35 Burst results for "Five Ten Years"

What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

The Small Business Radio Show

05:29 min | 6 d ago

What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

"The other day announced a new ceo. And so we're is amazon. Going in two thousand twenty one and how can small business owners actually participate hit. Help is jason boys. A season entrepreneur and nationally rise x. nationally recognized expert on amazon. He's considered the world's leading expert in dot com third party sellers. He's the founder and ceo of avenue seven media llc a seller group that harnesses the power of amazon for direct to consumer product brands. He's also the co author of the amazon jungle. The truth about amazon and the sellers guide to thriving on the world's most perilous e commerce marketplace jason. Welcome to the show. Thank you bury. Congratulations to you. Six hundred and twenty six show twelve years you know. He started with just one person. So tell me how you've been doing during this pandemic. Our business has been booming Amazon scott galloway came out and wrote a book about The pandemic amazon a company that was built for something like a worldwide pandemic and they've benefited greatly and frankly so's my business. Because so many small businesses that had regional brick and mortar retail store outlets that. Just shut down on him and folks were were kind of on the fence prior to the pandemic called and said jason get amazon tomorrow. Can you help me so our business has been. I mean we keep up very hits been it's been You know a bittersweet story. It's good news that our businesses doing great as results pandemic. But it's been a really difficult time for everyone. Any recession is always winners. And there's losers. But i tell you one thing jason happen. This year that i never thought could happen in relation to amazon. I couldn't believe they couldn't deliver in two days. Came buried i. I made some predictions in early october. That fda and amazon delivery network was going to break. It ended up not breaking but they broke the post office. They bury them with so met much volume that they literally couldn't couldn't handle it and you're absolutely right. There were very few packages that were delivered to people's doors within two day window within that one day window even still though what they did. This holiday in terms of ramping up delivery final mile warehousing added fifty percent of square footage and like four months. I mean it's historic area. It's pretty incredible what they did so just recently announced. Jeff bezos is going to step down. Ceo and there was a joke on facebook. That says well i guess he's fully invested 401k. Now that's why he's stepping down. But one predictions you have for twenty twenty one with amazon given a new ceo and the hopefully the winding down of the pandemic. Yeah well you know. I hope jeff vases is going to be okay with the pay reduction. Moving from fulltime. Ceo to just executive chairman. You think you'll be okay hope but yeah you look i. I don't think that amazon is going to miss a beat. You know the minute. The announcement came out which by the way was interesting enough announced around the same time as their blow out. Q four earnings call Historic in its own right Potentially to deflect which amazon's pr department is really good at About how great they have benefited in his really tough time for our country But look amazon's not going to miss a beat andy jazzy. Jeff clone bleeds amazon. Blew has been basically attached to jeff bezos hip for more than twenty years. He's an incredibly talented competency. Oh who took. Aws from zero to fifty percent market share in the cloud. Space according to gartner so He's incredibly talented. He will help Execute on jeff bezos division. Basil's we'll take a back seat behind. The curtain is gonna shove jesse in front of congress and answer. All those difficult antitrust questions and basis is going to work on what he loves doing which is invention and future technology. Whatever amazon looks like five ten years from now will have been developed from. Basil's mind so he's not going anywhere. He's just removing himself from some of the shall we say more uncomfortable task. It's going to land on jesse's lap in the next You know one to ten years. As i trust drums or are beating louder and louder. So let's talk about some of the trends that you've been discussing Tell us about how you think. Amazon is getting into healthcare. They are already in healthcare. I mean they're providing primary care for you know scores of their own employees tens of thousands of their employees they They famously removed themselves from joint venture with jamie diamond and berkshire hathaway recently In the rumors from within inside amazon at the reason they did that is because they were holding back and the amazon pharmacy group which spun up recently. we're saying we can't move fast you know. We can't move fast because we're being held up by chasing in berkshire hathaway. So i saw that. A lot of a lot of people in the press came out berry and said oh. This means amazon can't figure out healthcare. It's too difficult. It's too challenging. I didn't see that at all. I just saw that you know amazon. Saw this as cutting weight so that they can really focus on what they do. And that's innovate

Amazon Jason Boys Avenue Seven Media Llc Jason Scott Galloway Jeff Bezos Jeff Vases Andy Jazzy Jeff Clone FDA Basil Jesse Facebook Gartner Jamie Diamond Berkshire Hathaway Congress Amazon Pharmacy Group Berry
A Conversation With Loren And Lisa Poncia Of Stemple Creek Ranch

How I Built This

05:43 min | Last month

A Conversation With Loren And Lisa Poncia Of Stemple Creek Ranch

"Today my conversation with lauren. And lisa pawnshop owners of stemple creek ranch stemple creek ranch produces beef pork and lamb on more than a thousand acres in marin county california. It's one of the only carbon neutral livestock ranches in the united states. Lauren is a fourth generation rancher and he and his wife lisa transformed stemple creek into an organic regenerative farm. Fifteen years ago today they sell their grass fed meat to restaurants and grocery stores across the bay area and also directly to consumers across the us. So my first question to lauren was how do you make such a carbon intensive products like meat carbon-neutral guy what we do is what we call a dance with mother nature so basically replicating weather nature and what she did across the great plains hundreds of years ago with massive herds of bison crossing the great plains they were regenerating the soil just naturally so they eat the grass in front of them stomp on the grass below and poop on the graph behind him that generated the soil and grew more perennial plants and really. It's a photosynthesis business so if we have a living plant in the ground that's capturing sunlight it's growing with photosynthesis pulling co two out of the atmosphere. Storing it in the soil. So are you able to actually measure it. We think of cows for example as creating methane and that contributes to carbon pollution. But are you able to actually measure how you're you're able to sequester. Carbon offset the methane that they release. We have some really good data. This is the fun part about our businesses. A lot of times people say oh. This is what we're doing but we actually have hard data. We started this. Marin carbon project about seven years ago and we did a study about applying compost and how the compost effects sequestering carbon or not sequestering carbon in our soil's applied with all of our other management practices like fencing off the right perry in areas planting trees diversity in our pastures and basically what the data seven years later shows. We're sequestering about a thousand pounds of carbon per acre per year. Managing it the way we are even our control. Plots are other management practices. Besides applying compost are really helping with sequestering carbon and having healthy soils well from what i understand mean one of the things that releases carbon into the atmosphere. When soil is churned. Right and you aerate it. So what do you do to avoid doing that. We have a pretty intense rotational grazing system or pulse grazing. We call it where we rotate the cattle round in large herds and we try and replicate mother nature. We're not perfect at it but we dry and it just promotes printing plants. That are going to make more more photosynthesis which is going to question. Moore carbons lauren. We featured you on our segment. We did on the show a couple years ago called how you built that which unfortunately to put on pause this year because of other things. We're doing And i had a chance to busy ranch As you know and it was amazing to see some of the things that that just blew me away For example you plant chicory plants. Because i guess they have deep roots and they aerate the soil. And you've got worm farm. So the worms like dig into the soil things like that. Can you explain that. So basically a lot of people would say what's your biggest limiting nutrient and california dry land pasture and many people would say. Oh it's water because we're dry half the year but that's not really truly are limiting factor our biggest limiting factors air in the soil because without aaron the soil. It's like a human with a three hundred pound weight on our chest so there's three ways to get air. In the soil one is with the plow. And when you're plowing with a tractor you're actually releasing carbon into the atmosphere. The other one is with routes routes get down into the soil and break up the soil. And when they die they leave air in the soil and the worms. So we're trying to embrace not the plow and embrace the worms and roots and so there's diversity in the pastors real important and chicory has deep tap root plantation has deep tap root. There's some other really awesome natural plants that have deep tap roots. That actually help break up the soil. And they're printing they live for you know five ten years and they're super nutritious. That kendall loved them and she loved them and they make great coffee. I exactly lauren. You're a fourth generation california rancher. And i know that as a kid you watched your parents struggle to make ends meet while they were raising cattle that they would sell to. You know larger cattle ranches. And you even vowed never to go into the family business. You are in the veterinary pharmaceuticals for a while. But you did come back. And you and lisa decided to transform the family farm into an organic grass-fed farm. How did you come to that decision. And why I think that really comes down to guys. You have to be dissatisfied with their current results to create change and try something different. I'm super passionate about raising high quality food and we had to figure out a way that we can do this and actually make money and not struggle so. We've figured very quickly the way to do that was to be the price maker instead of the price taker and having unique product do what's right for the environment at the same time we do. What's right for the environment where we're making money on it. We've totally flipped the whole and instead of just being a price taker and doing what everybody else does. We've gone out and changed our market and created their own brand and basically dictate to the market. What we need to be able to make a

Lauren Lisa Pawnshop Stemple Creek Ranch Stemple Cr Stemple Creek Marin County Moore Carbons California Lisa United States Marin Aaron Kendall
Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

The 3:59

03:39 min | Last month

Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

"The cross has changed everything. How do you. Prompt exposed by the pandemic shift direction of five g to make more of a solution to some today's problems. Yeah certainly covid has changed everything for all of us as we think about the impact of twenty twenty. What we're dealing with is going to twenty twenty one in what i would tell you. Rogers if anything is accelerated dramatically exhorted the forward motion of five gauge. As you know two years ago he s we announced the eight currencies five g. You don't be asset when rally on on powerpoint to concept to commercial scale ability and People of seeing the crab will requirements for. I work from home new models for telehealth in education transportation. It's really accelerated potential in capabilities. People are seeing or power affi- date so let's look until health service made it so folks were reluctant to go into doctor's offices fear of contracting covid nineteen so remote medical care medicine has been around for for years but really hasn't taken off in a real way patients and doctors alike. Were not super comfortable with it. House five g may tell best in more powell experience for people. He has so. I think there's a couple of things that have happened for straws. We think about where the delay really happened until medicine. It was than many providers couldn't be paid for services that were minister via telemedicine A different methodology versus face to face off the entire ecosystem is embraced telemedicine. Telehealth for verizon is very pointedly as became apparent to austin. Ruin care for boys. We work with our customers at the same time to say. How can we help. Redefine you models in a code environment. In one of those was telehealth the end Large apartment we do business within terms that healthcare space centered on for fifty visits to upwards of eighty five to ninety percent for general visits the nate. Now the silicate the telemedicine one of the really important asset for us in that process has been acquisition. Bluejeans we fire bluejeans a really great in collaboration platform back in may of twenty twenty answer. Hawaii the timing was not only for remote workers uses video collaboration tools for trial because it gives the patient the ability to work directly with their provider to have that video connection. Video in connection with a is very secure on louise platform something. That was really important in. Annaborough ecosystem is opened up to saying we'll support the financial capability associated with that. Which is insurance is paying for those visit so i think we really accelerated years what we thought to. I will take us five ten years to really pull that in reimagined models. One of these were doing. Now that i think is going to fuel a faster you begin to think about to see and you begin to think about how do you get. Some of those biometrics in might not otherwise. Get an in a remote and i is the beginning to build up people's healthcare her vials. You begin to work with the broader ecosystem understand. Who's the customer is. The patient is the provider is the administration. We're in having these follow customers based on the past five. Gb play really critical role because of the power of the capability five.

