tell them you have this problem. We don't know you have this currency the most us currency in the world. It's it's wrong. You guys switch for this new currency it's only existed for a decade and it's extremely volatile. That's not solving a problem. I their philosophy that my experience when talking to people outside of the united states versus talking to them inside of the united states is that it's a lot easier to convince somebody who's in the us. And i really don't consider siobhan to be even though it is the us maryalice us territory. It feels like half american half pollen or half micronesian island. I mean there's there's differences so when you're talking to somebody in the us you can very easily make attacks on the federal reserve. They've heard this word they understand it whereas if you're in a foreign country and you're talking about why dollars or suck and the people are.

united states half american five ten years ago half micronesian island indian earlier today years half pollen a decade maryalice siobhan
A Conversation With Loren And Lisa Poncia Of Stemple Creek Ranch

How I Built This

05:43 min | 8 months ago

A Conversation With Loren And Lisa Poncia Of Stemple Creek Ranch

"Today my conversation with lauren. And lisa pawnshop owners of stemple creek ranch stemple creek ranch produces beef pork and lamb on more than a thousand acres in marin county california. It's one of the only carbon neutral livestock ranches in the united states. Lauren is a fourth generation rancher and he and his wife lisa transformed stemple creek into an organic regenerative farm. Fifteen years ago today they sell their grass fed meat to restaurants and grocery stores across the bay area and also directly to consumers across the us. So my first question to lauren was how do you make such a carbon intensive products like meat carbon-neutral guy what we do is what we call a dance with mother nature so basically replicating weather nature and what she did across the great plains hundreds of years ago with massive herds of bison crossing the great plains they were regenerating the soil just naturally so they eat the grass in front of them stomp on the grass below and poop on the graph behind him that generated the soil and grew more perennial plants and really. It's a photosynthesis business so if we have a living plant in the ground that's capturing sunlight it's growing with photosynthesis pulling co two out of the atmosphere. Storing it in the soil. So are you able to actually measure it. We think of cows for example as creating methane and that contributes to carbon pollution. But are you able to actually measure how you're you're able to sequester. Carbon offset the methane that they release. We have some really good data. This is the fun part about our businesses. A lot of times people say oh. This is what we're doing but we actually have hard data. We started this. Marin carbon project about seven years ago and we did a study about applying compost and how the compost effects sequestering carbon or not sequestering carbon in our soil's applied with all of our other management practices like fencing off the right perry in areas planting trees diversity in our pastures and basically what the data seven years later shows. We're sequestering about a thousand pounds of carbon per acre per year. Managing it the way we are even our control. Plots are other management practices. Besides applying compost are really helping with sequestering carbon and having healthy soils well from what i understand mean one of the things that releases carbon into the atmosphere. When soil is churned. Right and you aerate it. So what do you do to avoid doing that. We have a pretty intense rotational grazing system or pulse grazing. We call it where we rotate the cattle round in large herds and we try and replicate mother nature. We're not perfect at it but we dry and it just promotes printing plants. That are going to make more more photosynthesis which is going to question. Moore carbons lauren. We featured you on our segment. We did on the show a couple years ago called how you built that which unfortunately to put on pause this year because of other things. We're doing And i had a chance to busy ranch As you know and it was amazing to see some of the things that that just blew me away For example you plant chicory plants. Because i guess they have deep roots and they aerate the soil. And you've got worm farm. So the worms like dig into the soil things like that. Can you explain that. So basically a lot of people would say what's your biggest limiting nutrient and california dry land pasture and many people would say. Oh it's water because we're dry half the year but that's not really truly are limiting factor our biggest limiting factors air in the soil because without aaron the soil. It's like a human with a three hundred pound weight on our chest so there's three ways to get air. In the soil one is with the plow. And when you're plowing with a tractor you're actually releasing carbon into the atmosphere. The other one is with routes routes get down into the soil and break up the soil. And when they die they leave air in the soil and the worms. So we're trying to embrace not the plow and embrace the worms and roots and so there's diversity in the pastors real important and chicory has deep tap root plantation has deep tap root. There's some other really awesome natural plants that have deep tap roots. That actually help break up the soil. And they're printing they live for you know five ten years and they're super nutritious. That kendall loved them and she loved them and they make great coffee. I exactly lauren. You're a fourth generation california rancher. And i know that as a kid you watched your parents struggle to make ends meet while they were raising cattle that they would sell to. You know larger cattle ranches. And you even vowed never to go into the family business. You are in the veterinary pharmaceuticals for a while. But you did come back. And you and lisa decided to transform the family farm into an organic grass-fed farm. How did you come to that decision. And why I think that really comes down to guys. You have to be dissatisfied with their current results to create change and try something different. I'm super passionate about raising high quality food and we had to figure out a way that we can do this and actually make money and not struggle so. We've figured very quickly the way to do that was to be the price maker instead of the price taker and having unique product do what's right for the environment at the same time we do. What's right for the environment where we're making money on it. We've totally flipped the whole and instead of just being a price taker and doing what everybody else does. We've gone out and changed our market and created their own brand and basically dictate to the market. What we need to be able to make a

Lauren Lisa Pawnshop Stemple Creek Ranch Stemple Cr Stemple Creek Marin County Moore Carbons California Lisa United States Marin Aaron Kendall
Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

The 3:59

03:39 min | 8 months ago

Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

"The cross has changed everything. How do you. Prompt exposed by the pandemic shift direction of five g to make more of a solution to some today's problems. Yeah certainly covid has changed everything for all of us as we think about the impact of twenty twenty. What we're dealing with is going to twenty twenty one in what i would tell you. Rogers if anything is accelerated dramatically exhorted the forward motion of five gauge. As you know two years ago he s we announced the eight currencies five g. You don't be asset when rally on on powerpoint to concept to commercial scale ability and People of seeing the crab will requirements for. I work from home new models for telehealth in education transportation. It's really accelerated potential in capabilities. People are seeing or power affi- date so let's look until health service made it so folks were reluctant to go into doctor's offices fear of contracting covid nineteen so remote medical care medicine has been around for for years but really hasn't taken off in a real way patients and doctors alike. Were not super comfortable with it. House five g may tell best in more powell experience for people. He has so. I think there's a couple of things that have happened for straws. We think about where the delay really happened until medicine. It was than many providers couldn't be paid for services that were minister via telemedicine A different methodology versus face to face off the entire ecosystem is embraced telemedicine. Telehealth for verizon is very pointedly as became apparent to austin. Ruin care for boys. We work with our customers at the same time to say. How can we help. Redefine you models in a code environment. In one of those was telehealth the end Large apartment we do business within terms that healthcare space centered on for fifty visits to upwards of eighty five to ninety percent for general visits the nate. Now the silicate the telemedicine one of the really important asset for us in that process has been acquisition. Bluejeans we fire bluejeans a really great in collaboration platform back in may of twenty twenty answer. Hawaii the timing was not only for remote workers uses video collaboration tools for trial because it gives the patient the ability to work directly with their provider to have that video connection. Video in connection with a is very secure on louise platform something. That was really important in. Annaborough ecosystem is opened up to saying we'll support the financial capability associated with that. Which is insurance is paying for those visit so i think we really accelerated years what we thought to. I will take us five ten years to really pull that in reimagined models. One of these were doing. Now that i think is going to fuel a faster you begin to think about to see and you begin to think about how do you get. Some of those biometrics in might not otherwise. Get an in a remote and i is the beginning to build up people's healthcare her vials. You begin to work with the broader ecosystem understand. Who's the customer is. The patient is the provider is the administration. We're in having these follow customers based on the past five. Gb play really critical role because of the power of the capability five.

