36 Burst results for "Five Million Dollars"

Fresh update on "five million dollars" discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

00:40 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "five million dollars" discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Welcome to the twenty minute with me. Harry. stubbings into the show state and we have a first our first Grammy Award winning guest that music fuel many Peleton ride for me and just last week they announced that new venture Mantis now mantis that I thirty five million dollars venture fund, and so if you haven't guessed it already, I'm thrilled to welcome Alex Pool and drew taggart founders of the chain smokers and now mantis with the new vehicle have for some of the best in the business including Ron Conway mock he'd been Keith. And that off to the races in terms of building the portfolio getting into some really hotly contested browns fit on on loan snap. The vehicles also managed by Milan caulking, Jeffrey Evans, and if being the most sought after Dj's in the world and having their own fun wasn't enough journalists also in a production studio stakeholders in the Spirit Brandi, your Tequila and last year co founded the ticketing platform yellow heart. I have say this episode just so much funds to and I want to say, thank you to Christian Guard at one three, seven ventures for the introduction of some fantastic questions suggestions. Christian, I really do sir appreciate that. But before we move into the show stay I want to.

Grammy Award Ron Conway Harry. Stubbings Jeffrey Evans Alex Pool Browns Keith Milan Peleton DJ
Podcast listeners are listening longer

podnews

04:45 min | Last week

Podcast listeners are listening longer

"Constantly, listening longer says Cumulus is Westwood One who has published hits podcast download full twenty, twenty reports. It's their fourth annual study among the findings. spotify is closing the gap with apple podcasts by total listeners it's close twenty, two percent say the Apple, the most twenty percents specify the most willing to that today from our show notes and our newsletter. Do podcasts compete with music listening spotify has an RND division. We discover and release some data in April saying as people pick up podcasts listening, they tend to add it to their previous habits. So music listening remains almost the same once people discover podcasts, good news for musicians although possibly not quite so good news for specifiers hoping they wouldn't have to pay anybody for their podcasts guest. podcast analytics and attribution company. chargeable has raised two point two, five, million dollars in seed funding. The company is tracking one billion downloads a month protracted nearest competitor tracks. One point five, billion, we use that. So congratulations to Dave and Harish. Jack. Mates. Happy Hour from stuck on off has become a spotify exclusive in a youtube. Video Jack Announces spotify offered me a life changing amount of money. This is a game changer for us and ads I've never had any communication with Youtube. Former NBC and Fox News Anchor Megan Kelly is to launch her own podcast network without the constraints or political agendas of other media outlets. She says Devil May Care Media's first release will be the Megan Kelly. Show coincidence record for Mac. Os is a simple audio recorder that sits in your menu bar records records loss less if you like. Could be good for safety copies congratulations to podcast host blueberry who have a free virtual events tomorrow to celebrate fifteen years in business. They have Trivia and prize giveaways, congratulations, Todd and Mike, and everyone else at large media has new logo of bold new look from the same great company. You'll find it in our newsletter today and hereditary is building a MAC based audio editor for podcasts. They want your help to learn more about your production process. We've a new section in the news it's going to happen every Monday it's called the tech stuff. It's with our S S dot com or an excellent podcast hosts. Normally, it's not gonNA make it into this podcast. Today it is. It's aimed at developers and technologists working within podcasting Zahir goes. The podcast index has added a language fields taken from the podcast assassin plans to add eight detected language field in future to catch those podcasters who haven't correctly set it. Joe Morocco has also produced svg versions of the podcast indexes logo, which we now show in own search who websites development documentation has moved pages on get hub at hyper catch as now using the podcast index according to Adam. Curry. His podcasting ready Ip v six asks Thomas Harasser. He notes that some of the largest podcast hosts still don't support Ip six and that some phones in India now I six only at least for media files don't support Ip six you're losing listeners especially in emerging markets he says. And Asandra, dear ferrier used Google Cloud Platform to produce transcripts for his podcast in. Italian. Willing to his notes in English on how he managed IT Marco armaments writes a tongue in cheek clarification of apple's in APP purchase rules which are ever. So slightly opaque, and after we reported at bug charitable correctly setting an RSS user agent, we have more details and best practice. Thanks from our show notes and our newsletter today. And in podcast new seventy million is back for season three, its season premiere seventy million takes you inside Chicago's Cook. County jail during a rapid outbreak of covid nineteen spotify podcast launches, incredible feats today, it say daily show profiling amazing achievements made by people from all over the world hosted by Dan Cummings it's a spotify original available everywhere returning last week meddling adults is a podcast game show for charity with two guests solving children's mysteries from classic series like Scooby. Doo It was the caretaker. Linked to how they made it in our show notes newsletter today and good morning podcasts is podcast in English and in Spanish each Weekday Talk to interesting people in the podcasting scene,

Spotify Youtube Apple Megan Kelly Thomas Harasser Devil May Care Media Jack Fox News NBC Audio Editor Dave Chicago Ferrier Adam Joe Morocco Dan Cummings Google
How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

