35 Burst results for "Five Months"

Fauci: US to spend $3.2B for antiviral pills for COVID-19

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 6 d ago

Fauci: US to spend $3.2B for antiviral pills for COVID-19

"The U. S. will invest three point two billion dollars in a program to boost development of antiviral pills for cope with nineteen and other dangerous viruses that could turn into pandemics the cope with nineteen kills would be used to minimize symptoms after infection they're already being developed and Dr Anthony Fauci says the money will help speed clinical trials and give more support for research the program also aims to find new therapies for other viruses there are a few treatments that exists for many of the viruses that have what we call pandemic potential meantime the CDC says average daily new covert nineteen cases of the U. S. have hit their lowest point since the pandemic's early days and are down ninety five percent over five months Sager mag ani Washington

Dr Anthony Fauci U. CDC Sager Mag Ani Washington
AG Garland Unveils Strategy to Combat Domestic Terrorism

710 WOR Programming

00:36 sec | Last week

AG Garland Unveils Strategy to Combat Domestic Terrorism

"Garland announcing the country's first national strategy for combating domestic terrorism after a review ordered in the aftermath of the January 6th capital attack, the attorney general says the goal here is to disrupt and deter, but they also want to address The root causes of domestic terrorism. This comes five months after the January 6th attack, which the president has labeled as domestic terrorism. And now this administration is making this a higher priority, calling for greater coordination between national security agencies and more intense scrutiny of social media posts. ABC senior White House correspondent Mary Bruce President Dragon is

Garland ABC Mary Bruce White House
Transitioning from First to Second House Hack

Denver Real Estate Investing Podcast

02:44 min | Last week

Transitioning from First to Second House Hack

"To recap. You bought a house. Inner nevada three bedroom. Two bathroom main house. I believe with a one. One basic mother-in-law sweet above the garage wrecked about the perfectly out for a house. Ac you and your wife alison been there for two years. We we were there for about a year and a half year knafo correct okay so year and a half and what you live in the main house. You've been air being being the mother-in-law sweet above the garage and then you've done a great job of pivoting with that one covert happen. You switched to medium term rentals so as we. I want to get some numbers with you and details. Is you pivoted to medium term rental on there and now you have moved out your new property. So tell us about the pivot from a short term rental medium-term rental covert. I say about a year ago and why that's changed your investing philosophy so when kovic hit my wife and i looked at each other like. Oh crap our whole principles. Our philosophy is based off of short term rental people. Travelling people aren't traveling so the whole part of the game is adapting. And seeing what we can do. And so that's when we really started Looking into medium term rentals and medium term rentals or anything over thirty days and we started looking into furnish finder and copa to try to get people in because furnished finder is actually focused more towards traveling nurses and everyone knows during covid. There's a lot of traveling nurses and so that really got us through twenty twenty out safe. From april to september in september we opened backup april-september medium term rentals saved our business and during that process. We knew that we noticed that. Okay this is great. We're not doing laundry every night. This is great. have to deal with the cleaner. We're not having constant turnover. We're having more professionals come in and live with our live in our property that are more quiet and sleep during the and work at night and it just it really fit my wife and i during that time fit perfectly and we couldn't ask for anything better all right and so give a frequency so medium term rental is everyone everyone a few months turnover. Yeah it depends on what they're looking for the shortest term you can do is thirty days but we've had some up to four to five months and we've actually had people come last minute like hey can i stay a little bit longer. But we're really trying to keep it as business and keep our occupancy and our turnover or occupancy as low as possible so we have people lined up so we have had to turn away a couple of people but all in all we've had excellent excellent

Inner Nevada Kovic Alison
How to Buy Host-Read Ads at Scale

Sounds Profitable

01:48 min | Last week

How to Buy Host-Read Ads at Scale

"For the people. Who aren't familiar with you. How'd you get into managing your ads. The content creation. Yeah great idea you you made your show but like what made you decide to not just have somebody else handle your ads. Well i have. I i did want to have somebody else handle my ads and i called friends of mine at agencies. Well actually that wasn't even my first up i. I started talking to people that worked in marketing at networks. And i said hey. Do you have freelance little side. Hustle com moonlighting. Anything that i can do to hire you. And i got a lotta yeses. And then like five months later. They were still like. Oh i'm just really busy right now. And i thought you know i don't like waiting for people. How specialized is this knowledge. So i hired some freelancers at another network to just give me proposals right. I said if you had to plan this and you weren't executing it because you don't have time. What would the proposal look like. And they were like well. I would advertise. Here's how you buy some ads on twitter and here's how you buy some ads on instagram. And then we'd have you buying facebook ads. And i paid a guy who has a facebook ads specialist just to test this in. I got convergence for like six or seven bucks but they're not even subscribers. All we know is they went to the page. That i had the player on for the you know dennis rodman episode and i went. You know these are not people that we know. Listen to podcasts. Like we think they do but they clicked over from facebook. And so there's just so much loss. And then i said you know. I'm not convinced that a lot of these people really know what they're doing. I don't think they're clueless or scammers. I just think when you are twenty-seven you work at a big company or a medium company and they're like you have one hundred thousand dollar marketing budget. Are you thinking. How do i get the best bang for the buck or you on. Let me do something that says. Get me fired not gonna get me in trouble. Sounds good on the face of it.

Facebook Dennis Rodman Twitter
Embiid, 76ers Beat Hawks 127-111 to Take 2-1 Lead in Series

The Jason Smith Show with Mike Harmon

00:14 sec | Last week

Embiid, 76ers Beat Hawks 127-111 to Take 2-1 Lead in Series

"Billy shot 58% and beat the Hawks won 27 1 11 Joel Embiid with 27 points. Raptor forward Pascal Siachen had shoulder surgery and could miss the next five months. The NHL is off tonight and tomorrow number one

Joel Embiid Pascal Siachen Hawks Billy NHL
Mid-Year Check-In: Are You Being Accountable to Yourself?

THE BRENDON SHOW

02:24 min | Last week

Mid-Year Check-In: Are You Being Accountable to Yourself?

"The question of accountability. I love this question for several reasons. Now i it says account dash ability. I love this. One is because you actually have the ability to account for how far you came this year now. Let me explain what that means. Personal accountability means you stated promises to yourself. You took the actions and you fulfill them. You were accountable for how you showed up and how you perform each day accountability. Also means you'd be able to measure that you'd be able to take into account that so what does accountability really mean. Accountability really means you set up some systems of measurement. For your success. I know this is where it was. Jesus put some balloons up dancing bears. Can we have some positivity. Here i started with positivity. Now i'm going to go right to your face. What did you fail to take accountability for. Did you fail to take accountability for the fact that you promised to get your health in order. Did you fail to take accountability for your actions. So you're still blaming your spouse for your results. Did you fail to take accountability for the fact that you got pay some taxes. You still laid on. Did you fail to take accountability for your credit card debt this year. Like i just want you to think. Broadly i told you the beginning. This is a conversation. This is like a good old conversation with. uncle coach. Brendan and so. Where did you fail. Accountabilities piece i know that's hard but high performers are not uncomfortable with this conversation that we got to be very comfortable with our measuring sticks and have this conversation. I can tell you where mine were. Accountability i missed a ton of team calls this year. I fail to take accountability for me to make sure that every single week i got my team calls. I own that i'm aware of it. I'll do better next year. It's important for us to be able to look at ourselves and say you know what that piece. I wasn't as accountable towards my wife at the first five months of this year as i had promised her. When we move to puerto rico. I should have been more available to her. I should've doted on her more. I should have made sure she was set up as much as i was trying to set up the business in the studio and things and you know i should have had more wind nights with my wife this year like i'm accountable for that because i want to be a good husband and it doesn't make me feel sad. I'm not getting mad at myself. I'm being realistic. And i'm observing my own

Brendan Puerto Rico
Senate Report Details Sweeping Failures Around Jan. 6 Attack

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

Senate Report Details Sweeping Failures Around Jan. 6 Attack

"A little more than five months after the capital riot a Senate report he's describing sweeping failures around the attack the report lays out breakdowns within several intelligence agencies and the capitol police a series of missteps that allowed riders to violently forced their way inside it's the first bipartisan review of the insurrection and may be the last it comes two weeks after Senate Republicans blocked a bipartisan commission to investigate the insurrection the report does not even call it insurrection nor it looks at its root causes including van president trump's call for supporters to fight like hell the Senate homeland security committees chair says the report will allow for some immediate security improvements but it knowledge is it does not answer some big questions Sager made Ghani Washington

Senate Capitol Police Van President Trump Senate Homeland Security Commi Sager Ghani Washington
Boeing Halts Deliveries of 787 Dreamliner Jets Over Inspection Issues

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Boeing Halts Deliveries of 787 Dreamliner Jets Over Inspection Issues

"Of drowning. Boeing is temporarily halted deliveries of 787 Dreamliners is the FAA. Waits for more data on whether a new inspection method needs federal guidelines and requirements. Details from comas Craig her Schultz Bowling, said earlier he was providing the FAA with more information on its undulating Dreamliners, but that there was no impact on planes already in service. The 7, 37 Max and 7 87, have been plagued by electrical and other issues since late last year, Boeing only resume deliveries of the 7 80 sevens in March after a five month hiatus. The company says it's working to provide the FAA with additional information and that there's no impact on the Lead

FAA Comas Craig Schultz Bowling Boeing
Ariana Grande Secretly Marries Dalton Gomez

Daily Pop

01:44 min | Last month

Ariana Grande Secretly Marries Dalton Gomez

"Ariana grande is a married lady. She tied the knot with dalton gomez in a private ceremony at her home over the weekend. Now this comes just five months after he popped the question with this diamond and pearl ring. Now a source tells eat. It was a beautiful day and very romantic. It was perfect. And just what i really wanted. What was your reaction when you heard visits. I mean i'm excited for her. I you know. I think we're all rooting for her does she. Because we don't. I mean i don't know she can do a sequel to that song with more xs. We you know she was great. We love it. I love that absolutely have happy for her. She but she always did like she's a baby. You gotta let it grow up. That's the thing we cannot let her grow up. I'm like is she owned up to get married. She looks like because she's so petite she looks on. So you're like oh. I hope that this works out. Because she's been with so many superstars and nationally as a regular guy who is real estate. Let's say you brought up something really interesting. That she was with all these superstars before a lot of people say oh. I think it works because this guy's not famous. But i actually think it works. Because for the first time in her very young life she got a chance to stop and think and live and be normal yes and the pandemic kind of forced to be a regular person for a second and she got to know this guy. I am happy as a gay man. I will be honest. i'm pissed i didn't get full. Spread in vanity fair. I'm so mad. It wasn't on an island with four hundred people. But i'm happy. She got to do the wedding like she wanted to. And not make a

Dalton Gomez Ariana Grande
How to Discover Your "Why" in Difficult Times

TED Talks Daily

01:47 min | Last month

How to Discover Your "Why" in Difficult Times

"Some are start us off by by saying here. We all look after a year of the pandemic probably one of the most extraordinary experiences. Any of us have had. What do you think a day unexpected psychological carryovers might be i mean. Do you think we've kind of of me. Thinks people got more franchise that we've it's almost like a sort of learned timidity it have you have you seen any evidence of that or how would you characterize it. I think we've definitely all become much more aware of mental health. And that it's a real thing and that Mental health effects strong and healthy people We all suffered trauma during covid. Some of this dealt with it earlier. Some of us with later some of this is still doing with it but nobody escapes it. When covid i started you know. Many of us had to pivot our organizations that the pivot our businesses very quickly. And so i like many others. We went into mission mode and i called a friend of mine who is active duty military and i asked him a very simple question. How do i compartmentalize my emotions. So that i can stay focused on the mission. And he gave me a very stern warning. He said you can't. He said we can compartmentalize emotions for only a short period of time. But no one. No one escapes the trauma of combat. And he said you may not even experience the trauma while you're in it. You may not experience it when you first come home. You may experience. At months later. As i experienced at four or five months after i get home so i hung up the phone and called all my personality friends and said okay. We think we're good but we're going to get hit by this at some point and we made a deal that when we started to feel off our game we would call each other Safe space and we made another deal that there would be no crying alone