Affi Rogers Powell Verizon Austin Hawaii
The end of Plaid-Visa

Equity

01:44 min | Last month

The end of Plaid-Visa

"Want to lead us into plot. Alex as you alluded. This was the story of the week for anyone and everyone who cares about startups in vc. The five point three billion deal that would have merged loud and visa officially didn't go through for those following along that deal had been under investigation and ran into that regulatory wall. And now there's not going through. There's a lot to talk about what we're both of your first. Take alex and then danny by i take was holy crap followed by. Oh and i'm not surprised. The news event happened caught. me off. Guard didn't know it was coming but my second thought was like oh the doj was against this. Not a huge surprise. That was my take denny. I think there's a huge amount of concern around financial services more than other forms of tech companies when you look at financial services the so well integrated in the economy. Everything else is built on top of finance right and so i think for the antichrist authorities looking at tech deals. They're seeing this and they're saying look if visas able to corner the banking data market in own the infrastructure both at payments and with banking. That's an immensely powerful and highly leveraged place to be and i think the authorities have just gotten a lot smarter about preventing that from happening in the first place. I think they've woken up. I'm amazed at what was allowed to go through before versus. What now seems to be suddenly verboten. Why wasn't this. The case in the last five ten years finances not new whereas i think ad markets were new. Obviously we've talked a lot about antitrust ad networks with google buying doubleclick and buying a novel and a bunch of other companies. But those were new markets and said the regulators are. Just don't think new potential network effects that we're going to come out of those markets whereas in finance the regulators very admittedly familiar with the leverage points and frankly other competitors know what's going on as well. So my guess is mastercard went to the regulators and said whoa. Whoa whoa you got to do something here to stop this. This is really really bad. Yelp did this against google. But yelp didn't have the leverage. I think mastercard or other companies have been around a long time have

DOJ Alex Denny Danny Google Mastercard Yelp
Are You Ready to Make Financial Progress in 2021?

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

04:44 min | 2 months ago

Are You Ready to Make Financial Progress in 2021?

"This article runs through the twelve steps to get you financially. Ready for twenty twenty one. Obviously i can't go through twelve but you. Vip's are studious. You guys are on the ball and we'll make sure we have the lincoln. There's you can go read the rest of them. But i'm gonna pick out five. Let's take a look at number. One is review your goals the of years a great time to pause and look over your current financial goals just to see where you are with your progress I know this year was tough. But we're not gonna let it stand in the way of us moving forward with our money. So let's look at this get intentional. I've got the network calculator that you're gonna get over to my website And really figure out kind of where you are. How did this year in and again. I know this year was a challenge And this year has continued to be a challenge for a lot of people. But we still need to know where we stand The next one is update your budget. Obviously you know if you don't have one this is a good time to make one Do an audit of your budget kind of take a look. Are there some things that you could cut or scale back memberships. You don't use Do you have leftover money at the end of the month where you're redirecting that So there's a lotta things we can do and again as we start off the year on the good foot We wanna make sure we're being more intentional than ever Another thing end of year. Max out your 401k. If you haven't hit your full fifteen percent yet or you've got extra to invest you can make sure you get that done before december thirty first And remember you have until april to make contributions towards your ira a roth ira as well jay as hsa. We've got some time. So what does that mean for. A lotta people reach out to a smartvestor pro Make sure you're talking to your tax professional and he lp You've got people you want to get in your corner just to start reaching out. Especially for you self-employed. vip's For you you know. Tax time is a is a lot more paperwork in a lot of details grab up. Let's start getting that stuff. Gathered up right. Now you can get that in the hands of your cpa and the your make him or her's life a lot smoother as well as your own Speaking of find your tax return And again this sound can be can sound crazy. But it's just good to make a list of the things you're going to need get that prior year's return began to just details And talk about you know for some of you does a roth. Conversion makes sense. And what i mean by that real quick to not get into the weeds if you had an old 401k That's out there. You could convert that by paying the taxes on it to a roth Again it's a process of understanding the tax consequences having the cash first and foremost and being able to take care of that. So your smartvestor pro as well as your taxi. Lp can guide you in that Will entrust review your I know those things. Don't sound like fine. But i'm gonna tell you something after twenty twenty it's imperative that we have those things in place Really really important And also let me let me tell you this real quick It's important to make sure that you have beneficiaries updated. And i mean that in your life insurance i mean that in your 401k Because hear me the beneficiary designation 401k or on a life insurance policy will supersede meaning it outweighs anything in a will so the beneficiaries that you've established on a 401k. Four five ten years ago. You need to make sure you've got that updated especially if you've had a change of life if you were married If you got divorced if you adopted a cat or had another baby you just wanna make sure. Those are updated So beneficiaries on life insurance on ira's on 401k's these things are imperative. And do me a favor reach out to your parents To make sure that they've got there's updated as well a lot of times people. Sit and forget it with these things and it can just create some headache and heartache. Later a your estate plan needs to reflect those changes And if you don't have a will do get that thing in place It's imperative Some staggering statistic out there. That almost seventy seventy five percent of people don't have a will which means we leave the government in charge of your stuff Did you hear me say that. Yeah you leave the government in charge of your stuff I the government. Can't take the government's i know they will take care of my stuff So anyway let's get a will place But anyway you know we're twenty twenty one. Start off with the right checklist. Make sure we got things in place so we're able to grow forward interesting article again. They're twelve things. We covered five. You can go over to forbes dot com as always. We'll put a link to

Lincoln JAY IRA Headache Government
AGs' Lawsuit Accuses Facebook Of Gobbling Up Competitive Threats

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:49 min | 2 months ago

AGs' Lawsuit Accuses Facebook Of Gobbling Up Competitive Threats

"Facebook crushes the competition. That's one of those cliches. We used to talk about. Big successful. Companies is facebook crushing the competition. Legally or illegally. That's something the courts will decide. The federal trade commission and attorneys general from across the country are suing facebook. They say the company eliminated competition by either buying other companies or making it impossible for them to succeed connecticut. Attorney general william. Tong is one of the forty eight eight involved in the suit. Thank you sir for being here. Good morning oil. Facebook has been a dominant company. Four years now. Why filing this lawsuit right now. you don't facebook has expensive and power and what is done without our and its market dominance is. It's it's engaged in a program of what we call by in berry where they either by their competitors or if they don't play ball and sell they crushed their competitors and what they've done is they've crushed any threat to their business and their market domination. They've eliminated choice for consumers and they beat third party app developers and software developers into submission. And your argument is that's illegal. That's not just being smart competitive business. No it's not just being smart when you're a business like facebook and you essentially dominate an entire field that means so much to people today particularly in a global pandemic in public health when we rely so much on technology to stay in touch with our friends. Our family to do business to sell products to advertise Social media's become central really in our lives and when you're the dominant market player You have an obligation not to abuse that power and what a facebook has done. It's it has abused. Its market power to keep competitors out of the marketplace and the leverage that market power to prejudice. Anybody who doesn't play by facebook's rules okay but how have users been hurt by what you're alleging. Facebook has done the ordinary people of connecticut. How are they getting hurt here. So they really don't have any choice. They because facebook not only is the dominant player in its own right through facebook but because they bought instagram Which targets a younger generation including my kids and whatsapp. Widely globally used social messaging And also a direct peer to peer messaging app. Because they've done that. You really have very limited options and so you don't have a choice on where you go to For social media number one or two by products for example on on facebook facebook marketplace. And if you're a small business in connecticut Or even a bigger business and you want advertisers sell products. You really have to use facebook or one of its companion products so you don't have any choice because of their facebook argues that there is competition and i will tell you the young people in my life that the teens the tweens. They don't care about facebook at all. They're all on tiktok. Is it possible that in five ten years facebook will be kind of irrelevant or at least not the behemoth is now and that this is just sort of panicking over something that companies become dominant for a few years and they tend to fade know. Our view is Unless we do something. That won't be the case because facebook has frankly so much money and so much market power and that's why they're buyer berry strategy so successful because they can go and pay outside prices for instagram and whatsapp and essentially stifled competition. That way so no. We think that Unless the court takes action and unless the forty eight states plus the ftc are successful. Facebook will continue to dominate. The space facebook's general counsel makes an interesting argument noting that facebook bought instagram in two thousand and twelve and bought whatsapp a few years later and federal regulators said that was fine and now basically. They're going back on what they said. What do you think about that argument. Well we certainly weren't part of that determination and we look forward over the next two years to more robust antitrust enforcement enforcement of our nations and our states antitrust laws and the states the forty eight of us have done our own investigation and now in concert with the federal trade commission have determined that facebook is acting illegally. Okay connecticut attorney general william tom. Thanks so much for your time today. We appreciate it. Thank you well.

Facebook Attorney General William Connecticut Federal Trade Commission Tong Berry Social Media Instagram Attorney General William Tom
How Will Smith and Janet Hubert settle their decades-long feud on 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Reunion'

Daily Pop

04:59 min | 3 months ago

How Will Smith and Janet Hubert settle their decades-long feud on 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Reunion'

"So we'll and the first vibe. Janet hubert made amends during the fresh prince of bel-air reunion which just premiered on. hbo maximum. They both admitted in hard time for them over the years then genuine deep into just how much the feud cost her. When i left the show. I have this new baby and no one. Family disowned me. Hollywood disowned me. What you didn't realize either. That i was going through a lot at home right. You can no no very abusive marriage. You know i have. Children been divorced and second marriage and i can see now the level of pain and the level of struggle. But you know those words calling a black woman. Difficult in hollywood is to kiss of death death in your baskin back. When the president i wanna be is someone who protects you not someone at unleashes dodds. Wow so that was pretty deep. Why do you guys think it took them so long to finally have this heart to heart conversation. I'm actually surprised that didn't happen sooner off camera surprise at all that it didn't happen sooner. You know when you're in a feud with samadi and it's fresh and it hurts and then after a few months after a year five years goes by you. Just have a hard place for that person. You're not mad at them but you just don't wish them well. I think they got so use of that. Feeling of anger towards one another that just became a part of their lives and they probably for a long time. Didn't even realize and god what that feud was even a bout because it had been twenty seven years. Oh i disagree see. I don't think she's forgotten. What that feud is about for one second. I first of all. I started watching this last night and then stopped watching before this part. Of course those excited rundown this morning. This is some serious stuff. I mean obviously watching the fresh prince growing up realizing that and had been switched out with no. I realized that and i don't even remember how old we were. We were young. But i mean for things have gotten as bad as they did will smith and one of his co stars and we kind of nowhere to be this lovable likable hilarious guy. Like i was really surprised and for her to say you know to label the dark skinned black woman. Difficult in hollywood like as somebody that i was working with somebody that i was supposed to be family with has derailed my career for thirty years so little. It's a little too little too late. And i'm a huge will smith fan but once i kind of read what was going on between the two of them. It still isn't actually clear as to why he had such a problem with her. Yeah it's just really isn't too clear to me either. Besides the fact that she was able to work with but people are difficult all the time and the exactly you know it felt like a red table talk situation like taking a note from his wife jada. he's now opening up and having these heart to hearts. But being the will smith that we see and we know when we love now i. I'm surprised he wouldn't have this revelation. Sooner right over the years. I totally give being young. And he midst like your egos in the way you you you kind of. Who's on top of the world. He was really feeling himself. And and there was you know a little chip monir shoulder right and they typically goes away after a little while. I mean he took a long time. I mean they forced. You're i mean not. i don't want to say. They forced her out but they gave her such as she could thank you. They divorced her out by just giving her such a bad deal. I just don't understand. I think i would. I would have a clear to us where to get understanding what happened if i kind of knew what really started all of this but i just feel like this woman's career has really stalled because what what happened. I don't think that that's right but hold on the shoulders of will united because if sounds like the whole team may have thought because i thought yeah just like you know have only beef with will but i think it's like a family like if from this and both of you don't are both of us. Don't stand up or say something you're mad at the whole family because somebody was supposed to have your back. I think what happened. The situation was yes we do know will smith as in light one. The one who's connected but leaders get that way until about five ten years ago in in state like he was. This was a sitcom that was obviously very successful. I think for me to wrap it up in a bow. There's a disconnect as to why the tension was caused in the first place and back to justice point words. It's functional little family. If you guys made in my life difficult every day at seven months pregnant. I don't know how i would go to

