35 Burst results for "Five Six Years"

The greatest passport is my camera

Photography Daily

05:25 min | 5 d ago

The greatest passport is my camera

"Promise last week when i introduced charlene's first story edition. I talked to the absolute joy of finding what i thought of as a a street on her blog and blogs by the way aspect within our chats in a moment this on the you'll doing right now as photographer you may not thought about as something that could be precious to the way that you work and the message. Is you give on your website. Here's some food for thought. There's a raft of research out there that suggests we remember things that we see and even touch more than what we hear but we trust what we hear more than what we say. I was reading about a research group split into two groups. Same size groups. Twenty people watched the documentary one room and then twenty. People listened to the same documentary without pitches in an adjacent room. The results well. There was a sense of belief noticeably. More pronounced when the sense of sight was removed. Some suggested a fake news is almost trained out senses to the point where we no longer trust out is some of the research following. The session revealed sentences and feedback like well. It's so easy to manipulate. Picked these days and camera angles But it wasn't a toll that in real life yet. The palpable sense of dismissal was not nearly so pronounced in the audio only room. I find that fascinating that someone who's dedicated a great proportion of his life to sound. But now i'm a photographer. Anima filmmakers to mean a lot. Personally it'd be making kind of supercharged. Slide shows where the audio texture of what was actually happening at the time. I pressed the shutter and both commercially. And personally it's provides a great sense of satisfaction when presenting my stories but we can't all make or even wished to make films even slight says neal i he even when i can't really he still sensing what you'll say to me even imagining your voice to a degree really genuinely so. I was absolutely excited when i visited today's guests. Website moreover blog first time round to hear her talking to me many sites have a way of inserting audio. And if they don't you can always embed sound using services like soundcloud. Perhaps we should do an episode or even film about that at some stage is probably five six years since i visited a landscape photographers website. And please. i wish. I could remember the name of that talented shooter who played out the sound of the countryside. That was the soundtrack to each picture. Honestly i really labored over that site so it makes it all the morning embarrassing. I can't recall the name. It's likely that will come to me at three. Am in the morning so expect to post one day. So i want to ask you. How could you talk to those. Who view your pictures may not be suitable for every application short. But i i bet there's a story you shoot where it would add a version while somebody is digesting. You incredible pitches so to charlene winfred then for the second part in her mini series. We're going to talk a little more today about her. Nomadic life is a photographer and how having a camera making street pictures means. She investigates studies and a muscle and travel. But let me. I return to that blog. Post where i i actually meant charlene and i use that word advisedly. I'd read the about page ad. Spent time looking at the pictures. But this is where i believe i. I met her talking about making pictures. Spring into action. You make it frame. And then another and another and another the minutes took by the wolf aids from a blush to a bruise on the cusp of evenings dusty hugh streetlamps snap on and the night is gone you feel for a moment. The lament of that poet of lost boys and country lanes grieving for the fall of paradise. You drag yourself in your fifteen. Nothing frames home and hope that one of them carries the magic and day that demon that has been summarily banished. I'll leave a link to the whole piece own. Today's charlotte's my guest is charlene winfred. I looked at your site. Charlene for dot com on. I found immediately a posting your journal. That drew me in mainly. Because i don't think i've ever ever visited a photographer site to be treated to poetry and annot you don't call it poetry but that's what it appeared to sound like to me Your moment post evenly just posted. Actually it's fabulous. Fabulous is not going to become something you do more often. That's missing would you do it more often. I love that. That post was really was really just that it was an instagram post end. I've been neglecting my blog. Davor instagram simply. Because i can post on instagram. From wherever eminent only tend to post on instagram. Live out on the train and the bus waiting for something off in the middle of something. Which i don't do with my blog but honestly that spoken piece was just me trying a voiceover set out because i do. I do a little bit. Of course what fault. Phone my job and i just need a. We'd figure out how to how to bake a clean recording in. So i thought i'll just try to stop being david attenborough reading random things that i've written. Well i

Charlene Charlene Winfred Neal Aids Davor Instagram Charlotte David Attenborough
Sell Almost Anything You Can Dream Of with Russell Brunson

Entrepreneur on FIRE

06:35 min | Last week

Sell Almost Anything You Can Dream Of with Russell Brunson

"Russell. Say what's up to fire nation and sheer something interesting about yourself. That most people don't new what's a fire nation All right the first thing. I can think of the people probably know about me. Is that like i am. Deathly scared of cats have not touched the cat in over twenty years The last time. I touched a cat and mice will shut for three days and i have not touched. A cat said the my in-laws are cat people. So i literally go their house and i stand there and don't touch it. Well i can tell you. Can kate sorry. It was actually a campus and she was growing up. Her family always had one or two times. And i was the opposite. I was always a dog person. Springer spaniels my whole life and finally during quarantine because we used to travel all the time. In fact you. And i are supposed to be out in fiji recently. We weren't able to do that and we had a bunch of trips are ozzy cancelled. So i finally able to convince kate to get a dog with me so we now we have got him when he was two months old. But now we have a seven month old golden doodle. His name is gas and one reason why you'll love him russell's because he's hypoallergenic no shedding which was what i needed. Not because i was allergic to anything but just like. That's the one thing i don't like about. Dogs is the shedding. So gus is the perfect dog. I love him to death and follow me on instagram. If you want to see. Some great dog gussied dog video so russell as i t's earlier during the introduction. We're talking today about how to sell almost anything that you can flip in dream of and you have helped so many people do just that for so many years. I've been an avid click. Finals promoter and user for years and years and years now multiple to calm clever wars. All the nine yards. I mean i absolutely love. Click finals. I wanted to bring you back on. Because you've done something recently that again you just stay out of the curve. You continue to revolutionize stuff for so long like webinars were just boring like slides and then they have a talking head from time to time. There's an like and then you came out with this webinar. It's so spectacular because it's not lake. It's like this. Unbelievably new groundbreaking knowledge. I mean it's such important fundamental knowledge that you need to know fire nation. But it's how he delivers it with the stories and then the cartoons and the videos in the mix and the mismatch like i literally russell went back and watched one of my webinars and i hate it now. Like i hate my webinar. Because you so. I'm gonna follow your lead. My man and i'm going to mix up fire nation. Ill fire dot com slash. Click webinar just go over there. Watch this webinars free. It's amazing will up your game and it will help your business for the content but also for the presentation style you fire dot com slash click webinar and the title is the weird almost backwards. Funnel secret that is currently being used by underground group of entrepreneurs including myself to sell almost anything you can of so russell. Break that down for us. Yeah definitely so the group of entrepreneurs these are like my tribe. My people right. We call ourselves funnel hackers and a lot of people like don't turn means initially and for us. It's like all about trying to reinvent the wheel and figure things out from the beginning. It's like let's look and see what's working currently right and so looking at other people's funnel people's businesses and looking at as a model then create something new and unique outlook and i think that When i got started in business online. I thought i had to figure everything out. I was trying to be creative all the time and it really really struggled until i said that there's people who've been doing this for a long time and they're just trying to reinvent the will let me see what they're doing and what are the tweaks and changes. I can get my product or my service into the structure that they've proven his work and you know this is well anyone in in the online business like the art and the science right in the science doesn't change the framework. It's like the frame of a house right like that's that that doesn't change and so it was figuring what what's the framework. What's the funnel the things that we know work in the process that works the price points at work and then on top of that we. We've in our own art. Our own products our own messaging. And when you figure out how to do that we call funnel hacking. That's the that's the secret and now we've had people doing this. We have over one hundred hundred and twenty one hundred thirty thousand active members and click finals right now. We see it happening in every market in the world which has been so cool because it was kind of a new concept you know five or six years ago now. We're seeing it happen everywhere now. Literally i mean. I lost entrepreneurs on fire eight years ago and that didn't exist and i remember you coming and bringing of this phrase this term. You know this lifestyle back five six years ago. And i've washed it you know. Do it has done over the past five or six years. It's been absolutely amazing and fire nation. What we're doing next. We're going to go through the three main themes that russell talks about throughout the webinar. Now of course we're not gonna go into super depth on these because you're gonna watch the webinar for that and it's free and it's visual and it's beautiful and it's breathtaking at times like you need to watch for that reason but russell let's start with funnel hacking and how to ethically steel over a million dollars worth of funnel hacks from your competitor for under a hundred dollars. That's one benjamin taken away. Yes so this is something. I the concept i the principal i learn. Issue tony robbins. Who's a friend of both of ours. And tony said if you want to be successful in life you need to model those who are already successful and all parts of life. I like in in sports in business and everything and And so for me. I remember i was at an event and i heard this guy Showing one of his finals one time to talk about what they did how they did it and like all the money they spent all this stuff and i remember looking at that and i was like i'm never going to figure those things out and then for moment i stop and say what a minute. What if what. If i if i just looked at what he did and it looked like he had a product here and there was up selling the down so this was the process took someone to where if i took that again that framework and then i just weaved in my own product mountings into it and so i was kind of the idea. We'd have a name for back then. I would call frontal hiking today. But i i use that. And so i. This is before click funds probably seven or eight years ago is launching supplement at because i love supplements supplement. I know how to do it. So i found somebody who had to supplement funnel i looked at the structure. They'd proven would work to sell supplements. And i took that structure. I built my own supplement. You know put my own copy. My own words mount phrase by us use. There's is kind of a model like a business model. This is what we need to do and And we launched it and it blew up and we got huge and what was cool about it was. i didn't have to go and do tons of market researcher. All these things. All i had to do is literally go to the person's funnel and buy their product like put my credit card on my wallet spent a hundred bucks. I bought the product. And i was able to see everything right what we see some his website or a page. And it's like the tip of the iceberg but by paying buying the person's product and bunnell hacking him as able to see oh after they after someone buys a product sell them with this and they down so at this and this is the process. After i saw the process look like as the model that for my supplement. And that's how we were up to grow supplement company

Russell Ozzy Springer Fiji Instagram Kate Tony Robbins Benjamin Tony Bunnell
It's Our Holiday Gift Guide