Birth Care for Every Body

In The Thick

03:01 min | Last month

Birth Care for Every Body

"The reality. According to the cdc about seven hundred women die each year in the united states from complications related to their pregnancy. And the thing is is that you know this country says it is the most modern advanced industrialized and so it's seven hundred women. Every year is too many and black and indigenous. People are two to three times more likely to die from pregnancy related issues than their white counterparts. The relationship with the medical field and doctors and whether or not we as people of color can have a say over how we are treated probably is one of the factors here earlier this month representative corey. Bush testified before the house oversight committee about her own experiences during childbirth. Let's take a listen around five months. I went to see my doctor for a routine prenatal visit. As i was sitting in the doctor's office. I noticed a picture on the wall. They said if you feel like something is wrong. Something is wrong. Tell your doctor. I felt like something was wrong. So so that's what i did. I told my doctor. I told her that. I was having severe pains. And she said oh. No you're fine. you're fine. Go home. And i'll see you next time. So that's what i did. I went home one week later. I went into preterm labor. Twenty three weeks. My son was born one pound three ounces. his ears were still in his head. His eyes were still fused shut. His fingers were smaller than rice. And his skin was translucent. A black baby translucence. Can you could see his lungs. He could fit within the palm of my hand. We were told he had zero percent chance of life. The chief of neonatal surgery happened to be in the hospital that morning and saw my case on the surgical board and she decided to try to resuscitate him. It worked for the first month of his life as i was on a ventilator fighting to live for four months he was in the neo. Natal care unit. The doctor who deliver my son apologized. She said you were right. And i didn't listen to you. Give me another chance to us later. I was pregnant again. So i went back to her sixteen weeks. I went for an ultrasound at the clinic and saw different doctor. Who was working that day. I found out again. I was in preterm labor. The doctor told me that the baby was going to abort i said. No you have to do something. But he was adamant he said. Just go home. let it aboard. You can get pregnant again. Because that's what you people do. Mr kelly was with me. We didn't know what to do after the doctor left. So we saw a chair sitting sitting in the hallway. My sister picked up the chair. She threw it down the hallway. Nurses came running from everywhere to see what was wrong. A nurse called my doctor and she put me on a stretcher. The next morning by doctor came in and places arklow on my uterus and i was able to carry my baby my daughter my angel who is now twenty years old. My son who was saved is now twenty one years old. This is what desperation looks like that chair flying down the hallway. This is what being your own advocate. Looks

House Oversight Committee CDC Corey United States Bush Mr Kelly Natal
Mike the Headless Chicken

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

01:56 min | Last month

Mike the Headless Chicken

"How did mike. The normal chicken one of a billion normal chickens. How did he become like headless chicken. So it's nineteen forty five and there is a farmer named lloyd olsen who farms in colorado and. He raises chickens. He's slaughtering chickens for market and he grabs one five-month-old checking and chop set off and the next morning. He loads up his wagon to go to town to sell these chickens and he notices that one is still alive so this is a thing of heard of right like running around like a chicken with your head cut off. It is something that happens rate. If this happens when you cut a chickens head off this has been happening. Since people have been cutting chickens heads off which is like a long time. I chicken with its head cut off. Usually they live about fifteen minutes. Max but mike was moving around and this. This just continued for days. What made mike special. How did this even work. There's a couple of different theories over the years. One is that you know. When olson dropped the axe on mike it only cut off basically his face and a little bit of his skull and so he was walking around with eighty percent of his brain and that controlled his digestive system his breathing so all of the necessary functions were still there and other people think that perhaps a lucky blood clot kept him from bleeding to death so quickly and so they think that kind of the combination of those two factors kept him alive and moving around for the next few months so as much as this was sort of a an oddity it was also a little bit of a science or like medical mystery. I honestly think that's why people are still interested in him is because it is a mystery. He was in his own right. Kind of like a wonder if kind of terrible one

Lloyd Olsen Mike Colorado Olson MAX
Pfizer aims for full FDA approval of vaccine

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Pfizer aims for full FDA approval of vaccine

"Pfizer has started the process of seeking full approval from American regulators for its covert nineteen vaccine after getting a merchant see use authorization five months ago more than one hundred seventy million of the vaccines doses have been delivered across the US such authorization only lasts until countries declared the emergency is over so the vaccines need a more stringent review to get full approval for continued use Pfizer is started giving the FDA data from human they have the lab testing and will submit more these reviews generally take a few months is our understanding White House virus response coordinator Jeff science says the FDA will move as fast as possible without compromising safety sabar mag ani Washington

Pfizer FDA Jeff Science United States White House Ani Washington
"five months" Discussed on The big d zone

The big d zone

04:57 min | Last month

"five months" Discussed on The big d zone

"Holy cram i have so many bloopers. I wish i tell kept them but the way this phone don't have any memory and i could've done a blooper. Show another class on to about the buca but now that can be part of podcasts. For but i have so many bloopers data show but keep in. But i was trying to add the fact that When i was reading this email done the segment that is. I'm going to be like present green channel on youtube. Who has his entertainment program about how he taught the scammers tied to help us. Help us figure out. You know these scams Does a scant. that's going around. And especially allow them coming from nigeria. And he always had played that funny music funny movie that always makes me laugh when he was a during the nineteen music. Every time we find out where you're from. And so. When i was reading the email for some reason i take into pleasant. Greens youtube channel. My mind and it was like well. You'll be light. Pleasant cleaning but on podcast. What all i had to say. I mean he's two years have been total to rash. Can i at least get something good. I mean at least saw. I have like a true turnaround this year. I mean look how look january february march april. And we're already intimate death five months of crap. Even when i went to six flags lost. I did a few arriving in justice league very titan. I mean although it was fun. But i couldn't join because it was too tight on me and i couldn't do the Divide on the neck day pika and downing rocket 'cause they were the real real online. I was johnny rockin. And i knew it the clo- i will try. I had another show for it. And i had to go all right back to the hotel and i was in pain and everything. I had my medicine ready. Because i was gonna ride the roller coasters. Maybe one one of them. Before going back because i knew at a season pass. Because i didn't wanna go during the heat of the day and this is just five months. This is five months old. Beginning is bad. Hand five five straight months you. Y'all know that. I had covert and i still in recovery. Even though now is just a allergies that ever happened to everybody about algae hell no hell no. Nobody gets bilateral. Jeez and so. I'll be very cautious in very careful. I mean i can't take a pal. Because i mean i'm i'm in a balance i mean i'm the doors walk. I mean i'm on my cell. So the ghost of my wife could come anytime. go through. My wife could come keep me company. She's always welcome but anyway so five months of crap in a year. Oh crap. I mean cave up almost two and a half years already in may when i get on that plane or you know get up do what i gotta do before the flight. It'll be mid may mid may have gone five months of her pain now yuma why i have a dnr..

johnny rockin youtube five months nigeria two years five mid may january february march april nineteen music five straight months two and a half years one this year five months old six flags year many bloopers may league
Sony Has Sold 7.8 Million PS5 Consoles

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:04 min | Last month

Sony Has Sold 7.8 Million PS5 Consoles

"The. Ps five has shipped seven point eight million units in five months. This is james bachelor at games. Industry biz the launch of the ps five and a solid lineup four. Ps for help drive a strong year for sony corporation. The company released its financial results for the full year ending march thirty first. Twenty twenty which shows revenue growth in all of its divisions. Let as usual by the game and network services segment which operates playstation buried within the report sony revealed. Ps five has shipped seven point eight million units into retail since launching in november. This includes four point. Five million during its launch quarter and three point. Three million in the three months ended march thirty first while sony only reports on shipments into retail the ongoing sell up sell out of stock wherever it appears likely makes it safe to say that the full seven point eight million has been sold to consumers earlier this month and pd confirmed. It's the best selling console and us history. When looking at lifetime dollar and unit sales for the first five months of release sony sold three hundred and thirty eight point. Nine million games in the past year across the two consuls. Up from two hundred and seventy six point one million the previous year of these fifty eight point four million where i party up from forty nine point two million in fiscal year two thousand nineteen for the next financial year so forecasting revenues of twenty six point six billion dollars for its game games division. Which would be nine percent more than what it achieved this year. Can you believe that tim. They're forecasting a nine percent increase compared to the previous fiscal year which is wild but pretty much all this subject keely had a good tweet that pretty much. Put it in bullet point form for you. Are i tweeted out this morning. Incredible playstation facts and company earnings. Seven point eight point. Eight five sold forty seven point six million playstation plus subscribers. Three hundred and thirty eight million games sold for the ps four slash. Ps five in the past year and twenty four point four billion in gaming revenue in the past year.

Sony Corporation James Bachelor Keely TIM
Unprecedented Challenge to Biden's Presidential Win Underway in Arizona

WBUR Programming

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Unprecedented Challenge to Biden's Presidential Win Underway in Arizona

"Nearly five months after the presidential election was certified in Arizona. An unprecedented challenge to President Biden's narrow win in that state is underway. On Friday, a private company began a hand recount of more than two million ballots in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. The audit was ordered by the Republican led state Senate and follows false claims by some Republicans, including former President Donald Trump of fraud in the 2020 elections. This audit is also interfering with the efforts by Republicans who control the Legislature to pass new voting legislation. Then Giles with member station Cage's joins us now from Phoenix. Hello. Lou. They can't seem to let it go. So tell us about this audit. How did it come about? Well. It started in December, when Republicans first demanded an audit of the election specifically in Maricopa County, the largest county in the state. Their original subpoena was to gain access to ballots and the county's voting systems. It was tied to an effort to try to upset Biden's victory before it could be certified by Congress. Maricopa County election officials, Democratic senators the State Democratic Party, They want nothing to do with this. They say. It's a sham run for conspiracy theorists by conspiracy theorists now that the election is over, and Biden is an office those Republicans are saying they just want to find any problems. If there are any so they can introduce bills to fix them. And here's a Doug Logan. He's the CEO of cyber in inches. Firm the Senate hired to run the audit, speaking about what he thinks is the purpose of the all this. There's a lot of Americans here myself included. That really bothered the way our country is being ripped apart right now, way want transparent audit be in place so that people can trust that the results something get everyone on the same

Maricopa County President Biden Phoenix Donald Trump State Democratic Party Senate Biden Arizona Giles Legislature LOU Cage Doug Logan Congress
Over 1,000 Reported Arrested at Navalny Rallies in Russia

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Over 1,000 Reported Arrested at Navalny Rallies in Russia

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting protesters take to the streets in Russia demanding the release of lad Amir Putin's most prominent opponent there were protests throughout Russia Wednesday with demonstrators calling for freedom for imprisoned opposition leader Alexey the ball the the largest of the protests took place in Moscow Moscow police said six thousand people marched at the capitol but an observer told the Bonnies YouTube channel the crowd was about sixty thousand the OVD info group which monitors political arrests and provides legal advice says at least one thousand four hundred ninety six arrests were made in eighty two cities of all these reportedly deteriorating health after three weeks on a hunger strike the ball he was arrested on his return to Russia in January after five months in Germany where he was treated for nerve agent poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin hi Mike Crossey

Mike Rossi Amir Putin Russia Moscow Alexey Youtube Germany Mike Crossey
Reconstruction: Australia after COVID

Between The Lines

02:08 min | 2 months ago

Reconstruction: Australia after COVID

"Australia's economic recovery in the wake of the pandemic. Well we all know. Australia has weathered the pandemic bit of the most nations. It's been five months since the last reported virus related death and several months since any serious community transmission. It's quite extraordinary. Isn't it in coming. Wakes the most vulnerable. Australians will have been vaccinated on april. Nineteen this news. This week there will be reopening of the trans tasman travel route although they remind risks and uncertainties it's fate aside that the pandemic is pretty much forced drawings. But what does all this main for the economy. John edwards is a senior fellow of the lowy institute and a former member of the board. His new book is called reconstruction australia covered. It's published by the low institute. Get i john. Welcome back to the shy unpleasant to be on for the past year. We've been told we face the most terrifying economic conditions for generations yet australia. You think about it. The unemployment rights less than six percent the stock market is within a few percent of its high level and according to the imf this week international monetary fund australia is poised to grow at its fastest pace in twenty two years. It's four point five percent this year. Indeed we are among the world's standout performance in the recovery from last year's covid recession john. What accounts for our economic resilience. Well first of all. I think we handle the health trip. Caught will lettuce. We responded promptly. We put in social distancing. We prepared our health system for a bigger emergency than one. We presumably and australians will comply with the health guam. So that's that's important that we we contained the pandemic tilting but on the economic side. I think we also risk owner will be response in monetary policy the reserve bank and a very big response from fiscal policy treasurer and the morrison government.