Janet Hubert Samadi Smith Hollywood HBO Jada
Making The Case For A (Semi) Formal Specification Of CPython

The Python Podcast.__init__

05:03 min | 4 months ago

Making The Case For A (Semi) Formal Specification Of CPython

"Been using python since two thousand and five ish. My started using it when i was doing a master's degree on c. python stack machine and one of those things. We just need to do little. Toss jerry tables of data and all sorts of things and you just find. Co jarvis just a pain as php is just even worse than i just came across. Python is just perfect using visits. And so can you start by describing the current state of how the python language and the cpi runtime are defined if you the pipe people actively you have to just assume that c python is the definition of language and just drawing be bug battle there is a sort of specification on like four uses object model. How tax works excetera which is very useful. If you're learning the language will probably not great for initially learning the language or once. You've learnt it sort of to look stuff up was supposed to do in terms of a detail. Specification for continued. Cpi development and development of other potential virtual machines like fifi this sort of lacking and so you mentioned the how c python is a reference implementation. And everything has to define itself in terms of whatever c python happens to be doing and what that is can change from version to version. And so i'm curious if you can do what. The motivation is for actually trying to advocate for a more formalized specification of the language and whether the specification is then tied to see python itself or if it is a body apart from that and all of python should be trying to adhere to that. I think initially it would just be sc python. But there's no reason why. We can't differentiate watts so to see python specific. And what's more generally just python. The motivation really is this sort of evolution of the language and the run time. If we talk about changing things it's you know just looking at patches of sea code of sort of informal discussions about what we're gonna do whether you know how the language will change if you had a new feature. It's very hard to see. Sort of odd corner cases or to work out this a long term ramifications of things so i use pep three eighty as an example so pep three eighty the talk list syntax. Delegating generates but you probably noticed yield from. It's just the yield from keyword. Now that's a nice little feature. It's pretty well defined in the pep. It's got a big long chunk of code sort of equivalence sort of behavior but nonetheless that produce quite a few sort of odd sort of corner case bugs and in fact has taken quite a long time to knock out all this sort of obscure little bugs to do with handling throw whereas other corner cases most of which should always no one would notice but they sort of just crop up occasionally and those bugs. I don't know if we would have got rid of them. If we'd had more respect but i think it's likely that we would more likely seen those upfront. Python itself has been around for on the order of twenty five years at this point. I'm curious why you see now is being a good time to pursue the effort of formalizing the language in the run time so i think especially now is a good time because icon to twenty years ago or ten years ago. It's the old saying what's the best time to plant a tree. It was twenty years ago. But if you can't do that too now. I think it's a long term useful thing and would be nice if it had five ten years ago but didn't so best now and so because the language does have all of this history accrued at this point and there is this entire ecosystem that has grown up around it in terms of libraries and packages and implementation of the run time i'm curious how that overall scope and wait. Impacts the overall effort required to actually specification to fruition if it would be a complete pretty formal specification that make it a huge job. But i still think a specification of like the core language itself. Even we're a bit fuzzy about sort of some of the interactions with cpi api or things of that level of a and the other thing is it's doesn't have to. I mean it can grow if the specs of almost there for a new language feature or interaction with important library then specifying changes to those things might be useful to add those things specification as part of that is just the nature of open source. Stuff is it's you know if there's something there that's almost there. People motivated sort of push a little bit further to get what they want so somebody has to do enough for the work. To get things going you brought up the topic of this specification during the language

Jarvis Jerry
Marketing Strategies To Grow Your SaaS Startup With Jackie Hermes

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

05:10 min | 5 months ago

Marketing Strategies To Grow Your SaaS Startup With Jackie Hermes

"Kind of companies do you guys work with them? An Excel T. Yeah, so we work with B2B software companies. Mostly we work with somebody to be serviced businesses as well. We kind of evaluate them on a case-by-case basis to see I'm going to work best with and those are from pre-revenue start up that have raised, you know, a certain amount of money where it makes sense to invest in outside marketing resources up to I think our loyal client right now is about 30 million and it's private equity-owned. So we have a few private equity-owned companies in our portfolio as well great. So so I wanted to talk to a few different things with you in some of the tactics you guys are using for startups because it is a lot different running marketing for a start-up that maybe it's just building that audience verse is that company that's been around for five ten years and and people know who they are and and what they do one thing in particular was, New Jersey. Testing for for startups because you know, everybody as marketers were like you need to be testing. You need to run your split test figure out what works for your conversion, but one of life's challenges for start-up is do they even have enough traffic on a website to start running testing. So one that wanted to get your thoughts on that and and what you guys do for your clients. Yeah. It's interesting. We talked about a v testing and went in to fit for clients on our team, but we usually don't do it especially for our smaller clients because it's like if you're just gaining an audience if you have 10 people look at something it doesn't matter if you split test it or not, right because the sample size is so small. You're not going to get any information on what's really working and what's not wage. And in addition we're working with companies that are selling mostly Enterprise type software. So some of our clients are a little bit higher volume or they have contracts of 10 a.m. $50,000 a year, but when those contracts get above, you know, like Fifty a hundred thousand dollars a year. It's not a volume game and it's not you know, we're not a b testing the mises. It's like looking for getting individual buyers through the door and it becomes a completely different ball game. For example, one of our clients sells a lease accounting software into only the top 400 CPA firms in the country. So they only have four hundred prospects. And so that's a much different game than when you know, you have 10,000 not 5,000 or however many prospects to deal with so yet a hundred percent. I agree with you there totally different depending on how big your Market is. What is the minimum audience size? You need to start start running tests if you're going to yeah, so split testing on the website, I think can happen once you have maybe a few age. Thousand visitors. I mean if you could do it with less than that, and I mean there's a lot of different ways you can still pass right? You can split test landing pages if you're even using landing pages anymore. That's something that we are talking about moving away from you can split test emails. So I think it kind of is a case-by-case basis, but I wouldn't even be talking about that until you have a few thousand bucks website visitors a thousand subscribers in your email or whatever in in less than that. I think it's just a case of looking at your messaging you have an email that doesn't perform. Well, you know, like oh what part of your messaging is not working if people are opening but they're not clicking on anything that there's something wrong with the inside of your email, right? Yeah. So it's the format. It's the length. It's I mean God I see emails that don't work and I'm like, well this header is gigantic. There's nothing to click on here. There's way too much tax the lengths our way down in the email, you know, and so maybe we are dead. A few weeks later or trying something that is a lot shorter that has linked up higher in the email. So in those I think it's just a a matter of evaluating Effectiveness case-by-case versus testing against another variable. Does that make sense? Yeah. Yeah that does make sense, you know until you get the traffic. It doesn't make sense. It will take forever to get enough of em, that statistically you could say, you know, this version of the homepage converts better than that version and the time. I think would be so long that it doesn't even make sense things have changed in the world. Even you know, yeah well and just one more thing to think about how long it takes just to get one version of everything approved within a company, right, So if you're doing three versions and you don't even have enough traffic to get good data on what's working. It's just going to take longer to get that out there. I'm a lot more of a fan of wage. Getting your message out. Even if it's imperfect like get it 90% done get it out. And if it doesn't perform well understand why for your next message that's going to go. Yeah,

New Jersey
Mobile Voting's Future

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:29 min | 5 months ago

Mobile Voting's Future

"Maybe you've heard there's an election coming up. If you're voting and you didn't manage to get an absentee mail in ballot, you may have to spend hours waiting in line at your local school or Church to vote depending on which of the more than ten thousand election jurisdictions you're in. You could find yourself lead pencil in hand trying not to mark outside the lines of the bubbles on your ballot. And while you're standing there, you'll probably be spending time playing with your phone, checking your texts or even doing some chores. You might be transferring money to a friend for coffee or filling out your grocery water or shopping for clothes. Then it may on you I can do all these things on my phone. So why can't I vote on my phone? The idea of mobile voting is so enticing. Idea that you could just let people vote on their phones. This. Is My colleague Wall Street Journal reporter Paul, Vigna it would be easier. It would be more convenient. It would increase voting because of the convenience asking people to take time out. Of Tuesday avoid hated the idea that we give people one day in the middle of the week to vote of never understood it entrepreneurs have latched onto this idea they've begun developing mobile phone voting APPS and philanthropists are already funding some mobile voting APPs in a handful of jurisdictions. My hope is that this kind of becomes the Black Swan Moment for mobile voting, other countries including India away Switzerland and Canada have already taken up internet voting Estonia has been doing it for more than a decade. But some people have deep concerns and the resistance is coming from some of the smartest technologists in the room. So it is a great question if we can shop in bank on nine, why not vote online? Well, elections actually have surprisingly unusual requirements. An unusual risks which means that online voting would open up the potential for all sorts of new attacks and be really much more risky. But. While we're waiting in the precinct line on November third, our risk reward analysis of mobile voting might take a turn. Can you honestly tell me someday five ten years down the road of the keep experimenting with this that they will not be able to come up with a system that is secure.

Wall Street Journal Reporter Estonia Paul India Switzerland Canada
Blue Spruce Is Not a Good Tree Choice

Your Gardening Questions

02:26 min | 5 months ago

Blue Spruce Is Not a Good Tree Choice

"Getting back to trees. I know a few years ago Chris. We had a terrible problem around here with the some of the evergreen trees. Are we still having problems with mainly the spruce trees? Yeah, especially blue spruces. So I have to admit blue spruces are going right to that list underneath the pear tree. It just it's not a good tree to plant at home a lot of problems. We consider the short-term tree. It's a five ten year tree at best and they're getting a lot of problems and the biggest problem right now is needle cast which is a fungal disease causing the the needles to drop off the keys. It can be prevented. It can be sprayed but you're spraying those trees every year probably for the life of the tree. So, you know, the question is is a worth the investment and trying to keep the needles on the tree house. And what we're finding is a lot of times when people are calling us to treat these trees. It's too late that the trees are already defoliated 50% So, you know if you have a blue spruce and it looks good now is the time to be thinking of Saving it. Once you lose 40% of those needles. We can't really add 50% back into it. All we can do is really try to maintain what it looks like right now. Yeah, and then so if you have a big beautiful blue spruce you better be prepared to take care of it. Yes, just like emerald ash borer, you know the key to the streets right now and you know, it's people going to treat them for years. They started treating before they started to die and start to look bad the same things will happen with the blue spruces, you know, they're just they don't grow well in our area, you know, they look great but they just don't grow well in our area, you know switch them out with a calm color for you know, something that has more that blue tinge might be a little bit better for our area other some other spruce trees of the some of the some of the I guess green ones. If you for lack of a better word that are better healthier, yeah in Norway spruce has you know, those are those are a great spruce tree that grows well in our area. I love Green Giant Arborvitae. There's one of my favorites. They're very fast-growing upper body a little bit bigger than your traditional Arborvitae that a lot of people plant song. Nice single stem. So when you get that February ice and snow, they're not flopping all over the place. Those are probably my two favorite white pines do well hit-or-miss. Maybe Maurice name is more, you know, south or north. It's hard to plant white pines right along the river in our heavy Limestone soils. So I'd be careful of the white pine trees but you know, signal-to-noise off the Green Giant Arborvitae, so let's do really well.