Planet Money

11:28 min | Last week

How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

"How did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true Laura Sullivan is GonNa take the story from here. Okay, it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry they make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really comes from the dupont chemical company and some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the Hagley Library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first dupont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when Dupont made gunpowder not plastic. There's an archivist with a bow tie a handlebar moustache named Lucas Clawson, and he looks like someone would make cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world, a product that looked like glass but break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff but keep things hot called Styrofoam and incredible new film that can preserve food for days called. Saran. Wrap there were a couple of clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time the Society of the plastics industry their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon Chevron Dow Dupont. And there's this one memo from one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three, the. Movement is just being born, and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high but it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing I find reference to a memo a report, but then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it Lucas. Can I ask you a question absolute. Okay. Why? In this section are all. These APPS. So many of these. Cross out because those records are no longer. Here anymore day or not where did they go the society of the Plastics Industry Astra them back think they really yes is an unusual. That doesn't happen often. Do you do know why they took them. Did they say? I, do not know. Okay Of course, there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want. It's records back I did call society the plastic folks and ask them if I could see the records they took they said No. So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University and they're buried in its tax, our boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. Actually the industry consultant died in the why found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. I found what I was looking for a report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in nineteen seventy three. It says, recycling plastic is nearly impossible. There is no recovery from obsolete products. It says recycling is costly sorting. It is infeasible plus it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. So the oil in plastic industry new, they've known for almost fifty years. and. Then I found more confidential memos in meetings echoed decades of this knowledge insight thousands of pages of courtroom discovery. There's a speech from an industry insider in nineteen seventy four when it comes to recycling large quantities plastic, it says there is quote serious doubt that it can ever be made viable on an economic basis. Now. Okay. Sure. Anyone can take something plastic melted down and make something else. But what these documents are saying is that it's expensive, it's time consuming it's chemically problematic and it's just cheaper and easier to make plastic out of new oil instead of plastic trash there are all kinds of names in these documents men who have never spoken publicly before and there was one name I kept seeing over and over he. was, giving speeches at fancy hotels, hosting conferences and Berlin. Phoenix, they called him a bigwig. He was the industry's top lobbyist. Larry Thomas this is the man I had to find but do you know how many Larry Thomas's there are in the United? States. Thousands I'd call say are you the Larry Thomas used to work in plastics? Are you leery Thomas who used to be president of the Society of the plastics industry? And then finally, I'll prompt Merrin the plastics industry no getting around it the BIGWIG himself I'll walk. Do that's for sure. Yeah. My personal views certainly didn't always job with. US I had the quake as part of my job. That's the way it was there. He's retired now on the coast of Florida but I told him I've been reading all about his exploits in the world of plastic. Where would the offices the officers were? What would you think they would be K. Street yes. Twenty Five K. Street Casey was the heart of lobbying in Washington and it was in those offices at top executives in the world's most powerful oil and plastic companies met they had meeting after meeting about a little problem they were having there was just too much plastic trash consumers didn't like it. In one of the documents I found from nineteen nine, hundred nine Larry wrote the top oil executives at Exxon Chevron, Amoco Dow Dupont proctor, and gamble in a bunch of others he wrote the image of plastics is deteriorating at an alarming rate. We are approaching a point of no return. The classic. I was under fire. We gotta do. What it takes to take the heat off. Because we want to continue to make classic equality, they wanted to keep making plastic but the more you make the more plastic trash you get and the obvious solution to this is to recycle it but they knew they couldn't remember it's expensive. It's a great. Discussion about how difficult it was to recycle. They knew that the infrastructure wasn't there. So really have recycling amount to a whole lot. So they needed a different plan. Larry Decides to call a bunch of meetings at fancy hotels. He summons the Society of the plastics people executives Larry doesn't remember the specifics of each particular meeting but one of his deputies at the time Lou Freeman he remembers you could. Get. Back all the layers of my brain. Lou, remembers a bunch of meetings the basic question on the table was. You guys you're our trade association in the plastics industry aren't doing enough. We need to do more. This one dupont executive was telling Lou. It's your job to fix plastics imaging problem. So what do you need? You said, I think if we had five million dollars. which seemed like a lot of money. If we had five million dollars we could. We could. We could solve this problem. And My boss said in response. If you add five million dollars, you would know how to spend it effectively. Well, they came up with a way to spend five million dollars that and a lot more I. Remember this. This is one of these exchanges that sticks with me thirty five years later however long it's been. Anna was You know what we need to do is advertise our way out of it. That was the idea thrown out. The industry decided to advertise its way out of a can't recycle it problem. The possibilities off plastics plastics. From dense. Touted the benefits of a product that after it was used for the most part was headed to a landfill incinerator or even ocean. Look empty yet it's anything but trash it's full of potential. These commercials carried an environmentalist message, but they were paid for by the oil and plastic companies eventually leading to fifteen million dollars a year industrywide ad campaign promoting plastic. So I asked Larry why why spend tens of millions of dollars telling people to recycle plastic when the new recycling plastic wasn't going to work? and. That's when he said it. The point of the whole thing if the public thinks so recycling is working. Then they're not going to be concerned about the environment and if they're not concerned about the environment. Though keep buying plastic it wasn't just Larry in lieu who said this I spoke to half a dozen top guys involved in the industry at the time who all said plan was unfolding and it went beyond at the industry funded recycling projects and local neighborhoods expensive sorting machines that didn't make any economic sense school recycling contests. All of this was done with great fanfare. except I decided to go track down almost a dozen of the industry's biggest projects like the one where they were going to recycle plastic and national parks or the one that was going to recycle all the plastic and school lunches in New York they all failed and disappeared quietly but there was one more part of this campaign, the final piece that did stick around. That recycling symbol with the numbers in the middle this symbol has. So. Much confusion about what is and is not recyclable in the plan to stamp it on every plastic item popped up a lot in the documents I learned of a quiet campaign to lobby almost forty states to require that every single plastic item have this symbol stamped on it. Even if there was no way to economically recycle it, I should note that some. Environmental is also supported. The symbol thinking would help, separate and sort plastic but the industry knew the truth the symbols were causing problems. Warm report told executives in July nineteen ninety-three that the symbol is being misused. It's creating quote unrealistic expectations about what plastic people can recycle. It's being used as a green marketing tool, but the executives decided to keep the symbol anyway. I did reach out to plastic industry folks and they said that the symbols were only meant to help sort plastic and that they were not intended to confuse people but the symbol in the ads in the projects, all of this basically convince people Larry says the idea that the vast majority of plastic can be recycled was sinking in. Say that. After a while the atmosphere seems to change I. Don't know whether it was because people thought that recycling has solved the problem. was that they were just so in love with plastic products that they were willing to overlook the environmental concerns that were were mounting up. It's been thirty years now since most of those plans have been put into place and the public's feelings about plastic have started to shift again, people are reading stories about oceans choked with plastic trash and trace amounts of this stuff inside our bodies, and once again, people are wanting to ban plastic and the survival of the oil companies is at stake.