Australia Lowy Institute Low Institute John Edwards John IMF Morrison Government
Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:38 min | 2 months ago

Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis the most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations. Bit researchers leaders. Who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info. Yesterday's dini whose professional physics at amazon is taking versity. One of the primary of usage focus is new leaders. Welcome to see you thank you. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i know that you have done a lot of work on neutrinos. You have a few papers. That came out recently. And i want to talk to a twenty eighteen paper dalogue and my own neutrino signatures of primordial black holes. invite you say. These studied primordial black holes ph is as sources of massive neutrinos by hawking radiation under the hypothesis that black holes emit nuclear no bass item states be described quantitatively called the pbs evolution and lifetime is affected by the mass and flew munich dialect my own nature of neutrinos before we get the details celia I wanted to get some definitions of folks would know what black court saw a few episodes of black holes Here we're talking about. The pride won't imprac codes owes The these black holes are fall close to the big bang And then as caulking radiation Sort of The black hole evaporating So to speak and that That lady Imitating these particles called neutrinos. Right is that. Do i understand that correctly. Yes so so pry bhutia blackhaws before we get the neutrinos what is sort of the mechanism of formation their ho- exactly what they have formed sure We believe that Primordial hose could form in the early universe from density fluctuations so We know that any object could can possibly become a black hole if you compress it into a very very small volume so this same process could happen in the universe with Density fluctuations that could be a regional space where there is an over density compared to the surrounding and each of over the east coast past Then then it could get to the point of becoming a black hole This this The details of this process are beyond my expertise But this is fairly reasonable thing to expect and The diesel really small rate in the scheme of things. Yes so when i started to Learn about time or their black holes. I was amazed by how different in mass can be. They can be may be the massive wouldn't but they can also be The mass of Being or they can be Even even smaller so they can really be very very tiny. Yes oh so. That's really really small so this is sort of quantum fluctuations only universe Kind of getting Getting concentrated in vide- small areas But we believe those. Those primordial black holes emit nucleus. we Have to go back to stephen hawking for that stephen hawking wrote this seminal paper Which is about what we nowadays. Nowadays call hawking radiation so he demonstrated that any black hole regardless of what it is could be primordial black hole or a stellar. Nicole doesn't matter any black hole isn't really black because it meets radiations so radiation particles And the the process that we call evaporation so Because a black holes fundamentally gravity objects they would meet any particle that couples to raggedy including trees so It's the moment you have a black hole you do. Have hawking radiation and neutrinos are just that are expected. Part of hawking radiation. You're so caulking radiation so that that happens to every black hole even the even the supermassive ones right so i it said gentle phenomenon And so going to neutrinos now Don't typically thing neutrino site Caltrans and electrons are really well known. neutrinos are particles. Dad don't interact with The matter Espionage don't interact much with matters. We don't really see them. They don't really see them. And and so it's difficult to measure that's right and so so this could you give a. What does the history of neutrino vendor we. I understand such things existed. Let's see We go back to the twentieth century and the story goes That the father of neutrino sees Warfare he. He made the hypotheses of a new particle existing as a way to explain Some strange behavior of neutrinos produced by by nuclear decay so It's it's a long story but Let me just say that For a long time. Neutrinos who just the hypotheses and then around the mead of this twentieth century They would actually officer so we started to Know that this particles existed and But that was pretty much heat. So we didn't know much about the properties And one of these properties the mass which we still don't know i'm easy after all these decades but we still don't know if neutrinos have something like a magnetic went for example And something that we didn't learn until much later on is the fact. That neutrinos oscillate. That's that that sounds. That's something that we that were somehow established Turn of the sanctuary around the around the year. Two thousand really after after decades of of testing with the solar neutrino selling trainers. So there are still there are still a number of no on your trainers. One of them is the mass one and the other one is the The nature of the neutrinos being the iraq particles or miranda particles we She's kind of a fundamental cost. So there are that. That's that's that's related to the fundamental nature of the neutrino as particle break. So so they do. They have a mass but masses small. Do they have a chunk. Neutrinos don't have charge so they are electrically neutral and that's Comedy the biggest reason for for them to be a so allusive as you were mentioning earlier on especially in the in early. Nineteen hundreds all the particle detectors so basically a electro-magnetic detectors they were looking for charge or Magnetic behavioral some sort. So neutrinos don't have that and so they They only have the weak interaction At that that we know wolf and gravity of course and so that's why they They escape detection so so easily because their interaction is very weak. Yeah so so. That's sort of the beauty of neutrinos right so because they don't interact V can go back digits of years. Simple hats Perhaps become pickup one on earth and it would have travelled that distance through all sorts of things but would not have affected wider rate right. Yes and so so the other phenomenon of neutrino is that you mentioned that they also late so are they're failures of tinos they go back and forth. Yes it's It's actually a fairly Easy to this cried kwan to sonam on We know that In quantum mechanics there is this Particles described by these function which is called the wave function. And so the neutrinos could be on. Neutrino could be born as a say an extra and then it's quanta way function would evolve over time in a way that after sometime. The wave function is no longer a purely electron neutrino way function. But the has a little bit or even law actually of a different flavor. It could be a new one or tau. So what we observe in the actors. Is this change of flavor and perhaps the most striking demonstration of this phenomenon is solemn. Neutrinos because we know that the sun produces an extra treatments and It doesn't produce a new on and talion trainers so But here on earth we do Have evidence that the solar neutrino flags that we receive has some You wanna talion. Trina in it and that can only be explained by sedation and Actually after this other neutrino data showed this phenomenon. This was also confirmed by a saint men made experiments so it's a fairly established phenomenon it and so that the flavors are Electron new on tall. Yes that's right and so. Did you understand the vendor made in the sun for example there they are made as electron Neutrinos and by the time they reached the earth day the Immunes dot. Yes yes Impart young. that's that's what happens so ease. It always the case that they get a manufactured so to speak as as electoral neutrinos always. It depends on where they are born. There are places where neutrino sutter born in or flavors. A so it's it's it really varies with With the type of environment We are talking about okay. Okay and so in the people you say ph is this primordial black holes. We talked about radiates right. Handed and left handed dutra knows in equal amounts so anybody right-handed unless the cleaners. Okay let me see so Yes you say. Indicates of dirac neutrinos. pba Left neutrinos in equal amounts possibly increasing deceptive number noon pheno species nest. Yes is that explainable. Yes so right handed than left handed. Neutrinos that may take why to explain what that exactly means me. Just say that It's related to the neutrino mass. So if you're truly knows didn't have a mass which we know they do but if they didn't have a mouse They would only exist as left handed particles which means that basically their spin is Is anti aligned with the momentum and but if they have mass and the iraq particles There could be another type of neutrino which is right handed. Which where the This being ease aligned with a mentor other than anti line and so If you are iraq these these two different species could exist and so instead of having one species of neutrino emitted left-handed one Indicators of a massless trina if we have not suv nutrients than you would have to species and so. The black hole radiate war energy compared to The case when neutrinos don't amass so when we started working on this paper i was interested in this phenomenon that A lot of the literature having to do with a developer. Evaporation of primordial black couls. Consider the neutrinos as massless about. Now we know that they are massive. And so i thought well Sixty speaking at primordial black hole could radiate more energy than previously thought. So i found that aspect interesting and then sees you mention the possibility to increase the effective number of species. That's related to what it was talking about. So then you the black hole would ra- gate more neutrino States or more neutrino Species to spe pseudo speak and then Would increase the number of neutrinos per cubic centimeter Data we observe today so I'm kind of glossing over a lot of these days. But basically cosmology gives us a measurement of this and effective which is called the effective number two species. And if you have this right. Handed neutrinos coming from the primordial black holes. This number could be higher than than expected. And so that would be may be a i way to tell that maybe there are more black holes in the universe yet. So so the hawking radiation essentially creation coming out of black holes Expected defined Expected that over a long period of time. Black holes radiate away lap. Later ray out the mass or information that didn't do it And so this. Radiation is hockey. Radio station is it is a new park. Or is it. Fundamentally composed of neutrinos hawking radiation is made of every particle that no of so A black hole. A camera gate Pretty much everything. Photons neutrinos throngs You loans It said cetera but There is the catch here. The fact that a black hole has a temperature which is another Big achievement of stephen hawking to end and others To that the black hole is thermo dynamical object and so Basically the bigger the black hole the lower the temperature so if the temperature is really low The black hole wouldn't be able to immed- Very massive particles because they are thermal energy would be sufficient for that so because masses energy Mc squared right so because massey's energy If a black hole has too low of a temperature It wouldn't have its quantum energy It's it's Wouldn't be enough to produce the mass off a particular particle for example a proton may be too heavy to be produced by a really low tanto black home so so the beaker. The black called the lower the temperature. Yes ed so. So then can expect the bigger black holes to have more of a neutrino content in radiation. Yes because The bigger black holes would as i said be able to radiate the heavy particles and so they would only be able to radiate away the low mass particles and so there could be black holes that only emit photons gravitons and Neutrinos do a of sort of the distribution of this primordial black holes Isn't you know sort of everywhere. What is what do we know about you. Know some of the distribution of bbc's you mean spatial distribution like where they are now. I'm wondering just like the easy would do sort of look at the early universe will find them everywhere Probably at the beginning they would be a more or less uniformly distributed Bug in the universe. Today they would probably be Behaving like the dark matter. Does they would Be part of galactic halos In other words they would be they would class gravitationally on large structures like a like a galaxy placido galaxy so these call still around They would they would behave like like the dark matter down. So they would be in in halo. Galaxies would have by. Now have april would would they not have disappear because it far it depends on the mass That they have when they are born so their if their mass is less than a certain value that trying to remember Basically yes they would have to By now they would have completely evaporate did their masters larger than they will take longer to evaporate and they could still be around So they roughly speaking the dividing line between a black hole. Steve being around today or not. I think it's something like ten to fifteen grams fiery recall correctly into fifteen clams though So this paper. Eusebio obtained the diffuse flux of right hill. Neutrinos from his idea and so so. So so the nikkei actually act to build these neutrinos. They'd be flying here do pbs specifically In principle that's a possibility we Considered that for certain Masses of these black holes and certain density of this black holes the flux of neutrinos that they generate over time could be fairly large and so we could Detect these neutrinos If we had a very Power who attacked so Now life is never ideally in the sense that a real Ut detector have substantive issues like ground And so on. So at the end of the people we conclude that impact is giving given the limitations that current nutrient doctors have It may not really be possible to detect neutrinos trump mortgage black holes but people. That's a possibility and that alone is interesting. Yeah because they suggestion that this primordial black holes could be as as you mentioned could be part of the dark matter that yes to seeking. Is that still About us that has been. There has been a debate on these Kind of going back and forth in the scientific community The latest i heard is that Black whose could be part of the dark matter. Maybe even a large part but probably not they entire dark matter so a one hundred percent primordial Battery is a bit difficult to justify the day. experimental bowels that we already have constrained so various types but there could be scenarios where maybe a fraction of the dark matter. He's made of primordial black holes. I wanted to go into a ended up paper in twenty twenty supernova neutrinos directional sensitivity and prospects for dissertation here the export potential of current and future liquid cinta league neutrino detectors. I decade old town. Mass a localize a super a supernova neutrino signal into sky in douglas was feeding the core collapse nearby star tens to hundreds of english Coated and don't be constructed policy in the detector can be used to estimate a direction to the star so so this is now neutrinos from supernova and You so so we. We have Idea here that before this opened on what happens. If please open over a time period it is creating neutrinos that could pick up and and potentially get ready to see the super bowl. Yes that's what excites me The fact that Think about bitter jews. Beetlejuice is the most famous nearby star. That could go supernova anytime and we don't know when that's going to happen and If it wasn't for these neutrinos that our paper is about we will know until the style literally Collapses and and then soon after becomes superman but in this paper we we Show that before the star collapses which is the beginning of the supernova process We can detect these. These neutrinos That are used at that at that stage and so increase the pool we could know that You know tomorrow. These days beetlejuice exploding and that that would be quite exciting. Yeah it's beetlejuice is is red joy and reasonably close to was really big star. I can remember Cecilia there was some suggestion that It could go supernova within something one hundred fifty thousand years which is obliquely in cosmic time so it is getting ready to go to Supernova right yes. I am not you formed about exactly the number of years give or take but it's it's ready it's ready. It could be any time and any time any time for an astronomer muse anytime the next thousand soviet so we should. We should hold their breath. But it's ready could be tomorrow. It could be in a hundred years could supernova. I know that this is not part of the paper but could the beetlejuice supernova avenue adverse effect on north really know a supernova is very very spectacular event. it's it's a star that collapses so it implodes i and that explodes and then when he explodes It's very bright. In the case of bitter jews we could. We could see by naked-eye shore but in terms of A fact of each radiation and neutrinos in light