Chris Maurice Norway
Talking to Your Kids About Sex With Shafia Zaloom

Sex With Emily

05:32 min | 5 months ago

Talking to Your Kids About Sex With Shafia Zaloom

"She fears aloom welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. Yes. Of course. I'm excited that you're here because I have been on this sort of obsessive track lately around I mean for for many years I've been doing this. You've been do in doing this for longer than I. Have I think but I've been doing about fifteen years and it was mostly you know educating talking to adults who want to realize is that now I have a lot of young people, my life three nieces who are teens and friends, kids age and. In the last five ten years. Wow there. There's no sex education. I realize how similar the questions that people are asking me that the young people are asking me adolescents about sex are very similar to what adults are asking, and also a lot of people calling in listening this show because now they have teenagers and they want to know what do we do? How do we talked about Saxon problem because? If they parents never learned how do we actually talk to our kids about sex I know you've made this your life's work. and. So Sheffield tell me a little about yourself like what's your? What's your background? How'd you get into sex education? we you know I always had to have really positive relationships in my life and that made all the difference for me in a really quality education. and. So I was a social worker when I first got out of school and was working with. Kids in treatment centers as an alternative to incarceration who had a lot you know who are wrestling with a ton of issues at all really revolves around relationships or you know the type of relationships they had had as they were growing up and after several years of that realized, they really needed to get into more preventative work versus so much inventive work so that I could sustain my own life and start a family and do all those things and because relationships in education had always been such a strong force in my life I chose that path and started I. Guess It's been. Twenty five years now and that sort of what took me to this place? Yeah, I got it. So tell me how do we approach talking to teens about sex when a lot of parents are feeling that they don't have the information themselves that it's still taboo and shameful I mean. There are a lot of really great resources out there I think part of it is there's just so much information and so much about sexuality that you really have to know where to find them and I think that a sex positive approaches we all strive for like we all want to raise our. Kids to be good people of positive enriching relationships yet romantic as well as sexual ones and so I think it really is twofold I. The information is out there find the medically accurate information from credible resources and showed that with your kid in developmentally appropriate ways and you're educating yourself along the way it is. Okay. no-one taught us this you know either so we are pioneers and you know if you can talk to your friends and say you know I, don't really know how to do this. How are you doing this and source each other to create a sense of solidarity typically as? Parents you know we we tend to lady to do this together. Especially if our kids are younger, we do that really well as they get older teenagers tend to want their independence and we tend to not have as many opportunities to connect with each other but we should find those places where you can connect with each other. You know test the waters and see how open and comfortable those folks artist say like, how do we do this? How can we communicate consistent messages that aligned with our own personal family values, but also give kids the information they need to keep themselves in their friends safe. And with your kids in those conversations, you're really it's the value of these small victories are collecting moments your scaffolding this over time it's not one big giant talk. It's little ones over longer periods of time and it's OK. In fact, it's a tremendous gift to be able to say to your kid to role model healthy vulnerability in an effort to connect in an authentic way. To say I don't know, but this is really important and sometimes the most important conversations are the hardest ones to have, and so let's find out this information together and figure this out in a way that works with all the things we've been teaching all along. Now for some parents, kids suddenly start screaming I'm running from the room you know whatever it is I, don't want do. Don't learn. They might happen to have equality health program. It's one. Nelson say but I I I know everything I need to know don't worry about it. Learning learn it in school. The thing is, is that parents are absolutely the primary sexuality educator in life It can't be they're not the only one that they're certainly the primary one and your the consistent person that they are going to be connected to throughout their life, and so those people who teach them you know education relationship, education, educational those things they're gonNA, come and go. They'll have an impact. It's a huge blessing to have that resource. But really you're the consistent will run and their ethical aspects to sex education that like those family values that are essential to it only you can teach those to your kid. So parenting adults are really important in that role.

Sheffield Saxon Nelson
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 8 months ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Ilan Bluestone

Back To Back

04:21 min | 9 months ago

Ilan Bluestone

"Are you right now? Are you in the UK? London Yeah, you've always been based out of that right. I used to live in Los. Angeles for like if he is okay. And I moved back here, gods, who did you move over to l. a. when everything was I like blowing up for you I? Just I wanted to try. How just because I was traveling so much? I wanted to be kind of based in the US, so it'd be a little easier to get around, but I then moved, hummed, be closer to my family and my ex girlfriend interesting I mean where do you? I should say before Kuroda virus happened. Where did you find yourself playing? The most like I is the majority of touring in the US, or is it kind of every Larry Eighty? North America is so Canada's role. and Europe is well. Europe has been very very busy. The have there been phases of it because I know I know a slate less amount of information about the trance and progressive than I do about some others, and so I know that obviously it's. Like every scene has cycles. You know so. Would you say like right now? Twenty, one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty twenty pre corona. How is the state of the TRANSI? In in America from your is blown up on his been incredible? To see every year just getting bigger and bigger. A lot more in demand. People don't people still discovering trance music. I think in. The last ten years alone. Juno beach is kind of really exploded and I think. Being kind of like. On the road beats for the last ten years of just seeing it kind of expand and expand to people who've never heard engine Abe's. Musical myself, so it's been a very nice an enjoyable ride and I. Think he's getting better bigger. Let's cool to hear man I. I like stories like that. And it's you know you mentioned in June. And I think that's kind of a cool parts about your career. As well as that. You've found this family. It seems like pretty early on in your career that you've stuck with kind of the whole ride through which I think in this day and age is sort of rare for people who do what we do. Yeah! I've been with engine visas day one. UNAVO- stayed loyal to that kind of family. You know Does it feel like a family? Yeah. I think I think with the fan base the shore. Definitely, the fan base is just been super supportive. Not just in June Abe's Bob. My Solo career and in general has just been. Found bases exploded in the last five ten years on other. Need you seem like a? kind of a massive rise of this kind of almost like A. calls. It's been really incredible. That's interesting. Can you attribute that to anything like? Is there something that either you're doing differently and June as a collective is doing differently. You know in genders that kind of connection with people I think. Become a lot more. You know everyone's been interacting with each other a lot more. The community has just been alive and kicking in shows and people do a lot of. To kind of gate crashed. My Fan base is gatherings. Just show up with unexpected they kind of. They waste. Get really stoked. When I showed my my face, then also like they'll be doing like a fan. meet up or something and you'll show. Up and I'll just show up and I'll be like. Stop on that like. What the United States. Is really really cool to engage with the fines I've always been an I always will set an example to everyone else by staying at the show's over the LAS. person is gone hard. Very important. That's something that avoid kind of you know as a musician. Wanted to. UNDERSTAND WHY A LOTTA! deejays don't actually interact with their fans and I've always said to myself that the more A. Kind of explode. The better I'm GonNa be with my phone's I'M GONNA engagement with my fans, so every show I stay into lots. person goes down and always make sure that I get a picture with. Everyone wanted one

North America United States ABE Europe UK Angeles LOS Transi Kuroda Juno Beach Larry Eighty Unavo Canada
Monetary & Political Update

Crypto Voices

03:46 min | 9 months ago

Monetary & Political Update

"What is your opinion of like all of the latest sort of academic econometrics models? You know the Alan Greenspan productivity norm type models. What do they do for us like during this time? Because if you really just look at how these major swings in the economy happen, they happen. You know every ten years or five ten years. Everybody always says they're completely unexpected. We didn't know enough. We didn't prepare enough. We should do more. We should tweak our models more and in the same thing happens the next five to ten years so. What in your opinion is the point of All of these models and a of metric stuff that economists dude did it help us during this crisis? Will it ever help us? No, I don't think it. Help US I think. Perhaps there they're just. A way to make the economist few more comfortable, regarding the uncertainty of the future on. Maybe they'll feel more at ease regarding their inability to understand what is going on in the economy, I mean if you look at the forecast by the Federal Reserve System and the feds they employ if I'm not mistaken over five hundred economists and mostly PhD's and have they predicted the what happened in two, thousand eight. No, they did not predict that. Did they predict what happened now? No, of course not and. The situation we have. Currently is not only a matter of economic savvy business cycle swings of the business activity. Of course we do have the pandemic. This has had a major. Force in the crisis at least as the main trigger for the crisis, but why? Why always tried to pinpoint is that the economy was already fragile, so you could see from a whole list of financial indicators. Economic Indicators. The American economy is the global economy was not on a sound footing, so the fragility was. There you could see anything that could be. Trigger might have the effect of precipitating an economic crisis that could in turn lead to a financial crisis. Ex exactly as has happened in the last three to four months so I don't think economic models can do any kind of job in predicting what's going to happen? Economists try to. To Understand reality to understand how the world works, and through this econometric models, which some of them are very sophisticated, they think. By doing this. Different models with a lot of different variables they can have a more sophisticated model that that can provide them with more knowledge, regarding the future, but it just can't. It's impossible to model reality. It's impossible to model the world, and it's impossible to predict what's going to happen, but you can at least assess the the underlying state of the economy of markets, and this is something that I think. Mostly Austrian it tastes have done pretty nicely over the last twenty thirty or forty

Alan Greenspan Federal Reserve System
Finding Positivity in a Pandemic With Deborah Heisz

Live Happy Now

07:12 min | 10 months ago

Finding Positivity in a Pandemic With Deborah Heisz

"Welcome to episode two hundred and fifty nine of live. This is Paul thanking you for joining us for many of us right now. It seems a little bit harder than to find the good in the world and finding things to be optimistic about concealing even more of a chore. If you know what I'm talking about and I'm guessing you do. You don't want to Miss Today's episode. This week I sat down with live happy. Ceo Deborah Highs to talk about how we can look for. What's good in these? Trying times and find positivity and optimism and make the most of this most unusual time deb. Welcome as always to live. Happy now remotely are remote social distanced version of live happy now. I always glad to be her Paula. And yes it is a social distancing time so we are in our respective homes and having this conversation do unique experience. I don't WanNa these for my house yet. Yeah we'll see. It's all about new experiences right now. It really is well. I wanted to talk to you because you always have such great insight on kind of the lesson in the goodness of what's going on so when you look at what's going on. How do you start finding some of the positives in the pandemic? Well there are some real positives for many of us. I don't WanNa say all of us because not everybody is in. You know the new social environment where they have a family to be at home with but for those of us who do have a family to be at home with and people we live with you know. One of the great positives is truly eating dinner together. Every night truly spending time and and being in each other's involved in others lives meal for me. I've found a way that I haven't had the opportunity to do before I love to cook so we don't go out of the League at groceries really so I've been able to cook. We'll have family dinners at kind of the same time every night because I'm also not stuck in that car for forty five minutes on the way to and forty five minutes away from the office and I'm not getting home to load the kids into the car to go to whatever practices is on tonight. So it certainly. It's created kind of A. I'm going to say a change of pace. That is welcome. I think might be the first time in my adult life. I've getting the right amount of sleep per night. Yeah and I've heard that I've I've also heard the flip side of that is true but and we'll talk about that in a minute but you know we were talking in our house the other night saying I wonder how many people will when this ends in opens up. How many people will decide voluntarily like? I'm not going to go back to that job. Because I've found that this is like I was spending too much time doing Xyz and not enough time with my family or taking care of myself. I think it's a real eye-opening time for a lot of people who I think that's true. I also think it's an eye opening time for a lot of employers being manager being someone who who who leads organization you know you always have a little bit the fear that people aren't there in the office. That work isn't getting done but I think you know. My experience has been exactly the opposite. I think more work is getting done by people because are more positive environment more self directed environment and yes. We spend a lot more time on conference calls. Communication is definitely more deliberate than it was in. You know flying by the Hallway and somebody and being at this question you know you actually have to schedule a meeting time to do it or pick up the phone and call somebody to get to make sure we're communicating but there are advantages on both sides. I think there are a group of people were like. Hey you know what I really like this working from home. I'd like to continue doing it. And there's a group of people who are like you know what I was fearful of. No maybe my employees or my staff to Matt. I'm not as fearful anymore because I see that things are getting done so that's been interesting but I also agree with you. There's a whole swath of people that are like what have I been doing the last five ten years I've been I've been in the rat race and suddenly I'm not certain there's some real advantages adding time to meditate workout. Do the things that we know we should be doing and do with people we love. I think it's going to be hard for my children when I go back to work. And they go back to school so to speak not that I haven't been at work but it's going to be different. It's going to feel like there's a loss yellow St- I think we have not put enough I into that yet because people are saying thinking of like. Oh my gosh as soon as this has done. I'm going do this. And this and this. But we're kind of discounting the fact that we're gaining some real treasures here in in terms of time in our interaction with people and we. WanNa make sure we don't miss those. I agree I think what we lost in entertainment because you know for me personally. I think people listening to podcasts at all. No I'm a sports fanatic. I Miss My sports. I MISS WATCHING BASEBALL ON TELEVISION. And going to hockey game. You know but what we've lost in those areas. I do think we've made up in other areas. I have never done as many Legos as I have in the past four weeks. But it's been quality time and you know my dog probably doesn't WanNa go for walks. Yeah that's how the dogs when the people go back to work. They're going to be like way way way. We thought we had a new world and we were running it and well you know. There's been a lot of dogs adopted from shelters. It's GonNa you know for pet population. I think there's a lot of positive. I certainly hope people take as much care of an animal. That bonding with right. Now when they go back to work and I don't find it. Suddenly it is a little bit more difficult when you have to buy a dog walker home. You know there are some positives in the world. You know somebody another thing I wanted to wrap on. The positive side is now social. Distancing is is interesting in that most of us know that you know when we're in crowd were in or anything. We always have a bit of the risk of getting the flu or or you know a cold or something. You know you have this. But the social distancing claim for a lot of people. They need to remember that they aren't doing this for themselves. It's not about whether or not you get sick. It's about helping other people not get many occur strangers to you. This truly is an opportunity to give back to the world by doing something that most of us never would have thought that simply staying home and help the world by doing your part. It's really a collective effort to improve the lives and the health of the people in the world but in order for it to work it has to be a collective effort. It's a very interesting thing it's going on. It isn't good enough that you stay home. Your neighbors have to so just an interesting social dynamic going on and I find it fascinating that so. Many people are adopting social distancing. You know not just because they're told to but because they're doing it because it's the right thing to do and in some ways it gives me faith in humanity that people are out there. Doing the right thing.