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:07 min | 2 weeks ago

It's Our Holiday Gift Guide

"Okay gel so. I think we better start with a nod ben calendar. I mean. it's the most classical gift you could give somebody. I mean i just love this trend that started probably like five six years ago but the beauty advent calendar. So there's so many out there. I just want to highlight one. Though that i think is really good value for your money and that is from the body shop. It's the make it real together advent calendar. Sixty-nine dollars in it's worth one hundred and thirty seven dollars on the outside. It looks like a house like an a frame house in it's purple kind of cardboard packaging. So i like that because it's actually paper so at the end you can recycle it. It's not going to be a ton of waste very beautiful illustrations on the inside and there are twenty four. Little doors that are filled with mini goodies. Yes so i like that you get the full twenty four door experience. Spot is on a lot of bulk and it's not a lot of waste. Yeah so you get everything in there from their lip. Bader is to scented lotions handcream. Shower gels body scrubs. And i like the little extras that they've done. They have a festive nail file. They have hairclips. They have a bath. Lilly in there and bath gloves so these are just like the little things that are like. Oh yeah. I do need a new house. And they've included them in this particular thing so i think it's great bang for your buck and we're spending so much time at home might as well have something to open every day while you have your coffee. Yeah hell yod surprise and delight me every day. You know but. I love the body shop around the holidays because it's great for all ages. It's just so giftable and it doesn't break the bank. So i think that was a grapevine gel. Now i'm really excited to tell everybody about my fine from sephora like i said i crunched all the numbers i put my lake analytics hat on and the winner was the first aid beauty. All that fab five piece holiday sat so this is forty nine dollars. Us with a hundred and twenty seven dollar values. So they're seventy eight dollars in savings. So i know that's a lot of numbers. I just threw out you but basically you're saving more than what you paid for the box. So that's pretty aussie. That's awesome math. It's going to be sixty four dollars. Canadian with hundred and sixty seven dollar value. One thing that i really like about this five piece set is that four out of the five pieces are full-sized. They're not just many. So that's great because you hear a great value. You think it's just going to be the travel size and then has every step of your routine as well. So it's got a cleanser moisturizer cream lip product and exfoliating toning pads. So it really. Has you like completely taken care of all season long. And i'm a fan of i aid beauty anyway because it's great for sensitive skin you know. They don't add a lot of the product. It's been dermatologist tested. I think even if you don't have sensitive skin going into the winter you need that like bare your repair and they have all of these ingredients. That are going to help with that. They've got glycerin to hydrate. Nyah cinema. that's going to help with texture and tone as well colloidal oatmeal. That's going to help to soothe irritated skin and then in the exfoliating toning pads at scott. Aj's going to give you that gentle expoliation. This is a kit. That's great for all genders. All ages all skin types. You know it's just basically like soothing. Brightening doing everything you could ask for mainly hydration so this is a win for me joe. Yeah and no hate no shade to first aid beauty. They're not necessarily sexy looking packaging or products. But they've dressed them up right on this package. I have it right here too. So kind of like an art deco vibe on the front of it is really fun. Ads like silver and gold and black with celestial stuff on it. I mean anybody wanna open this for the holiday awesome levitt. If you guys are on a budget you know when you're not willing to pay the the triple figure price tag. I know you found a kit that was like sitting right around twenty five dollars with some products that we also love right. Yes so this is from bioscience. It's their lives glow kit. It's twenty five. Us dollars with a sixty two dollar value. That's thirty three canadian. Seventy nine canadian value so this includes two products. The scaling and lactic acid resurfacing nights serum plus the scaling and vitamin c rose oil. These are both like smaller. They're not full sized. Get the full experience using these products and for me that squealing and lactic acid. Resurfacing night serum. It's one of my favorite products. I've tried in all of two thousand twenty and the reason is you put it on before you go to bed. You wake up. You're so glowing. It's insane you get those instant results. But there's no irritation and then the vitamin c rose. Oil smells amazing. And it's not greasy at all and it really. I think is a great product to use in tandem with that exfoliating. Yeah i love a face oil. When i'm using heavy duty exfoliating because my skin just got so dry and it just feels like It needs that like give me that oil. After you know so i love this little combo. It even has the gift box like you. Just write. someone's name on the top. You don't even need to give perfect perfect. Yeah love

Bader Sephora Lilly Spot AJ United States Levitt Scott JOE
Your Signature (MM #3498)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Your Signature (MM #3498)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation my wife and I went out in early voted last Thursday here in Tennessee. I love the early voting because I hate standing in line. We own a stand in line for about twenty five minutes, which wasn't bad. I'm not complaining at all. But the one thing I keep reading about online is about signature matching from your voter card to your driver's license to the piece of paper you have to sign in front of them. But what's amazing to me is how people can expect your signature to be the exact same thing. Now my voter registration card is probably five six years old now and that card is only so small my driver's license which has a signature which was signed probably fifteen years ago when I got my tennis need his license is about the size. So it's probably smaller than a fingernail. So how can you match that signature to the signature on the card now, the signature is similar my signature pretty much looks the same depending upon where I'm signing it, but some people have a hard time matching their signature from one day to the next it's very sad, and there's got to be a better system. Is it time for a fingerprint match with all the technology we have there's got to be a better system. I'm voted. I think it went through and everything's good least. I hope so long

Kevin Nation Tennessee Tennis
Your Signature (MM #3498)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Your Signature (MM #3498)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation my wife and I went out in early voted last Thursday here in Tennessee. I love the early voting because I hate standing in line. We own a stand in line for about twenty five minutes, which wasn't bad. I'm not complaining at all. But the one thing I keep reading about online is about signature matching from your voter card to your driver's license to the piece of paper you have to sign in front of them. But what's amazing to me is how people can expect your signature to be the exact same thing. Now my voter registration card is probably five six years old now and that card is only so small my driver's license which has a signature which was signed probably fifteen years ago when I got my tennis need his license is about the size. So it's probably smaller than a fingernail. So how can you match that signature to the signature on the card now, the signature is similar my signature pretty much looks the same depending upon where I'm signing it, but some people have a hard time matching their signature from one day to the next it's very sad, and there's got to be a better system. Is it time for a fingerprint match with all the technology we have there's got to be a better system. I'm voted. I think it went through and everything's good least. I hope so long

Kevin Nation Tennessee Tennis
Sigma Prime with Mehdi Zerouali

The Bitcoin Podcast

05:59 min | 2 months ago

Sigma Prime with Mehdi Zerouali

"Hey everyone my name's Matty I'm a CO founder and director of Sigma Prime We are an information security consultancy mostly based out of Australia being hiring a bunch of people all over the world lately. We've been around for about full years providing security assessment services to a lot of blockchain projects working. Almost exclusively lately on. Iridium. Providing security assessment on smart contracts on a lot of protocol. Layer developments. And I guess we are here to talk about Easter 'cause we are also the founders and maintainers of light hops arrest implementation of the. Two point plano specification thanks for having. A real quick. What would you say the? Technical advantage or differentiator lighthouse has over other there to. Invitations. a question question it. We that quite often we because of of the the company we're in information security consultancy we take security very seriously. We'd like to think that we've incorporated security into our development lifecycle very early on. So would like to think that our clients is probably one of the hopefully safest was secure clients out there it's written in Ross Ross is particularly fast. So the focus has also been on the fullness speeds and as I mentioned security So that's probably what differentiates from the rest of the other teams. Get a moment to pitch chill out to private the process of lighthouses. Good nells offended A. that. The approach here is the kind of. Break down the concept of theorem to what's going on and what users can expect so. I'm not exactly sure how I want to do this the the conversations going to naturally evolve I think but like if you had to give the. Highest of high. Level overviews of the transition from ethylene S to. Or just say. Okay. Let's have this. So, F one is the proof of work chain that we all love us and as you all probably know, the plan was always to transition to approve of stay consensus mechanism. So namely. Casper, if g so the research team has been working on this. If your foundation research you had been working on this for the past four, five, six years and mentors have been developing the. Specification, turning it into actual usable software. For the past two and a half years. The main difference as mentioned is the consensus mechanism. So moving away from proof of work, which is a quite a west full way of coming to consensus if you ask me. I know this can be quite polarizing community, but this is basically how Paul my co founder got started on Lighthouse I think ethereal currently uses as much electricity as Costa. Rica, if I'm not mistaken. And we think sigma prime. That is so. Much. Better ways of coming to consensus. And kost perfect is one of them. So super excited about the environmental impact of the transition from steak and this transition will happen gradually. we'll be shipping if to in various phases. So phase zero is the first phase that will be introduced hopefully a few weeks I a couple months. The latest set ladies year is what we're aiming for. and. This introduces consensus change. Right is introduces the proof of stake consensus mechanism Gasparilla Gene, and we essentially call these chain, the beacon chain, and you can see as this orchestrate. That gives the pulse of the network to Valley daters, giving them tasks, rewarding them when they do their job correctly. Penalizing them when they don't etc, etc.. That's phase zero. That's what I guess. All client teams are working on at the moment and. Phase One will hopefully come shortly up and phase one introduces shards, the concept of shod. So Ethier two point Oh will be shotted blockchain meaning that will have. Sixty four sub block changing see them as sort of independent blockchain's that are all linked and tides with each other through five that consensus mechanism in the beacon. Check. So. Once we have that will be effectively using those shards just as dot availability layers we won't. Have State transitions or users of smart contracts or transactions as we are all familiar with in if one that will come in light up so talks about phase one point five, which hopefully will. Get one into each to and have that as a separate dedicated shot. In face to. Will introduce I, guess proper state execution and smart contracts, and this is when will actually have a blockchain usable blockchain developers as we all relative with them when you hear him on. That makes sense.