Affi Rogers Powell Verizon Austin Hawaii
The end of Plaid-Visa

Equity

01:44 min | 8 months ago

The end of Plaid-Visa

"Want to lead us into plot. Alex as you alluded. This was the story of the week for anyone and everyone who cares about startups in vc. The five point three billion deal that would have merged loud and visa officially didn't go through for those following along that deal had been under investigation and ran into that regulatory wall. And now there's not going through. There's a lot to talk about what we're both of your first. Take alex and then danny by i take was holy crap followed by. Oh and i'm not surprised. The news event happened caught. me off. Guard didn't know it was coming but my second thought was like oh the doj was against this. Not a huge surprise. That was my take denny. I think there's a huge amount of concern around financial services more than other forms of tech companies when you look at financial services the so well integrated in the economy. Everything else is built on top of finance right and so i think for the antichrist authorities looking at tech deals. They're seeing this and they're saying look if visas able to corner the banking data market in own the infrastructure both at payments and with banking. That's an immensely powerful and highly leveraged place to be and i think the authorities have just gotten a lot smarter about preventing that from happening in the first place. I think they've woken up. I'm amazed at what was allowed to go through before versus. What now seems to be suddenly verboten. Why wasn't this. The case in the last five ten years finances not new whereas i think ad markets were new. Obviously we've talked a lot about antitrust ad networks with google buying doubleclick and buying a novel and a bunch of other companies. But those were new markets and said the regulators are. Just don't think new potential network effects that we're going to come out of those markets whereas in finance the regulators very admittedly familiar with the leverage points and frankly other competitors know what's going on as well. So my guess is mastercard went to the regulators and said whoa. Whoa whoa you got to do something here to stop this. This is really really bad. Yelp did this against google. But yelp didn't have the leverage. I think mastercard or other companies have been around a long time have

DOJ Alex Denny Danny Google Mastercard Yelp
Are You Ready to Make Financial Progress in 2021?

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

04:44 min | 9 months ago

Are You Ready to Make Financial Progress in 2021?

"This article runs through the twelve steps to get you financially. Ready for twenty twenty one. Obviously i can't go through twelve but you. Vip's are studious. You guys are on the ball and we'll make sure we have the lincoln. There's you can go read the rest of them. But i'm gonna pick out five. Let's take a look at number. One is review your goals the of years a great time to pause and look over your current financial goals just to see where you are with your progress I know this year was tough. But we're not gonna let it stand in the way of us moving forward with our money. So let's look at this get intentional. I've got the network calculator that you're gonna get over to my website And really figure out kind of where you are. How did this year in and again. I know this year was a challenge And this year has continued to be a challenge for a lot of people. But we still need to know where we stand The next one is update your budget. Obviously you know if you don't have one this is a good time to make one Do an audit of your budget kind of take a look. Are there some things that you could cut or scale back memberships. You don't use Do you have leftover money at the end of the month where you're redirecting that So there's a lotta things we can do and again as we start off the year on the good foot We wanna make sure we're being more intentional than ever Another thing end of year. Max out your 401k. If you haven't hit your full fifteen percent yet or you've got extra to invest you can make sure you get that done before december thirty first And remember you have until april to make contributions towards your ira a roth ira as well jay as hsa. We've got some time. So what does that mean for. A lotta people reach out to a smartvestor pro Make sure you're talking to your tax professional and he lp You've got people you want to get in your corner just to start reaching out. Especially for you self-employed. vip's For you you know. Tax time is a is a lot more paperwork in a lot of details grab up. Let's start getting that stuff. Gathered up right. Now you can get that in the hands of your cpa and the your make him or her's life a lot smoother as well as your own Speaking of find your tax return And again this sound can be can sound crazy. But it's just good to make a list of the things you're going to need get that prior year's return began to just details And talk about you know for some of you does a roth. Conversion makes sense. And what i mean by that real quick to not get into the weeds if you had an old 401k That's out there. You could convert that by paying the taxes on it to a roth Again it's a process of understanding the tax consequences having the cash first and foremost and being able to take care of that. So your smartvestor pro as well as your taxi. Lp can guide you in that Will entrust review your I know those things. Don't sound like fine. But i'm gonna tell you something after twenty twenty it's imperative that we have those things in place Really really important And also let me let me tell you this real quick It's important to make sure that you have beneficiaries updated. And i mean that in your life insurance i mean that in your 401k Because hear me the beneficiary designation 401k or on a life insurance policy will supersede meaning it outweighs anything in a will so the beneficiaries that you've established on a 401k. Four five ten years ago. You need to make sure you've got that updated especially if you've had a change of life if you were married If you got divorced if you adopted a cat or had another baby you just wanna make sure. Those are updated So beneficiaries on life insurance on ira's on 401k's these things are imperative. And do me a favor reach out to your parents To make sure that they've got there's updated as well a lot of times people. Sit and forget it with these things and it can just create some headache and heartache. Later a your estate plan needs to reflect those changes And if you don't have a will do get that thing in place It's imperative Some staggering statistic out there. That almost seventy seventy five percent of people don't have a will which means we leave the government in charge of your stuff Did you hear me say that. Yeah you leave the government in charge of your stuff I the government. Can't take the government's i know they will take care of my stuff So anyway let's get a will place But anyway you know we're twenty twenty one. Start off with the right checklist. Make sure we got things in place so we're able to grow forward interesting article again. They're twelve things. We covered five. You can go over to forbes dot com as always. We'll put a link to

Lincoln JAY IRA Headache Government
AGs' Lawsuit Accuses Facebook Of Gobbling Up Competitive Threats

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:49 min | 10 months ago

AGs' Lawsuit Accuses Facebook Of Gobbling Up Competitive Threats

"Facebook crushes the competition. That's one of those cliches. We used to talk about. Big successful. Companies is facebook crushing the competition. Legally or illegally. That's something the courts will decide. The federal trade commission and attorneys general from across the country are suing facebook. They say the company eliminated competition by either buying other companies or making it impossible for them to succeed connecticut. Attorney general william. Tong is one of the forty eight eight involved in the suit. Thank you sir for being here. Good morning oil. Facebook has been a dominant company. Four years now. Why filing this lawsuit right now. you don't facebook has expensive and power and what is done without our and its market dominance is. It's it's engaged in a program of what we call by in berry where they either by their competitors or if they don't play ball and sell they crushed their competitors and what they've done is they've crushed any threat to their business and their market domination. They've eliminated choice for consumers and they beat third party app developers and software developers into submission. And your argument is that's illegal. That's not just being smart competitive business. No it's not just being smart when you're a business like facebook and you essentially dominate an entire field that means so much to people today particularly in a global pandemic in public health when we rely so much on technology to stay in touch with our friends. Our family to do business to sell products to advertise Social media's become central really in our lives and when you're the dominant market player You have an obligation not to abuse that power and what a facebook has done. It's it has abused. Its market power to keep competitors out of the marketplace and the leverage that market power to prejudice. Anybody who doesn't play by facebook's rules okay but how have users been hurt by what you're alleging. Facebook has done the ordinary people of connecticut. How are they getting hurt here. So they really don't have any choice. They because facebook not only is the dominant player in its own right through facebook but because they bought instagram Which targets a younger generation including my kids and whatsapp. Widely globally used social messaging And also a direct peer to peer messaging app. Because they've done that. You really have very limited options and so you don't have a choice on where you go to For social media number one or two by products for example on on facebook facebook marketplace. And if you're a small business in connecticut Or even a bigger business and you want advertisers sell products. You really have to use facebook or one of its companion products so you don't have any choice because of their facebook argues that there is competition and i will tell you the young people in my life that the teens the tweens. They don't care about facebook at all. They're all on tiktok. Is it possible that in five ten years facebook will be kind of irrelevant or at least not the behemoth is now and that this is just sort of panicking over something that companies become dominant for a few years and they tend to fade know. Our view is Unless we do something. That won't be the case because facebook has frankly so much money and so much market power and that's why they're buyer berry strategy so successful because they can go and pay outside prices for instagram and whatsapp and essentially stifled competition. That way so no. We think that Unless the court takes action and unless the forty eight states plus the ftc are successful. Facebook will continue to dominate. The space facebook's general counsel makes an interesting argument noting that facebook bought instagram in two thousand and twelve and bought whatsapp a few years later and federal regulators said that was fine and now basically. They're going back on what they said. What do you think about that argument. Well we certainly weren't part of that determination and we look forward over the next two years to more robust antitrust enforcement enforcement of our nations and our states antitrust laws and the states the forty eight of us have done our own investigation and now in concert with the federal trade commission have determined that facebook is acting illegally. Okay connecticut attorney general william tom. Thanks so much for your time today. We appreciate it. Thank you well.