CEO Deborah Highs Paula Paul FLU XYZ Matt Hockey Walker
Streaming Storage Reimagined

Big Data Beard

06:44 min | 11 months ago

Streaming Storage Reimagined

"This Corey Menton and we are back with another season of the big. Dig Up Your podcast and we're GONNA kick it off in style this time with a little conversation around streaming storage reimagined and have that conversation today. I'm joined by two folks from Dell Technologies. Amy Nannies is the product. Marketing Manager Adult Technologies and Flavio. Jakarta is the senior distinguished engineer. Adele Technologies Aiming Flavio. Welcome to the show. Amy How are you surviving in this crazy corona virus work from home migration and doing surprisingly well? I think I was made for this kind of living. What's funny I had a conversation yesterday and I somebody said its worst nightmare for an extrovert. Because we don't get to get out and socialize but it's also works nightmare for an introvert because you really don't get a lot of downtime because there's so many people in the house potentially for those of those kids and wives and families and all this stuff so it's everybody's struggling a little bit flabbier. How are you doing in this time? I'm pretty good pretty good. It has been on. It has been nice intelligent at the same time. Nice from the perspective that We spend a lot of time with family together like I. I believe we have never done before. So that's nice but telling him. Part is not being which you step outside me here stain. We have full lockdown. Now can we go tight for groceries and all that stuff from that perspective is challenging but You know we. We were coping very well. So we'll good well. I hope everybody else's stand out there. Hope our audience sustained safe and hopefully this conversation with episode. We'll give you something to enjoy in the lockdown. That's happening so many places around the world. Now business hasn't stopped. People are still out there. Working trying to derive value from data and one of the conversations kind of macro themes that has been really popular over the last two years. If you will is this concept of analytics on streams so I want to set the table Amy would you favor and help us understand? What exactly do people mean when they talk about streams sure yes so extreme as just a continuous data feed? That's in constant motion. So there's no beginning there's no end. Typically we have a time stamp on our data feed so this is different because it's always flowing Today a lot of our data naturally comes in this form you know everyone has a organizations are beginning to utilize drones and security cameras. So we're seeing this information produced all the time interesting now. This constant stream of data a guessing is kind of important you just mentioned a few Kenna interest in areas security and surveillance and those kind of things why streaming getting so much press. These days is becoming really critical for modern analytics. Yeah so you know. It's important for us to be able to consume it store it and analyze it in real time as it's coming in because we get the most value from this data as it's coming in A good example is when we're shopping online so we get to the cart and we have suggested purchases if the computer behind that was to look at that data. Historically we'd be getting it a week from now and that wouldn't be as valuable Or something like traffic lights. We can look at how busy they are and change the timing in between them if we can get that information as it's coming in so the ability to analyze information as it's coming in is hugely valuable in almost every industry. Yeah so get into that real time. Capability is so challenging. I imagine you know there's a lot organizations and a lot of technology is being built and developed to handle executive that problem so far beyond cures from your perspective. What are the challenges that this stream type data bring to maybe those traditional analytics platforms that organizations have spent the last five ten years deploying right so following up on a on what amy said if you're continuously generating data in you can imagine applications where you have a large number of these data sources? So she she used an online shopping example right. But you can also think of food servers Sensors edge applications in general. You can have many of those and all of those producing this flows of data continuously so this year diggity unnecessary to ingest this data and make available downstream. So if you're talking about applications that we want you tell that street rates went to processing data as soon as possible so ingesting that making available news is challenged by itself. Now if you think about the characteristics of of the Stream flows they need their unbounded right so as you mentioned the arm-banded so they have They have a beginning. They begin at some point by there is no no no. There's there isn't necessarily an end end. Not even that alone. You can have fluctuations in the in the workload so that the flow. You're getting my change in my few censors at some point or more sensors oranmore service fiercer results although this cannot can fluctuate and and the the your plan which accommodate those changes and in addition to that you don't want you don't want to have duplicates miss events or or or have problems with the with the streaming away that doesn't reflect what application expects a consistencies and other is another important property. All that's with the with the application wanting to deliver results with low latency so he's taking that data processing yet and delivering results as possible. And finally the the the aspect of reacting facet changes. So if you are in this in the situation that you are taking the state alive processing live and delivering results as fast as possible. System must also be able to accommodate changes to too many thanks to the work as I mentioned on. That could be faults in the system needs to watch to react to those. Maybe replicate In my need to increase the the D'Amato resources dedicated to a critical application. So all those make a beauty a platform like this very challenging.

Amy Nannies Flavio Corey Menton Dell Technologies Marketing Manager Adult Techno Jakarta Adele Technologies Distinguished Engineer Kenna D'amato Executive
We Live On Zoom Now  And That Might Be a Problem

On The Media

08:54 min | 11 months ago

We Live On Zoom Now And That Might Be a Problem

"Zoom has become the default meeting place of the world. There are a lot of virtual conference APPs. What's so special about this one? It has exploded in use mostly because it's reliable. They can handle shoddy connections. It can also facilitate meetings have quite large solid. If you WANNA catch up with friends you're able to do that. And of course this free as well so plateaued from a just videoconferencing piece of software right up to a defacto social network now at last count I believe there were nine hundred crap. Tilles zoom users. But it's free. So what's the business model? It's not advertising. So what then right where they do to encourage people to upgrade to them will premium plans. You can page more features maybe could add more people and businesses especially do this as well but of course there is a loss of alum data transfers loudest while we. Yeah well hold. That thought you first started reporting on Zoom in twenty nineteen even then it showed itself to have one major glitch. Tell me about it. Yeah in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. A research found a pretty serious problem with zoom in that Pretty Skilled Hackett would be able to take over a web camera of Zuma music. Obviously this is probably the last thing you want. Twenty using video conferencing piece of software. Fortunately zoomed did fix that issue but apple also had to push update to sort of deal with it itself as well and put a blemish on zooms record. Yeah and you've been documenting the blemishes. Let's start with the facebook data issue. Facebook and data are two words that when combined give you the Hebrew? Jb's what are the particulars? So I found that when you open the zoom APP It would send data to facebook regardless of whether you actually had a council. Thanks pickle knelt so this included the type of phone. You were using the time zone city you connecting from and unique appetizing. Id that accompany could use potentially two targets advertisements in the future. The key thing was that this was not mentioned explicitly in zooms privacy policy. I mean a lot of APPs do this. It's certainly not uncommon for APPs to send data to facebook. But you would hope for us to make an informed. Decision companies would actually disclose information. And that's not what they did. When I contacted zoom to comment. They took some time a few days later. They actually signed to remove the code that send the data to facebook. Didn't they claim that they weren't even aware that this code was in their software and that facebook was getting this data you know is it just like yeast sitting ambient in the air. How could they not realize that? The code was there so lots of companies including facebook. They push out these so-called software development kits rusty KS which basically bundles of Code Levin APP to lots of features. That means that the APP developer doesn't have to build it from the ground up themselves so he could use the FACEBOOK S. T. K. To perhaps log into Soom via facebook but of course a scientific of that is the cameras result in some of this data transfer and zoom apparently. Wasn't aware of that when they started using this code. Now there is something else that's going on. I guess in the realm of unintended consequences. If you sign up to zoom using your company email you get a bonus now so if you sign up if you'll company or your work email is due will kind of pool if those uses together. So let's say I sign up in my work. Email Joseph Cox advice dot COM resume. Ooh than put all of a vice come uses in my contact list and this is supposed to make it easier for colleagues to communicate with one another because it puts them in the context. That's an interesting featuring it might be helpful. But some users I spoke to they found when they were signing that personal email addresses not affiliated with work whatsoever. They were having fountains of people pushing so that contacts Who will complete strangers and this gave them the ability to trying to start a video call with them. See that name see that photo and see if they were online it seems to be a bit of oversight from Zoom in mats. They allowed some addresses. G Milo Yahoo to not work this feature. But they haven't done it for every single Imelda to make this really weird side effect of strangers exposing their data to one another now. Are there any actual horror stories attendant to this glitch? Not particularly with that issue but it does relate more to the more general zoom bombing issue. Zoom meetings are getting hijacked in a new trend called zoom bombing. I it just seemed like people were checking in and then very quickly devolved into a lot of pornographic images being dumped as screen shots people hosting the public zoom meetings. You know maybe they put out a link and they say hey. We're having a guest today. Who's going to lecture about something or educates us about something and you're welcome to join if you want. But some people are joining and then using a featuring zoom allows them to share. What's on their computer? They press a button and then they abutting resume cool with hardcore pornography. Right help to hate speech against minorities so there is a real spectrum here of all. It may be a funny little prank right up to where they can. It should be targeted harassment as well. You could possibly on your meeting but if you wanted to be public don wants to do that. So you have to go into the settings and disable something else like not letting people share their screens. The burden is delegated to the user to work fast out. There's a one final issue and that concerns. The companies claim that it offers end to end encryption of its matings. That just isn't true. Yeah in their marketing material on their website. Zoom prominently says they have end to end encryption. And this means ensure that if I'm having a zoom conference cool the only two entities can be able to read that communication will view it. It's GonNa be me and the person I'm speaking to the attraction then twins encryption. Why messaging platforms such as what sap have rose. How ever zoom simply does not use into encryption? Even though it says it does the intercept. Fallon's when they went through the technical details approach the company Zoom omitted. It doesn't actually do this. And of course. Incredibly misleading marketing and that needs to be remedied and use these there is also a trade off because zoom has become so large so rapidly and technical limitations of you being able to dial into meeting with a telephone call. Robin with the computer is actually quite complicated to get end to end encryption going but that doesn't mean they should be misleading uses about US tool. It turned out that the only thing that was end to end encrypted was the messaging that users could do back and forth individually while in the larger meeting by Ms Course if use of reads the website and sees encryption. It's not it's going to be fair to the user to assume that that means myzone meetings my big conference schools with my friends. Will my company also criticism this way? But unfortunately that's not the case and these sorts of encryption they used US potentially gives zoom the possibility to look at more use the data. Then it would be if it was properly encrypted. None of what we've been discussing seems that zoom is a menace to our privacy in large way but the company has gotten into the sites of various regulators. What's going on New York? Since lesser to zoom asking him to clarify Walsall Security Measures in privacy protections. They have actually put in place especially as zoom has skyrocketed in popularity and then after our reporting about the facebook data transfer a user did file a class action lawsuit in California citing the state's new data protection. Act arguing that use. The data was transferred without permission. So we have to see if she sends up in court on a K. Principle of Internet law is the notion that platforms are not responsible for the content that they pass along to users. We're zoom fit in in this notion of being held harmless for the mischief of those who use the platform. Yes maybe five. Ten years ago there was a much more widespread belief that facebook and twitter and social networks could be sort of hands off the uses. That thing and we'll stop you if you do anything illegal. But that sort of it that's has been a great cultural shift in that especially around the social networks and they are being particularly more hands on when it comes to all sorts of contents especially harassment. As well and I think logically that could extend to zoom because it's not just a video conferencing piece of software. Today it has become a social network. Children are using zoom teenagers. Young adults everybody basically is on this platform and when harassment is taking place when racial harassment is taking place logically. Zoom also has the same sort of responsibility to protect its uses. Is there a larger lesson to be drawn here? Just about the general risk taken the trade offs that we make when taking advantage of technology particularly social media. The utility is obvious there but not without its dangers. Yeah I mean when a social media ramp or any sorts of communication tech platform you know skyrockets in popularity people need to bear in mind particular risks of that and maybe if the APP hasn't received all that much scrutiny before maybe uses onto worry about that of course it would be nice if companies prioritized the engineering of privacy insecurity before they became massive communication platforms. But at least maybe they can deal with that