Costa Ross Ross Iridium Matty Co Founder Australia Casper Sigma Ethier A. Director Paul
Two-thirds of Americans favor a $15 federal minimum wage

Clark Howard Show

05:36 min | 2 months ago

Two-thirds of Americans favor a $15 federal minimum wage

"There's Something that very interesting in a time of extreme alien nation in US society and intense division. That people feel depending on whether they are a Republican or Democrat. But there's a new USA Today survey. Finds that Americans. Have some things that they very much feel in common. Whether they're. Republicans Democrats. Or independence. And This survey data. Is Very interesting in terms of what people are feeling. About the economy and the direction we're going. And one thing that is clear and was runaway in the survey day you know. Is that Republicans Democrats and independents. Overwhelmingly. Support. Raising the federal minimum wage. And the numbers are. Extreme for any survey today with the polarization. That, there would be similarity and how people responded to the question. And three quarters of Americans. Support raising the minimum wage, which is a significant increase even from just a year ago. So. This data has been going steadily up. As the federal minimum wage has stayed where it's been for Long Time seven dollars twenty, five cents an hour and I remember probably five six years ago. When That Waiver political movement started for fifteen dollars an hour minimum wage I was like wow. So you're going to support that. And it's been something that I've been pretty much tone deaf on is how People feel about. Making sure that the minimum wage does what it was originally intended, which is to allow somebody to earn enough to pay for life's basics which obviously, you can't do on seven, twenty, five, an hour minimum wage was last raised and two, thousand nine. So when there's that much consensus for it. Even the corporate interests that bottle up the congress are going to. End Up, having to agree to some level of increase in the minimum wage now, another area. Where there was extremely strong support three quarters. Of Americans. across the political spectrum. and. Very little difference again, among Republicans Democrats and Independents was about making sure that there's child care available. For what is referred to as high quality affordable childcare, which if you think about it, that is a very, very traditionally liberal position. And there was overwhelming support across the political spectrum. For doing whatever public policy would create. Affordable child care numbers were so strong on this that I'm sure it's at least partially pandemic related. Because There are so many people who've had kids who? Who's schools have remained? digital remote whatever. Zoom what? Whatever we call this online learning kind of thing that's going on or hybrid models where the kids are in school maybe as little as two days a week in person three days a week online it's played havoc with people's ability to work, and the polling shows overwhelming that people want government involvement in creating. Some form of program for. Affordable. Child care and I don't know where that ends up going in the political process but it was something that was very stark in clear in the polling. You know one thing also that is clear is that the traditional lines in terms of economics of liberal and conservative? Have not. Really been in play since the great recession started in two thousand seven that there's been a shift in people's attitudes based on the enormous. Disruption. Of the great recession. That people are more interested. In, government being involved in social services in ways that people generally. Did Not want if they were people who. Would consider themselves or wore the label of being conservative now conservative and liberal. See Eye to eye on things involving. Certain phases of the economy and That will move. What. Happens in terms of public policy it states and nationally.

Democrats United States Usa Today Congress
Drug Addiction In America

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | 2 months ago

Drug Addiction In America

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. Today we're talking to Dave. Marlon, he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. Bruce Dave. Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, we're in London. You're in the US, it such different situation in terms of addiction, mental health, and obviously the pandemic to get started. Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. We. have. You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. we we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. Twenty years, and in the last five, six years Oh actually even a little longer. An opiate problem has has become. Our most serious addiction challenge. Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. It it's interesting. I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. Vegas of. Gene. Years. And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, four years, they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery without the opiate use disorder their primary. Primary substance. Now I work at an indigent facility in in downtown. Las Vegas where. More than half of our clients are homeless. And what's interesting is with this demographic, there's a much higher methamphetamine use. Would say my number one. Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. That's really interesting I. Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. It has. Interestingly, fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. And I remember in my last. My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. Thirteen fourteen years ago. It became. Newsworthy in fashionable. Six seven years ago, and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic.

United States Las Vegas Bruce Dave Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rehab Center Marlon TIM CEO Southern Nevada LAS Cocaine London Methamphetamine Iran
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:37 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont public radio I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Vermont Margot Jane Lindholm Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:32 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Jane Lindholm Margot Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
Marvel’s Avengers DLC Characters Leaked

Kinda Funny Games Daily

03:10 min | 3 months ago

Marvel’s Avengers DLC Characters Leaked

"There's been a massive avengers data mine leak. This is from sub Reddit user six plus four equals fifty two on the marvels vendors sub Reddit fifteen unannounced characters have reportedly been data mined from the Marvel's avengers bad. And before we get into it, I gotta Say I'm pretty excited about this like this game I'm. AM. Higher on it than I ever thought I would have been after playing it but I'm still not where I. Wish I was you. You're talking about what the Batman Games like I wish this was just a single player vendors game, but it's not we're getting this online multiplayer. From what from what I've played it like the single player Linnea Thurs cinematic stuff is definitely the stuff I've enjoyed most but like this list is exciting for the same reason that I was really excited to find out the model was going to be essentially the main character of the story which is yeah. Give some love to some of these characters that haven't been big enough to be MC you. Staples yet like those are the gangs that are going to get the people come list I'm excited out totally, and before I even read the list I, WanNa point out that we're in a very interesting place with marvel right now when it comes to licensing their characters out both for movies for TV stuff but mainly for video games is what I'm talking about because what we've seen in the last. Five six years have been some pretty interesting and. Not Great Decisions made on the licensing front of Marvel versus Capcom Infinite for example, where it was very clear that marvel had a heavy hand in what characters are chosen not chosen like having no X. Men in that game is just San. Right, that's the thing is there's definitely wild model has only been interested can use it to mock it the MC you otherwise, we don't really care like. You don't want. We don't want to get it. If it's one of the properties that like show, we can put the X. men in a game, but someone else owns the film tonight. So why would we totally and that's I think where we really getting hit with X. men minute fantastic four particular but. He's not just above marvel studios, but he's also kind of above marvel as a whole. I think we're GONNA start seeing a lot more synergy in a way that doesn't feel as a things are being excluded but more as like a well rounded thing to get people more familiar with the smaller characters or different characters smaller not even the right. That, we might not used to seeing constantly constantly constantly. With Mc, you can say that Oh the EMC you. Is only focusing on the same things. Then you introduced the world to guardians of the galaxy so it's like They're doing great stuff too. But so looking at the list here, we got AAH man the Wasp Vision Black Panther Doctor Strange Falcon Marvel mockingbird quake winter soldier scarlet Captain Marvel Kate. Bishop. She Hulk and machine. Pretty Great List yeah definitely, there's a few really good ones on that like I I'm really excited at that. Kate. Bishop is on that because. Clearly the better Hawkeye. More. Interesting character by alone shot. Kate Bishop does not get enough love and I'm very to see that like, yeah. Yeah. Get

Marvel Captain Marvel Kate Kate Bishop Marvel Studios MC Reddit SAN
The Hidden Gem That Is Uruguay With Karen Higgs

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

03:55 min | 3 months ago

The Hidden Gem That Is Uruguay With Karen Higgs

"Hel Lo travel nerds and welcome to the extra packing peanuts travel podcast the show that teaches you how to travel more while spending less I'm your host, Travis Sherry, and joining me today is someone who used to sing sixties covers in the psychedelic rock bar and Costa Rica whose hometown is roughly eight thousand miles from where she now lives and who is the only urguay guidebook. Lives they're carrying Hague's from Guru, Guay Dot Com Karen, thanks for joining me and a huge. Welcome. I was so excited to hear what you're going to take out of my via. Those good with those those. Highlights there. Right I. Love that I mean I think you're probably the only person. I've ever introduced that sung sixties covers in the Psychedelic Rock Barn Costa Rica Wall the only one who's intro involved. I'm sure other guests have done it because who has right? Exactly that's kind of par for the course if you're a traveler I want to start out, could you were talking about one of my favorite countries in the world but somewhere, I've never been so little known fact or maybe not that little known if you used to follow way back in the day. Karen I said that my two favourite countries in the world were Slovenia an Erg Urguay but I had never been to either one I've now been to Slovenia but I haven't been to. Uruguay. So I am very excited to chat with you I'm I'm totally shocked what why Uruguay can I ask my? So I think just when I started traveling, I looked at a map and was like, don't like what I'm taking I was kind of like entire nation is going to be taken back. There you go. I looked at a map and I remember thinking. Like where are the hidden gems? Hidden Gems when they travel and so oh, Brazil Argentina and I remember I and I liked soccer slash football and. Howard now I'm understanding more. Colors, the light blue I like Diego Forlan, and so I just remember thinking that would be a coup country to go because everyone goes to Argentina everyone goes to Brazil. I want to go there and Slovenia same kind of thing this tiny country tucked in amongst kind what you would call like tourist powerhouses of Italy and stuff like that and. Yeah I just so for me, it was like those are the two that I just I thought they use are going to be it and have been something. We haven't made it yet. Then that is a good question well. Yet to give you a little bit of background, my wife and I wanted to come to South America for quite a while. So let's say five six years where we've really been like South America let's go. We've still never touch the continent. One of the reasons was we are not and naturally very cautious people but because we were trying to have kids and Zeke was happening and all that kind of stuff especially down in Brazil we kind of thought well, we can put it off like if we don't have to go and I know Uruguay was not Zico hotbed. But of course, if we go there, we wanted to go to Argentina Brazil. So we kinda just kept putting it off, putting it off, putting it off. And now we're recording during covert times if you're listening in the future hopefully, you're out of it by then. But yeah. Now, of course, as an American can't really go there. So. I would have if you had spoken to me five or six years ago than I would have said to you that you have to come anyway for your entire vacations to Uruguay 'cause there's so much to do and enough of people thinking that it says side from Argentina or Brazil. Okay. So I would have said that immediately and I also would have said to you that you know Zeka. Zero cases here and that Uruguay has great public health policies, and in fact, right now we are kind of like one the stock countries in Latin America regarding the virus

Uruguay Brazil Argentina Slovenia Costa Rica Wall South America Costa Rica Travis Sherry Guay Dot Hague Zeke Karen I Diego Forlan Soccer Zeka Latin America Howard Italy
Its Worth a Shot with Principal Scientist Dr. Rinke Bos