Larry Thomas Lucas Clawson Society Of Dupont Chemical Company Lou Freeman Dupont Laura Sullivan Sodium Nitrate Delaware Hagley Library Chevron Dow Dupont Exxon Syracuse University Phoenix Syracuse Consultant Berlin
Rams CB Jalen Ramsey signs five-year, $105M extension

NFL Live

00:17 sec | Last week

Rams CB Jalen Ramsey signs five-year, $105M extension

"Five, hundred, five, million dollar extension. The first time a defensive back in the NFL ever has been paid over one hundred million dollars contract. Jalen Ramsey finally gets the big deal that he's wanted all along and one of the reasons that Jacksonville sent them to L. A.. Rewarded him today

Jalen Ramsey NFL Jacksonville
Trump says he'll use his own cash to fund his campaign if needed

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

02:01 min | Last week

Trump says he'll use his own cash to fund his campaign if needed

"Finally, there's some talk of. A cash crunch. Now for the trump campaign incumbents generally have a financial advantage but there's reporting that that the trump campaign has raised one point one billion dollars since the beginning of twenty, eight nineteen and has spent more than eight hundred million of that already, and some questioning of why the trump campaign for example, spent money at a super ad long before average voters are tuned. In and meanwhile Jason the Biden campaign raised three, hundred, sixty, five, million dollars in August alone, which is a new one month record for fundraising like that and I. Mean obviously money is not everything trump was outspent in in two thousand sixteen but it's it's interesting to wonder whether the management of these campaigns could play play a role in the dynamic in these last few weeks to. Share and I think you know the Biden people. They have a lot of support in among wealthy people. I think Kamala Harris has been probably a good fundraiser among California's well to do, and so I think you know a lot of a lot of people have decided. that you people who run companies and so on. Have decided that you know they don't want any more of the trump show and I do think that they're going to give Biden a fundraising advantage I saw that the president is thinking about spending. Hundred million dollars of his own money by. You know I think I think that that's that that's a red flag for him. If he doesn't have enough if they don't have enough, for example, the contest in Michigan Nafta books on other states and that's also. Going back to what Kim said about the Senate not just going to hurt the president but hurt Republican chances in the Senate if the trump campaign has to pull back in be more selective about where they're spending.

Biden Donald Trump President Trump Senate Kamala Harris KIM Jason California Michigan
Trump has record reelection spending despite trailing Biden

Buzz Burbank News and Comment

01:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump has record reelection spending despite trailing Biden

"Even before their convention, the trump campaign, the Republican Party, and their affiliated committees at spent more than a billion dollars over three years on trump's reelection efforts. No presidential campaign has ever spent that much at this point in the season in July alone, the reelection campaign had raised one, hundred, sixty, five, million dollars Biden raised one, hundred, forty, million in July after having led trump and fundraising the to prior months. The post-convention August figures are not out yet. Both trump and biden campaigns have around three hundred, million dollars on hand at the moment sixty days before the election. But the Republican National Committee pulled in fifty five million dollars for the party with no debts while the DNC took in only sixteen million and has one and a half million dollars in campaign debts. This Week Biden picked up the endorsement of eighty one Nobel prize winners from the fields of chemistry medicine and physics their endorsement sites Biden's willingness to listen to experts and his quote deep appreciation for using science to find solutions. The endorsement was arranged by Illinois Democratic Congressman Bill Foster who is himself of physicist The only physicist on. Capitol Hill.