Facebook Harassment United States Blemishes New York JB Pickle Hackett Apple Joseph Cox Code Levin Zuma Imelda Developer California DON
"five ten years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"five ten years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Dot com is the website if you'd like to learn a little bit more we've been talking about what goes into the structure of your financial house this is the analogy were making for your retirement plan and the decisions that you need to make that will help you make sure that your income will last and Phyllis for those who missed it in the last segment let's recap real quickly and explain real quickly what are the basic structural pieces of a financial house we think about a real house we think about the foundation the walls the roof those are the three basic pieces talk about what those three pieces are of your financial house sure the foundation is the most solid part it's your income plan yourselves Kerry your pensions and your other streams of income that are solid then I go to stand you know stand up to inflation and they're gonna be tax efficient they're your emergency fund he's gonna have on when you need them the walls the walls a pretty solid in the house but they're a little movable dear mid term goals there your things that you you know if inflation's high for a few more years you can pull for that if you have a trip that you want to do five ten years from now I think of those as moderate investments of you know we you can you don't expect them to implode in the next two thousand eight but they can go up or down a little bit below she well and the roof just like in house exposed to the elements okay out there they can get beat up the key to having a good physical health is what you have in the room are your long term investments that you're not going to need for your income if the market crashes you're not going to your roof to take that money just to maintain their lifestyle long term we know that the market always recovers we know that you'll be able to eventually take that money or pass it on is a legacy that's what the fiscal house is all about so those are the basic structural pieces and I do want to go back to that foundation piece that the income plan as well as you said we want to make sure we have a solid income that's coming in it was social security certainly going to be one of those sources if you have a pension that's great that's going to be a solid source of income but Phyllis what if you don't have a pension and you need to figure this out on your own how do you build an income stream that's kind of like a pension but it's not because you don't have one yeah you this is the key to what we do having a solid income plan is so very very important and this is what separates what I call the accumulation specialists from the preservation specials will preservation specialist well we time it will strategist where's the accumulation specialises all about growing your money so that you can get to retirement we're all about growing it safely and creating streams of income a very big difference okay so what we see with most people even if they do have a pension it's frozen it doesn't keep up with inflation okay or they don't have a pension you've been your own pension managers because you've been doing your own investing you've been doing in your four oh one K. you've been doing your IRA things of that nature how do you take that money and turn it into a life long income which first and foremost is the way if you don't have cash so you don't have a retirement so this is kind of three methods that that are out there that might have some credence and I'll just give you my opinion the who it's for whatever this is the percentage role this is the rule that most accumulation specialists are gonna tell as as the end all be all and it's usually called the four percent rule okay you've got your medley of stocks and bonds in and your well asat allocated L. you got lots of room in some a small cabinet came up short term bond long term bonds a whole medley and you know what if you just pull out four percent a year and if factor for inflation each year you are golden well if you have the right sequence of returns if you retire into a great stock market we have a crystal ball it tells you how the market's going to perform and you know what's going to happen with interest rates that may work for you but it's not an absolute I mean it really they could implode now if you're in a situation that you have a great you have got a lot of social security you both worked in you got the right strategy you got a pension and he you really that covers most of your bases and you want to use the icing on the cake the four percent rule for your investments icing on the cake it's just added extras and if you don't need if the markets bad you don't take it when you're you're okay okay maybe I'm not a huge fan of that for most people who need income he is the one that we usually use most of the time it's a tough time segmented approach we figure out how much income you need in the short term and we want safer investments to begin with that we know we're gonna come in reliably we're not trained it W. triple your money here but we want those to come in reliably within the market up down and sideways you can touch and feel those that security when we go out you know more than five or seven years we know we could have a little bit more risk in our investment something a little bit different to kick in and give you a raise and re place and you know replace that income stream and then that's time segmented we know we go out fifteen to twenty is the market will always come back we can have more of a risky investments when we set up a time segmented rocketed income strategy we can be very deliberate with expectations and really be more succinct and what we're going to have for income throughout retirement we can be in for more intense that's my favorite way to do it for somebody who's got a medley of stocks and bonds they don't have a large pension if any at all and they just have some so security at times segmented plan it's very intuitive people really like it when they understand that and each segment we can pick out the different tools that's going to work for you in your particular situation you don't have to guess what the market's gonna do you don't have to guess what interest rates are going to do we already have some predictability to some extent and the third way some people right this method is called Florence Hey my expenses are they gonna come in each and every month throughout retirement we want those covered win lose or draw something boring just our expenses our our jury expenses are travel are extra gifts to our kids or grandchildren all that stuff well you know we want to take some risk for that so we cover with boring the floor our basic expenses and then the rest of it we kind of have you know more aggressive investments and if they do well we take it and if they don't what we take it next year those are the three ways I'm more of a ton segmented person because more more more seeing people who do not have a solid income plan their pension is if anything it's not much so security who's gonna be there for us but boy they could mess around a lot of things that that impact that benefit so we have to have a solid foundation in time segment the close us more realistic expectations it kinda since we don't have a crystal ball it kind of helps so here's here's the key though if you don't have a written income plan I need you to come on in you need to come on in to make sure that we put one together so that you know we are cash flows coming in retirement I retire fit analysis could help you paid that blueprint it's going to look at all the aspects of that foundation for your cash flow okay and if you if you don't have a solid foundation like like you may think well you don't know we'll help you build one because without cash flow you don't every time at this other aspects but that's so important so if you've done the heavy lifting and you got all that stuff going on a four one K. an irate of bank account all different types of investments but you don't have them put together in a way that's going to create reliable income or you think you might whatever the case may be if you saved at least two hundred fifty thousand dollars or more for retirement come on and complementary will do a retire fit analysis that will show you whether there's any gaps with it is any issues if you have one and you wanna help will show you how to fix them no obligation no cost to do this six two three seven nine to fifty four ninety six again six two three seven nine to fifty four ninety six the guard rails on a bridge are there for a reason they keep you from tumbling over the edge we're going to talk about how you can put some guard rails on your retirement coming.

Phyllis four percent two hundred fifty thousand dol five ten years seven years four one K one K
"five ten years" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on Probably Science

"Nice and don't they have a to scale representation of the solar system where the sun is in the planetarium and deserve story. And then if you go all the way out in the yard there are some of the orbits of. Yeah. No that. Yeah. Close to that sundial it in front of it. They've got no they have that thing that a lot of science museums. Have what you can see how heavy you are different planets. A fan of that. Weight and height and space. Wait on do. They do the gas giants because you couldn't even stand on him. But you would still way lot presumably. Yeah. They did man. I wanna go where I can lose a couple pounds for sure. So would that be all of the the highest gravity of of the rocky planets or not? What's bigger than I should know this at the top of my head. He I if you're about to jeopardy uses what I should have done is really crammed on world capitals. I feel like that's an easy. Afternoon on and get a big game because they love that kinda shit. That's boring trivia to me, but whatever yet, you should know, you should know capitals. You should know oceans, we'll see. Okay. Mountains state capitals world capitals, you're gonna get stumped by some dumb. Pop culture celebrity. Movies. The last five ten years. I don't know TV left last five years. I don't know shit about. And I'm not trying to be one of those even watch TV people just haven't been I haven't seen an episode of big bang theory or our rights. What's a hit show that I've just never seen up to half Manby seen one episode of I regrettably was asked at one point with my wife, we were made at the time that matters. But we were asked by someone randomly if we would audition as a couple for this show where you sit on your couch. You get paid like decently to just watch TV. And that's what people are watching at like. So it just. You're watching you. Yes. It's so this is an American remake of British TV show goggle box. Really? It's it's so much renting it has any right to be given description. See I thought about to like make fun of hell notable Americans were. But you said you did it. I I'm twitched for team is what think it was. I think the American people's count show something like that. Yeah. I think that's what it was. And I mean, it was I mean, I guess like you get an insight to like the inner workings of a couple which could be. I mean, it's all reality TV show. But but the problem was when they were interviewing us we kneel the interview they love this. We had a lot of fun. But it was like you said where they were asking us like shows like that where it's like, oh, we watch patriot and stuff. They're not going to be interested in that. So we started bend watching like crappy reality stuff, and then we oddly got hooked on like the bachelor now, it's like what am I doing? Told me it's fun to watch that shit. I I'm sure I would like it. Once I started it. Too many things TV I get paralyzed with. I gotta go watch six seasons shits creek because that's great. It is so far, but like stuff I have started game of thrones. It's too late for me. I can't it's not. I thought the same thing you can do all seven seasons in a in a week in a week candy. Five days. We must have talked. This the podcast like I know what the red wedding is knows. It's still executed. Very well. And you'll be a better, man. I don't really care much about dragons and that kind of stuff. Dragons? Don't care about boobs. So I don't know it's a tradeoff. So it's dragons boobs, I I did just watch the dirt. Because by Newton said, it was a fun. Hate watch dumb thing. The crew movie. Oh, it was a documentary until I saw a traitor and realize. Yeah. It's ridiculous. But it's very easy to have on the background half..

shits creek Newton five ten years five years Five days
"five ten years" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on KNSS