The WoMed

05:32 min | 4 months ago

Its Worth a Shot with Principal Scientist Dr. Rinke Bos

"Hi Dr Boss. Welcome to the WO- Med I am so grateful. You're able to take the time to speak with me. I can only imagine how your world is right now and I know you're probably inundated with interview requests and being pulled million directions right now so i. truly appreciate you making the time to speak with me today. Thanks on your. Experience to be here so I like to use the wome med. As a space for women in medicine to kind of come together share their perspective journeys through the field. It's kind of like an educational space where people can come and learn about different careers as well as all the incredible things that women are doing, and you're just one of those women that have truly stood out to me in this time is Cova. Time of all the hard work that you're doing? Your things has been been an extraordinary. Ah, six months I special time. Yes, for sure I'd love to start with. How did you get interested in immunology? I. Don't think it starts in the during my university. Studies funded biomedical, Health Sciences, okay, and even all the tedious yeah. was part of it very small part excavate a lot of different. Things about science Yet. At My my university, but immunology just yes, put my attention. It's so complex that it's. It's. They're older. Time We. We get sick. Everybody gets the once in a while and I just thought it was very interesting. To learn more about this to learn about the interaction of your immune spells, and what the effects are on your on your health. Though was the first time. They really interested in that, and and then I started to follow some additional courses and get even more interested, and then when I was looking for a PhD position I found PD position where. they were looking at the interaction of the immune cells with cancer. And that's really caught my attention. I really wanted to learn more about that. So what I studied you might teach and I concede to study during my post office well. And it was all quite fundamental research. And, then at some points really fell to make. A step. Closer. WHO. More, developments of Office scenes or medicines. To really get closer to using the knowledge we have to help. Increase enhance health. In the world, so to really get more closer to working on on something that really used to in the clinic. And its friends words to into Johnson and Johnson. That's amazing. So how many years school did you have to go to for that? Annetta less university is. Four years. Edited Ph d of about five six years in post broker five six years. Yeah it. It definitely does year specialist. Did you have any role models in the industry that you really looked up to? Now actually. Especially in the Netherlands. The industry is not very common for people to make the transition from. Industry is not really a promoted is seen as a negative thing. Oh. Yeah so people think you? If you want to do good science, you should really stay academics. And it's changing a bit now but I. Did my post DOC in the US? And ask? In the San Diego in La Hoya a description of the research. And there learned it's. It's very different, indeed this. A lot of people. Actually just moved to to industry to be able to contribute even more as science. And Development of medication ethics. So that's. A big change there. I yeah I met more people that worked in industry and I learned is fascinated me and I really wanted to try to work for me fell and I'm very happy. I I made the transition to industry. I didn't frequent I i. read it like Oh. That's wonderful. I'm glad you made the transition. I bet there's going to be a lot of. New Students and you know women. In industry that would that will be looking up to you and I. Mean you've kind of paved this new pathway? Then in the Netherlands. Yeah I hope so I don't think contribute to this in dense them. Yeah, now because we working together winter with academic partners fan I hope that they actually see. Dance we really went to. Use The science for the development of teens, and not just making fixing. To make money so yeah, I think this price is, it's a really terrible of course, but it's also giving yet many opportunities for people to learn more about science and academic and industry, and it's all having the same bull and working very closely together.

Health Sciences Netherlands Cova Dr Boss Johnson United States San Diego La Hoya
Will Dak Prescott Sign A Long Term Deal With The Dallas Cowboys?

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

02:53 min | 4 months ago

Will Dak Prescott Sign A Long Term Deal With The Dallas Cowboys?

"Prescott. There is two hours and fifty one minutes left until Dak, Prescott, and Dallas Cowboys can work in extension if not he will be under the franchise tag for the next season earning himself thirty one point four million dollars guaranteed. With the potential chance I, guess up after this season or get franchise tag again. He is now the third quarterback in the history of franchise tags and the NFL to play on the franchise tag. If that happens obviously before after four o'clock drew brees that it what the San Diego chargers. He leaves Don Kirk cousins, does it? What The Washington redskins twice? He leaves town, so history says Dak Prescott will play. This franchise tag may be getting again even but not in Dallas Cowboy long-term. If Your Dad, how do you feel? Do you pumped about thirty one point? Four million dollars guaranteed because if I'm looking at that piece of paper I'm like fucking here we go. Yeah. He's got to be torn. I would imagine I'm sure you're excited. Okay? I'm going to be the starting quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys for another year. MC, thirty one million guaranteed, but he doesn't feel like he has that long term security that he wants from the team. McKay. You think I'm your guy. You're willing to pay thirty one MIL for one year. Why doesn't that don't you think you should give me five six year extension and give me big time money for down the road? That's where he's gotTA. Be Thinking, but so if he doesn't do it today though. He will become a free agent. When the League year starts next March right now after the season they can negotiate. There's another window after the season before free agency to work a long term deal. I actually had that happened after I got franchise tag the day before free agency, we worked a five year deal or four year deal, so I never hit the market, but I was franchise tag the year before, so they could still potentially do that, but I guess I five year deal was offered to Prescott. Numerous Times but DAK wants a four year deal. Cowboys won a five year deal and we've been told by everybody around the cowboys and that knows the organization that that is literally. The only holdup is a one year difference so that's very interesting to me because it feels like there's it's much bigger than just a one year difference there. Thirty three to thirty five million dollars offered with over one hundred million dollars guaranteed, so if you look at that, they know that the cowboys won a five year deal that means three years of that deal was guaranteed. The other two were not locked in for five years as opposed to attack once for four, so everybody's assuming he's going to sign that deal. They're not going to get a deal done, but it's interesting because. He could potentially get thirty seven point four or something next year if he gets franchise tag thirty seven point nine if he gets franchise tag again I, don't see them running into the situation next free agency. I don't. There's no way that the franchise tagging him again they would. You would think they get the deal done I think that they're trying to see if he and Mike McCarthy going to work, I honestly believe that I think there's now granted. They made him one hundred million dollar guarantee already, so maybe I'm wrong in thinking

Dallas Cowboys Redskins Dak Prescott Prescott NFL San Diego Don Kirk Prescott. Mckay Mike Mccarthy Washington
When a myth becomes a mystery

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:22 min | 5 months ago

When a myth becomes a mystery

"Owls Welcome to kids Miss Mysteries! I'm your host kid crumb today. When a myth becomes mystery for today's Podcast, I decided to begin with the definition of terms I started with myth I went to my webster dictionary and came away with the following a traditional story, especially one concerning the early history of people, explaining some natural or social phenomenon, and typically involving supernatural beings events, next I locked up mystery something that is difficult or impossible to understand or explain I needed a local place or event that fit both definitions and had more from myth to mystery, and decided on Mount, Shasta California Shasta a dorm volcano located at the southern end of the cascade range in Siskiyou. County. California is has erupted approximately. Approximately every eight hundred years for the past ten thousand years and vulcanologists will tell you it is overdue. It has seven glaciers, three small glaciers on the southern flank for the larger ones are located on the north and east flanks for those who live next to the volcano, especially on the north side in the Lake Shasta area remnant from the last eruption are easily visible, ranging from lava tubes amounts left by cry, pyroclastic flows Labra Shasta is an incredible site and occupies the lands of four native American tribes. The earliest myth was that the great spirit Scowl came down from the heavens and fought with the spirit of mountain. Ussamma known today as Crater Lake. Indeed this is how the ancient. Ancient people of the area explained volcanic activity for years. It was believed that Shasta contain sacred healing waters during the eighteen eighties, teenage psychic rhetoric Spencer Oliver who lived in the nearby town of White. Rica wrote a book a dweller on two planets. It was published by his mother in nineteen five six years after his death. It was among the pages of that book. That young Oliver, mentioned the many tunnels and chambers in and Beneath Shasta some will tell you that the publication of dweller onto planets was went. Myth turned to mystery for Mount, Shasta, remember now that myth is a traditional story, especially one concerning the early history of people or explaining some natural, a social phenomenon, typically involving supernatural. Supernatural beings or events and mystery is something that is difficult or impossible to understand or explain tunnels and chambers below Shasta is certainly hard to explain it and qualify as a mystery but Oliver, and perhaps hundreds of other authors claim that these chambers are occupied by the survivors of Atlantis still others describe Americans remnants of a lost civilization as the occupants who occasionally wander into the town of Shasta city to trade gold for supplies. Any locals of the area described little men from Shasta that only come out at night, wandering the surrounding woods collected herbal edibles Shasta has been variously described as a doorway to another dimension. I hidden UFO base, a time warp and containing a black hole, still malkin. will explain that CHASTA's Bass. Lava tunnels are filled with molten rock at it is the fifth most likely of all knows the United States to erupt next so there you have it. Mount Shasta Crate example of a myth that's turned into a

Labra Shasta Lake Shasta Shasta City Spencer Oliver Crater Lake Siskiyou California United States Chasta Rica White Malkin.
How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