on on us and on our daily activities. It wouldn't it. Wouldn't affect them in any way so it's a save Show to just enjoy without any worry. Great answer so you talking about supernova neutrinos so so can be actually detect neutrinos from supernova. What different from what we talked about in the previous people Different from pbs I'm not sure. Can you repeat yes. So the new teen emanating from a supernova different from the Neutrinos of expectancy from a primordial black hole. Yes the the different In many ways disney trails have higher energies. So it's much much easier to attack them and indicates will beat the jews. We would detect thousands or even more of dan millions. Probably of them Indiana so different in the way they are born because in our primordial black hole ordinary black hole The processes volcanoes the asian. Which which is a gravity phenomenon in a supernova. You're born out of the very hot and dense environment That the that that the star as after it has collapsed so star collapsing on its own way to become very dense and so In this very dense in hot environment nuclear processes take place that produce these nutrients. So i guess the main difference is that indicates supernova it's most nuclear phenomenon and in the call is really fundamentally a gravitational sonam. Okay you discover technique in this paper and you saved sin principle possible unique the identify the progenitor star so So the existing technology and ideas discussed in the paper viki see teacup a neutrino decode. Identify valid came from or what direction thing from embed you can go back and look at the in that direction if he find to supernova then you could say that the supernova that created in-principle Yes let me. Just say that There are situations and this is not one of them but there are situations where if you have one neutrino you can point to the pointing the sky. What came from in these case. It's a little more complicated. Because what really gives us. The information is the statistical distribution of these nutrients so we are talking about may be the tax in hundred a hundred Gable take from say be for example and What did detector really observe is not the neutrino is kind of a vector which is related to the products of these neutrinos so this neutrino sues interacts with the interact with the detector. And then out of this interaction you have a positive on the new thrown and those can be observed and you can you can create a factory using these two and then and then these rector will have a certain orientation but each each neutrino coming will give you a differently oriented vector but statistically if you look at the distribution of these factors you you can tell you can you can do for with a certain of course The direction of the neutrinos because these vectors are not uniformly distributed they are they have a non uniform distribution of the direction. And so using this information we can we can define a regional the sky where The new three could come from so we can. We cannot now down to a point but we can now down to maybe a cone of a few tens of degrees Width and then we look in that cone and see what stars that com and maybe be juicy one of them. Yeah so As you say you if you see a few Neutrinos Statistics bution of those will give us some some probability That it is in in some region of the sky. And then you say the paper You can then that if it is happening please open nola. You learnt other observational. Modalities multi messagero rations Invisible in radio and other other types of observations Do actually pick up more data so this is almost like a early alert system If it is in place right yes i would call it a very early I learned to because it's we're talking about maybe our worse or insert very fortunate cases. We are even talking about maybe day Before the assad goes supernova and. so that's enough time to plan for for it so a something that fascinated me When i heard about this from a from a an experimentalist is that there is a human factor which was not aware of but The factories so if you have come up with thirty minutes to plan for watching supernova this may not be enough because it just takes stein to make phone calls and get a hold of people and and decide what to do. Come to a consensus in that. I saw in addition to technical things. Like okay have to maybe turn your telescope Direction which takes time. But i i was really fascinated by the human factor. Those things that if you had style we'd be you can kind of gathered. Relevant people decide something but if you have thirty minutes or or or minutes maybe not so. Yeah yeah i wondered. If such a earlier system is in place Perhaps could be something programmatic. Crises is picking up And you have some you know. Maybe some ai techniques or something like that that identifies the region and it goes. Programmatic returned the telescopes look. Yes yes exactly so. There could be a protocol in place For that so e if a telescope was suitable for observing a nearby supernova which which is not always the case than than now that we showed that it's possible to know beforehand if a star is going to go supernova then there could be some sort of protocol in place already so that when the alert comes which is we can just activated the protocol and oriented telescope. maybe automatically will in some sort of Organized way yeah as you say if you remove humans from the process it becomes not better there is actually already working this direction It's called this new two point. Oh a network which has to do with Exactly these using neutrinos as alert for the astronomy community and That has to do with exactly a creating alerts and also creating protocols for how to react to an alert rate. I want to end the people that just came out. it concordant scenario for the observation of neutrino from the tidal disruption. Even eight hundred twenty nine hundred ninety s t You say be induced at phenomenology concordance canadia with the logistic jet of for the title disruption event Between ninety s jesmyn proposes a source of the astrophysical neutrino event. Ice cube So the title disruption even this is star getting cooler into a black hole getting Getting sucked in rate is that the is that even up to the match yes This is something that we We had about be in in popular science stalks What what happens if you get too close to black hole and It's kind of scary. So the answer is you would be ripped apart because your feet will be pulled in with a strong force than your head and these. This is what happens to two statehouse. Use the star gas to close than by guests Ripped the park. Which is what the tied is option means and so instead of a star Rotating around a black hole we just have a stellar stellar That dr intially. I created by the black hole and so This is something that The happy neighbor cops serve did so so we have. This does happen this particularly Eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s and Bequeath actually see a new cleaners from that particular even so tightness. Deduction events are fairly well established phenomenon in astronomy. We have many of them served They they are Fairly a common plays events But what's special about this particular one. Eighty two thousand nineteen years. G is that We could let's say It could have Produced on neutrino that was detected a ice cube so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s. She is the first either direction event. For which is coincident. Neutrinos detected a dice. Cube in queens. This coincidence is likely to be accidental. So on approachability estimate tells us that these coins. This is pretty causal not accident so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety. The g could be the parent of this neutrino. And that's that's that's a i. That's very interesting. Yes i skew. is a is a big ice cube in the in. The south is I'm not sure it's exactly cuba. But it's it's the biggest block of is which has been Eastern With values Small detectors So it's it's an array of swarner detectors but yeah it's basically a big block of ice which has been transformed into a detective and so so the idea that this high energy neutrinos from what they were System montemar even that happened Out there this high energy neutrinos passing through that ice q. believe some telltale signs All of that happening and yuxi picked up Then began back Just like you were talking about the previous creeper begin. Please back to a region so this is one of those cases where you can tell from a single neutrino of course the with with a narrower where you can tell the point in the sky where three neutrino kate from. It's doable with one single neutrino because this high energy neutrinos when they enter the is They produce ca a shower so they kind of illuminate. They you me nate. The is but the do it in a way which is very much Beat so and then and then the direction of the the direction of bigotry knows. We have a pretty good accuracy often. How often could be a pickup something like that. Do we have an estimate of how often that would happen. Meaning ice cube detects something like this. Every year ice cube the tax Of the order of ten high-energy neutrinos froth outside our galaxy. Tadesse the number for the entire crop of neutrinos that ice cube has It went we talk about tidal disruption events in the specific these are fairly rare phenomena and so they estimated that maybe a few times so percent of the entire neutrino flux the thais cubeys of serving could be from tidal disruption events. Not much more than that. So we are talking about less than half of the total flats being to tell this option events okay and so the tug disruption burned as as you mentioned It starts getting clipped applaud and pulled back into a into a a black hole but this ten percent. Do they have to be these braces as they call it. The things that have a jet that is sort of lying towards us. Is that it necessarily condition for these types of high energy neutrinos. It's it's a plausible scenario Let me just say that. There is an important difference between blazers in tidal disruption events. In the fact that the ablaze is something that has a jet. She's always on so the jets kinda kerman feature of of these particular galaxy but the title is adoption. Event is transient events. Saw dotcoms creates the accretion. This accretion of the star of the black hole produces flair is flair can last year or two but then it would just fade away so There could be jet and in fact in our paper we present where there is a jet so they partisans the user chat But if there is a jet in tiger disruption event. That's a transient suggested. That's born when This starts to create the stellar debris. And then it's on for months or years and then and then shuts off and it has two point in our direction as you as you mentioned because otherwise we would. We would see the trains your so this high energy neutrinos sillier how. How many orders of magnitude are we talking about coming to the one set you pick up. Let's say from the sun I'm not sure about the question. Can you maybe rephrase yet. So when you say this high energy neutrinos that is coming from let's say a tidal disruption events or something like that How much comedy orders of magnitude more energy Outdoors come to you. Know the ones that might be created the sun a lot menu of this magnitude so It is a big difference. So the sun produces new three meals. over a wide range of energies Higher energy neutrinos from the sun reach energies of the order of ten am pt and mega awards and for the ice cream. Neutrinos we are talking about one hundred of the older one hundred t. v. or even thousand teams. Which would be p so. Let's say maybe eighty tortoise magnitude finding the mass rife or okay and so this e. v. measure it is actually measuring the mass of the neutrino of newfield. Now these these neutrinos are have such a Such high energy that basically It's impossible to know their mass Because because as i said massey's energy so they talk energy of neutrino Detected is to be so high that that percentage view to its mass east so tiny that this practice mutual so i was wondering if we know the energy couldn't be sort of back computer to save the mass is or it doesn't follow The reasoning is a bit different and The way to sink about this is perhaps they let me see the formula for energy particle Which used the rest energy Applause the kinetic energy and So connecticut is so high that he thought the overwhelms direct energy. So it's it's and of course every time you measure the energy when three no. There is a narrow associated with the measurement so You we can't really we can't really tell what What led the boss of the detroit news but both roughtly this. This appears to be sort of an early warning system for many many things right topped the supernova the in the title disruption events producing heightened plano's So this could be sort of inundated with a monkey message. Observations protocols as you mentioned that gives us a higher success. Wait suspect. I would think certainly nominated be one right That's the power of multi messenger astronomy the integration of different signals coming from Photos tree knows navigation waves Causing me craze and Danger plays very powerful emmanuel cases and maybe supernova case is the most striking Xenos come first. But that's not always the case So in the indicates of tidal disruption events Did you know that was observed. Came about five months later than the initial dhammika looser version of the tidal disruption events so It's if it can go both ways. neutrinos can be early alert or they only alert could be for example a radio salvation or or an x-ray use ovation and then and then the neutrino attacked or could Focus a surge in that direction as see what they find which which has actually been done ice cube sometimes. Does these these archival. Search this on the basis of others from From for example x ray or gamma ray surveys interested. Exciting eighty that said a lot to be owned It seems It seems like these till don't know all the production mechanisms for neutrinos but if we have robust with to pick them up on than we can place them back and and talk asking questions What might be there definitely So yes so. People celia the next five years Wanted the aid is that you believe Be will make a significant crocus in this Innovative neutrinos then two different areas. That a very promising One is Broadly speaking Manmade nutrients so there is. There is a big push especially hitting the united states to build Create very powerful beams of trainings and then these beams are manmade. So we know that very well. We know that energy we know the composition and we can use them to learn about The properties of treatments and then That other men bead neutrino experiments where Scientists look for the between months so that's also very promising In something i really. I really excited about that. That may be a furious novel with noble the neutrino mass us from these very high position laboratory experience. Then there is the whole Topic of neutrinos as part of the mouth of mike messenger astronomy and in that area. I think what was was to look forward. To among other scenes is the interplay gravitational waves shock waves. You still Somehow a science of its own into a large extent but there are so many possible connections. We've neutrinos tidal disruption adoption events should produce reputation ways so baranov shoot us gradation ways So so there is. There is a a lot of potential there which is still unexplored in and that's where i see myself Working on in the next few years you adjust very quickly The do gravitational waves travel bid closest and new ashtrays and so if If they both are produced in In uneven they're expected to arrive on earth close to simultaneously. It depends on the timing of the production if the answer is yes the waves ending a knows are born at the same time which may not be exactly true because the physics that governs tation waves is different from the one that that governs neutrinos. So but the difference in timing would be the difference Accumulated that birth But but the two were were generated genetically the same time. They should arrive the same time. Just thinking this a systematic difference in the production time than guan lorries given early warning for the other. But that doesn't seem to do a case right. There could be cases where significant lag in the production of rotation way with respect to the production of the tree nose and one example is. We haven't touched on this before but let me just nation mergers so if we have if we have a merger for example we have maybe a merger of a neutron stars or black hole neutral star before the merger happens so when the two objects that kind of still approaching each other we should start observe serving ways and this is what this is what has been seen so Delight experiment observes these these nominal But if we have a merger After the merger has occurred and the two objects have become one than a. Dan could be the formation of of over an accretion disk and he secretion Trainers which we can which we can back so the neutrino We come After they initially asian waves and so relation as would be the alert for the neutrino. That does excellent. your this has been great as celia. thanks so much complaining pleasure. Okay thank you bye. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com.