"What five ten years will be narrow let all twenty years with the speed of change that's going on. Now. However certain things that universal never change. And that is humor humor is inherent in the human condition. And I think either you are born with a sense of humor or you develop very early on. Or you can't do it. And I think talk radio without a sense of humor is worthless. And that's why occasionally I will inject humor into my performance is because it gives me a break for other. I go crazy if I can just hammer you every day over and over and over conservative good conservative. Good conservative. Good conservative conservative liberal bed. Liberal bit liberal bit liberal bit conservative good. I wouldn't do it. I can't do it. I don't understand. Why anyone listens to it point blank? Don't know this has to have an element of levity to it lyricism Umer something poetry, something has to be an so either you have it. You don't have not wanting to go there and compare and contrast I'm talking about it in a more universal sense. Because of the shows I'm talking about such as I'm dying up here. Right. One of my features is I do news views and reviews. So those topics space based on the news, right? And you could sit here my views, but I also do review. So I'm going to do some TV reviews from minute. Even the most of you who listen to talk radio do not get cable. So you don't know about Ray Donovan, it's a great show. One of my favorite actors is in that show called you know, who he's terrific, Jon Voight. But I just watched the deficit with great disappointment. It was horrible. It was an ambitious failure in many ways gives it made. No sense. The Ray Donovan episode had no continuity. It was an incre show for those. Who know it's coming, and it was for those in the business of Hollywood who understand the plotline? I couldn't follow it. I didn't know what it was about. There were too many flashbacks and the worst part of it. Unfortunately, was I'm talking about this Ray Donovan thing is they brewed they brought out that rotting fruit from the jungle floor Susan America last serandon that was the end of it for me why in the world they had to bring that sour push out. I'll never understand. There are so many other more talented older actresses who could have been used politics aside. The only thing Susan Sarandon was ever in that. I like was it Lantis city with Burt Lancaster that she became a leftist fanatic and believe me on top of that a rotten actress. So no, I'm not watching right? Donovan again until next Sunday after Donovan on Showtime series. That's become something of an interest to me called. I'm dying. Up here, which is about comics trying to make it in the nineteen seventies. In LA, you see before the internet and before viral, videos, comics or people wanted to be comedians had to perform at comedy clubs and then rise up. By doing standup comedy and making a name for themselves. So this show explores the Los Angeles standup scene in the nineteen seventies. As these hopeful comedian stand up on the stage dying for fame fortune and a shot to get on television. At that time the Johnny Carson show. And some of them are terrific in the cast some of them are average. But it centers around a comedy club owner named Goldie who was a cheapskate who gives none of the comedians any money, but she claims to mentor them, and it's their life stories, you know, up and down and she runs her business with an iron fist in an IM purse. And she allegedly nurtures the comics with tough love. But the fact that she gives them no money. She's just a cheapskate, but it's an interesting little show. And there's a lot in it. Some of the writing is pretty good one of the best lines of that show was this one when they're talking about an agent or a big let us say day. At CBS. So they're trying to get on their with their show who becomes very nasty to them. And one of them says and passing never underestimate the aggressively untalented terrific line because it's true in radio as it is in every field. Never underestimate the aggressively untalented fabulous line. Now. The reason I'm talking about right? Donovan and the show I'm dying up here. There are a couple of reasons for it. They're not related to the opioid epidemic or. But the fact is is that talk radio. Is in some ways either it's an offshoot of comedy. I can't decide which is an offshoot of what I don't know. What preceded who? But I know this that many people in talk radio or killing the field because they have no humor. They have no capacity for detainment..

Ray Donovan Donovan Susan Sarandon Burt Lancaster Johnny Carson Goldie CBS Los Angeles Jon Voight Hollywood Susan America Lantis LA five ten years twenty years
"five ten years" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Heavily. Money back piled up like nobody's business. What's your what's your home? What's the homework probably to seventy five? Okay. All right. Good. Yeah. We currently pay a lot for his like through work. We pay a lot for his life insurance because he has diabetes and sleep apnea. So we have very little outside of work. So that's another reason I kinda and wanting to do it. And here's the other thing. Once you reach a point that with the house paid for that there's enough of a nest egg that if he were to pass away, you would be financially. Okay. That's the point that you're self insured, and you would drop that life insurance. Okay. Should you're paying a lot of foreigners especially. Yeah. Once you have enough of a nest egg upon his death with a paid for house for you to be okay. At that point. That's called self insured. Okay. He's turning sixty. He just turned sixty last month with those two chronic issues. Do we still start the long term care insurance exorbitant, and we pursue being self insured? I would make sure you had long term care insurance. How much it costs? Well, not not no matter how much it costs. But I would look at it very very strongly. I mean, I don't know what the expense is going to be based on that. But the problem is if he goes into a nursing home, you've got a hundred and something thousand dollars laying there and a paid for house. That's not gonna leave you in a good situation. You need that nursing home to be covered today. Now, again, look up look up five ten years from now, and you got a million dollars, which you should have investments with a paid for house and your net worth approaching a million and a half. If you want to self insure at that point through a nursing home, stay up that that would be fine and somewhere along the way, you would have dropped your life insurance to which would also pay for that. Then that would be fine. But the point is if you think about the event occurring, whether it's death or a nursing home stay where does that leave you? And today in neither case does it leave you great. It leaves you good. But not great. So only time we dropped the insurances are when we're in great mode show today. I pay off the house A B. I'm only doing that. If I'm firmly committed to building this next egg really really rapidly using this fabulous income that you have and see you keep the life insurance play in place for today, and you put your long term care insurance in place today. And then we dropped the life insurance as soon as there's enough money to cover upon his death. And then later on if you've got enough piled up in you want to drop the shelf insurance through the the long term care insurance later through the nursing home. Stay later, you could do that. But that's probably out there a decade or so away, you probably buying that for about ten years before you can get there with the numbers, you're giving me, but you're doing really really good very well done. Let me give you a copy of Chris Hogan's book it will guide you. Through this process. It's called retire inspired number one bestselling book. So hold on. I'm gonna send you a copy. Amanda is with us in Oklahoma City. Hi, amanda. How are you? I'm doing great. How are you doing? Dave better than I deserve. What's up in your world? Okay. So my husband, and I are twenty five years old and the only non mortgage debt, we have is a student loan payment or student loan of about fourteen thousand dollars good. Yeah. Yeah. I'm really sorry. We have twenty seven thousand and our savings now. So.

Amanda diabetes Chris Hogan Oklahoma City Dave fourteen thousand dollars twenty five years thousand dollars million dollars five ten years ten years
"five ten years" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"Now, this is not a this would not be the right business decision. The right business would be go in there, and just, you know, drop all kinds of viral bombs, and you know, there's a St. that from five ten years ago that would have. Gladly done that. But. Amount of bile guys. I'm just out of it. I just. I'm done hating people as much as they hate me. I just don't. Forty five man it when I was thirty five I was like, I got all kinds of time. And I'm looking at it now. And I'm like, my kids are almost grown one of them's good attorney eighteen and a few months, and I'm asking myself when I'm finding is I get older is I wanna fight a lot less with the things. I wanna fight about. I want to actually fight about them harder than it used to does that make sense. But that's alternately our charge. We are charged to fight relentlessly without hating. Yeah. So. If she wanted to bring me on one on. Here's how this applies to my thinking in this situation if she wanted to bring me one on one on one on one today to discuss even the cost of Trump thing. I would do it. But if we're gonna do pro wrestling, and I I don't even believe the Republican party's talking points. So. I don't even I don't even do that stuff. Number one. Number two. With everything going on with a cost. I think we know what the conversations going to be now don't we this was actually booked with funny. They tried to me before the election. And this is what Aaron you referring to about? Steve king is we figured they were gonna try to corner me with all the stupid crap. Steve king said, and if you wanna get steeping steak ask him, I'm not sleeping. So I said, I'll do it. Well after the election thinking, we would actually talk data and numbers and what happened. No. And now with the cost and everything now, we're back to the third grade and Robert room again. Think about this during the break. Stay tuned..

Steve king Republican party wrestling Trump Robert room attorney Aaron five ten years
"five ten years" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on WJR 760

"Show news talk seven sixty wjr back here in seventy sixty wjr maybe it'll change by the end of the year but did you know so far halfway through two thousand eighteen what the two most popular baby names are anna had you read this story already so you're ready now okay do you had you read this ray yes well then fontaine is number one right olivia for girls not bad but surprising that it's the number one name after name is probably gotta actually know who livia i mean is there some libya suddenly who's in the news olivia wilde amman libby he'd been an actress for the last five ten years i don't know why libya but the male one has real this is every year i look at these ago come on i remember when max was number one and what are some of the other well jason for years but they were all getting a little odd but this atticus headache advocates is the number one most popular baby name and was for all of last year so this means in the next four five years as you're if you've got friends who have young kids chances are you're going to hear this sentence this is our son atticus and you're going to have to look at that kid with a straight face what's so weird to think about to me is that you know how they're like multiple you know bob's or something in an office are they're going to be multiple attic attic guy room yeah a t shirt with your last name initials was the nickname for that what cuss no i mean you to you can't i mean you mean to tell me that this is all because of of the sequel to to kill a mockingbird i mean is that is that which wasn't that big book i don't know why where did the only advocates that anybody noses atticus right i mean they didn't remake the movie the closest thing i could think of is they came out with a sequel that was like three years ago wasn't it we get that and what's called a didn't even have mockingbird of the huntsman editor what was what was it called the song but the it i didn't dig it wasn't like to kill a mocking did it i remember who she did it did it come out i remember came yeah yeah it was a follow up after all those years but advocates 'cause i gotta look i mean that's not even a cute name to come here atticus wasn't there a year where because of the movie gladiator maximus is actually named don't you regret that now come on if your kids not around even aimed your kid maximus okay in a fit of of love for that film now don't you feel stupid the kids like twenty seven he's not getting off the couch you have to say okay and you can't doesn't even sound right and he probably rolls over and says i'm waiting for my kingdom to return and you say don't be a fool maximus daring get a job get off your bluetooth well i mean that works pretty well put a comma comma maximus got a job max disappointed your name is not only in my mind is never mitchell has been top ten list monday.

four five years five ten years three years
"five ten years" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"Cially two thirds of the people aren't going to be interested yeah but it's the third that is interested i want them in there and i want to get you know everyone in there being interested in going through this program probably higher pastor or social worker someone to teach them how to manage a property which is a cool business anyway because you get marketing at sales you get personnel issues yet advertising you know all sorts of stuff it's it's a neat business to to learn but at the same time you know let's say it's a retired pastor or something like that these fifty families here church and your job over the next five ten years his get them all off these programs you know speak speak the truth of liberty to them in in your faith to him and let them know you know what a powerful program and something that that get your truly that's real charity is what it is there there may be a maybe a financial component to or a profit component to it or not minolta what you're doing is you're helping people a the the chains of bondage and these social programs that are holding people down it's been my contention for many years that it is what's holding down many of the minority communities in america is the fact that they are on these government programs where no one is expecting them to to sustain themselves right and this type of program would find those people who truly wanted to be free and truly wanted to be self sufficient and would give them the opportunity to do it i think it's just i think it's great it sounds like you're the perfect guy to do it to try to make it happen you know and and at the end of the day there's a an apartment complex now it's market rate apartment complex and it's it's valuable asset you know i could take refinance the property and take the fines i use for it and go buy another one.

america five ten years
"five ten years" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"The alternate decision my life would have been a whole lot different and i have no idea whether i would have been happier less happy it's very possible that i might have migrated to wall street counting to five ten years later though again by then you know since the career path was sort of a stab wished i wouldn't have had the opportunities to the same degree my first job was withdrawn tall regional new york city brokerage house and it was trading options for their account just in terms of of how different the world was i mean one it was really hard to get a job even you know even someone who got into an ma in math and three years and headed you know graduated from the allen and so forth as i said you know i i the job was a fluke and i stumbled upon it and certainly no nobody nobody else i knew was remotely sort of similarly employed you know when you told people if you were a prop traitor they didn't know what you were talking about what was the math of options like in the late seventies early eighties and where people using black scholes for you calculating on a piece of paper i mean what would i actually wrote a you know i'm a little bit or i didn't get a nobel prize i did write a black salt the black souls after pricing model while i was in college it is kind of the first thing that sort of a curse to you but sixty seventy percent of our business was doing conversions reversals you know so that's turning put into call our call putting and ira trashing with the stack and that you know so the fundamental equation is long call short put equals long stack didn't need to solve any differential equations.