Learn to Code with Me

05:32 min | 5 months ago

How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

"Went through all this work in effort to become a pharmacist. And then you left pharmacy like you know got a job after you laugh, too. So what led to that like? Regis defined it as fulfilling, or you just were very excited by software, engineering or Yeah! That's a good question. Yeah spent maybe like. Five six years in an industry including education. I think. The more. That's really monroe for me when when I made that program to all the made finding prescription due dates. Preceding that that's program. Bring down the task for like two hours to less than the second. I. I can't tell you how amazing that was. Like it was so painful just looking through every specialty. Bro And finding that but being able to do that in just in just a short program. I thought that this is. This definitely I wanNA. Do in the future. Yeah. That's really cool and. You wrote that I program. What language technology re using some also thinking? Aren't there a lot of? Regulations like in pharmacies like imagine with their computers like things you can and can't do. So Dea it. They have lots of obstruction on the computer, but this was just a local, so I wrote it in Python and there's a local script. It didn't require any. External. dependencies in I didn't look for any other API's so I I just donald a spreadsheet file from our local pharmacy software and plug that into the firm Python program, and the on saw local, and there's nothing to worry about on security side. Gotcha I'm just laughing. Because I'm like imagining like in other jobs or other professions, you could just bring the work home with you, but it's like you can't just bring home like people like I'm sure. It's like sensitive data. Right that you're working with. Other. Same last name address and everything's all there, so you can't really take home, but. You're able to do it at the at the pharmacy while you're working and all that. Yes, keep it to that story, Yeah! Just for context for myself in the listeners. How long ago is this like when you first started coating when you're still working as a pharmacist? How many years ago at this point or pretty recent? Yes Oh. It's Today is the first. One full year that I've been at this company, and then the MRI her I saw been working. suffered the bubble for two years now. Yeah and I think I started just in these in opponent projects. Three years ago. So took me about a year to get. Re Yeah, yeah, exactly like you said about a year when I was working as pharmacists to feel comfortable to looking for a job, and I've been working as a developer for two years gotTa, and then how long were you pharmacist for? Awesome for two years, oaks about the same now right like seeing amount of work experience from pharmacy to announce a software developer torture. Gotcha okay, so we just got your background with the pharmacy in in all of that and your first job. which now you're not there. You're working at a SYNTECH company, right? Cool, so were you planning to work in Fintech? That sort of just come about because I feel like. Some of your experience would be really helpful in like a med tech kind of industry. Yes so that's that's another good question. So the eighty first company went down I. Actually had to go through a job, looking process and actually interested in metallic. How tap that sort of thing because? I thought okay, I do have A. Background there and that interest there, but the thing was when I started the appointees. I met second how companies they required. Either a lot of suffer experience or a lot of research, clinical experience and I had. Neither. So it was difficult to to get into that soul, I started looking into other companies that I thought I had a shot at and this company turned out to be a great fit for me. Go for Culture Wise, and also lies got it. That's interesting about the clinical experience. Research experience at the health. Tech MIDTECH. Quick Sino, could you? Is there a difference between those two things? I love talking about like the different sectors technology. Is There A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MED? Tech in health tech. Some people police Actually I don't think there really is a difference in my point of view. Yeah, I, mean I. Don't know I. I was asking I was like. Okay. Could be medicine, maybe or to the health could be like me. Look physiotherapy or something. Yeah, yeah, that's a good point. Maybe helps more broad. YEA like. Fitness APP or something, or like the thing I always get commercials for Num num the weight loss. You know talking about Donald State. Have as many on I have Hulu, Hulu live TV, and I swear like. Every break! There's a new commercial which is like I guess it's an APP that uses psychology to help you lose weight, but I feel like that's kind of like I guess it was developed by. Doctors by must be yet like health. More. Health Tech

Donald State Hulu Monroe Regis Fintech Software Developer Developer Sino
Sung Kang reveals the fight to make 'Better Luck Tomorrow'

Asian Enough

08:19 min | 6 months ago

Sung Kang reveals the fight to make 'Better Luck Tomorrow'

"Sung king you know him as the street racers. Hans Solo. I love that Han Solo in the fast and furious movies. And you can argue that. Seng's portrayal of Han the impossibly cool mentor of Tokyo drift. A member of the core fast and furious family made the franchise the most surprising and successful blockbuster series in Hollywood history. I would definitely make the argument so we are very lucky to have the chance to speak with Song. Today on Asian enough. Thank you for being here with us forever me we want to start off by addressing the big news. Which is you are coming back to the fast and furious franchise for the upcoming fast and furious. Nine which is huge for those of us who obsessively watched these movies because we know than Han. Your character has been gone for a couple of movies and in fact has one of the most tremendous most unpredictable. Arc's I feel like in movie history in that you know Tokyo drift. Which was the third movie in. The fast and furious franchise is the one that you originated this character. And we'd love to hear from you. What has your relationship with Han. Been like over these years. It's a love hate relationship. The hate is a strong word for it. I think it's maybe love and difficult is what it is because I'll never dismiss what the fast and furious and with the Han characters done for my career and my family and opened the Hollywood doors the first time I you know Justin and I worked on festive fears like we would just literally walk around the production office and then go into his office and start like laughing. Because can all these chairs the free snapple into the free water right those little things that we really appreciate it. Because when we're shooting tomorrow we had nothing we had a fold out table with five sticks of. Wrigley's spearmint gum spread out and a box of cold intimate donuts breakfast. That was our craft service and better luck tomorrow. Of course was the two thousand two indie film about over achieving Asian American teens who flipped the Model Minority Myth on its head when they start doing crimes so better luck. Tomorrow was Justin. Lin's first solo feature recode to feature call shopping things with Quinton leave and there were still students at Ucla. And then I heard that this young filmmaker out of UCLA was making an Asian American film. But I had already worked on a couple of Asian of American films that never finished and it was kind of a fiasco and felt like yeah. It's great to be part of this movement but we're not going to be able to compete with because you can't even finish the movie and when I came back to La. I was so disenchanted anytime I heard about another Asian American filmmaker instantly said this is probably not a good idea. That was already probably a few like maybe five six years in right. I mean I've been already a journeyman into business. You know and the auditions that I would get are the roles that would be a waiter or Yakuza and I felt like maybe the timing was rights. And this idea of being an actor in Hollywood is not GonNa Happen. Right and then I got a couple of phone calls from some aspiring producer. Asian American producers. And they said Hey. There's this guy named Justin Lin. He's a ucla and he's doing this. Asian American film. You should take a look at the script and you should like audition for it now and then two more friends call and say hey. You should really take a look at the script so Justin I actually met at. Danny's on Wilshire and western Koreatown. We met to talk about the script right and talk about the role and stuff like that and at that time. I think Hon- was written as a Filipino character. That drove a hundred civic here like a shaved head. Wow he was really perpetuating kind of like this. You know southern Kelly J. JD M. car culture kind of thug. And I'm from Georgia so I don't identify with I'm into muscle and you know my role models were like James Dean. Paul Newman John Wayne. If you will right and so this thing did not resonate so when I sat down with just and I said Hey I can I addition for Ben. The main character for best. I better tomorrow and just in being the the the patient older brother if you will and he would make a great poker player because slow played it and he's like why not. Let's see so. I went at like three times to read for Ban and knowing the whole time. I'm way too old looking. I don't fit the VIBE and I said to myself if this dude cast me it's movies gonNA suck and compromise vision. So after the third edition called me and said. Hey Man it's not gonNa work out but I would still love free to play on. I was like this is a guy that I would go to paddle with one last shot. Because if it doesn't work out I probably have to go and find a real job and it was so challenging because we had the whole budget in place but then the investors had asked Justin to change all the rules to Caucasian and Justin being. Who is now not GONNA do it? And he started putting the equipment on his credit card but as soon as the credit card companies. No you're maxing it out. They basically linked to the other companies. And then they'll hold your credit card so we're screwed and then I had worked at this restaurant in Beverley hills this cream barbecue place called Hula okay. That is no longer and we shot for a day and then justice said the money's not coming in so we probably have to shut this down and I went to work and I was so depressed right and I'm a server. They're left of a smile. I was so bummed and this is where I feel like everything happens for a reason. Like I don't necessarily subscribe to all these myths and stuff as some Guardian Angel but if if there is such thing that night she showed up and by that you mean John Wong and her husband. Jeffrey go founders of the Cherry Sky Films Production Company. They had been coming into the restaurant for a couple years and there was the first time they saw me not smiling and that kind of goofing off and she said what's wrong way so sadness explain the situation and she said can. I take a look at the script as I have in my car. She goes Why don't you in the director come by the office? Like the talk we went in there spoke for about an hour and then she wrote us a fifty thousand dollar check. Wow there's something like so mythic about this whole story but isn't that the keep a fifty thousand not enough to finish this movie right and so then we're stock and just kind of freaking out and the only person he knows that really has money. Is this guy named Mc Hammer right and how does he know MC Hammer so justin used to work at the Japanese? American museum is to be editor for the downtown Japanese-american Museum and so he was in plans of shooting tomorrow. And at that time the cannon xl one three chip consumer camera was coming out. And if you guys are aware if your techies like big deal so that was the first option of going digital post to film and suggests that went down. I think there was a convention down there to look at the new cameras coming out and Hera was there so hammer's standing next to a kid. You know anything about this camera. And he kind of helps them out and he goes. So what do you WanNa do this well? One day I hope to be a director. They Kinda you know. Talk a little bit and hammered being who is gave him his phone number and said hey you ever need anything. Give call so fast forward. The money's not happening just freaking out the credit cards frozen. I think he had the the phone number like pin to his wall. For you know for Sake right is that what the hell he calls. Hammer Hammer picks up. What's up is okay. Do you remember me Zig. Know what do you want? Here's the situation he goes. Hey it's not hammer time anymore. I can't just be funding these things. But here's ten grand. Do what you gotta do but you know I don't I don't need it back but here it is so if you go and watch. Tokyo drift anytime. There's a Tokyo City. Scene is hammer

Justin Lin Hammer Hammer Hollywood HAN Ucla Tokyo Hans Solo Director Tokyo City LA Seng Beverley Hills ARC Wrigley Paul Newman James Dean Kelly J. Jd M. Georgia Producer Cherry Sky Films Production Co
Alex Natera on the Origin of Run-Specific Isometrics