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"five months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

05:37 min | 10 months ago

"five months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The true full effect of these of the increase in gun sales for several more months or years reporting on suicides tends to lag several months or or or even more in some cases. And so we we might not know the full effect of of this big increase in gun sales for some time. But you know even taking suicides sort of and putting that. Aside, we are seeing increases not only in homicides, but also just in in in everyday gun violence on that's attributed attributable. Partly, to pandemic stresses that people are feeling partly to stresses and perhaps fear of the social unrest that's happening around people. And certainly just with the increased availability of firearms I mean there's a lot of research to show that you know in any area in a household in neighborhood as the percentage of people who own guns increase the percentages of firearm violence increases in those places, and so the the prevalence or the more people that own guns the research is pretty. Clear that that does increase gun violence both both both on the suicide in interpersonal levels. The NRA has been struggling for a while now in terms of its internal politics in terms of investigations that have been lobbed against it and I'm wondering how we I mean we just you mentioned earlier that both Harrison Biden have very low ranking, thin the NRA with. Their voters don't have a real issue with if you will but tell us a little bit about the investigation and how strong you suspect or not strong. You suspect the NRA will be able to be into sort of counter some of this The ads that you mentioned for example, that might be coming from every town USA Yeah I would think they would certainly be muted this year I'm you know it's funny you mentioned that the voters perhaps would mind so much biden, her Harris had fs from the NRA innings in some campaign speeches..

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"five months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:17 min | 10 months ago

"five months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The New York Attorney General is investigating the trump organization and the trump family is dragging their feet. Every step of the way with the trump organization has learned over the years dating back way before trump became president is that it pays to stonewall in court cases I'm Tansy Nevada and today on the takeaway for Tuesday August twenty fifth look at the steps the Attorney General is taking and what it could mean in the lead up to November. Also, we'll look at how Democrats are approaching gun violence in this election cycle in terms of differences between. Harrison Biden there's really very little but of course when you compare either one or both of them to president trump or or vice president Mike Pence there's there's a pretty big Gulf there. But I on Brianna Taylor's case the public pressure to take action against the police officers who killed her let's get started. Those are protesters chanting Brianna Taylor's name in downtown Louisville Kentucky. It's been more than five months since Louisville police served a no knock warrant at Taylor's home shot the twenty six old emt to death. The officers involved in her killing have yet to face charges and only one has been fired. The incident was an example of a pattern of systemic racism and police violence that have spurred protests.

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"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

07:58 min | 11 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"I I mean at new stuff and. I. I do wish there was a real audience to gauge on like I just can't. I can't tell if people the people that are watching resume shows are people that listen to my podcast. So there may be predisposed to liking what I say or disliking it on an a and I feel like I'm not getting real test on material in front of light kind of the neutral audience that wandered in on groupon. Five. Dollars show thing. So You know I I. Am Not hundred percent confident in stuff. I'd written necessarily feel like I. Don't feel like it's been vetted properly. In front of Crowns for sure. So in June your mom attracted covid nineteen and I am so sorry for your loss and it seems right away. You're you're tweeting about it and you know when you're your dad was dying of cancer also made jokes through that experience. You eventually filmed a special with that material. You wrote a book about the grieving process so I can't imagine. There was as much patient just because this is like you're like this you knew what it was gonna be like but do you remember deciding to tweet jokes or what was the impulse sort of when when it started I? Think it started my mom was diagnosed on the on the eleventh of June. I think I, didn't know what I was GonNa do I just couldn't I couldn't believe it. It was just it it. It's it's It was so a look she had done everything necessary to avoid getting it and. I think I was in shock because I thought California was good. I didn't know where about it like she was part of the first wave of Oh we're not good not good at all. It's really bad. And then maybe maybe I mentioned it. At. After seeing some coke covert is a hoax tweet or something like that, and then I was like fuck this shit, it's not and then I kind of maybe started from a place of anger at that point. If I remember your first tweet was sort of like straightforward but I think by your second tweet, you joked tweaking the setup of my if Cova so contagious. Don't have it. I'm glad I have material that work with I. I had some stuff to start with I didn't have to start cold on my mom I was are already headed there. And so what was it like? What was the sort of responses you're getting throughout the her sort of battle with it? And Nestle get responses. Knowing, knowing tweeted to me directly that I was a monster but I, I don't know if people think privately. Would you do jokes about it? I know you're on zoom shows. Yeah. I had a couple of shows while she was. Dying. At A. Darts again. It was so easy. Just started to my bedroom and tell a few jokes and go back to. Watching her die on my IPAD. Denounce yes. Yes. It's particularly I. Yeah. It's even easier because it's like you didn't have to go to a club or had the tweets but also like, oh, now I can sort of do it to an audit into I. Don't know how they're feeling about this. Yeah. Sure. I mean if it was much more convenient, my dad's death so I to thank her for that. Was Her Eddie Joe, can you remember the particularly proud of? You just like a lot. I guess the one that's still working is my mom was a trump supporter and she died from Kobe Bryant and as a result, the coroner ruled her death a suicide. That was the joke I wrote down. That's my though that was also the job. This is amazing. That might work for a long time that might be a long time working joke. We talked about the first time on but you are a joke writers joke writer like what goes how does it? How does your brain make a connection for something like that? Like do you remember? What the impulse was and sort of how it sort of followed it just sort of like. So perfectly crafted. That was Everett. They're really quickly right before I was GONNA. Do that on zoom they didn't have any new stuff, but I mean it's just something that's percolating. White One reason I wanted her to the conscious for a second I wanted her to admit she'd made a mistake in term of mistake I never got her to admit it was a mistake to vote for trump in out by the time she was diagnosed with Kovic. She was unconscious unable to respond to things so I feel cheated because I I know. I know like I. Fuck at one that argument. It and you're not here to admit but I want it. You want the worst way. Possible. Truly to it, but it is a no it's like a it's a perfect Ross joke in that a combined sort of to failings of person. For an twisted around it. It's just like. You know what? What did it mean to you to have comedy is a way to express yourself as a way to sort of connect people during that time. It was very grateful to have twitter to to projects out there for you know I, mean. I I. Guess I'd I'd already read a ton about Kobe. I've been kind of pretty obsessed with it. You know and It was all. Heartfelt Shit, which is good Alleanza I just felt like all right. We'll won't be so heartfelt even though it has hurt though that's how my heart feels. Feels feels it feels through comedy. You know but yeah. I think I. Yeah. I think that's true. Right. There was. It people are having a hard time to forgot how to make jokes about it and I think it was partly like so many people are dying. As a real like how to do it, but there is something like well, this is my personal experience and no one was going to be like how dare you people are dying? You're like I'm well aware. Oh yeah I know I got this freedom that only say, maybe Pete Davidson feels about nine eleven lake I can make any Jenky can't take that. You can't take that away from me. However I am uncertain that they think Nicos Santos's. Stepfather or stepmother away from Cobra to like I'm certain, there will be more of us. Qualify to really make the jokes jokes about jokes about this, and so you're as you said, you're still doing some that at least joker doing are you still doing jokes are used to working on material around it oh? Yeah. Yes. Yeah. Yeah I mean. Yes. I. Yes I am. It's IT'S A it's a burgeoning chunk. So that's it. Is there anything that you are pull bound? You know there's this Mandy Slab it and he basically keeps saying almost every day if the entire country shut down for like maybe a month or two, we could we could end this for everybody. You know and maybe at some point, people will listen to that I. Don't know it it. There's a way to stop this. You know you don't have to wait for an act seen. We don't have to wait for better treatment for people to get really bad verge co bed. We could just everyone just stop for two months at the most and then everyone's like case go back to school they start sports starts back up again like you you have everything fucking one again if he could just. Tampa down for two. Months..

groupon Kobe Bryant Cova Tampa twitter California Mandy Slab Eddie Joe Nicos Santos A. Darts writer Kovic Everett Ross Pete Davidson Cobra Jenky
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