Biden Donald Trump Republican Party Congressman Bill Foster Republican National Committee Physicist Nobel Prize DNC Illinois
Work Management App Asana Files for IPO as Productivity Tools Soar

Business Wars Daily

04:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Work Management App Asana Files for IPO as Productivity Tools Soar

"If ever. There was a word that became a cliche overnight. It's the word unprecedented for a second allow me to stop bullying. Swamp when it comes to work life we're in unprecedented times there we have it. Millions of us are still working from home making managing projects and teams more challenging than ever before we can't just pop in Dave's cubicle and say, Hey, you finish that code yet. Even. Before the pandemic productivity in project management tools were on the rise because nineteen is caused some tools particularly those intended for teams to skyrocket. Soaring sales prompted at least one such business san-francisco-based Asana to file for an initial public offering. Asana is a work collaboration APP in a world filled with productivity tools designed to help overwork professionals hold chaos at bay. It was founded in two thousand eight by Justin Moskovitz, the much lesser known multi-billionaire co founder of facebook while at Facebook Moskovitz, and his co founder Justin Rosenstein were struck by how much time people spent doing what they call work about work. That's the mind numbing minutiae of organizing how things get done keeping track of work communicating about it an answering email about who's doing what when Asana claims that knowledge workers spend a full sixty percent of their time performing work about work rather than actually getting things done. It's an Rosenstein started. Asana. With the intention to fix that nagging problem by the way Rosensteins name sounds familiar. He's known as the guy who invented facebook's like button. Today is used by more than a million people worldwide at more than seventy five thousand companies. High profile customers include a t and t google and NASA according to Forbes Asana has been focused on growth. It took in one hundred and forty million dollars in sales last year up ninety percent over two thousand, eighteen from this February through April revenue shot even higher in its most recent fundraiser. The company was valued at one and a half billion dollars and yet. Asana is still losing money last year it lost one hundred and twenty million dollars. Those losses continue to mount as Asana plows money into growing sales. Still a little thing like earnings isn't holding it back from the stock market last week. Asana. Filed Paperwork with the SEC for an IPO in the New York Stock Exchange according to Forbes Moskovitz who has pledged to give his wealth away is taking the company. Public in order to reward employees. Asana, named for the yoga term is famous for the Mindful Corporate Culture Moskovitz is said to have built. If the CEO seems unfazed by Losses Moskovitz is also not letting competition hold him back from going Public Asana faces rivals wherever it turns there's the three billion dollar start up Monday dot COM two, billion dollar company notion and smart sheet recently valued at almost six billion dollars. Last week while the introverted Moskovitz was fending off interview requests about the IPO smart sheet was making news of its own the Bellevue Washington company made a one hundred, fifty, five, million dollar deal to acquire brand folder a Denver start up that manages digital assets in other words content like photos, videos, and graphics because a big part of producing content his guess what about work tackling content management is a way for smart sheet to grow. It's already large footprint. SMART sheets deal signals. What could be ahead for any work collaboration company that is they won't be satisfied with only helping US plan our way out of a paper bag like smart sheets, they could begin to acquire businesses that also store move and find all that content that no matter how hard some of his tribe gets lost anyway. As the culture continues to shift at lightning speed and we all continue to figure out how best to be productive from home. Our ways of working are almost certain to evolve work management. APPS. Like Asana will surely evolve within amidst all this uncertainty. One thing is certain. There will be a lot of money made by companies helping us all figure out how to get things done.

Justin Rosenstein Justin Moskovitz Facebook Facebook Moskovitz Co Founder Losses Moskovitz Forbes Moskovitz Google Dave United States SEC Forbes Nasa CEO New York Denver Bellevue Washington
Advancing Life Quality with Objective Research and Action with Jenna LeComte - Hinely

Outcomes Rocket

06:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Advancing Life Quality with Objective Research and Action with Jenna LeComte - Hinely