Just Fly Performance Podcast

05:46 min | 7 months ago

Alex Natera on the Origin of Run-Specific Isometrics

"Alex it's awesome to have you back and I think in this type of necessity really where I think a lot of us are a little bit more barebones place than we typically are in our own trading environments and things like that. I I'd like to ask you a little bit of the history of what we talked about. Lascaux which was Your isometric training protocol and. I'm curious how did you come up with that? Like what was the necessity that sparked the all the overcoming isometrics in that protocol that you talked about last time on the show? Yeah sure I think. There's actually a real spock incident before that incident occurred always already involved in some full loss metric training through right back to where a little kid. I was a martial artist Back in the day as a youngster is a five six year old and happened to do a really sort of traditional style. Mosh largely run out in the Wilderness and the and the scillies out in the wilderness. And you'll you'll they're bamboo flooring in your training out there. Doing all sorts of a real traditional taught work. And there's a lot of awesome metrics back. Then I remember back in the Divan and advocates that were in the martial lots like I just felt like always automatic genetics. Whatever the youngsters. Six seven eight year old but I always felt stronger than them but we just doing. Masha up four or five. Times die Just Chine- Anyway. But in that. Masha outs sign much. Awesome metric stuff ruled traditional stuff pushing against your own hands against objects are the people that were bigger than you and that sort of stuff let alone. The numerous amount of push ups. You do as well or whatever but so. That was a I sort of Introduction the awesome metrics Was Awesome Energy. Was just something we have to kind of thing and then I guess another key moment was going into high school starting to try starting to lift weights learning Lipson. Let's Basically much traditionalist. There was some point in time and Utah used to try. And he's still do try to stop a very visceral that but locks when you're young and so. I remember trying just thinking from a necessity. Really Thinking Rob will Lift the white up but also lower light down as much as possible. I didn't know anything about muscle actions yet. I've learned that you can also hold a white cockatoo. That with different loads at different times. We'll warm I gonNA just sit there and do bench press and then file pushing it up and rocky no one on file lowering it. I'll get a spot on. I'll foul Lawrence and on a file like holding it. As as long as I can with the highest white on compulsively hold it for so I was already playing with stuff then and obviously now. You've got lots of other things. Come into the system. Here you've got your growth and maturation ideologies Chinese very rapidly in whatever nonetheless. You're starting to think while they stopped really works like this is amazing. I'm getting far stronger than everyone else. And Excelling Sport and so on but then I finish them Action into my sport now as a professional and one position applied we American listens But in the scrum always in from the middle of a scrum where you're literally pushing V. I gather As much load going through your body and if your dominant scrum you might start with. We men overcome them eventually. And then push would. But there's not a lot of concentric taught movement it's really a high blood isometric and modernization onto struggle kickable back to the arrest of nights so on between massive men and I honored killers. Where the pressure coming at you and I'm having to stabilize on one leg while accessible by and start it just made sense to me. That has all its training. Could squat uncle really well. A strong squad relatively speaking an absolute sims will for my size but I just started doing more symmetric work and it felt like what heavy load felt lock the scrum and therefore and the transit was dramatic from an average on ended up becoming quota yet act became a strong point of Ma Game. Attest completely dos. Metrics now is very specific wrought as in muscle action was very specific to the to the movement that I needed to do in the game then moving along in our going into the professional environment in terms of a practitioner working as a strength and conditioning are starting to use awesome metrics in the reeb setting often and at also in the assessment the assessment of neuromuscular capacities particular peak force. So that'll started coming in really when I started moving over to the English Wish probably my my biggest development journey for instance for example. Sorry and time on end up taking a few people through the rehabilitation early with the Physiotherapists import obviously on the early stages. But then some of the exercises way would doing on carry on with the longer because we'd see guy for a period of time where you got six weeks or something doing awesome interest. Because that's all they could in the Rehab setting and then I'd move on to more autonomy would but actually stop keep keeps them awesome metric in long because my mind I was going hold on getting any pine from this exercise where actually really really high near Moscow. So I can look them hot on this exercise. Robin drop the white and become what we thought was more specific moving into US twenty tropic so that and then what I was seeing the back of that with some really promising results like people just coming back a lot quicker and a lot stronger and so I needed less back work of strength training to get them often and returning to plan returning to

Alex Divan Lipson United States Moscow Utah Ma Game Lawrence Robin
"five six years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:52 min | 7 months ago

"five six years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"With Devon hunter his websites are all linked up already it coast to coast AM dot com Sir go take a look and we'll be talking about his newly released work called the modern which spells recipes and workings when will America go back to business we really need to and as a matter of fact Friday they're gonna release unemployment figures and they will be sky high in states like New York and California the lockdowns could last for who knows how long now newsmax TV is conducting a very urgent national poll asking if you agree with the lockdowns all around the country the newsmax poll asks you what president trump should also do so once you let your voice be heard vote in the newsmax poll the president does look at these polls and it's really simple approach just text the word river the thirty nine seven forty seven that's a river the thirty nine seven forty seven AM vote instantly letting president trump Congress and the media know your opinion I don't forget to watch newsmax TV it's got great coverage great I watch it it's good people newsmax TV on direct TV three forty nine dish to sixteen Xfinity eleven fifteen the spectral optimum one oh two U. verse twelve twenty file six fifteen **** Suddenlink one oh two while Armstrong and more so what should tune into newsmax TV and don't forget to vote in their poll on the lockdowns and the president just text the word revert to thirty nine seven forty seven that's river the thirty nine seven forty seven I've got this tax bill for Sharpay rescue dogs okay another shar pei the one who is I have stuck with the dyna light on my goodness probably five six years people remark really how well my dog what do you hold close they hi tell me they get a regular diet of dynamite with every meal is it trash and all I have to do is say dog food pandemonium they can be half asleep and they're thrilled you don't need to wait until the problem it's far better to keep the dog happy and healthy at all dynamite for life we'll be right I tell I get my Dino from V. I. T. dot com news radio twelve hundred W. O. a high and welcome back to coast to.

America New York California trump president Congress Armstrong newsmax Suddenlink Sharpay
"five six years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"five six years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"About five six years but impatience six once the twelve years now the guy's a great athlete and then he's got a great mind for for whatever he does in sports and he's he's he's got four pitches that are working for now you know the the eye sight lines are changing for the hitters he he he's got the fastball but at the top of his own he then he comes down with a slight are low in a way he's he's he's I think he's more of a pitcher now that he's ever been when he just could go out there and swing the fastball and get by with it with a with a couple breaking pitches he's thinking a lot more out there it doesn't quite have the stuff that he used to have but it's been impressive to watch I mean you can talk about spin rate and and what he's been doing all you want but you have to do it on the field and what he did yesterday I mean that the the Phillies just went completely quiet you know everything about you little bit your your story today was terrific he came into the dugout singing a captain and Tennille song from us he was definitely singing you could really hear me there was one was over double what what what what was that you were singing there the captain and Tennille I mean this is this is a that's an old school moment there and in every way but you know that's not a bad not a bad tune but a that was going through his head needed mind you don't share it with us you know what's funny about him of course he's going to be a hall of fame manager but the way the managerial tree is going the young managers are taking over the game and not only does he become a hall of fame manager but he sort of fits the role because our name one left like him yeah well that and that's really a shame.

Phillies Tennille five six years twelve years
"five six years" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"five six years" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"About, you know, five six years ago for this Thursday, and quote hooked way, all from my mouth is you know, I can't take him with right until run out in the hell is chemotherapy. So right. You know, but they're doing what I'm doing where on I'm tolerating is. It's a mile does I had to go ever thought for ever third week to set the fragrant, but undoing well, I'm glad to hear. Thank you for sharing that information with us and best wishes as you continue. Oh, okay. I don't think fully recovers if I send for a wind up advantage been a real fan on they fly things. What's the opening day of phone paying Quicken's? So thinking through the covers of I sent for Williams and everything we do for Ville is just so how new offense accord, maybe so, but I I know why I just wanted to let you know. I think he's a all The other. other. And they ought to all people is vice him, Danny? You continue the fight. And we thank you for joining us today. All our best. Thank you. So thank you very much. Great to have you on listening to the Paul finebaum show podcast March lie by joining us. We just showed his way too early. Mark great w on the big story here, of course, is Jalen hurts and oak, the Homa tell us about the decision to move Oklahoma from outside the college football playoff projection. Of course inside. I mean, it call it really came down to Oklahoma Ohio State inside a little bit more confident confidence than Jalen hurts than than just in the fields at this point urges twenty six to a starter. I think he got better as a passer last year, he surrounded by some some really good skill players on offense at Oklahoma Lincoln Riley, proven the last couple years, obviously that they can take a transfer and tournament to a really good quarterback in his system. And you know, I think the I think the jury's still out a little bit on Justin fields..

Jalen Oklahoma Ville Paul finebaum Justin fields Quicken Lincoln Riley Williams Ohio football Danny five six years
"five six years" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on The Working Experience

"If you finish. No, I'm not joking around five six years old. He would come over and smack on the back of the hit. Talking about like light little tap like if you had food in your mouth, you would spit it out that would be the velocity of his hand against your. And I remember it was an upward swing. I mean, honestly had yet practice. So he come by. He wouldn't do it to my sister. But he'd due to my my brother he come by upward swing. Am right in the back of the head? And you know, it didn't. To say that it it hurt. It didn't hurt. But I definitely felt. Yeah. You know what? I mean, it wasn't like he punched me in the face right rushing me face who would have been in appropriate. This was like, you know, if I was standing up he might smack me on the, but but I was sitting down. So my head was the only option, but that was you know, that was socially acceptable did not scar me any way, shape or form a today. Like if we were sitting around the table in one of my sons didn't finish their food. And my dad walked over him and smack them on the back of the head. Literally the record would stop. Yeah. Just my wife would have a problem. I would have probably at. Yeah. Yeah. But it's it's it's different. Now. It's like and also to it's like, I'm not advocating that we should go back to hitting children. I'm just saying that it's kids today. Superior that, you know, the parenting style is very, you know, Netflix, you know, very trying to shield them from the hard realities of life. When when in fact, and we all know this when they get out of the Coon life is not going to be a warm hug, you know, warm hug and kiss on the cheek not to say that you shouldn't do this. Parents you should love your kids. You shouldn't hit them. I'm just saying it's making a point that you're you're gonna face obstacles. And you know, and you have to overcome them if you con. Currently teach your child that you're always gonna get a medal or everything's always gonna be. Okay. It's not that's not how things are gonna gonna roll off in life. Well, you know, I hesitate to say no for a fact, but you know, I've taught for long enough to come to the realization that you always you always know for I know for a fact, I know it prevents your less. That kids. Do they kinda crave they seem to crave somebody who will tell them like yes to this. No to that. Like, this is how you do this. This is how you don't. And you know, I student said that to me one time she, you know, she was asking me about this in that high school kid, and I said well now, that's you know, whatever it was kind of forget what it was. It was not something about school. It was something about I don't know driver's license or something I civilians concert. And she said, you know, I just don't like she's I don't get the impression she gets real answers from her parents like she indicated that and you know, I mean, I don't have any personal stake in it. But I do get the impression that kids. Do you know they kind of want somebody to say like I'm kid. I don't know what to do. I need somebody to tell me..