06:37 min | 11 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"This is just a quarantine comedy show and they set the tone for me and. After that, I did thirty five to forty five minutes of Newman tyrone quarantine and pilot to jokes pre quarantine, and from there I was hearing digital labs. I would throw it out there and it will go through the Wifi, go they speakers, and then they here and then they come back and what was interesting about it was that nobody's they're not in the same. Room they're on the same but not in the same room. So I get here and keep laughing at another person that person left that makes them laugh. So you had this ripple effect and I was like this is a wave right? Like, Oh, this is cool like I'm and the digitize. It's just like I the texture of it was just attractive to me so. From. Nair. I am getting the same satisfaction from when I do on stage and also it's working and and I'm giving joy to my fans or whoever clicks on the link and time is going faster. So did I did a couple shows in April and May, and then I hit up my label my albums before to way a blonde medicine to like, Hey, man, I want I think I have a couple of bits that could put together make an album and he was a young man I is crazy said because. This comic does not WanNa. Do a zoom or they're supposed to record their album and they were on the verge of figuring out how to route. And yet, nor you would be the crazy motherfucker to do this. So this let's do it. So because you record each track audience member differently. So even there is like a baby crying or even dogs barking, you could take their laugh out and then you still have a complete show. So we I I. I did a couple more shows the comedy, try outs through May, and then recorded a week after Jewish Floyd. was murdered and that was the that was the Friday. 'cause. That's Saturday was the uprise in New York City. So that's when the temperature changed again I stand up like we have this window of Li-. Hey, we wanna laugh when quarantine and then after like uprising personally, I won't let Nick, we've got the fight right so so it came in a great time like the universe. Hooked it up with the timing of and got that recording, and then after that was just post and then to the uprising. So that was that was the process. How did you approach it sort of album sort of conceptually of what he wants to do, and then also sort of practically how did you build material? Was it like how you built material? Anyway. Yes it definitely was writing and also I I do fifty fifty writing on paper. No Pat, and then writing on stage. So I was riding on zoom to wear like what are the are the members reacting to with what am I getting a digital laugh too, and then I also want to like what's the theme of this album like let's let's bring it back to like. In the beginning what we thought and that observation, and then also my twist on it of shopping and lining up and ESPN TV binge watching. So I wanted to give like a time capsule of like this is what we been through. Because it's like this year twenty, twenty things change. So fucking fast like we forgot like Kobe passed away. Man. I'm still more than that like I sometimes I remind myself that yeah. That did happen this year like we lost him. Straight going. So that's what I wanted to be where people can. Yeah. That was like that was like that because we just don't know in these hectic times we forget where we came from. What we've been through what we with so That's how I started, and then it just started shaping together of giving people that remembrance that reference of like Oh man I remember that. Yeah that all Larry but then having my twist on and then building from there, how did you adapt your performance style for Zoom Audience? The thing that I noticed as the laugh rhythm is different. How you ride a laugher them as different because it's not pops it's sort of like her it's cut its you you commenting on their last and you could you could feel you finding a different rhythm. What was that like? That that was it was a coaster man and it was it was beautiful because these people did not even like put hands on but they press the link to come and I, feel like acknowledging laugh, their laughs is this is all not normal none of this shit is normal but doing that makes it more normal uncomfortable for them to express themselves. So It was really definitely figure out the timing I had to definitely teach myself how to let them laugh because if I do another joke, they even laugh at the day then finish the other was already I'm fucking myself out I don't know if our curse on A. I'm fucking myself up. It's just like I had to keep telling myself like pace yourself to where like in the comedy clubs you could just ride that wave. You know that you can see the energy of what they're doing. They're especially resume. You have to feel that like I tell people I felt like Rachel, performance standup my it was all all hearing I had because even if I look. At, the screen it to them, it looks like I'm looking up so they're not even engaged. So it's really like performing. Into camera and I'm hearing him laugh and I'm like I let left out. DID EVERYBODY GET OUT Next one. Then, and from there cat riding and not to say like. There was a many times on zoom meetings I bombed like I thought Oh my wife is working. What Yeah? Did you stand? I stand yeah. You had the Mike I had the can't laptop backed up and I was standing. So all they saw just like you see here it's like showed up and I was performing I was doing. Which I love doing smart. That's my shit and bringing that live standup atmosphere to them on their laptop is is crucial because of I'm sitting down then I feel like it's more of a monologue and it doesn't give the essence of Standup I. Mean I'm not a cosby that's just not my style. I feel like if I can give not a storyteller. Yes storytelling Oh man don't. Use His name because he's notorious..

WanNa Newman Mike I New York City ESPN Li Rachel cosby Nick Kobe Pat Floyd. Larry
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

05:12 min | 11 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"Mean there was like one movie contagion about it but I don't remember anyone else really talking about this that much. That's so Yeah I. Think I. We're all just in different stages of grief and. I've I've come to a place of acceptance though now I'm really just trying to figure out what other I've I've did stand up. I was. Lived through a boom. Boom is over. It is officially over people are so excited about comedy, but it's it's podcasting now. I'm exploring reality shows like I'm trying to find ways to be myself like the person I was on stage in different different ways. So what what how is that materialized? What has that looked like that has felt like something that least gets close to feeling like you're so expressing whatever you were able to express your standup I mean it looks like going live on instagram a lot more than I ever used to. It looks like. You know I was already kind of planning for this because I just don't think stand up the way I was doing it in the way you have to do it to be. Really really great or at least the way I have to do it to be the greatest I can be every night. Every night and I got a treat it like I'm training for the Olympics in the Olympics are might special tapings and in between the Olympics you have nationals which are different TV appearances and I could never take a night off and if I did I felt guilty and. I think I had an inkling that I couldn't do it forever, and especially as a thirty six year old woman who would like to have a partner and maybe a family some day I'm not gonNA be out doing stand up every night I can't do it and now I, know the life. That you can have where you don't do standup every night like. Eat Dinner and watch TV with my parents and go to bed like it's awesome I. Haven't lived like that since before college and I really love it and I'm really proud of myself for kind of thinking about this. Even before this, all went down because I've been honing my broadcasting skills. Through my radio show a really kind of pivoted towards broadcasting because I knew much like stand up when I first discovered it. It's just something that came naturally to me and I just felt really comfortable on radio and so I. I'm trying to build a radio career and podcasting career because. I already had that kind of base now I'm really Sinking my teeth into that and thinking, oh, that's going to be my future that's going to be actually a future that would make me a lot happier than being in the clubs every night even though I'm never gonNA stop doing stand up as soon as the club's open again, I'll be out every. Eat, my words but Yeah. That's that's what I'm doing. So you have the raiders show podcast and you've been doing these sort of instagram's speed dating. Shows. Dating on Instagram does it Does it feel similar to get the same? Or is it sort of like you accept that this is the feeling that is like your wave expression yourself like it's almost like. Me Put the question this way, which is like the what stand up comedy. There's sort of the creation of that. There's a joy to and the response to it, and now the response has to be so different because you're not hearing it, but he's still can maybe get the same feeling towards the creation of it. Do you feel that way and you have optimism to at least that part of it? Yeah. I think that the more mature I don't need that. It laughter. I think that's I. Think stand up is really a young person's kind of like an immature. Humans. Coping Mechanism for wanting to be loved because it's just like the the quickest hit of. Validation, and now I get validation from deums telling me. I love that you talk about this thing it made me feel less alone like I'm getting validation in. Other ways and I'm not seeking that immediate. Hit that I used to thrive on so much and I think it's just by virtue of doing work on myself and not needing people's propose much. I do miss the every night being creative in every single day in some way and getting that out there, and that's why I go live on instagram. That's why I took my podcast, a weekly podcast to a daily podcast because I I like to perform every day. It's really good for me and I think the performing thing is more important to me now than the actual response from the audience like I did. I co hosted or I guess hosted Kimmel this past Tuesday it which was so weird because you do this monologue which I kind of adapted into like what my? instead of doing like topical jokes or whatever late-night host i. just let me just try to do this like as a standup send kind of thing, and it's so weird because there's no audience there's just you with a cameraman in the room who's not even allowed to laugh like you don't even get titters like on the soup or whatever from. The producers just nothing and it's so awkward. But I liked it because it was a challenge to like okay. How do I make like we were talking about before? How do I make everyone watching at home not feel bad for me right now and know that I am fine without getting laughter and I'm comfortable and they don't have to worry about me. Welcome.

instagram Olympics Kimmel raiders partner
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

05:17 min | 11 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"Because I. didn't realize this in starting in comedy. The audience is so nervous for you and can't believe you're about to do what you're doing and they just want you to be okay and so like. Outside of Covid that's all you're trying to do up there. You're going to need to be funny to be a comedian. I'm serious like I've just you can be successful if you just look comfortable there because the audience is so freaked out, they're putting themselves in your shoes and how uncomfortable they would be. If you look comfortable up there, you can. You don't even have to tell jokes got people will have a good time. And like you said on top of that with the t the discomfort of what's in the air literally and metaphorically. They're on edge and it's the elephant in the room. You can't address it because you don't WanNa dwell on it too much. I. Mean You want to address it, but you also don't. That's what people are trying to escape by going out and laughing. So that is the weird thing is mitigating how much to talk about it or it? If you talk about anything else does it seem? Trivial. At this point that was, that's the heart with comedy talking about it. You don't want to talk about because you're trying to get away from it but not talking about it seems like how could you not talk about it? Yeah. So and then. Dredging up old material I I was talking to. It was nice because I was talking to just namedrop David, spade was working the same club after made in salt? Lake and we were discussing and I was so happy to hear from him to that he was struggling remembering bits and he'd be in the middle of a joke and I was talking to him like going. Used to be like when I would go into a bit that I was like it's eighty percent they're like it has room for improvement and I'll mess with it but I'm like it's a killer joke. You're just Kinda like it's like you're on a road trip and you've got the Cruise control set and it's open roads and I haven't felt this way ever maybe even when I start comedy because when I first started comedy I was going just liner jokes so I didn't have to white knuckle entire bit. This is why this is driving in a snowstorm with not tread on your tires just like home. I got that is what every single bit felt like just trying to remember it and I would remember like. If I. Had Twenty Punch Lines in one bit. Think would be maybe around the amount that I would have been like A. Three minute thing I would remember like eleven of them in the other ones are lost forever because to get them back, I'd have to listen to old recordings of myself, which I I literally can't do. So I'm just starting from scratch. What was CA- sound of laughter through masks like It was exactly lake. The first. It was like doing comedy for the first time again, because it reminded me of clubs where at open mics they don't they don't see people with any kind of. Thought towards the comedian what would make for a great show it's so funny because. The things that make comedy clubs work close close. Proximity to the other tables, really just tightly packed as close to the stage as you can get low ceilings and and. That's what works for comedy clubs like the best rooms, low ceilings, basements, cellars, and people just cramped in a place best best conditions for comedy show. So now we are operating the world worth those things can't happen anymore. So you're it's been removed to have the best show possible. So what it felt like was an open mic were just like free seating and people are not there to see anyone not definitely not there to see you it was it was like doing comedy the first five years, ten years, twelve years of my career where people showed up at the club just like we like comedy, go the club like no one was there to see me I've been lucky to even People to perform comedy in a world where people came to see me I'm just grateful that I ever got a chance to. Perform in a sold out theater like. It it took me so long to achieve that. But there are a lot of people that are just I just feel for comics who are on the way up now and may never get get that I'm sorry to be so. Pessimistic but that might not be a reality for the next. Few. Years. And it's like even if they what whatever these sort of. If this ends in any capacity. Then you have to get people being comfortable with the idea after not doing it for three years. Yeah. We're like a decade away from that the way it was feeling that comfortable in that close of spaces unless you're down in the Ozark stewing shows I think they're still fine packed down there. But like there's certain places, you can go maybe to get that feeling again but. It's I we lived in a bygone era. It's just like I'm I really come back to this thing. I think so many people are what no matter what you do for a living or what your circumstance is like. We're all morning lake, the death of of life. Before cove it where we didn't even know this kind of thing was possible I mean life wipe go back to normal but we're always going to be on edge that this could happen again and we didn't use to have to live that way because we didn't know that this could happen i..

morning lake CA David spade
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