Facebook Attorney General William Connecticut Federal Trade Commission Tong Berry Social Media Instagram Attorney General William Tom
How Will Smith and Janet Hubert settle their decades-long feud on 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Reunion'

Daily Pop

04:59 min | 10 months ago

How Will Smith and Janet Hubert settle their decades-long feud on 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Reunion'

"So we'll and the first vibe. Janet hubert made amends during the fresh prince of bel-air reunion which just premiered on. hbo maximum. They both admitted in hard time for them over the years then genuine deep into just how much the feud cost her. When i left the show. I have this new baby and no one. Family disowned me. Hollywood disowned me. What you didn't realize either. That i was going through a lot at home right. You can no no very abusive marriage. You know i have. Children been divorced and second marriage and i can see now the level of pain and the level of struggle. But you know those words calling a black woman. Difficult in hollywood is to kiss of death death in your baskin back. When the president i wanna be is someone who protects you not someone at unleashes dodds. Wow so that was pretty deep. Why do you guys think it took them so long to finally have this heart to heart conversation. I'm actually surprised that didn't happen sooner off camera surprise at all that it didn't happen sooner. You know when you're in a feud with samadi and it's fresh and it hurts and then after a few months after a year five years goes by you. Just have a hard place for that person. You're not mad at them but you just don't wish them well. I think they got so use of that. Feeling of anger towards one another that just became a part of their lives and they probably for a long time. Didn't even realize and god what that feud was even a bout because it had been twenty seven years. Oh i disagree see. I don't think she's forgotten. What that feud is about for one second. I first of all. I started watching this last night and then stopped watching before this part. Of course those excited rundown this morning. This is some serious stuff. I mean obviously watching the fresh prince growing up realizing that and had been switched out with no. I realized that and i don't even remember how old we were. We were young. But i mean for things have gotten as bad as they did will smith and one of his co stars and we kind of nowhere to be this lovable likable hilarious guy. Like i was really surprised and for her to say you know to label the dark skinned black woman. Difficult in hollywood like as somebody that i was working with somebody that i was supposed to be family with has derailed my career for thirty years so little. It's a little too little too late. And i'm a huge will smith fan but once i kind of read what was going on between the two of them. It still isn't actually clear as to why he had such a problem with her. Yeah it's just really isn't too clear to me either. Besides the fact that she was able to work with but people are difficult all the time and the exactly you know it felt like a red table talk situation like taking a note from his wife jada. he's now opening up and having these heart to hearts. But being the will smith that we see and we know when we love now i. I'm surprised he wouldn't have this revelation. Sooner right over the years. I totally give being young. And he midst like your egos in the way you you you kind of. Who's on top of the world. He was really feeling himself. And and there was you know a little chip monir shoulder right and they typically goes away after a little while. I mean he took a long time. I mean they forced. You're i mean not. i don't want to say. They forced her out but they gave her such as she could thank you. They divorced her out by just giving her such a bad deal. I just don't understand. I think i would. I would have a clear to us where to get understanding what happened if i kind of knew what really started all of this but i just feel like this woman's career has really stalled because what what happened. I don't think that that's right but hold on the shoulders of will united because if sounds like the whole team may have thought because i thought yeah just like you know have only beef with will but i think it's like a family like if from this and both of you don't are both of us. Don't stand up or say something you're mad at the whole family because somebody was supposed to have your back. I think what happened. The situation was yes we do know will smith as in light one. The one who's connected but leaders get that way until about five ten years ago in in state like he was. This was a sitcom that was obviously very successful. I think for me to wrap it up in a bow. There's a disconnect as to why the tension was caused in the first place and back to justice point words. It's functional little family. If you guys made in my life difficult every day at seven months pregnant. I don't know how i would go to

Janet Hubert Samadi Smith Hollywood HBO Jada
Making The Case For A (Semi) Formal Specification Of CPython

The Python Podcast.__init__

05:03 min | 11 months ago

Making The Case For A (Semi) Formal Specification Of CPython

"Been using python since two thousand and five ish. My started using it when i was doing a master's degree on c. python stack machine and one of those things. We just need to do little. Toss jerry tables of data and all sorts of things and you just find. Co jarvis just a pain as php is just even worse than i just came across. Python is just perfect using visits. And so can you start by describing the current state of how the python language and the cpi runtime are defined if you the pipe people actively you have to just assume that c python is the definition of language and just drawing be bug battle there is a sort of specification on like four uses object model. How tax works excetera which is very useful. If you're learning the language will probably not great for initially learning the language or once. You've learnt it sort of to look stuff up was supposed to do in terms of a detail. Specification for continued. Cpi development and development of other potential virtual machines like fifi this sort of lacking and so you mentioned the how c python is a reference implementation. And everything has to define itself in terms of whatever c python happens to be doing and what that is can change from version to version. And so i'm curious if you can do what. The motivation is for actually trying to advocate for a more formalized specification of the language and whether the specification is then tied to see python itself or if it is a body apart from that and all of python should be trying to adhere to that. I think initially it would just be sc python. But there's no reason why. We can't differentiate watts so to see python specific. And what's more generally just python. The motivation really is this sort of evolution of the language and the run time. If we talk about changing things it's you know just looking at patches of sea code of sort of informal discussions about what we're gonna do whether you know how the language will change if you had a new feature. It's very hard to see. Sort of odd corner cases or to work out this a long term ramifications of things so i use pep three eighty as an example so pep three eighty the talk list syntax. Delegating generates but you probably noticed yield from. It's just the yield from keyword. Now that's a nice little feature. It's pretty well defined in the pep. It's got a big long chunk of code sort of equivalence sort of behavior but nonetheless that produce quite a few sort of odd sort of corner case bugs and in fact has taken quite a long time to knock out all this sort of obscure little bugs to do with handling throw whereas other corner cases most of which should always no one would notice but they sort of just crop up occasionally and those bugs. I don't know if we would have got rid of them. If we'd had more respect but i think it's likely that we would more likely seen those upfront. Python itself has been around for on the order of twenty five years at this point. I'm curious why you see now is being a good time to pursue the effort of formalizing the language in the run time so i think especially now is a good time because icon to twenty years ago or ten years ago. It's the old saying what's the best time to plant a tree. It was twenty years ago. But if you can't do that too now. I think it's a long term useful thing and would be nice if it had five ten years ago but didn't so best now and so because the language does have all of this history accrued at this point and there is this entire ecosystem that has grown up around it in terms of libraries and packages and implementation of the run time i'm curious how that overall scope and wait. Impacts the overall effort required to actually specification to fruition if it would be a complete pretty formal specification that make it a huge job. But i still think a specification of like the core language itself. Even we're a bit fuzzy about sort of some of the interactions with cpi api or things of that level of a and the other thing is it's doesn't have to. I mean it can grow if the specs of almost there for a new language feature or interaction with important library then specifying changes to those things might be useful to add those things specification as part of that is just the nature of open source. Stuff is it's you know if there's something there that's almost there. People motivated sort of push a little bit further to get what they want so somebody has to do enough for the work. To get things going you brought up the topic of this specification during the language

Jarvis Jerry
Marketing Strategies To Grow Your SaaS Startup With Jackie Hermes

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Marketing Strategies To Grow Your SaaS Startup With Jackie Hermes

"Kind of companies do you guys work with them? An Excel T. Yeah, so we work with B2B software companies. Mostly we work with somebody to be serviced businesses as well. We kind of evaluate them on a case-by-case basis to see I'm going to work best with and those are from pre-revenue start up that have raised, you know, a certain amount of money where it makes sense to invest in outside marketing resources up to I think our loyal client right now is about 30 million and it's private equity-owned. So we have a few private equity-owned companies in our portfolio as well great. So so I wanted to talk to a few different things with you in some of the tactics you guys are using for startups because it is a lot different running marketing for a start-up that maybe it's just building that audience verse is that company that's been around for five ten years and and people know who they are and and what they do one thing in particular was, New Jersey. Testing for for startups because you know, everybody as marketers were like you need to be testing. You need to run your split test figure out what works for your conversion, but one of life's challenges for start-up is do they even have enough traffic on a website to start running testing. So one that wanted to get your thoughts on that and and what you guys do for your clients. Yeah. It's interesting. We talked about a v testing and went in to fit for clients on our team, but we usually don't do it especially for our smaller clients because it's like if you're just gaining an audience if you have 10 people look at something it doesn't matter if you split test it or not, right because the sample size is so small. You're not going to get any information on what's really working and what's not wage. And in addition we're working with companies that are selling mostly Enterprise type software. So some of our clients are a little bit higher volume or they have contracts of 10 a.m. $50,000 a year, but when those contracts get above, you know, like Fifty a hundred thousand dollars a year. It's not a volume game and it's not you know, we're not a b testing the mises. It's like looking for getting individual buyers through the door and it becomes a completely different ball game. For example, one of our clients sells a lease accounting software into only the top 400 CPA firms in the country. So they only have four hundred prospects. And so that's a much different game than when you know, you have 10,000 not 5,000 or however many prospects to deal with so yet a hundred percent. I agree with you there totally different depending on how big your Market is. What is the minimum audience size? You need to start start running tests if you're going to yeah, so split testing on the website, I think can happen once you have maybe a few age. Thousand visitors. I mean if you could do it with less than that, and I mean there's a lot of different ways you can still pass right? You can split test landing pages if you're even using landing pages anymore. That's something that we are talking about moving away from you can split test emails. So I think it kind of is a case-by-case basis, but I wouldn't even be talking about that until you have a few thousand bucks website visitors a thousand subscribers in your email or whatever in in less than that. I think it's just a case of looking at your messaging you have an email that doesn't perform. Well, you know, like oh what part of your messaging is not working if people are opening but they're not clicking on anything that there's something wrong with the inside of your email, right? Yeah. So it's the format. It's the length. It's I mean God I see emails that don't work and I'm like, well this header is gigantic. There's nothing to click on here. There's way too much tax the lengths our way down in the email, you know, and so maybe we are dead. A few weeks later or trying something that is a lot shorter that has linked up higher in the email. So in those I think it's just a a matter of evaluating Effectiveness case-by-case versus testing against another variable. Does that make sense? Yeah. Yeah that does make sense, you know until you get the traffic. It doesn't make sense. It will take forever to get enough of em, that statistically you could say, you know, this version of the homepage converts better than that version and the time. I think would be so long that it doesn't even make sense things have changed in the world. Even you know, yeah well and just one more thing to think about how long it takes just to get one version of everything approved within a company, right, So if you're doing three versions and you don't even have enough traffic to get good data on what's working. It's just going to take longer to get that out there. I'm a lot more of a fan of wage. Getting your message out. Even if it's imperfect like get it 90% done get it out. And if it doesn't perform well understand why for your next message that's going to go. Yeah,