"Welcome back to the PODCAST. Privilege of hosting Dr on account timely she's the CEO of Hark Inc. Heart stands for health assessment and research for communities. She obtained her PhD at Portland State University in the field of applied psychology with an expertise in occupational health psychology, and she strives to keep workers happy healthy and productive. The idea of data and evaluation is something that we all tend to cringe when we hear. But today we're going to dive into why it's actually good and how it. Could really appropriately help the health of communities when we think about the topics of a social determinants of health and how he each WanNa Tackle B.'s whether you be a provider organization a Public Health Organization or just an entrepreneur trying to add value to the ecosystem. Today's conversations really gonNA dive into how we can take a look at data on evaluations as a positive thing Dr Lee count timely has served on the board of many nonprofits including John Senior Center. Health and HIV aging research project among others her passion for. The healthcare ecosystem and giving I really inspiring and I think you'll enjoy today's conversation. So Jenna privilege to have you with us today. Thank you for having me. So what are I missing your intro that maybe you want to share with the listeners? Pretty, comprehensive. So Hark is a nonprofit in addition to sort of serving on their boards of nonprofits. They also route one and that I think that they kadhamy that seeing it from both sides has been really important. So we're really a nonprofit that there's other nonprofits and other health and Human Services Agencies, which is a very rewarding thing to do love that. Now that's key. So what is it? That got you interested in in healthcare ecosystem to begin with? Well, I'd say we are more focused on health not health care health care is only a small piece of your overall health. The county health rankings models shows that clinical care only counts for about twenty percent of ultimate health. Outcomes the length of your life and the quality of your life. The rest is all about those social and economic factors, the physical environment, your health behaviors. So I typically think of myself as in the health sector, not the healthcare because it's so much broader, but it's a good distinction. Yeah. Yeah and I got into through research I started doing research when I was nineteen and I, just loved it. It's so fun to find the systematic way to find answers to your questions, but I always wanted to do meaningful research. So not which candy flavored do you like best but research that actually helps people. So I started off studying doing research in gender discrimination and from. There I got into occupational health psychology. So that's the how to keep workers happy healthy and productive. So that's what I studied in Grad School and my thesis and my dissertation were both on the topic of work life balance and its impact on your physical and mental health, and so after that, I was looking for a job and I found the job director of research at initially I was director of research for about three years and I became CEO about four years ago, and it was really exciting to me like I could not have crafted a better job because it's so fun to do. We have so many different clients and to do research one day on. A fall prevention programs for seniors and the next day on a literacy program for kids. It's so diverse that we really get this wonderful full circle picture of what is health and our community I love that and I could hear the passion in your voice when you when you talk about the different topics and I'm glad that at the beginning of our discussion and you prefaced it with, Hey, you know health health is big thing. It's not just the point of care that we're so used to focusing on and so as you've conducted the work that you do what's been an inside or an outcome that you've helped your your customers achieve that's different. Hard is really Where data geeks all of us and we're really designed to be that sort of outsourced, the many small nonprofits want to be evidence based, but they can't afford to have a researcher on staff fulltime. So that's where we come in to customize on. So that's how we have the this diversity of clients and honestly I'm not doing anything that changes lives. My clients are using the data that we give them to change lives, which is magical and so happy to be a part of. that. Is Sort of a negative connotation but I, it's it's accurate. In a positive way. Yeah. Yeah. So one of the things we do actually what was launched for us, we do this huge community health survey of the Coachella Valley in Southern, California and we provide that data back to the community at no charge so he can use it and I think what's most Encouraging and exciting is how some people have used it to change lives, and one of my favorite examples is desert. AIDS project is a federally Qualified Health Center, an FQHC here in the desert, and this really illustrates that we do this survey, every three years, and the first time. There was no questions about HIV and delegates projects. Said I think we need to. Add One. So at the next survey, we added a question whether an adult had ever been tested for HIV just ever in your entire life and we found out that almost seventy percent of adults in our region had never been tested for HIV, and they didn't know their status and that's terrifying given that we have an HIV prevalence that's twice the national average. So based on that. Desert AIDS project launched get tested Catella Valley, which was this three year public health campaign. It was five million dollars there was so many partners working together to get everybody tested, and for those who tested positive connecting them to care. So they had US do some research on wire people getting tested and wires some others not, and one of the things that we found was super important. We talked to you providers we talked to people who had been tested for HIV and said. Why did you get tested and one of the top to answer was my doctor offered it we talked people who'd never been tested and said, why haven't you been tested and one of the top two answers was my doctor never offered it so it became clear that physician input is really important to a really large component of the campaign focused on provider education rather than patient education I mean, it's always great if your patients are activated engaged in asking for an HIV test. But it's most important that the provider themselves is they're offering HIV test.

HIV Public Health Organization Qualified Health Center CEO Portland State University Director Of Research Hark Inc Hark Catella Valley Dr Lee Jenna Human Services Agencies John Senior Center California Researcher Grad School Southern Fqhc
How I Built Resilience: Niraj Shah and Steve Conine of Wayfair

How I Built This

02:22 min | 3 weeks ago

How I Built Resilience: Niraj Shah and Steve Conine of Wayfair

"And today we're going to hear from the CO founders of Wayfair near a shot and Steve Cohen. We first feature Neeraj. Steve on the show in April of two thousand eighteen and we just republished that episode. It's near the top of your podcast queue. You should check it out. They have an amazing story anyway since we talked to them in two thousand, eighteen wayfair has become profitable and despite anticipating huge challenges during this economic crisis. Wayfair has actually done pretty well as people start. To beef up their home offices, I spoke neurosurgeon Steve About Wafers unexpected success during this economic crisis and how that's changed their business practices. Let's start by taking back to sort of March. How did you begin to plan for presumably the worst at that point? What were some of the steps you took, Neeraj Yeah. So obviously, when covid started, there's a whole lot of uncertainty. We kind of decided a few things. One was, how do we keep our supply chain up and running? So we can take care of our customers. So we implemented a lot of safety protocols that actually worked out very well because we're able to keep running and keep everyone healthy. And Safe. Second thing is from a liquidity standpoint. We didn't know what was going to happen next. So we actually decided to raise money. So he raised five, hundred, thirty, five, million dollars in hindsight we didn't need. But at the time, you don't exactly know what's going to happen, and so we did that we did that very quickly over two week period, and so I think that put us in a in a great position, and then we had a big scramble to get everyone productively working from home who was involved with the supply chain, and so all of our three thousand people in customer service who corporate team, and so there was kind of. Like a bit of a of Mad Dash in the beginning to get everything well situated, but we have eighteen and they they they really rallied didn't a fantastic job. It sounds like you had anticipated that you were going to face a serious slowdown and that's why you raise the cash to presumably to help you through what you anticipated was going to be a slowdown down our worry was actually we didn't even know what the governmental regulations we're going to be my perhaps we'd be shut down. You know we we didn't actually know government sending what was essential what was not essential there's a question at some points about perhaps the carrier networks won't carry. Certain. Types of packages, not other types of packages and we knew so we didn't have answer, but we had uncertainty, and so we reacted to that and then the notion of a slowdown certainly was on on our minds. Obviously what's happened it's quite different but more of a boom but we didn't know that at the time