05:35 min | 11 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"Like our so the. Associate, doing standup like the COMEDIANS. So trained for a certain interaction and certain feeling from what what it feels like for a set to go. Well. So to remove that, it allowed you to be like, what am I, what what is this for? Yes I don't need this. This isn't fulfilling whatever standup was giving me this ain't doing it and that's exactly right I. Mean I as much compulsion to do it the. And it was just about like trying to keep up and compete with everyone else. STANDUP is like you get that hit from the from the crowd interaction feeding off of them, and it's just there's Laughter over Zoom is just so disappointing and it's just not as good and I've done some live shows with people wearing masks, and that's also just not as fun and coming from a place. It was humbling because it just reminded me of the early days of doing standup. I was talking to some other comics that had been performing at clubs I've just done Salt Lake City. Can you talk a little bit about deciding to do it and what? What the experience? Yeah that was hard. I have I only did it because I saw other comics that weren't like. The comments I look up to in comics who I feel are my peers were accepting gigs like, Oh, if they do it, I can do it. So I did local shows in Saint Louis at a club ear that I never have worked helium because as soon as they open, they lake couldn't afford me. I was making a joke like I never thought I'd have to work at this club because I was better than it and now performing at the Galleria Mall next to a build a bear and I'm getting van mowed my paycheck and like things have changed. So I, I accepted the gigs locally just to get on stage and. and. Just to have my friend come open for me. Again, get to hang out with the comic and stuff like that. Just to see if I could do it and it was weird it wasn't satisfying. I didn't get a high from it like I usually do it's just not it's not the same and. because. There are fewer people in the audience because the audience felt like they didn't know what they should do risking everything to go out and do this thing you feel like you're doing my friend Emil Joaquin who opened for me was making a joke that it feels like being in a gay bar in the nineteen twenties or something like but not as fun because you actually. Feel bad about what you're doing and you know that what you're doing is probably wrong as opposed to you know that experience but it did feel like it felt naughty way that wasn't a fun naughty like I like breaking the rules when I know what I'm doing, it's not really harmful to anyone this felt like the rules and not really knowing for sure that what I was. Doing wasn't going to harm someone every the staff and my agents everyone is so worried about my safety I'm not worried about catching it because I trust myself to be safe as much as I was worried about my audience being put in a situation where you get inside and then the tables aren't as far away as they promised, they were going to be or there are people. That aren't wearing masks and once you get in environment we've all been there where you go socially distance barbecue or birthday party, and you get there and people are not respecting the six feet they're talking without their masks they're hugging they're shaking your hand and you can do it. You shake their hand you hug people that you don't want to because there's this weird peer pressure that. You just fall into so I didn't want my audience to ever feel like they had to stay they bought a ticket. So when I went to Salt Lake City eventually that was the first one I've traveled for because I just drove down the street to do St Louis shows so didn't feel Like. I was putting anyone at risk. Right before I went to. Salt Lake City which I was already like on the fence about but I was assured by Bert Kreischer who had traveled and done so many clubs in so many different things he was like they're doing it right and they truly worth there's any club Dakota right now that room is huge their spacing people out more than they even need to everyone has to wear a mask. I mean they're doing it the right way but I was alarmed because I took a flight there that was oversold and people were not good about wearing masks and I was like am I bringing. Corona virus to Salt Lake City I mean I was way far away from the audience even if I was like. You. Know Gallagher. Ring. My Spit, they wouldn't have. been able to reach them but I, still felt like I do test positive in two weeks because of this fucking flight I took. Then I'm going to have to Bryan callen and do a little testimonial video of anyone who came to my show and. Didn't. WanNa I. DIDN'T WANNA. Have to make that statement and then I was just scared of getting canceled to be honest with of like what if a bunch of people that went to my show die? and. So that I did the shows 'cause I was. By the time I started having these panics I already landed in Salt Lake, and I just wanted to support the club clubs are going under and I just I did it but then I canceled the rest of my my tour that I kind of had planned because I was like I don't I don't need a society so I'm just no no more stand up. Unless it's I'm doing drive INS coming up though so it's In Salt. Lake. City. Can you describe the feel like 'cause when I imagine it? How do you describe it? It's like in any comedy show, there's an amount of tension because like this person has to make us laugh out of nothing and and that's part of what is fun about going to see a comedy but it seems like the tension of everything is so immense like if you could break but it seems like it's impossible to break because this thing is. Hanging over us. That's so true. I mean. First of all, that's always what I say to people who are. Who Want any advice on comedy and or public speaking?.

Salt Lake City Salt Lake Bryan callen Galleria Mall Emil Joaquin Bert Kreischer Saint Louis Gallagher van St Louis Dakota
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"So you don't have to get ready, staying ready. So you don't have to get ready. I heard a young event say that one day, and I was like. So fortunately, I happen to be ready. I didn't have to get ready. It was just a matter of crossing the TS dotting is, and now that you're at your new firm, you told me you've been working long hours, what's your new job until and what's different about it than your previous firm, which was at a much larger situation? Well, yes. So, you know, to go from a firm that has three hundred thousand employees under their umbrella to affirm that has less than one hundred employees under its rela. It's awesome for person, like me, who, like say likes to be able to be creative, and flexible like our CEO's offices next to mind. Our chief compliance officers office is next to mind. So if I want to get an answer to a question and know whether I'm in the lines, it takes thirty seconds, that is beautiful for somebody like me. But then, you know separately from that. So my job before he sensually it was fifty percent managing the clients at relationships that I already had. The other fifty percent creating new opportunities and bring in new client relationships. Now it's probably a third third third between those other two and then the, the second third piece third third is developing other newer associates, and junior planners to able to take on some of that, low, because essentially, there's more activity happening in like I said that independent advisor world than there is inside the larger traditional brokerage firms. So we'll twelve hour days. Here for a while. Right. Indeed. Indeed. Well, I wanna thank you for sharing that amazing story with our audience. I want you guys know he was trying to be all conservative about it. And then he wrote the show, and then he was saying more than I had wrote by nature. I am a pretty button. Yes, you are surprised when you didn't have time when you walked in the day. All the time gone. Goodness, I got on Thai TV Lee that go ahead. That's a great difference. Right. So, I to firms if you don't have a tie on, when you come in the door, they ask you, if you're not to do, that's a serious. I saw that happen twice new firm. I'm the only person that wears a tie, right? I make everybody else on comfortable because it's just that much ingrained in, like, what I do you know so that is funny that you say that, that really is a thing that's we'll bring this out to the close on that one. We want to remind you that we have that are coming up for you. If you're a podcast, listen there, and for those who wants to show on TV were always thankful that you watch wanna remind you catch past episodes of the show on apple podcasts. Soundcloud Stitcher Google play. Spotify, an all kinds of different platforms. Just search.

Spotify apple CEO advisor Lee fifty percent thirty seconds twelve hour one day
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"And we realize there's a lot about professionalized learn and share with our church of them. So you can take it into which will. But okay, so in all seriousness recovered from the scripture indicating we'll, we'll bring it back for a second. We talked about sort of my side of all of it. I mean, that was a tenth probably of all of the back and forth, that went on that. You know, you were privy to most of it, what was happening in your world in your brain as all of this is, is happening, right? I'm calling you saying I'm being. So we've got a shut it down. I'm being told we've gotta pull our. Entire presence from interwebs wherever that all those kind of things was happening on in your mind. It was two items. I think for me like I mentioned before it was a welcome break store, just what we were dealing with at home continue to do little more management out at it, but also entertaining because for for for me for someone who created this. I remember literally still remember the moment when I had idea that was managed money for a four on Bank. One of the top four banks to be threatening. You know, someone who's part of the project Andrew part of the project saying you need to cease and desist. I was just tickled because I might I didn't really good job of helping to create this thing that now the compliance department feels is such a threat to the entire banking organization. I was take I was very entertained. I really didn't have too many worries. And I knew also. For professional standpoint that you had always had dreams of doing what you're doing now which is moving in a more independent direction, how year doing your financial management personal finance career. So it's interesting to that, all of the folks who we've had conversations with sort of in the background about partnerships and all that kind of stuff. I can't say all, but the majority of those folks are some Bank. So it's interesting that in, in a space where the full to wanna be down to speak our competitors of the horse and buggy in them, it's just interesting to me that, that those folks. See it differently. And that speaks more to actually a whole nother issue. Why don't you share a little bit with us about? You mentioned. You're the most people who are in your position as a personal finance expert CFP, or whatever the acronym is CFP Elizabeth morning crew. But I know what I was trying to see us p p and then also managing a portfolio of dollars most people like in their sixties, maybe fifty. What does that say experienced tell you about the financial services industry at large that a show about money that the podcast and the TV show like a threat to department, that's responsible for making sure everyone's complying with the rules of the firm?.

Andrew
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"I'm you know, so I, I had already gotten to a point, while was like anybody coming to see you Otis on the talent. So it kinda if nothing else was just that last push that you need to say, you know, if not now then when right as certainly. We'll talk a little bit about your new gig. But it is interesting because of the compliance apartment essentially moved us in a place and more, so you in particular for professional professional sense, and for now, the freedom of what we do now with the show, and there were things that we couldn't do didn't do because you were at the firm you were at we didn't want to raise too many alarms didn't want to get in the way of, you know, getting our paychecks every two weeks. But I think it's important for me to eliminate a few things for Y B M audience will add like you to please insert Borgen's behind me here. In the bible, and turn to the book of care. Please Malcolm turned. Yes, my favorite artists behind usher. Drake that will always have the all time position right now. Drake is like right now my bed, you were onto something in abrupt. I just wanted the world to know that drinking usher, your favorite artists, somehow that that was five probably. Oh, I want you to turn to I number one and take care lines to three when you have it. Same. Still, and I'll be hearing this stuff. You say jealousy is love and hate. What we. Own department was very concerned with. So concerned, I've been to say, Malcolm's case with the most interesting thing department has trained in years is not ever. They will ask. Episode. A man only is force a mug. Take us off to set. Lightening strike here in the middle of our set that was him. Was not me interrupting because I need to make sure that the scripture in the blaspheme last is on your side of the death. Okay. Out of this clear in the compliance department that was really probably. If they will repeat back. We said that we have forgotten in shows past our show back and forth, but the job. Love and hate at the same time just like. Grant's older, but I came here today about going back and forth with the compliance department in Yellowknife. Okay. Stay courage, caliber minds us. They will always try to get away. Don't it? I came here to tell you the day. Remind you not to hang your head when day. Isn't that is never? Amen. I come here today to say you don't need to hang your head.

Drake Malcolm Otis Borgen Yellowknife Grant two weeks
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"Those who are listening for the first time you might not know this show airs television show and as a podcast on the last time anyone heard from EM was back in February of twenty nineteen that was the last podcast episode of this show posted. And our last recording was even earlier that with five or six months, maybe four months, I can't recall behind us with our show and social counts, going dark, because, Malcolm only tweets occasionally many might assume that been Malcolm may have just flamed out taking care of triplets, and getting married, where on anyone, but the truth about our absences, much more intriguing than triplets, or planning for wedding. We start season four manager damn money by explaining why we were gone for so long. Malcolm reveal sure we kind of teased it online a little bit here. And there we put up a little. On the website. So we've tease it enough is the time has come. It's pretty much an open secret considering we already did post something on our website, but what happened. Why are we going for so long? I think you have some explaining to actually more than not. In short in store, and then we'll be man was trying to keep us. Oh man. Now that is the you know, like you mentioned. So, for example, my social media going, dark. It's amazing to me that people actually noticed. Okay. So you criticize my tweets about, you know, randomly watching basketball games talking trash to Kevin Durant whatever else, but people actually will like asking me, if everything was okay because I hadn't been engaging my nonsense with them on Twitter. Right. But also just, you know, I won't talk about them by name my Old Firm who shall remain nameless? I don't want them to show up a horse and buggy to show up here in the studio. Somebody all of a sudden, you know, try to have beef with us, but I will say they're one of the four largest banks in the world. And, and just to clarify my talking about where he used to work where I used to work old financial firm. Financial services firm. So apparently we little in y diem. Have become bigger than I thought we had become because I finally got to a point where we became competition. Oh, interesting. So it's kinda one of those things where like your side, chick is getting way too much attention in your main chick takes notice, and it has something to say about daddy sensually was was. My main chick came to me and said. She got to go. That, that he is. You know my best analogy..