New Jersey
"five ten years ago" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Accordingly and he says focus needs to be on helping people who get sick as well as working on prevention of Facebook is canceled a major conference scheduled for Saturday Microsoft is canceling gaming conference in San Francisco I'm at Baxter Bloomberg radio thanks so much you're listening to Bloomberg business week Gil Borok still with us U. S. president chief executive officer for colliers international sticking with us for a bit I gotta ask you just in a couple minutes that we have here in this little Phil as we call it New York verses LA what are the trends that that you're seeing yeah well L. A. it lasted two thousand nineteen had the highest volume of sales come from long higher than New York which is interesting right and it's a very different markets you know this is a it New York that's because I'm here today yeah big off this big office stock and then as industrial you know outside of outside of Manhattan of course LA today has less office stock there New York certainly quite a bit less but big industrial sort of them it's a very different which is why it's been such a healthy market in LA that's not to say that we haven't see office sales in New York we have but industrialists really disproportionate Gallagher out apples to apples right additional rare than apples to apples compare but we have the weather yeah yeah and LA has just like it just goes and goes and goes and I mean in talking to people and I was out there this week to LA's Brad there are different the level but you know there there are parts of the city that even five ten years ago people wouldn't go to or even think about living or working there right that is correct says you go east of downtown LA for example that's not the place to be you know got warehouses and you pass some frankly not so great areas and then you get the most popular restaurant in the city old some of them so it this is in line with the live work play right that that there is at all certain developing that you would have never thought would develop to be what they are today just got about ten seconds here are people still moving back to the cities are we really seeing that trainers I think so it is I do think so yeah I think it's a millennial young person yeah yes all right stick with the skill Borak we're gonna talk a.

Facebook Microsoft San Francisco Gil Borok chief executive officer Phil LA New York Manhattan Gallagher Borak Baxter Bloomberg Bloomberg president colliers international
"five ten years ago" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"I remember maybe five ten years ago, Roxie. Oh, was a notorious issue upgraded windows, nothing at work. And it turned out it was a Roxie driver that was on there. So just make sure you get the latest versions. I think you're okay, you're better off. But it may be a little hard, but dig through the when you get elements, which is a really good premiere elements, which is really good video. Editing package. One, I recommend you might have to look through it. But it absolutely will build will burn raise these okay. And PDF foams. Acrobatic dobie. I don't know. I would stay away from adobe for pedia-. I don't know if it's bugger than other software. But because it's everybody's expecting you to have it. That's where the bad guys. Go. I like FOX it. FOX IT. Okay. Yeah. And, and you know, maybe it's not as it's not more secure. In fact, there have been problems with FOX but it's just not as common. So the bad guys are always going to write the, the bad stuff for the most common programs. Right. That's what they're okay. So I stay away from it. I try to put his little adobe PDF stuff on my remember, you can read with the new, Microsoft, edge browser you can read PDF's. But if you wanna do form create PDF's, then FOX, it were cute FTP's, another good one that I like, okay. I mean cute. Yes. Okay. Last question I hadn't still. Well, it, it didn't even come with a. Software to actually view a blue DVD, although it came with the with. But didn't so that I I call it. The Adele and everything got twenty four seven you know, covers and everything that help, and they install the L C. Yes. Which is free. You don't. Yeah. For years, but it'll play regular boot. It would play a regular DVD but when it goes to Blu Ray, it says blue era this. Right, this knees, a library for as C S Dakota. Oh. And you'll system does not have it. And they did put another. Software to burn it. And I'm not so I play it and its power media Blu. Ray. I see what's going on here. So this is copy protection, the ACS dynamic library. If you Google it. Okay. You will find the, the way to get around that. Okay. So that's copied petition. Yeah. Blu ray? So, you know when when the Blu Ray committee got down to making this new Blu Ray format. They said, we don't we don't want to do, what we did last time they made DVD's with copy protection, but a high school kid who has since he's now an adult, but since been named DVD John, cracked, it cracked it like within weeks, John lecture Hanson, and he's become famous as a result. So the Blu Ray guy, said, well, we can't let that happen. So they put a lot more copy protection on and even the ability to rotate the Blu Ray keys and stuff like that. They've never to my knowledge I've never yet done that they have the capability of doing it because they haven't done that the existing keys are out there, it would be wrong of me to tell you..

Blu Ray FOX PDF adobe John lecture Hanson Microsoft Google Adele ACS C S Dakota five ten years
"five ten years ago" Discussed on Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

"Is amazing business radio with ship hikind. We're back on amazing business radio. And I love this idea that connected strategy, and I jokingly say put a chip in the back of my net. I remember the movie minority report, I think we've brought this up once on the show probably a year or two ago. But in the movie, Tom Cruise is like walking, you know, down, and the stores, are like screaming out in them because they know he's there. And, and I think it's such a an interesting thing. Are we willing to give companies informational not that many years ago probably maybe four or five years ago? Target came out with a great concept that we want to send you emails, but we only want to send you emails that you want. So tell us what you like us to send you information about. And I think he can do the same thing here. You can opt in to accompany at various levels. I mean these that being part of what makes us work. Think about the relationship that you form was the customer is on Personalizing. What customers which of wider than? This one of in marketing, in general known forms of customer relationships doubt, recall epizotic, a lot of friction and eight points of the customers. Those the firm on of effort, that is put into the relationship, it is appreciated by the customer in the more, you two million customers repeated interactions. Moore, can you tailor the offerings of the custody. We think is happening is positive feedback through the more you and I interact with each other. The more known about your reference pharaoh for job. I can do offending your needs next time. But Moreover, I non about people just like you. But there are other people see unique in that way. But they're gonna somewhat similar to you. Learn about the population thereby can create new for outs new services. I can move my assortment just better job of that market segment. Visible of these fake noobs are really making the company's strong relationship richer, and the Assadi. What, what is still the competitive advantage of talk? Now you bring up a great point. And I'll use Disney's example when you wear that band it connects to your phone is at correct. What was his thing was? The Disney magic grabs interest in initial version, did not connect to the form is basically the hopper the sensing hopper. Right. The par. The latest version. Disney actually did Shanghai park is it just go to Ray on entirely by the way, was a magic fan reason for the day is in? No connect by to your. So you eliminate the banned altogether. Exactly the race on early on the race amid interesting question to Nikolai was, which was a question. Like what can I do as a small business? The small business in, in the past, maybe five ten years ago, you're hearing things such as magic bandages while the taking G infrastructure hostile off something advanced way to millions and millions will everybody has magic fan in the pocket. And basically, the technology is there it you can provide these magic customer experiences at no cost, even a small, so the phone becomes the magic band. Absolute end here. But here's the point about personalization, and Nikolai whether it's chip in shoe connected to the band, or Christians example of Disney, if I'm a family of three in my kids are five year old boy, two girls seven and eight. Okay. And I go. Win. And I'm from a certain part of the country. If I all I need to do is give Disney that information who I'm with, and they can start to customize personalise my experience because they will compare me to the tens of thousands of families that also have three kids, a boy, that's five and a girl to girl, seven in all of a sudden it's like they probably know exactly what my kids and I are going to want before we actually know we want it and make suggestions. I think that's a of its predictive analytics, but I think it ties in when you tie the artificial intelligence into the connection that you have with your customers, magical things happen. Absolutely nothing. That two we need to make a one is really understanding different customers preferences of how much they want to actually be connected at how much they want to have things on the so you may be customer said, look, right? Of the more the better and you think maybe everything's really natural whereas some other customers while that's rather creepy. What to do and, and customers will very much different on the amount of connective that they want, right? And so, I think that is first of all really important that we are not again, just reading one kind of connected strategy when Klein of customer experience with some customers like fast rights, slow writes, some people lot of activity, some people like less. Right. Or some people want to be more in the driver's seat versus other customers can just automate, these things the you'd do this for me. That's I think that's, that's one piece the other piece we haven't quite touched on yet. So far. We've talked about the customer experience. Now the other, what makes the the magic as strategy is not only does the magic band allowed. Disney to create a more custom-tailored, wonderful experience for the customer for the visitor, but it also drives up there. So now since I know where all these customers, all right? I can direct you to underlies me. Sources right. Here's a right. That has a short line. He has a right that has a long line, I can provide you a services once it's really convenient from your friends since if I can convince you to have your lunch at eleven fifty rather than until thirty. All of a sudden has less acute fell thirty I don't need to have more staff, twelve thirty two creates shoulder-length twelve thirty, but I can use my stabbing up sixty and so by being able to direct somewhat kind of customers again actually not only the customers have experienced business running the park more physically is allow able to the weather cops, and this sounds complicated. You know, my idea of a connected experience for me as I have a an app. It's the shop hike in happen. You carry me around in your pocket. I have videos that come out with every week articles. And, and if you wanted to you could interact with me, that's real simple, that's an app is that I realized that is such a, a basic sophomoric level of connective, but. Would you is that where it all starts maybe just something as simple as that? It is absolutely simplest that every business. John's took questions want into out, what is the customers get out of your app, or just imagine a customer, extent, you wanna provide what is negative terms at what drives of willingness to pay the custody live the experience. So that is what the need of the customer. And then there's a how are you ship going around? And are you for filling those needs, and it creates some fulfilling possibly those apps don't fall from having to build them up as wholesome Disney has higher restaurant workers has by food as organized on survives fulfillment, plus, and usually in the past is tension between the want