Steve Cohen Wayfair Covid Neeraj
With Milk Sales Up, Dairy Industry Revives Iconic Got Milk Campaign

Business Wars Daily

04:28 min | 3 weeks ago

With Milk Sales Up, Dairy Industry Revives Iconic Got Milk Campaign

"From, wondering I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily on this Thursday August twenty seventh something strange happened over the last few months we started drinking milk again think it might have had anything to do with pandemic for the last several years. It's felt like the dairy industry been singing swan songs milk sales fell thirteen percent from twenty ten to twenty eighteen according to CNN I one dairy. Then another collapsed under the weight of competition from plant based drinks soy almond, coconut, banana, Oat flax all. Those plants were out to get poor daisy the cow the dairy industry was so freaked out that it launched a pilot lawsuits against makers of those plant based drinks trying to forbid them from using the very word milk. You can't squeeze milk out of another grain they said but for the moment, at least dairy farmers are experiencing a bit of relief with. So many of us eating more meals at home, we're guzzling the white stuff again, it's long been true that milk drinkers tend to drink milk. Not at restaurants. So lockdowns have in fact, helped the dairy business cow's milk sales rose about twelve percent over last year for the twenty weeks ending. July eighteenth CNN reported your kid and mind mindlessly grabbing a swig from the carton added up to four and a half billion dollars in sales this spring, and that has spurred the dairy industry to revive an iconic ad campaign. Remember got milk. Vast company called it one of the most famous ad campaigns in history that campaign was launched in Nineteen ninety-three, its message, whatever you do don't run out of milk over time three hundred celebrities including Britney Spears Dennis Rodman Bill Clinton, and the simpsons all appeared sporting those milk mustaches. The ads became enormously popular by the end of the campaigns run in two thousand, fourteen, ninety percent of all adults were familiar with got milk to Huffington Post Contributor Gene Delvecchio but there was one a little problem. The ads didn't actually work over that same time milk sales declined steadily soda consumption bubbled over guess what those Soda Lovers used to drink you got it delvecchio a former AD industry executive argues the got milk ads were like bringing peace shooters to a gunfight, the gunfight being Pepsi and Coke Monster Marketing Budgets while the to soda makers battled each other milk lost but the dairy industry apparently believes their campaign was effective embracing Estonia the industry's marketing arm milk. PAP has revived the got milk campaign today's ads bear little resemblance to the Owens though. Sure there's still some celebrities Olympic gold medal swimmer Katie decades, viral tiktok video showing her perfectly balanced a glass of milk on her head while swimming a lap. That's certainly a turned heads but the bulk of today's campaign features, regular folks and a ton of user generated content milk drinkers were urged to do silly things with milk and boy did they respond people open gallons of milk with their toes jumped into kiddie pools filled with milk and cereal according to the trade paper? Agra. News will this generation's got milk ads do anything to keep the cow's milk train going if the wildly popular ad campaign of your didn't work well. Be Hard pressed to say that this one is a better peashooter. The dairy industry itself is making predictions. They say they're simply celebrating the quarantine induced sales boost. What is true however is that the competition from those plant based rivals is only getting. Over the same twenty weeks that saw a twelve percent rise in dairy milk sales oat milk sales went through the roof up two, hundred, fifty percent. Of course, oat milk sales are still tiny compared to cow's milk. They totalled only one, hundred, thirty, five, million dollars, but other signs point to the continued aggressive challenge from those gentle plant based alternatives. Oatley the. Leading oat milk maker recently attracted two hundred million dollars in investment funding from blackstone and Oprah it hopes to go public next year according to Forbes, and on Monday good Karma, a maker of flax milk bought itself back from bankrupt dean. Foods investors are Thurston lapping up all of these cream alternatives and no matter how beloved the Got Milk Gad's once were. All this competition puts a whole lot of pressure on twenty twenties version of the same campaign.

CNN Katie Decades David Brown Thurston Gene Delvecchio Gold Medal Huffington Post Britney Spears Agra PAP Dennis Rodman Bill Clinton Executive Blackstone Estonia Oprah Forbes Owens Pepsi
Facebook to pay $125 million in back taxes to France

Daily Tech News Show

00:27 sec | 3 weeks ago

Facebook to pay $125 million in back taxes to France

"Has agreed to pay one, hundred, six, million euros in back taxes the equivalent of about one hundred, twenty, five, million dollars us for unpaid taxes between two, thousand, nine and twenty eighteen. The company legally funnels French income to other subsidiaries in Europe to lower tax burden. But to do that, it must show there weren't any sales from facebook personnel in France to French customers Amazon apple and Google have all previously settled. Similar tax issues in France

France Facebook Europe Amazon Google
Steve Bannon Arrested on Border-Wall Fraud Charges