allen nobel prize new york ira sixty seventy percent five ten years three years
"five ten years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Talk snow negotiations we're not merely a look fat we're not we're not fully at negotiations and you know the you imagine the people bringing the briefing book to donald trump and having spent you know whatever five ten years twenty years thirty years of their career uh sending stuff up the pipeline to the president on in terms of like intel and understanding of of north korea and you know handing it to this dude and d m just looking at gun like uh his new pictures so i don't know what it says as a little bit is a little bit terrifying but uh i guess hope springs eternal yep all right well let's let's move from that because it's been you know a crazy week and we may have touched on this i'm just curious about your theory about stormy daniels because my my operating theory has been for for about a month or so now uh basically since the story about uh cohen steven cohen being the one to pay her off uh prior to the election to keep her quiet ma i've been operating under the theory that this is not about the election because you know does anybody think that there's a single vote that's going to be lost because this guy had an affair with a with a adult film worker or anybody else for that matter um i i don't i don't think they're that and i don't think they were worried about that and certainly we found out this week that michael cohen was trying to suppress her speech now so the idea that.

president intel north korea daniels steven cohen michael cohen donald trump five ten years thirty years twenty years
"five ten years" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

Izzy and Spain

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

"Right wait for the tournament to go same for the same for the teams you would think that they might what gonna head up get out ahead of it and save artless and where we got this guy we were sitting him it's on a big strong your and the answer double anyway so we're a take our chances with our team minus that guy and hope we make it and don't punish us after that or will they step back and say look this is a lot of programs maybe we should just wait see what the nc aa wants to do see if they drag their feet say if they decide to not punish the same way because there are so many i think there's a real risk both ways right in waiting to to act and also in stepping forward and offering yourself up as the first sacrificial lamb well jeff gruber was on goulletquer window this morning talked about whether or not this could affect the tournament this is what he said no include a boy you go nowhere twitter could go there could be moved kucan eligible for the time being until they talk to them or they could not talk to him for four neither would surprise me we don't know when it comes to the into the way so like it's all speculation because i as i've been saying for years bnc away if they really wanted to clean this thing though they would've went out and higher like five fbi agents five ten years ago to clean this thing up instead they've got a bunch of people and enforcement bit really arts scaring anybody they're not trained well enough to be able to break open investigations and gather information and not manner so now again the kinda you look at them when you said they've got no juice nobody's scared of them the only reason anybody scare right and that was why 'cause the fbi gotten ball that it a couple and it goes back to your point sets which is the reason it's a crime is not because the nc aa was ever going to enforce them as crimes it's because technically it's as you mentioned fraud bribery conspiracy across state lines and the federal government financially supports public and private universities through student aid in grants and tax breaks and so.

aa jeff gruber twitter fbi fraud bribery five ten years
"five ten years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Guy and he found look you know what i mean you can't find a quarterback from the next five ten years who's the way who had a guy in house you know it's just makes no sense to me they should've kept garoppolo i got them and what they were gonna pity they should each of them yeah i mean i i can't argue with that whatsoever and you're right um maybe they're spoiled in a sense because what the patriots have done is already unprecedented so what we're trying to ask of them is even more unprecedented i made on i don't even know what the comparison his did the impossible twice i suppose right that's that's what you're you're you're saying but it it was there for them it was there for them mean how many honestly if you're looking across the nfl let me ask the guys in the studio chris anthony how many quarterbacks currently in the nfl would you take over garoppolo going forward how many has right now yeah five i'll put the put it at the okay that that's fair that's not many so i'm not saying garoppolo is better than tom brady or will be tom brady but he clearly it seems is better than most of the quarterbacks in the league and how many quarterbacks in the league would you takeover tom brady going forward it may be more than eur posing it in in that direction rain i don't know if felt so on patriots that move for a number of reasons one they've had a tendency of trading their greats right before the end and to they didn't get much him return it's not like they traded garoppolo when his return was at its highest member he was supposed to be traded last year it was all in the rumors and you would have thought he was worth a firstround pick at least so so it does make you scratch your head and it adds a lot of validity i think to the story the context of the story the wave of garoppolo trade went down because it is counter to the way so many of the other patriots moves have been done and it's one of the first patriots moves were i sat there and thought it doesn't seem right in our didn't fit the um the bill didn't fit the the.

patriots nfl tom brady chris anthony eur five ten years
"five ten years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Would be tax cuts last tax cut will laugh up until two thousand and twenty six point five ten years and then i'll start to dissipate independent what type of track record during your tax would make are going up sooner like if you and me forty two 35 percent tax bracket tax may thought going back up in two thousand twenty three but all depends on what tack wrecked during the period when you teknath are going back up again what would there be any immediate financial impact of rather that's good or whether that's bad for the individual and then in the end what will be the financial impact on the country as well well the internal revenue service is currently we writing the form called a w four former determine if individuals with a big distant they have in order to calculate what what type of attack they're going to be pay and they won't be out until mid february estimate right now they're given nothing a guiding part when there will be out in typically most tax brackets they will be receiving any type of uh increase income of anywhere between one and three and a half percent depending on what type of tax pressure during marriage thing award at her house though nami children yeah but typically goes from one percent to three and a half percent increase in your your your paycheck based upon uh those tax bracket now what is the going line now the impact of that people have more money to put into your pocket stand on different things today in theory that she'd healthy economy or or people be able to stay more have up you know don't believe from paycheck debate yet that that was actually going to be my next question do you think you know what you got where consumer confidence is these foresee people spending more was to have this extra money in their pocket or will they say that with them cases of.

forty two 35 percent five ten years one percent
"five ten years" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

"This is a consulting engages his longterm we weren't you three five ten years down the road you wanna see you grow in that's very important for us to to make sure that our our clients in and prospects we talked to understand that it's not shortterm mrs this is longterm and so what is your your sale strategy young i'm sure you do you do get a a word of mouth a lotta inbound but i'm sure the remedy also responsible for do when cold outreach what what's working there so outreach for us is is a lot of you know thought leadership an example so the most important process we go through his is that the humble process will meet we reach out to somebody and say we don't know a lot about your organization we want to learn more we want to learn cut of the pains the ends the odds the good to the good things that the good times you're having but also what are some concerns where some fears um everything in the world today around security right the breaches the hacks that are going on uh no matter how big or small you are no matter what industry year and you we've seen construction we've seen education and then we've seen financial and business so we wanna come to you and say look here's what's going on in your space we've we've worked with clients similar to you i wanna learn more about you and explore those possibilities in in in and see if there may be a way for us to help uh we never go at any body new and say hey i've got services i i can help you with this product or service because in theory looking at the outside it may be okay we could help this financial.

three five ten years
"five ten years" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on WEEI

"Top commodities in the past five five ten years in their back pocket that they could have used to powell a into a really good pick or picks in your turn around to me and give the guy away for it never to pick that is unbeaten lee out a month ago if you had said that i would have boo'd you off the station and it's not as if uh i like to do that anyway velenjak uh were n he he he is a huge fan of jimmy garoppolo years no matter absolute and behind the scenes from what everything you've read everything you've heard it wasn't as if belachov was trying to find a way to get this guy outta here he commented him and i think as schefter accurately poured it when he was right justifiably adamant about it bella checked did not want to give this guy up rochetta was the only way nagy needs to come back on the air now and talk about this impossible trade that became possible because what happened what i think that schefter source was bella check and from just trying to put these pieces together to plus two week wales four here it looks as if someone else made that decision forum by as co powerful we know the bill bella check is in charge of the new england patriots i doubt anybody in the front office in you give me a name or even know who's in the front office now bell check runs the team but in this particular case he's had to come from crap how could this have been a football related decision how could build bella check the greatest coach in the history of the national football league according to many how could he make this deal doesn't make any language image issue this go wet bad that craf really bungled up the brady a deep deflate gate a mess south the irony oneminute minute easy i cussing out who then he goes out there behind the curtain and now everybody's friend he really screw that a bad but he got over that now you turn around and your come back and you're telling me at the last second he decides look we're not pay in the guy of franchise we're not going to do it a bill we don't want it to the structure sure we wanna keep brady i might get rid of brady under any circumstances i don't mind any of.

belachov schefter football brady powell jimmy garoppolo bella nagy five five ten years oneminute two week
"five ten years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Policy as a cash value just move it it oh either love saw or or uh over time with five ten years or something in stages but that's the one pocket to the next type of thing literally look at the portfolio and take that hundred thousand dollars or fifty thousand dollar cd it is steadily the bank at a net nothing you put it with the insurance company and it's still safe and secure in and largely liquid they're not quite is liquid as they were well when we first set these things up a few years ago because of the low interest rates and in what have you but but you basically put that money in a lump sum in in ninety percent of it is available back to you if you needed it thirteen months from now after five years it's all back to you so it's a know it's a it's a mild that is uh it is very very liquid here than i hear the music would love to finish this we will finished it on but but you do have what do you think that you have basically the same thing it's just that different just a different institution that is this holy the money it's a double duty effect on your buck arose second round save money monitored dot com as i get older gene that's his website he's got information there is also got white papers on this and other vehicles.

insurance company interest rates hundred thousand dollars fifty thousand dollar thirteen months five ten years ninety percent five years
"five ten years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Deductions that they had for so long like their mortgage deduction well that it's true maybe the houses paid off but jim you know these places that are ten years away from being paid off how much interest are you really paying on that mortgage in the last five ten years almost none it takes a longtime though before even recap with what have you paid for twenty twenty five year old mortgage interest right off eight again beyond this standard russian that's for sure but this is one of those classic mistakes because if you're relating to somebody that's forty five or fifty years old and they still have a you know 26 years left on their mortgage are going yeah i'm going to lose that big mortgage deduction well when you're seventy five unless you brief fight at that's not necessarily going to be the case and then this one future tax brackets may be higher than today they could be but keep in mind this whole idea of silos of money and there's a tax cost the building posttax silos of money just remember the advice that i had given you for years if you're in a high income tax bracket or a relatively high income tax brackets take advantage to the max of getting that the duct the ball contribution then take the actual tax savings that you get by getting a deduction and put that money into something that will grow and deliver tax free in that's the best way investing is a longterm process there's more than one way to invest in your education investing in the right products securities and real.

jim income tax twenty twenty five year five ten years fifty years ten years 26 years
"five ten years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"five ten years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Acts that actions that they had for so long like their mortgage deduction well that it's true maybe the houses paid off of jim you know they'll easy that places that are ten years away from being paid off how much interest are you really paying on that mortgage in the last five ten years almost not it takes a longtime though before even with what have you paid for twenty twenty five year old your mortgage interest right off eight again he had beyond this standard deduction that for sure but this is one of those classic mistakes because if you're relating to somebody that's forty five or fifty years old and they still have a you know 26 years left on their mortgage are gone yeah i'm going to lose that big mortgage deduction well when you're seventy five unless you refight of that's not necessarily going to be the case and then this one future tax brackets may be higher than today they could the but keep in mind this whole idea of silos of money and there's a tax cost the building post tax silos of money just remember the advice that i give given you for years if you're in a high income tax bracket or a relatively high income tax bracket take advantage to the max of getting that the ducked the ball contribution then take the actual tax savings that you get by getting a deduction and put that money.

jim income tax twenty twenty five year five ten years fifty years ten years 26 years