Disney Nikolai Tom Cruise Assadi epizotic Moore Shanghai park John Klein Ray five ten years five years five year
"five ten years ago" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on KTOK

"Our news editor at coast to coast AM is, of course, Tim banal. And he has a feature called in coast. You missed it and Tim. What do you have forced this week, my friend? Hey, George good to talk to you. Again. It was kind of a tough week. I think you know. Mentioning the story that kinda stopped everything in its tracks this week. And that was the passing Dan Freidman. I know we're going to have a tribute to later on tonight. I had the great privilege oh, over the course of the last fifteen years, spent a lot of time with them had a lot of conversations with them hung out with him at conferences, and stuff like that. And he was just a wonderful, wonderful person, and I'm gonna miss them an awful lot. And I just want to say that always upbeat always. Oh, absolutely. He was he was the best and I'm gonna miss an awful lot, and my heart goes out to all of his friends and family. Or also, you know hurting this weekend as well. I'm sure on that note. We'll take things from sad to Ladd here and move into stories of the week. The first one kind of I guess you could say sort of a little tribute to stand. This is an interesting story came out of Turkey, a pilot for Turkish Airlines actually filmed, a UFO while he was flying in route from Istanbul from Cologne to instable, and it's, it's not the greatest video. I've seen in my life. But what's remarkable about this? Is that it was a pilot for? Turkish Airlines posted this on his social media, which is like unheard of five ten years ago. I don't think any pilot in the right mind would do it would not admit it. Yeah. Yeah. It's amazing. And we've been following this trend. This has been happening over the last year or so this is the third time a pilot for a major airline has mentioned seeing a UFO this year. And there were about four last year that this happened, so something's happening where where the stigma is changing. And he said it was an incredibly bright celestial object at high altitude very close to them. He said it was very bright in spite of the son. He was certain based on his experience, as a pilot that it was a star or satellite. And he said it was unlike anything ever seen before. And then it took off at an incredible speed. So you know what was it? I don't know. But it's it's, it's remarkable not only the phenomenon but also that he was brave enough to go on social media. Share the video great story. And the other story here is also another strange thing in the sky. It's a little cut and dry. But it's kind of interesting to look at the number one spot last night in the number two spot in the carousel tonight. A woman in Argentina. Monica are Amaya took this picture of what we describe, as an Djelic figure. It looks like Jesus to me. Doesn't it? Some folks are comparing it to Jesus and the detail. You know, I've seen these pictures over the years, the detail on this one is remarkable. I mean the head is, is pretty distinct. The arms the robe. I mean you can really make out a lot of a lot of detail in that one. And I know skeptics will say, oh, it's a trick of light and shadow, and it's the sun in the clouds. But, you know sometimes when you had when you when you when you're down when you're down, you know you gotta think you yourself. Well, somebody had to put the sun and clouds, there, someone had to make that combination happen for that thing to happen in the sky. So who knows you know, hold out hope I guess. Right. You got that, right. I would think maybe somebody had some kind of light machine and they were lighting something in the cloud said to show, the figure of Jesus, because, it's, it's remarkable to. It really is amazing. I'm sure some conspiratorial folks will well wonder if it's you know that old thing where they said they're going to test out. Holographic technology or something. You know, you never know. But it is, it's one of the better, one of the better, you know Jesus nominees that I've seen quite some time it was..

Dan Freidman Turkish Airlines Tim banal news editor George Ladd Turkey Istanbul instable Argentina Cologne Monica Amaya five ten years fifteen years
"five ten years ago" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on KTOK

"Thousand our news editor at coast to coast AM is, of course, Tim banal, and he has a feature called in coast. You missed it and Tim, what do you have forced this week, my friend? Hey, good to talk to you again. Thank you. It was kind of a tough week. I think you know, knock I mentioning the story that kinda stopped everything in its tracks this week. And that was the passing Dan Freidman. I know we're gonna have a tribute to later on tonight. I got the great privilege. Oh, getting to know staying over the course of the last fifteen years, spent a lot of time with them had a lot of conversations with them hung out with them at conferences, and stuff like that. And he was just a wonderful, wonderful person, and I'm gonna miss them an awful lot. And I just want to say that here always upbeat always. Oh, absolutely. He was he was the best and I'm gonna miss an awful lot. And my heart goes out to all of his friends and family. Or also, you know hurting this weekend as well. I'm sure on that note. We'll take things from sad to Ladd here and move into stories of the week. The first one kind of I guess you could say sort of a little tribute to stand. This is an interesting story came out of Turkey a pilot for Turkish Airlines actually filmed a UFO while he was flying in route. From Istanbul off from Cologne to Istanbul and it's, it's not the greatest you up. Oh video I've seen in my life. But what's remarkable about this? Is that it was a pilot for Turkish Airlines posted this on his social media, which is like unheard of five ten years ago? I don't think any pilot in the right mind would do that. It would not admit it. Yeah. Yeah. It's amazing. And we've been following this trend. This has been happening over the last year or so this is the third time a pilot for major airline has mentioned seeing you up this year. And there were about four last year that this happened, so something's happening where where the stigma is changing. And he said it was an incredibly bright celestial object at high altitude very close to them. He said it was very bright in spite of the son, he was certain based on his experience, as a pilot that it was no star or satellites. And he said it was unlike anything ever seen before. And then it took off at incredible speed. So you know what was it? I don't know. But it's it's, it's remarkable not only the phenomenon but also that he was brave enough to go on social media, and share the video great story. And the other story here is also another strange thing in the sky. It's a little cut and dry. But it's kinda interesting to look at it. We had it up in the. Number one spot last night in the number two spot in the carousel tonight. A woman in Argentina. Monica are Amaya took this picture of what we describe, as an Djelic figure. It looks like Jesus to me, doesn't it? Yes, I'm folks are comparing it to Jesus and the detail. You know, I've seen a lot of these pictures over the years, the detail on this one is remarkable. I mean the head is pretty distinct the arms the row. I mean you can really make out a lot of a lot of detail in that one. And I know skeptics will say, oh, it's a trick of light and shadow in the sun and the clouds. But, you know, sometimes when you had when you when you when you're down when you're down, you know you gotta think you sell. Well, somebody had to put the sun and clouds, there, someone had to make that combination happen for that thing to happen in the sky. So who knows you know, hold out hope I guess. Right. You got that, right. I would think maybe somebody had some kind of light machine and they were lighting something in the cloud said to show, the figure of Jesus, because, it's, it's a remarkable to it really is amazing. Yeah. I'm sure some conspiratorial folks will well wonder if it's you know that old thing where they said they're going to test out holographic. Technol-. Or something does you know you never know. But it is, it's one of the better one of the better, you know Jesus novels that I've seen in quite some time it was. I can imagine being there in person by gosh, I love it. Thank you. That's Tim banal our editor at coast to coast, a oh. Hey folks, producer Tom here, the other day, I was on the web looking at the coast to coast AM store and all the amazing fun items that are available signature mugs for you coffee. Drinkers v. Neck shirts for the ladies baseball, caps, bathrobes, and more. It got me thinking about where all these great items come from. So with me now is Jeff Schwartz. Jeff is the CEO of Schwartz promotions in the creator of all these neat merchandise. Jeff, how do you come up with all the ideas for the coast to coast? AM products. Tom, thanks for asking, I try to come up with items that are both useful and fun. And some of my ideas, even come from coast listeners, and what's really need is we have new products and promotions all the time. And how long does it take for people to get their items? We ship all. Orders twenty four hours so they get to you in no time. Well, there you go. Convenience shopping and shipping. Click to order your favorite item in, it'll be on the way in no time these items are must for any coast listener. Here's what listener Angelina has to say. I can't tell you miles, I get from people I coast to coast baseball cap. I even got one to give birth. They get for friends. She loves it, too. And now we both look really stylish. Well, there.