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:09 min | Last month

Steve Bannon Arrested on Border-Wall Fraud Charges

"Architect of Donald Trump's twenty-six election victory who wants claimed he wanted to destroy the state and bring everything crashing down was arrested on a yacht on Thursday and has since pleaded not guilty after being charged with defrauding donors in a scheme to help build the president's signature wool across the US Mexico border. As a top advisor to trump's presidential campaign who later served as White House chief strategist. Bannon. Helped articulate the America first right-wing populism and fierce opposition to immigration that have been hallmarks of trump's three and a half years in office. Dinan was among four people arrested and charged by federal prosecutors in Manhattan with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money. Laundering prosecutors accused the defendants of defrauding hundreds of thousands of dollars through a twenty, five, million dollar crowdfunding campaign cold we build the wall. Bannon used hundreds of thousands of dollars of that money to cover personal expenses according to the charges. He was freed on a five million dollar bond and was barred by Federal Magistrate Judge from traveling internationally. Bannon was arrested in Connecticut by agents from the prosecutor's office and the US Postal Inspection Service aboard a one hundred and fifty foot long yachts according to a law enforcement source trump told reporters at the White House that he feels very badly about the challenges but typically sought to distance himself from Bannon and the alleged scheme Bannon is the eighth close trump associates to be arrested or convicted of a crime former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort longtime friend and advisor Roger. Stone. Former national security adviser. Michael Flynn and former personal lawyer Michael Cohen. The indictment comes as the Republican. President trails Democratic challenger Joe Biden in opinion polls ahead of the November third presidential election. Biden's campaign said corruption surrounds trump.

Bannon Donald Trump White House Joe Biden Advisor President Trump United States Chief Strategist Dinan Michael Flynn Wire Fraud Mexico America Michael Cohen Paul Manafort Connecticut
Diageo to Buy Ryan Reynolds Aviation American Gin for up to $610 million

Business Wars Daily

02:40 min | Last month

Diageo to Buy Ryan Reynolds Aviation American Gin for up to $610 million

"Well, the Movie Star and Entrepreneur Ryan Reynolds certainly had something to celebrate this week. His Liquor Brand Aviation American gin is being acquired by the world's largest spirits business on Monday. Reynolds. Announced that Dr. Joe is buying the Startup Jim. Maker for up to six hundred, ten, million dollars the the fourteen billion dollar owner of brands like Johnnie Walker Whisky Tanqueray Gin and Guinness Al among others. The deal is a coup for Reynolds a Rakish forty-three-year-old celebrity actor best known for his performances a superhero with a twisted sense of humor in the twenty sixteen movie deadpool. It's also a testament to reynolds star turn as a copywriter. Reynolds bought an ownership stake in aviation in two thousand eighteen and became its brand ambassador. He applied his quirky provocative sense of humor to the task to here's just one example remember the Peleton ad that went viral in a bad way the one where the poor Peleton wife played by actress Monica, Rees appear to be exercising against her will to satisfy her sexist tons desire for skinny spouse. Well, Reynolds decided to help his career and Tro Peleton at the same time he cast releasing an ad for. In it, she in two friends are sitting at a bar, their nursing MARTINIS. She looked downcast while her two friends look on with concern. The peleton wife then downs, the entire Martini and the friends pass there's to her the implication of course, is that she has left the suddenly abusive husband on social media just to make sure we all got the joke Reynolds wrote Hashtag exercise bike not included naturally that ad went viral in a good way. It was cheeky ads like these along with Reynolds thirty, six, million instagram followers. And fans on other social media platforms that helped aviation sales skyrocket revenues grew in triple digits in both twenty, eighteen and twenty nineteen making it what Fast Company called the fastest growing super premium gin and the World Diario who's Gordon's? Gin. Brand is the world's largest was watching closely just three years ago. The conglomerate bought a Tequila brand from George Clooney valuing it at a billion dollars. That brand has performed rather well for Dr Geo. Now Aviation's biggest rivals have become family with the acquisition both tanker and Gordon's GIN become sister brands to aviation. The deal doesn't allow Reynolds to simply take the money and like the superhero he plays deadpool run he'll stay on as an owner and the brand's ambassador presumably for the next decade Diarios paying three hundred, thirty, five, million dollars now and offering an early of two hundred seventy, five, million dollars more over the next ten years depending on aviations performance

Ryan Reynolds Brand Ambassador Now Aviation Gordon Tro Peleton Dr. Joe Johnnie Walker Dr Geo George Clooney Guinness Al Peleton Fast Company Monica Rees
Steve Bannon's arrest has tertiary ties to video games