Malcolm Kevin Durant Twitter basketball four months six months
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"So we we even seeing in Brazil, they starting to talk about similar type legislation set starting to happen on a larger scale, and and I think as the benefits of GDP L, become clearer. I think we'll see more countries at a federal and national level outside of the EU. Adopt similar kind of privacy legislation and privacy acts. Do you think there are industry groups and companies by themselves that might just say, well, let's look at GDP are and the, you know, California consumer Privacy Act. Maybe what's going on in Brazil or elsewhere, and synthesize that so that there is kind of a standard for for companies to adhere to in the absence of legislation. Industry. Buddies are definitely getting involved in. I I know the, you know, the DM as getting involved the is getting involved yet in the US a lot of the industry buddies off trying to lean in especially in California legislation was proposed. They, you know, there was a real concerted effort and in speaking to some of the quite interesting outside of the normal industry. Buddies, a lot of the technology companies in the system all getting together and saying hang on. Let's start self-regulating start self imposing certain things here to make sure that we can drive this positive way. And again, I think this is all positive for the industry. I think digital grew so quickly and it fragmented the market in an opened up so much data as a consequence that there's a little bit of a consolidation process and a little bit of a maturing of the industry, and I think that's that's again. That's that's positive for everybody. Yeah. I mean, you make the point about, you know, the growth of data and. Kind of coming out of nowhere in the last twenty years or so, and it's in the these companies live on their data. So having good practices around. It seems to make solid business sense doesn't it? Completely completely. You know, there was a there was a beautifully published article about a year or so ago and economist that referred to today's the new oil an unofficial that. But that analogy, you know, kind of stuck with me, and you know, if it is the new oil than the last thing, we want is, you know. Oil spills every way, I think that's what's been happening to use that analogy. So how do we mole animal safe and more environmentally friendly way mind, the oil refining, the oil and distribute clean fuel? Right. I think at the moment load O'neil we having a whole lot of data spills. I you know, what happened with Facebook equifax and whole lot of the others, but we're also not necessarily refining distributing that oil, and in the most safest and cleanest way that we possibly can. So so I think the whole industry is starting to acknowledge that this this mobile to be done yet. And an and we weren't in this position eighteen months ago, even twelve months ago, I'd say I guess the only difference is that in fifty sixty seventy years we're going to run out of oil. Data is going to be here. Forever going to determine people's lifestyles. It's going to determine pretty much every aspect of your life. Right. Absolutely. Absolutely. It's it's like the brief absolutely while Jacques as always thanks for joining me here on confessions of a market. It was a pleasure having year. Likewise. Thank you so much oldest. Thanks for being here. As I noted next time shock, and I will dissect Amazon, Apple and Google points of view in all the chatter about privacy. Stay with us. This episode of confessions of a market was written produced edited by yours. Truly t Jordan of A-Class productions wrote the theme music. Confessions of a marketer is a trademark of read Edwards globally. Incan? This episode is copyright twenty eighteen. I'm Mark Rita. Cenex..

Brazil California EU US Facebook equifax Mark Rita Edwards Jacques Amazon Google Apple fifty sixty seventy years eighteen months twelve months twenty years
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"And just speaking to my team over the last couple of weeks. We we are definitely seeing an increase in requests for proposals out in the market clients all looking to customer data platforms accustomed gauge platforms as a way to invest in an manage. They first party data across channels to take them all Omni channel view because they realizing they can't be overly dependent on digital quality based channels. I think about everything they own estate their own apps. Right. The own whole Saint is the own web sites. So again, I think that's that's a very positive development for the marketplace. One thing that occurs to me is Brexit going to effect GDP are will Great Britain conform to GDP are is there any understanding in that area. That's a good question. So at the moment fall, intents and purposes, the United Kingdom's still abiding by GDP, the example, I gave you was the ICO. Which is the British enforcement agency for Judy pill is actually proactively influencing in taking a position that. Yeah navy. They will one of the leading lights and helping shape and develop GDP L A. So, you know, so Fennell it seen as part of the GDP all kind of block and process. If you like I'm wondering whether back in the spring when we said that there's a way to look at GDP are as positive maybe where we overly optimistic review had clients that look at this as a win. Maybe we were maybe it's because it was early spring as I recall was a beautiful city. I think it's a bit early to call victory. But with that said, we all seem kind of meaningful progress, you know, the points I made above about how the whole value chain specific you on the technology in the media and the data side is starting to clean itself out. But we all seeing market is putting a real focus on the first party data. But specifically about data ownership who owns the data. How does that impact my customer relationship with my customer experience? How do I apply a to and a bit more meaningful way, you know? So I think there's this real notion that if you really think about customer experience and customer design you have to put data in front of friends and saints as part of that process. You know, it's. If you want to really deliver personal and mole Uman sainted marketing people by small if you will people based marketing needs people base data, and I think the smart marketers have always known that. And they sing GDP and privacy by design is a full two to support that SPA shin. Right. So we we all seem plans taking that position. So I think it's it's it's meaningful progress is at victory not quite yet. Because I think we're only a couple of months post the summer went on the full, and I think between now and maybe a euro. So I I think the landscape will look significantly different given some of the points of shade earlier. Okay. Let's let's move to the US where we are right now. It's actually a sunny fall day here in the US where I am. And there is a bit of action going on with California's consumer Privacy Act, and maybe even some some hints that maybe something at the federal level unclear. But how do you think that could shape up? How would that affect marketers in the girl US avai? I spoke with our chief privacy officer, Rachel Lhasa about this. And in all of you is as marketers and people in the industry, it will be very hard for us to manage that protection for fifty different states. And I think it'll be very confusing for the public and the real challenge for businesses and marketers at large to to understand and comply. So in a maybe a federal legislation will be more beneficial to both market is end in consumers in the public, but one standard in let's say, the California process an education goes through that would be the highest standard and by default people would almost have to ply that. Right. And you know, the awesome nuance in difference between what is being proposed in California versus GDP. Oh, and I think that's fair sell. It's getting difficult for marketers. And we don't one Marcus in the industry at large to kind of just lose kind of faith in the whole prices because it becomes so fragmented and so complex sure because ultimately this is trying to protect the public, and I think that's a positive thing..

US California Brexit chief privacy officer ICO Judy pill mole Uman United Kingdom Fennell Great Britain Marcus Rachel Lhasa
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"Advertising. Ken go horribly wrong. So I think there's a sadly a quick kind of default to contextual advertising as a just a quick means to get campaigns out into attempt personalization. But I do think fortunately, some very brave is, you know, all. Really deepening. The efforts around first party data at a thinking about the two mystic data sources, and realizing that if you get on top of it. It's actually easier to maintain consent wherever you have a direct relationship with with the customer and ultimately have direct relationship. It's it's a bit away to drive value, and and be closer to your customers and not be this into mediated. Which which I think is the way market is need to think of GDP. So what changes have you seen on the marketing landscape after GDP are, what's what's changed? Yes. So as a data guy, you know, I'm going to have to bring some data points to this conversation. Well, it's so that's why I have you here. Yes. I think the first thing we've seen this is a very interesting, but of research that came out of the Reuters institute for the study of journalism is that we've seen over twenty two percent drop in third party, cookie. Use across European pages. That's pretty dramatic. You know, just under a quarter. I think that number's going to gradually increase of time. So for market is this means that an overdependence on third party cookies as part of your marketing optional is going to be a problem. So how do you do personalization without being Sodhi dependence on third party cookies, which gets back some back to my contextual marketing point tried and then one which I didn't see coming. And this is from Neiman labs was that over a thousand US new sites are unavailable to European read is two months off the GDP. Oh, and then some of these are pretty substantial publications than. The LA times and Boston Globe as an example. So for marketed kind of limits. A especially if you're a global market of trying to do any kind of Joe targeting or trying to target expect traits all trying to understand people across specific publications regard itself way, they base that limits your each so so I think that's making it a little bit harder in the in the Neo Thome full marketers. And then another shakeout we seeing which we end -ticipant it. But I really think it's it's better. You know, it's been a massive rise in programmatic media basic at auction based buying and selling of auto knee media invention content. But also, the the data and the customers that come with that content, and we are seeing a lot of the demand side platforms taking quite a stance on the supply side or the sell side pet foles an I trying to make sure that isn't this long string of people reselling other people's content. Right. So there's this notion of only one will maximum two hops in. The process, and I think anybody in media in publishing I think that's a that's a good development. And there's also a lot less manipulation of of the media auction process taking place, and again, I think that's very positive. So I've had horrible stories of people selling media inventory as I as a broker reseller to a site that doesn't even run video as an example. Right. Just to get that highest CPM. So I think all those things are being flushed out, and it's one of those unintended, but positive consequences of GDP is at the whole ad tech ecosystem Israeli taken a long hard look at itself, which actually goes broader than just the initial intentions of GDP in my opinion. And again, I think that's positive, and then we sing many of the major Ed tech players will kind of marketing cloud type solutions a working very hard to comply and making it easier for clients to to manage permission..

Ken Reuters Neiman labs LA US Boston Globe Joe twenty two percent two months
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"Each at the end of September involving fifty million customers. So the big headline is will they potentially? I'll be fined under GDP. Aw. And if so people estimated that could be up to one point six billion. Oh, so that's really that's a real number. That's a real number. And it is that going to happen. I don't know. It's this is the interesting one for us to keep an eye on. But to your first question, what is this meaningful the market is and I say on the ground floor kind of away from the headlights and the headlines of the world gardens. I think it's more a case of partly sunny than than partly cloudy. I'd say sunny in that. You know, many of are using this as an opportunity to spring clean the and get their house in order. I'd say the is a bit of cloud around because what we've seen practically is happening is almost a two tier reality playing out for marketers summer so cautious and Philly so behind on really having a good handle on they first party in the customer data that they will sadly in my opinion. They ought defaulting multi contextual advertising. So listen to contextual is basically using content triggers. As a way to personalize your marketing or your your marketing campaign or your credit for your content, and that's not necessarily the best proxy in my opinion. Full personalization, troop, customization old great customer experience and an offer context..

Philly
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"On episode thirty five of confessions for market. We're revisiting GDP with jock van Niekerk. Talking back to confessions of a marketer. I'm Marguerite Edwards today. We have Jacques one Niekerk wonderman data CEO on to talk about the effects of GDP are on marketers. That's today in the first part of our interview next time, we'll dissect Amazon, Apple and Google points of view in all the chatter about privacy. So we'll get to part one of that chant in just a moment. We've got episodes on conversational marketing doing a rebrand telling stories with data along with the collaboration. I'm undertaking on innovation. We might launch a separate podcast for chats about that. We'll have a pilot sometime in November or December thought maybe we could get it. Launched sooner schedules are tough this time of year with thanksgiving just around the corner believe it or not here in the US. So stay tuned onto Jacques Fandi Kirk Junkin. I I chat at last may about GDP are and what we could expect now about five months out from GDP. I thought it would make sense to checking with him to see what the effects of been shock is CEO wonderman data very firm that pretty much invented direct marketing. So he speaks from experience and a broad client roster. This chat was so interesting. And there was so much talk about in the news. I asked him back for a part to chat about all that. But here's part one first let's get to it. Jack, welcome back to the podcast. How was your summer Baker? Thank you, busy. But that's the way I like it. And it's really good to be back on the show. GDP are was what five six months ago twenty fifth of may. And you know, it happened in the world still here. I've still got a pulse. You know, how have marketers fared over the last five or so months? That's right. I remember I remember United is the world going to end notes not gonna end, but I will say let me get onto the market is an Sekine. But because I think is a couple of quick kind of baselining of what's happened since the twenty fifth. That's probably going to be really important. I think what we've seen is the complaints. Should it spike? And I would say the regulators already ching fully find books. I think that's really what's happened. But but the world will hasn't ended. But we've seen some interesting things in the United Kingdom when GDP all came into effect. This first couple of weeks, the regulators there it's called the ICO at one hundred sixty percent increase in in the first few weeks in excess requests, and and many of the other egg laters have been receiving a lot of requests it trying to figure out, you know, exactly what is the jets which are the ones that they really need to focus on on. That's why at some level. It's not like there's been a plethora of of enforcements taking place, but it's not like complaints have not been filed. But we all to make you believe in force until go with a complaint soul and early on that tends to be against the big walled gardens or the larger platforms that most of the attention. And I think has unite talked about a little bit. The last time, you know, all the attention that Facebook had a checked it to yourself and Google ten extent. Even prior to GDP. You know, they've they've already been on notice before this happened and wave of this kind of any Joe political political campaigning associated with the platforms. You know, for example, the crimson hexagon, Cambridge energetic positions that Facebook found themselves, and I think that's still going to play out because most recently, the icier ICO in the UK has formally taken JD pill enforcement against a Canadian company called A I Q, and you know, they've been seen to kind of us commercial behavioral targeting full political campaigning as part of the Brexit campaign in the UK. So it's quite interesting that that was one of the first bits of enforcement that's taking place, but I think equally in this vein equifax and Facebook both paid fines of about a half a million pounds under the previous data Protection Act, which preceded GDP all, but I think you would have seen it in the press Facebook at another day to..

Facebook CEO Google Jacques Fandi Kirk Junkin Marguerite Edwards Jacques ICO Amazon UK equifax United Kingdom US Jack Joe Cambridge Apple twenty fifth one hundred sixty percent five six months