Tim banal Jeff Schwartz baseball Turkish Airlines Tom Istanbul Dan Freidman news editor Jesus Turkey Ladd Angelina Argentina AM store Monica editor producer CEO Amaya
"five ten years ago" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Eric coast to coast AM is, of course, Tim banal, and he has a feature called in coast. You missed it and Tim. What do you have for this week, my friend? Hey, george. Good to talk to you again. Thank you. It was kind of a tough week. I think you know, the knock I mentioning the story that kinda stopped everything in its tracks this week. And that was the passing Dan Freidman. I know we're gonna have a tribute to later on tonight. I had the great privilege of getting to know staying over the course of the last fifteen years, spent a lot of time with them had a lot of conversations with them hung out with them in different conferences, and stuff like that. And he was just a wonderful, wonderful person, and I'm gonna miss them an awful lot. And I just wanted to say that here always upbeat always. Oh, absolutely. He was he was the best and I'm gonna miss them an awful lot and my heart goes out to all of his friends and family. Or also, you know hurting this weekend as well. I'm sure on that note. We'll take things from sad to Ladd here and move into stories of the week. The first one kind of I guess you could say sort of a little tribute to stand. This is an interesting story came out of Turkey a pilot for Turkish Airlines actually filmed a UFO while he was flying in wrote. From Istanbul from Cologne to Instanbul, and it's, it's not the greatest UFO video I've seen in my life, but what's remarkable about this? Is that it was a pilot for Chuck airlines posted this on his social media, which is like unheard of five ten years ago. I don't think any pilot in the right mind would do that. They would not admit it. Yeah, yeah. It's amazing. And we've been following this trend. This has been happening over the last year or so this is the third time a pilot for a major airline has mentioned seeing you up this year. And there were about four last year that this happened, so something's happening where where the stigma is changing. And he said it was an incredibly bright celestial object at high altitude very close to them. He said it was very bright in spite of the son, he was certain based on his experience, as a pilot that it was not a star or satellite. And he thought it was unlike anything ever seen before. And then. Took off at incredible speed. So you know what was it? I don't know. But it's it's, it's remarkable not only the phenomenon but also that he was brave enough to go on social media, and share the video great story. And the other story here is also another strange thing in the sky. It's a little cut and dry. But it's kind of interesting to look at it. We had it up in the number one spot last night in the number two spot in the carousel tonight. A woman in Argentina. Monica are Amaya took this picture of what we describe, as an Djelic figure. It looks like Jesus to me, doesn't it? Exactly. Yeah. Yes. I'm folks are, are comparing it to Jesus and the detail. You know, I've seen a lot of these pictures over the years, the detail on this one is remarkable. I mean the head is, is pretty distinct. The arms the robe. I mean you can really make out a lot of a lot of detail in that one. And I know skeptics will say, oh, it's a trick of light and shadow in the sun and the clouds. But, you know sometimes when you had when you when you when you're down when you're down, you know you gotta think yourself. Well, somebody had to put the sun and the clouds there, someone had to make that combination happen for that thing to happen in the sky. So who knows you know, hold out hope I guess. Right. You got that, right. I would think maybe somebody had some kind of light machine and they were lading something in the cloud said to show the figure of Jesus, because, it's, it's remarkable to it really is amazing. Yeah. I'm sure some conspiratorial folks will well wonder if it's you know that old thing where they said they're going to test out holographic. Technol-. Or something? You know, you never know. But it is, it's one of the better one of the better, you know Jesus novel that I've seen quite some time it was. I can imagine being there in person by gosh shaking, but a love love it. Thank you. That's tim. But all our editor at coast-to-coast AO. Hey folks, producer Tom here, the other day, I was on the web looking at the coast to coast AM store and all the amazing fun items that are available signature mugs for you coffee. Drinkers v. Neck shirts for the ladies baseball, caps, bathrobes, and more. It got me thinking about where all these great items come from. So with me now is Jeff Schwartz. Jeff is the CEO of Schwartz promotions in the creator of all this neat merchandise. Jeff, how do you come up with all the ideas for the coast to coast? AM products. Tom, thanks for asking, I try to come up with items that are both useful and fun. And some of my ideas, even come from coast listeners, and what's really need is we have new products and promotions all the time. And how long does it take for people to get their items? We ship all orders in twenty four hours. Hours so they get to you in no time. Well, there you go. Convenience shopping and shipping. Click to order your favorite item in, it'll be on the way in no time these items are must for any coast listener. Here's what listener Angelina has to say. I can't tell you smiles, I get from people women coast to coast baseball cap. I even got one to give birth. They get for French. She loves it, too. And really stylish..

Jeff Schwartz Tim banal baseball Instanbul Tom Dan Freidman Eric Turkish Airlines Jesus Turkey Ladd Chuck Angelina Argentina Cologne AM store editor Monica producer
"five ten years ago" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Thousand our news editor at coast to coast. AM is, of course, timber knoll and he has a feature called in coast. You missed it and Tim, what do you have forced this week, my friend? Hey, good to talk to you again. Thank you. It was kind of a tough week. I think you know, the not I mentioning the story that kind of stopped everything in its tracks this week. And that was the passing Dan Freidman. I know we're gonna have a tribute to later on tonight. I got the great privilege. Oh, getting to know STAN over the course of the last fifteen years, spent a lot of time with them had a lot of conversations with them hung out with them in different conferences, and stuff like that. And he was just a wonderful, wonderful person. And I'm gonna miss them an awful lot. And I just want to say that here always upbeat always. Oh, absolutely. He was he was the best and I'm gonna miss an awful lot, and my heart goes out to all of his friends and family. Or also, you know hurting this weekend as well. I'm sure on that note. We'll take things from sad to Ladd here and move into stories of the week. The first one kind of I guess you could say sort of a little tribute to stand. This is an interesting story came out of Turkey, a pilot for Turkish Airlines actually filmed, a UFO while he was flying in route from Istanbul from Cologne to Histon bowl, and it's, it's not the greatest video. I've seen in my life. But what's remarkable about this? Is that it was a pilot for? Turkish Airlines posted this on his social media, which is like unheard of me, five ten years ago. I don't think any pilot in the right mind would do that. They wouldn't admit they would not admit it. Yeah, yeah, it's amazing. And we've been following this trend. This has been happening over the last year or so this is the third time. Uphill it for a major airline has mentioned seeing you up this year. And there were about four last year that this happened, so something's happening where where the stigma is changing. And he said it was an incredibly bright celestial object at high altitude very close to them. It was very bright in spite of the son. He was certain based on his experience, as a pilot that was no star or satellite. And he thought it was unlike anything ever seen before. And then it took off at an incredible speed. So you know what was it? I don't know. But it's it's, it's remarkable not only the phenomenon but also that he was brave enough to go on social media. And show the video great story and the other story here is also another strange thing in the skies. A little cut and dry. But it's kind of interesting to look at it. We had it up in the number one spot last night in the number two spot in the carousel tonight. A woman in Argentina. Monica are Myo took this picture of what we describe, as an Djelic figure. It looks like Jesus to me. Doesn't it? Yes, I'm folks are comparing it to Jesus and the detail. You know, I've seen these pictures over the years, the detail on this one is remarkable. I mean the head is, is pretty distinct. The arms the robe. I mean you can really make out a lot of a lot of detail in that one. And I know skeptics will say, oh, it's a trick of light and shadow, and it's the sun in the clouds. But, you know sometimes when you had when you when you when you're down when you're down, you know you gotta think yourself. Well, somebody had to put the sun and the clouds there, someone had to make that combination happen for that thing to happen in the sky. So who knows you know, hold out hope I guess. Right. You got that, right. I would think maybe somebody had some kind of light machine and they were lighting something in the cloud said to show, the figure of Jesus, because, it's, it's remarkable to it really is amazing. I'm sure some conspiratorial folks will will wonder if it's you know that old thing where they said they're going to test out holographic. Technol-. Or something? You know, you never know. But it is, it's one of the better one of the better, you know Jesus novel that I've seen quite some time it was. I can imagine being there. Impersonal gosh. I love it. Thank you. Editor at coast to coast, a oh. Hey folks, producer Tom here, the other day, I was on the web looking at the coast to coast, AM store and all the amazing fun items that are available signature, mugs view coffee. Drinkers v. Neck shirts for the ladies baseball, caps, bathrobes, and more. It got me thinking about where all these great items come from. So with me now is Jeff Schwartz. Jeff is the CEO of Schwartz promotions in the creator of all this neat merchandise. Jeff, how do you come up with all the ideas for the coast to coast? AM products. Tom, thanks for asking, I try to come up with items that are both useful and fun. And some of my ideas, even come from Khosla, snookers, and what's really need is we have new products and promotions all the time. And how long does it take for people to get their items? We ship all orders twenty four hours, so they get to you in no time. Well, there you go. Convenience shopping and shipping. Click to order your favorite item, and it'll be on the way in no time these items are must for any coast listener. Here's what listener Angelina has to. Say I can't tell you may smiles I get from people women coast to coast. Baseball cap got one to give it a birthday gift for French..