Netflix five six years
"five six years" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Acquired

"We figured, you know what better way to start our brand than a physical manifestation of what we were about. By the way, it was also a bootstrapping mechanism. So we actually bootstrapped our company for the first five years with very little of the capital that I saved that Goldman to get this company off the ground, either the action pads journals were a big part of that as long as well as these conferences. And the first book that I wrote, there were various ways we're trying to bootstrap the company, but it was always it was. It was a somewhat medium agnostic, but mission Centric approach to building the begins brand. Both you were getting awareness in distribution if you will for be hands, but also non dilutive capital. That is true. And I think that is a big factor we want to get into it. But I mean, we'll we'll get there but with the acquisition, a big part of the math was the fact that we had not really diluted ourselves much. We'd raised one real round of third party capitol five, six years into the business, which really was very, very significant for us. Well, it's interesting having a revenue stream that you don't think is going to be your ultimate product to help boost dropped the company. I think it's a pattern that most people don't explore because when they're setting out to start a startup, they often want to venture backed right away. And so they wanna get right into the core business. But you know, it reminds me of one other business that sold something to make money along the way. And that was those Airbnb with Syria. Imagine if they were selling airbeds or something that was actually like very aligned with raising awareness for their product in their community itself. You know, you're gonna do inter. View job? Yeah, one of the co founders for the messing middle for the new book. And I'm talking about sort of those early days. I mean, they were. They went through some real fits and starts, and they had multiple iterations in in the first two didn't really hit it like the third one dead. The serial was like a. It was also like a coach role element of the team and how they operated and how they work together. There was something significant even though the cereal wasn't necessarily related to the end product, but it was all about like kind of this fun experience and community and that sort of thing. Yeah. So you're bootstrapping you're selling action journals. You're doing conferences your first book, and then you also had a ninety nine percent, right? Which was essentially ninety nine or ninety nine. Sorry actually you both are right. It was ninety nine percent until the whole Wall Street movement happened where there was like the ninety, nine percent thing..

Goldman Airbnb Syria ninety nine percent nine percent five years six years
"five six years" Discussed on Mere Mortals Unite

Mere Mortals Unite

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Mere Mortals Unite

"Not have mentors they don't they're they're typically younger people who are looking for somebody to guide them are absolutely in so what you're able to do is say okay let's take that natural hunger that they have which we all have frankly we all would love somebody put an arm around us and say you know you're julianne you're just a wonderful speaker you're wonderful podcast to your went in we all want to let me show you how to be better right i remember when in fact because i was in pittsburgh into a school there in i was an athlete good little athlete in third grade i had a friend of mine who's dad was an all of whose grandfather was in all american football player at the university of pittsburgh in like nineteen nineteen through nineteen twenty one in his grandson was not as athletic i was remember afterwards this man used to walk up put his arm romance kevin you are phenomenal young athlete on you're just a good kid and he spoken to my life i was that i remember that right that far yeah i know exactly what you mean in so these these this is what it means to care in beginning a lot has how do we create the conversation so this toured purpose statement tool which is such a simple little tool but it's it's a sort of thing we sit down somebody's so what did you give your purpose statement you know you've got celebrating life what does that mean to you wanted is how did you choose that what's going on some will you have a meaningful life conversation which is not which is hush i say it's it's not business base but it comes back to being business base searchable harassment it's not you know equal opportunity you know it's just caring life because want in the legal world in the the political economic legal world that would tell us you don't engage with people because it's scary and your lower to get a lawsuit while the truth is you need to be able to life together in the workplace in the home and so on and so forth and so this is one of those ways that you can have a real conversation that isn't just superficial like sports or how the job or going on vacation not anything wrong with his conversations but the real depth getting to know who somebody is in how you when you care about somebody where they are in their life and they know that you care therefore you have a business cares absolutely an interesting i just went to conference last week and you know we started off with wellness programs like about nah maybe five six years ago and and they would talk about work life balance which i always thought was an oxymoron because i don't think there's a balance because there's not a separation and i was at this conference last week and they called it work life harmony and i really liked that because that's really what it is when i work with businesses i always say you know there are skills that you can teach your workforce that will not only help them on the job it will help them with change at home let's say i'm doing change management it'll help them with change that happens in their home that could be a dog dying or it could be a broken washing machine changes change and you use the same skills in both more obviously when you're losing a dog or a relative or whatever then you are when you're a broken washing machine but it's those little changes that that give you the opportunity to practice those skills so when those other incidents happen your brain already knows oh i have a skill for that and you're really doing the same thing with being on purpose is people have another thought process they can go to right it's it's another i always say it's like we have tool belts right life skill tool belts and the more we have in those tool belts the more we can do when things come up and none of us should wait for tragedy to figure out we need those skills and the other part of this is really important as all of this can be taught all of this can be learned.

five six years
"five six years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"The us would need as many as five thousand judges to catch up with the backlog of cases involving undocumented persons the us it'd that elaborate as part of his justification in calling for instant deportation at the same time the president's happy he signed the order ending children being separated president trump saying in the oval office he does not regret signing the executive order last wednesday ending separating adults and children arrested for crossing into the ucla legally as for his tweets about near instant deportation with no due process for migrants mr trump thinks it meshes with keeping families together a nice simple system that works you know mexico halls people for four hours for five hours for two hours and we have people for four five six years and they never leave says in twenty eleven mexico changed its immigration laws giving some due process rights to illegal immigrants before that deportation could be swift bob costantini washington harley davidson facing rising costs from new tariffs to begin shifting production of motorcycles heading for europe from the us to factories overseas harley sees it europe is a critical market for the company you look at last year it did fifteen percent of its business their forty thousand motorcycles were sold so for now harley is basically going to eat the higher tariff costs the company says it's going to take a hit of thirty million to forty five million dollars for the rest of the year and if you look at the full year the impact could be as high as one hundred million dollars correspondent alison kasich well this'll be very hot week in albuquerque but we could see a break in the weather by the weekend national weather service meteorologist roger smith says it could be hint that the monsoons aren't far off large for high that's gonna give us a hot weather through thursdays going to start to slide east late thursday and by friday we could see some moisture move up from northern mexico smith says whenever we see moisture moving up from the south in late june or early july it's an encouraging sign that the monsoons.

us president ucla mexico harley davidson europe harley roger smith executive mr trump bob costantini alison kasich albuquerque one hundred million dollars forty five million dollars four five six years fifteen percent five hours four hours
"five six years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I started to do some research looking for new movie ideas probably about five six years ago and i you know looking for something with you know nova scotia story grew up with a book called helen helen creighton's blue knows ghosts and it was kind of the bible on every family in cape breton nova scotia cape on especially we have very strong supernatural love their bruno's ghosh's terrifying i mean this folklore creighton traveled to these small communities all over nova scotia collecting go stories and she compiled them in a book and this book would keep you up at night and i know was getting i knew i wanna make a horror movie because my dad was such a big hoorah about who trained me to love or movies i said it should be nova scotia story that's one thing i haven't seen all the scary movies i've seen from around the world and we've got our own creepy folklore right here in this province i i should mention that this isn't a a horror dramatization of the ideal maternity home though is not of the butter box babies right yes that's right yeah so tell me a little bit about how you manage to use that as the sort of a plot arc from what you ended up doing sure will there's ton of material available in line i think in one in one essay i read liley young's daughter the the real proprietors midwife of the ideal maternity home i think i'd rather daughter tried to open it as a country in after it shut down due to all the lawsuits lila was never never convicted of anything and i thought i wrote myself great idea for scary movie a haunted house story in a country in an then it it's sort of came together very quickly when i decided to put my attention to it in spring of two thousand fifteen three people in a country in said this this can be you know the shining needs rosemary's baby in the orphanage the great gear modell toro film and it's something we could do on the but it's we have enough scotia we we we had a really terrible time does fifteen the first version of this film was was sunk do.

helen helen creighton bruno cape breton nova five six years
"five six years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"It's got to be a lot smaller now with the internet but the question is when you buy stuff over the internet from a company that's physically in a in a state far away from you and they don't have a physical presence in your state they take the position these retailers that they don't have to collect sales tax for you and they say oh look how difficult it is my god look at all the taxing jurisdictions and counties and special districts anyway they they seem to have forgotten this computer software out there anyway we've got a really interesting senior legal analyst time and it involves baseball no it does because it's not like the supreme court brought it up but when i was looking at this case yesterday from the supreme court there was this there's another case that popped into my mind and it has to be discussed and it's about baseball it really really is and speaking about baseball i have a confession and an apology just before we get into the guts of what's going on today four weeks ago four weeks go i said that we would start a new feature at thirty three minutes into our first hour on wednesdays and here we are wednesdays and we're into our first hour now last week i had planned and i had announced and we had made a date we've made an appointment that at thirty three minutes into the first our last wednesday i would tell you the back story of this clip before but give that give my opinion well that's the longer version because the long versions a minute twenty four and there's a hilarious story behind it about five six years ago i played this told.

baseball supreme court analyst thirty three minutes four weeks five six years
"five six years" Discussed on Are You Real