Jeff Schwartz Turkish Airlines Tom baseball Dan Freidman news editor Tim Jesus STAN Ladd Turkey Khosla Angelina Istanbul Argentina AM store Editor Monica producer
"five ten years ago" Discussed on Beyond the Baseline

Beyond the Baseline

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Beyond the Baseline

"And you know, we have the Roger fetters Serena's of the world who kind of keep amazing us all they were gonna retire five ten years ago, and here they are still winning. So I think for tiger to extend that theme is remarkable everything he's been through personally professionally. I think it's just a great thing for people to realize that you can come back, and you you know, you. You can do those things again. And as you said for for Petra, I think it was interesting to hear, you know, she's she didn't watch necessarily. But she heard, and I think she as she said, she really respects him as as an athlete and interesting to hear as you said, she's in her own sort of comeback. So yeah, I think that with tiger. We all know the back story, and we all know that the context and the redemption. But I think you raise a good point Jamie just strictly from an agent time perspective forty three years old and two thousand eight was his last major. I mean, two thousand eight you we could have fun with us. I mean, I looked it up while I was while on von of it was ranked number one that was a few days after goes the week after the two thousand eight French Open. So we we have not had rough Adele win a major outside of Paris in two thousand eight three no Williams head eight majors. Whatever Felix OJ was seven years old. We can have fun with this. Bama hadn't been elected yet. The point is that's a long longtime even for someone as magnificently skilled as Tiger Woods. And I think too long time to go without majors. I think it's interesting compare and contrast to continued excellence ad from young age to an older age for for him. He was so good so young and obviously had this peak and then really came crashing down. And then now, he's he, you know has slowly climbed back up, and you know, he wasn't. It's not like he's been doing great for years and years. So I think that that whole concept to is just really remarkable me talk about Serena sustaining even through all the things and federal sustaining..

Tiger Woods Roger fetters Serena Felix OJ Petra Jamie Bama Adele Paris Williams forty three years five ten years seven years
"five ten years ago" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Or or just looking to manage your assets, you found the right place biz talk radio. The Ray Lucia show. Okay. So where we left off and for those that are just tuning in. And this is important. To finance professors. Did a study a couple of three four five ten years ago actually eleven years ago now, and it stuck with me all these years, and I was able to find it through a professor from Tulane university. Actually, whom we met, Johnny. And I met back when we broadcasted from the steps of two lane two thousand four I think it was when it was back. It was back in the day. Yes. It was. Anyway, I really appreciate wish. I could remember his name. I totally apart. Give us if you're watching. Yeah. Really? But but but anyway, the article was titled the study was titled as bonds first withdrawal sequence extend portfolio longevity long way as saying his spend, your fixed income, I in retirement and everything else will work its way through having that rising equity glide path that we talked about last week. That's exactly what happens when you spend. And bonds verse if you're fifty fifty in stock and you spend ten percent of your bonds right here. Now, sixty forty stocks over bonds. Right. And if you spend it down to zero you're one hundred percent stuff was everybody says one hundred percent stock is way too risky. That would be true. If you didn't do the balance of the plan, which is making sure that you've got your essential expenses covered. By what guaranteed income social security pensions annuities bond ladders with tips or whatever. That's between you and your adviser. That's not what we do anymore. We talk on the radio and television talk about stuff that's pretty freaking important, and this is one of the most important lessons. I ever learned in finance, and that is even the professors and everybody else sometimes gets it wrong because these two professors got these spending bonds first, right? They went back and looked at one hundred thirty six years of data taking a seven and a half percent fixed distribution from retirement accounts and determined that spending bonds I worked ninety percent of the time produced the best results over a fifty fifty mix rebalanced or spending the stocks. I so it worked ninety percent of the time. But the other ten percents I looked at the study it was physically in. Significant. So it's basically spending bonds I instead of doing that systematic withdrawal with automatic rebalancing, which I can assure you unless you're adviser tended, any of my classes, or is a religious follower of this program. That's what they're doing. They are doing a systematic withdrawal with some kind of annual monthly every other year rebalancing to stay consistent with the asset allocation mix or they're doing what you said, John they're doing a hundred mine is your age or some target date strategy that takes the glide path in the exact opposite direction making it more conservative as you age, which increases the odds of Ugo and broken retirement. And why did.

professor Ray Lucia Tulane university Johnny John Ugo one hundred percent ninety percent one hundred thirty six years three four five ten years eleven years ten percent
"five ten years ago" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