Are You Real

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Are You Real

"I love that i love how you're even specifically touching on what some of god's heart is in the original intended he has for that nation what is it about the government mountain that makes you come alive you know that's a real interesting question because i didn't care about government for the longest time you know i don't know why just is one of those things that when i was younger the it was the spiritual is more important than anything now in so just ignorant to that fact and then really about five six years ago just started developing a passion in a hard for politics and started paying attention what was happening in the us and then really start paying attention to what's happening in in africa on the different nations and i just believe that god really wants to move government because he wants to he wants to show art of its heart rue the leadership accu wants himself expressed who that and i think that's fascinating in in in we all god or a lot of people will you got as as this distant authority who really cares for himself with god is not distant he cares for people tunities of government to express that more than anything else or god is close in cares about people really good so as a true kingdom statesman yourself i would love for you to weigh in on one or two of my attributes of a true kingdom statesman teaching that i do which includes character development kingdom understanding inherited wisdom favor expectancy prophetic skill emotional intelligence and self awareness as kind of the seven pillars are traits that you really need to develop an own as a truth william statesmen perhaps weigh in on on which one has proved to be the most valuable to you and which one has been the hardest to develop.

us africa five six years
"five six years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Certainly in the minor leagues i don't know exactly what the baseball's have been doing the home run rates haven't taken off like the half the majors but do you is this something you sort of have to keep in the back of your mind or or maybe even more forward from that trying to pitch round what's gone on with baseball you're the stat guy thought you'd probably know this before i did but i'm pretty sure twenty seventeen was the most home run ever hit major league baseball if i'm wrong yeah so i mean well for one gathered bigger faster stronger than they've ever been i think that i think that has a lot to do with the training methods that are going on in baseball right now i think over especially even since i got into pro ball and since i and beat level college baseball last five six years the training methods have gotten a lot better guys just their bodies are just better so i think that had a lot to do with these guys these guys walking up to the plate or no joke i mean these freak athletes with unbelievable hand eye coordination but from pitching standpoint i think again it just comes down to pitch execution you can't worry about giving up home runs like obviously it's going to happen but key is if you i think one of the biggest keys that you gonna give them up give them up nobody on bass solo shots aren't going to beat you it's a three run home runs that are gonna really do damage for you and then just i mean it's just executing down in his own making your pitch and if you make your pitch and guys still hits one out i mean that happens and sometimes you just have to your cat so obviously we we have you on for a number of reasons but the primary reason we'd like to talk to you is about the ongoing now bubbling up conversation about money and the minor leagues and you yourself you're a you're drafted twice but the brewers selected you in two thousand fifteen and the twenty seventh round believe you're a senior sign out of oklahoma state i don't know your exact signing bonus but i can guess and you also have the unusual angle of you've been accepted into the.

baseball brewers college baseball oklahoma five six years
"five six years" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on The Interchange

"The bad news is that were still a long way from emission reductions it'll keep global temperatures below two degrees c and if you look at the past five six years we've been reducing the carbon intensity of global energy supply by about half a percent a year and 2016 we probably reduced it by almost one percent a year to keep global temperatures below two degrees we need to reduce the carbon intensity of global energy supply by two to three percent every year for uh for the next add next thirty years so there's a lot for a lot of work christoph to do going to be going a lot faster by you know but climate risk is not by an area and the first few tonnes that you reduce deliver some of the most significant benefits in terms of improved outcomes for for for uh for human beings and for the planet and and the progress that we made over the past decade is is is nothing sneeze at trevor hauser is a partner with the rhodium group he was formerly hillary clinton's energy policy adviser he is a former senior adviser to the state department on international energy and environmental issues and his analysis at the rome group group is fantastic we will of course provide links to allow the studies that we discussed in the podcast in the show notes right therefore you to access trevor thank you so much for coming on the show we really enjoy this effects from young guys i pressure that's going to do it for this week's show folks if you like these conversations please share them around send a link to your colleagues are your friends you can also go into apple podcast and give us a rating in review that is always very much appreciated you can find us anywhere you get podcasts if you're not in the apple ecosystem who will play stitcher tune in soundcloud wherever just download us.

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"five six years" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Exponent

"And it was it was so prescient not just in a it was right but in a perfectly articulating that the way that the paradigm had change to now in iphone was a was a computer and rim did make computers the computer company is going to be the phone company and you don't for him it was the right moment right time right guy right perspective just holy nailed it had the luxury of protective kind of strolling in answer to the tail end of that and saying let's put a ball around this and understand what what have we learned over the last five years was the reality of this market and what is it sort of mean going forward it's crazy i mean and now you look at the market in it feels very mature it feels like everybody has that place and we understand but there was still some pretty divergent opinions even back in 2013 six what's that five six years after the whole thing kicked off with the iphone and the the extent to which you right like people were still talking about samsung versus apple and like how this was going to play out and it hadn't shaken out and it's one of those things so where you didn't even realize that it kinda happened until you look back and it's like 2013 twentyfour attained ikea eight this iphone thing it's not going away there's going to be a division of the market and here the reasons why right well let me i would say that's what i did that was kind of the from if there is a broad the eyebrow it's hardest it's harder to like distill it to one thinks i were about all kinds of stuff you know the first your every year every day i read the bible church of writing everyday i'm uncovering a whole range of topics but if you sort it takes or the 50000 foot view.

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"five six years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You five six years from now is not going to be where are you going to be able to do this in know with jimmy butler so i think pay i'm not i'm not usually a rebuilding advocate but i think for this franchise given the run that they have had you know have been made the playoffs whatever i not know honey when he cares about over the last ten or twelve years probably among the top five teams in the league as far as playoff appearances you were just stuck now and there was no great it was no real legitimate pair that that was realistic that you were going to be able to get back in contention you might not be able to now but this is a path to it you didn't have a path to it before which jimmy because you could only get you know this kind of pay off if you trade it jim it you couldn't keep jimmy and get these kind of players with what you had on the roster because you've been drafting out of the lottery for the last ten years angered you've always say well they may italy's mistakes they should pick this guy that guy you know might go back to the '90s and when the bulls were drafted out of the lottery and see what they picked it hugh those ten guys were you jerry krause whose in all fame now no one to executive at a year awards mark randall does ten draft x tell me how you were going to build a team out of that well you could make the argument those and that you could have had carmelo 'cause you pay greek date got him to the thunder so then you could add carmelo rondo jimmy ties you could abroad back that team is probably i dunno fourth seed in the in the eastern conference so well now you couldn't have credit card melo how could you had come out he he he he could have come here a couple of years ago he wouldn't you know when it when it clear he could have he had to trap has no trade pick a place he did not want to come to chicago then that.

jimmy butler italy bulls jerry krause mark randall melo executive carmelo rondo chicago five six years twelve years ten years
"five six years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Next six seventy five six years whatever however long it lasts so there is that advantage to it it can be it has to do with taxes and timing of the deduction and not necessarily having the charity identified today that's what they really come in handy i've seen him used for estate planning purposes were an individual had a fairly large estate and they want to teach their kids especially even after their goal on nothing kids are gone the parents are going to be charitable with the you know the wealth that was there and so they're setting up a charitable donate a a fund and they're making gifts to it now because they're taking that exhibition but they're basically destructing the kids to make gifts of x amount of those rex percent of the fund every year after they're gone other kids don't have access to the money but they have to make the gifts and so force them to be charitable in some respects so there's different things in different disadvantage you don't have the same direct contact with the charity necessarily there are some fees involved other than you know it's a fund you're paying somebody to do something for you we're all you're doing is making gifts of stock you know you've got less fees so right how would you know what percentage would be for if you do uh i'm sure that they're not they're not huge huge huge huge fees any other mutual fund a little newbie to slightly more and they range it depends it depends on the size of the gift if you're making a 20billiondollar donor advise fund verse can you give your or versus the two thousand dollars of donor advice well you know i'm sure that the fees are going to be different in that respect to you can shop it around see there's different ones out there because i'm currently with merrill lynch craig now and whether i hit or are trying to go at one of the.

merrill lynch six seventy five six years two thousand dollars 20billiondollar
"five six years" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on KFC Radio

"Oh you to blow job of the night with me over 50 can have a an arab baby thirty years let's do this we gotta get through like yet i can knock out a week no problem i hope amendment one of fifty pickup gonna i don't know about that lesbians or virgins pick your pick took to tickets lesbian could choice virgins are weird prisons are with her guy uh so i've been living with my girlfriend berg ottomar now i know dark let me don't want come i felt quite yet by i might be getting there uh anyway we live in a twobedroom apartment obviously i'm rooming with my girl and then the two people rooming in the room across is uh the ride being couple so for the past laura uh department couple by the way has been dating for about five six years and uh i've noticed that when one of them has gone the other one we'll have a guy over now it sounds like they're batting uh for like a better word when i come home and that's what they're doing uh in in the ruins but it sounds like and actually both girls are doing this one of the other is that out doing whatever now uh uh very pretty damn good at this to get away with it every turn on the any way that they're going to get cot uh i want to ask you is there any with anything i can do to uh have this thing exploding in front of my eyes of think it's going to be hilarious uh guys let me know.

twobedroom five six years thirty years
"five six years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Okay what's your household income um combined together lear uh let's see i make 45000 he or she makes off fifty five ooh schoombee long slog in the kyoto it is i know i already have no hope while i want you to have hope but it's going to be a distant uh light over the horizon them in you got mathematical issues here with a hundred grim towards three hundred grand i mean if i do sixty year year out of your 100 and put your own beans and rice that into three hundred that's like what in the five years or uh you got a tough five six years ahead of you and that's if you really really dial it back and no you don't need a by hell street clean this mess up labour i shouldn't say right now what i think probably awsat the out there question additives to their uh the now but you won't be able quit working stay home oh no no no i i've never won it couldn't get asked okay i mean kids you can have kids and and they're not that expensive than i mean you you know they eat what you it usually for smart once again pass the early stages anyway but uh get kids don't break you but um that you know you don't have an extra thirty thousand bucks to save up and put down on a house while you've got three hundred thirty eight thousand dollars a student loan debt making a hundred grand yeah and we're we're in an apartment we're we're gonna at i told him who need to stay there until we knocked down yeah you need to get some progress on it before you even move to a rental house but um yeah i think you're gonna it's gonna take you a while so you're going to have to live somewhat of a life but you know you you don't need a plan on vacations and you don't need to plan on expensive car purchases or anything else you you've got a.

car purchases three hundred thirty eight tho five six years five years sixty year