10:03 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"NewsRadio ten thirty to seven. On Sunday morning. February the seventeenth two thousand nineteen. And if I say if. The booms creek a bit more when you wake up in the morning. You just don't have the same zip and pep used to have five ten years ago. I've got a gentleman here who's going to help you and we talked about Las Vegas the first hour, but we're going to talk about what you can do as far as meals and other adjustments to your lifestyle to make it much more comfortable for you as you get older. They'll take us from the beginning. How you came up with this concept? Well, I had. I've always had close friends and talking about feelings has been very important to me, and I've had women friends and mentors when I was a young, man. And there was a several older women in my life that were very very important to me. And one woman I met at the beginning of my research Vegas way back in sixty seven and now ninety four years old and still a very dear friend of mine very alert. I call her every week, and I called her and I was just reflecting on life. And I told her I said is my memory. Bad. Or? Gene, something I don't understand. I said it seems to me when I was young people when they were fifty or old people when they were six the ancient and today people in their seventies and eighties are in far better shape. And of course, leaving out people with illnesses. But the person that's healthy. And she said, no, you're right. Nice. Simple. I don't understand it. I said are we have a minute much of our growing land is dissipated. It doesn't have as good nutrients today. We literally have hundreds of potential toxins that didn't exist way back when in our living areas and working areas, we shouldn't be healthier and she shot back at me and said stimulation. And I felt like a lightning bolt had hit me. And I thought back when I wish you on. And we didn't have all the entertainment and all of the other things. And when I was young the people when men retired. They ended up sitting on the couch or the porch staring in the distance, the wives when the children had left USA had some responsibilities, but not a lot. And so they sat and I realized how tuned in turned on how impactful that is. And I started thinking about my parents life. They were both born in the first decade of the nineteen hundred. There was no telephone. There was snow radio. There was no phonograph. There was no distraction. So indoor plumbing was just coming in most. People didn't have it. So I started thinking because when you look at the movies, and you look at a movie about the early part of the nineteen hundred zero show old cars, which only the very rich had driving down paved streets living like they do the day while they didn't have running water. They didn't have the streets were mostly unpaved mostly covered used by horses. And you had to keep your tires washed after driving. It was a completely different world. And I thought about my current history. I start from the first day European came into the Nevada territory, the native American territory of Nevada a century before gambling was legalized, and I take that whole history. The first chapters till legalization started and then from then on to nineteen fifty and I thought. I would like to present what life was really like back then. And I started researching I the inventions and what intrigued me because I'm always looking for the human interest aspect. Was how they develop these things. But then to other things hit me one of them is I started getting census figures and other studies that were done these things were developed very slowly. For example. The first refrigerator was sold in nineteen o nine yet. In nineteen fifty over half, the American homes still had iceboxes with someone every day delivering a block of ice and someone else delivering milk bottle because they didn't have much storage space. I looked at all the other things, and it was amazing. How slow this happened in nineteen fifty a quarter of American homes did not have running water, and that was half of the rural homes so life was very different than it's been projected in our media. And then as I studied each invention. It hit me I thought of each of these things as individual elements, and I started to realize that virtually all of them were. Inventor figuring out a way to harness one of the wavelength of the solar magnetic electrical magnetic field, that's hitting the part of the earth facing the sun all the time. And what they did was find a way to harness this form of energy coming at us. And I've worked on it. Now for six months, I'll be done within two months. I am totally fascinated with how it all works. And it's not scientific with terms of. I'm not using formulas or in depth scientific. I'm using how does this affect our life? And so the first half is the inventions, how they came to be the second half is how the electromagnetic spectrum operates, and to give examples why when you stand in front of a fire the part in front of you facing, the fire is very hot and the rest of you is that most little warm, and that's because the heat is coming at you through a different form of radiation. And it's hitting you in a very different way. Not just because of where you're facing it and shock. I thought you know, I could be wasting my time. No one might be interested in this chapter at that part to show what life. Was really like at that time. But I found practically everybody of every agency interested the older people reflect back on what life was like when they did not have running water when they didn't have the other things they remember iceboxes things. I didn't know is people rarely bathed more than once a week until we had running water. There was just so much about the way of life. I didn't even understand and the older people. They just sit there with their memories. And tell me what their life was like and the younger people go, I can't believe Mike grandparents live like that. I tell you. It was my parents, I'm gonna stop you at this point of a break. To take if you want to call in and maybe some of your stories talk about your relatives. Back in the day. He'll Friedman is my guest and time and temperature WBZ one. I'm sorry. To seventeen and twenty eight degrees..

Nevada Las Vegas booms creek USA Gene Friedman Mike twenty eight degrees ninety four years five ten years six months two months milk
"five ten years ago" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"Now, this is not a this would not be the right business decision. The right business would be go in there, and just, you know, drop all kinds of viral bombs, and you know, there's a St. that from five ten years ago that would have. Gladly done that. But. Amount of bile guys. I'm just out of it. I just. I'm done hating people as much as they hate me. I just don't. Forty five man it when I was thirty five I was like, I got all kinds of time. And I'm looking at it now. And I'm like, my kids are almost grown one of them's good attorney eighteen and a few months, and I'm asking myself when I'm finding is I get older is I wanna fight a lot less with the things. I wanna fight about. I want to actually fight about them harder than it used to does that make sense. But that's alternately our charge. We are charged to fight relentlessly without hating. Yeah. So. If she wanted to bring me on one on. Here's how this applies to my thinking in this situation if she wanted to bring me one on one on one on one today to discuss even the cost of Trump thing. I would do it. But if we're gonna do pro wrestling, and I I don't even believe the Republican party's talking points. So. I don't even I don't even do that stuff. Number one. Number two. With everything going on with a cost. I think we know what the conversations going to be now don't we this was actually booked with funny. They tried to me before the election. And this is what Aaron you referring to about? Steve king is we figured they were gonna try to corner me with all the stupid crap. Steve king said, and if you wanna get steeping steak ask him, I'm not sleeping. So I said, I'll do it. Well after the election thinking, we would actually talk data and numbers and what happened. No. And now with the cost and everything now, we're back to the third grade and Robert room again. Think about this during the break. Stay tuned..

Steve king Republican party wrestling Trump Robert room attorney Aaron five ten years
"five ten years ago" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

Izzy and Spain

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

"Right wait for the tournament to go same for the same for the teams you would think that they might what gonna head up get out ahead of it and save artless and where we got this guy we were sitting him it's on a big strong your and the answer double anyway so we're a take our chances with our team minus that guy and hope we make it and don't punish us after that or will they step back and say look this is a lot of programs maybe we should just wait see what the nc aa wants to do see if they drag their feet say if they decide to not punish the same way because there are so many i think there's a real risk both ways right in waiting to to act and also in stepping forward and offering yourself up as the first sacrificial lamb well jeff gruber was on goulletquer window this morning talked about whether or not this could affect the tournament this is what he said no include a boy you go nowhere twitter could go there could be moved kucan eligible for the time being until they talk to them or they could not talk to him for four neither would surprise me we don't know when it comes to the into the way so like it's all speculation because i as i've been saying for years bnc away if they really wanted to clean this thing though they would've went out and higher like five fbi agents five ten years ago to clean this thing up instead they've got a bunch of people and enforcement bit really arts scaring anybody they're not trained well enough to be able to break open investigations and gather information and not manner so now again the kinda you look at them when you said they've got no juice nobody's scared of them the only reason anybody scare right and that was why 'cause the fbi gotten ball that it a couple and it goes back to your point sets which is the reason it's a crime is not because the nc aa was ever going to enforce them as crimes it's because technically it's as you mentioned fraud bribery conspiracy across state lines and the federal government financially supports public and private universities through student aid in grants and tax breaks and so.

aa jeff gruber twitter fbi fraud bribery five ten years
"five ten years ago" Discussed on Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

"Where adulting it you know five ten years ago i mean i think this is like definitely every generation you know there's there's new perspectives to add to your perspective i can like the world grows the number of humans on a grow and the the challenges we all face grow where it like our version of adulting has to be so much more aware of everything or and we have the opportunities to be so much more aware of everything um and it is overwhelming linked sometimes i find myself missing or not missing 'cause i guess personally at the moment wasn't there but is a simpler time when i don't know that times were ever simple like i think that that's kind of a little bit of a misnomer i mean there were things i do i'm so grateful that i don't have to do like i'm so grateful for the internet in the street of communication refrigerator fully stocked with food at alltime right i think of the thing i miss is something i was alive for which is probably i heard a quote winds in this has been my experience at like up until twenty five you're just living your life and then from 25 on your thinking about living your life and so like there's this amount of awareness that happens that is good like that is good for people to be aware of its earnings i miss just live in my life like just taking making those jumps instead of thinking about making those jumps in what impact that's going to have on my like five years from now and how that's going to impact my kid and i sound so selfish right now be like i wish i could just think about myself police you're saying that you're not does.

five ten years five years
"five ten years ago" Discussed on Around the NFL

Around the NFL

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"five ten years ago" Discussed on Around the NFL

"Moving to put loss of vegas of all places it would have been insane to imagine this even as a possibility five ten years ago you would never thought the nfl what even considering yeah so it's any team is going to go to vegas yeah fakes that that it would be the raiders but it's still sticks that you're absolute read about them i think yeah all this growing up is football fans if you watched like tv year movies and there was a fake football teams in those when you don't have the nfl licensing was i was like the loss biggest red ag absolute ages out la right and it's like you know with that there are the lob last night his raiders this doesn't make any sense of us happened to guy mention on a network it it feels like when you're just utterly you're younger and just utterly hammered and plane maddening coming up with the most convoluted liked the in team combination it's like this to steal surreal everything is it's not a surprise we knew this was going to happen we knew this was in the books but valid it's happened it feel so bizarre at so awkward for fans that have to go to games now in oakland for the next two years before they make the move to las vegas and it's sort of like i mean coming off this the second this maybe i'm just my head is in this space but i feel like for the fans you can look at it like it's kind the dealing with a terminal illness so you have a chance to have those two years to say everything the you want to say you can say you're go by is and take your time with it and sort of ease yourself off of the team instead of having them just ugly caught in the middle of the night and you're at lacked dealing with shock get emotions and feelings yet now you can just take your time and watched the team slip away you know that that analogy dark is living because you know what you know my big takeaway with terminal illnesses please it sucks yeah yeah it's a fitting it like right after year at the bedside and you're crying and you go to the funeral with your brother isn't all you know we're going to we're all going to miss mom you're looking.

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