Gaming Ride Home

05:35 min | Last month

Steve Bannon's arrest has tertiary ties to video games

"Former thirty eight studios CEO curt. Schilling was involved in the build a wall pack. The thing that just led to former Donald Trump advisor, steve bannon getting arrested. This is just a weird tangentially related to video games news story that is just so strange and it also kind of goes to show that if curt schilling is involved in a company, that's probably a good reason to not invest any money. So for the. Non Video game side of the story former President Donald Trump advisor Steve Bannon was arrested this morning for issues related to a crowdfunding campaign. He was involved with that was raising money to build a wall between Mexico and the United States of America. The campaign raised over twenty, five million dollars, but apparently, the money was being used for personal gain Audrey Strauss the acting us attorney for the southern district of New York said. The. Defendants defrauded hundreds of thousands of donors capitalizing on their interest and funding a border wall to raise millions of dollars under the false pretense that all of the money would be spent on construction while repeatedly assuring donors that Brian Cole fade the founder and public face of the We build the wall would not be paid a cent. The defendants secretly schemed to pass hundreds of thousands of dollars to coalfields, which he used to fund his lavish lifestyle. That quote comes from NPR story. Linked in the show notes. So that's the main part of it but the tangentially related video games side of it comes from Edward Isaac Dove Air From the Atlantic on twitter who wrote Crisco Bosch is the General Counsel of the build the wall pack that Steve Bannon was just arrested for being involved in as chairman. The advisory board includes Eric Prince Former Colorado Congressman Tom Tancredo Sheriff David Clarke and former pitcher curt schilling curt schilling is predominantly known for being a pitcher in the MLB. I will always know him as the CEO of thirty eight studios, the developer that created kingdoms of Amour with investment funds from the State of Rhode Island, which he neglected to return when required, which ultimately doomed the developer and the kingdoms of Ahmir franchise though then might be making comeback soon, there's a, there's a remake rerelease on the way. It's really gross that money was being raised to build a wall which as near as I can tell is thankfully nowhere near fruition and it's totally unsurprising that it is all collapsing under the weight of its founders deciding to just try and keep the money for themselves. Rock steady responds to recent sexual harassment issues with kind of a weird public statement. The publication. The Guardian recently released a story about sexual harassment issues at develop a rock steady games and how the company had not taken proper action when women within the studio went directly to its leadership wants the article was published rock steady apparently began to take action internally and called a studio meeting but the developer also released kind of strange statement on twitter. Here's the statement in full working on. Our response to the recent news, we received the following unsolicited letter eight out of ten people that sign of the original two, thousand, eighteen letter or still rock steady. The following unedited letter below is from seven of those people. Please note that all involved do not wish to have their identity disclosed publicly under any circumstances. This statement is sent in representation of the current women at rock steady studios who were. Working at the studio in two thousand eighteen who signed a letter regarding issues being faced by female employees. The statement has in no way been asked for or influenced by management or anyone else. This is solely the voices of those involved who are still currently employed by rock steady. We all feel the need to respond to this and to reflect what actually happened at the time and how this has been. Handled since recently, an article was posted in the Guardian regarding this letter, which was sent to the studio heads and HR in two thousand eighteen in addition to multiple other accusations. In this article, we feel that the anonymous source or sources attempted to speak on behalf of all women at rock steady, and we do not feel that this article is a fair representation of us the events at the time or. Since the letter was received when the letter was received by the studio immediate action was taken, which resulted in a series of meetings with the women of the studio to allow us a safe space to talk about any issues we were facing figuring out strategies to resolve these issues and what the studio could do going forward continued efforts have been made to ensure that we have a voice within our. Working, within the studio ranging from involvement, specifically with how our characters are represented to workshops to help build self-confidence within male dominated industries. Throughout all of this, a firm promise has been made that there always an open forum for us to speak out net issues would be addressed with seriousness none of the current female employees at the studio who are involved with the letter were contacted about this letter being released. To the media until we were informed by the studio at the time of working through the original letter with the studio, we were assured that this would be kept as a private matter. As this was what we had collectively requested we feel that our privacy and witches have been disregarded and a private matter has been made public. This has left us feeling that we have been violated by the source or. Sources as it was kept private for personal reasons, twelve involve not to industry secrecy. We would like to conclude this statement reaffirming the importance of any minority within the games industry to speak up and four studios to take seriously as rock steady did at the time and continues to do any allegations being brought forward to work towards creating safe environments for us to work in so that we can make games.

Curt Schilling Steve Bannon Donald Trump Developer CEO Harassment Advisor Twitter Brian Cole NPR Edward Isaac Audrey Strauss MLB Mexico New York Rhode Island Crisco Bosch America Tom Tancredo Founder
Ex-Trump adviser Steve Bannon charged in border wall scheme

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Ex-Trump adviser Steve Bannon charged in border wall scheme

"Former chief trump strategist Steve Bannon is under arrest and facing allegations in a southern border wall scheme prosecutors say Bannon and three associates ripped off donors who contributed more than twenty five million dollars to build part of the wall the criminal charges state much of the money never made it to the wall instead enriching the men including Bannon who was pulled from a luxury yacht off the Connecticut coast he's the latest in a long line of trump associates have been prosecuted though the president was quick to distance himself from his former aide and the scheme I know nothing about the project other than I didn't like when I read about it I didn't like it I said this is for government this isn't a private people and it sounded to me like showboating the president did tell reporters he feels very badly about the situation Sager make ani Washington

Steve Bannon President Trump Sager Ani Washington Connecticut
Ex-Trump adviser Steve Bannon charged in border wall scheme

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

Ex-Trump adviser Steve Bannon charged in border wall scheme

"Former White House adviser Steve Bannon has been arrested Bannon and three others are accused of ripping off donors in an online fundraising scheme called we build the wall the indictments were unsealed in Manhattan federal court prosecutors say the scheme raised more than twenty five million dollars to build a wall along the southern border the indictment says that involve fake invoices and sham vendor arrangements the project mentioned was for three miles of fence post in South Texas it was ultimately built and largely funded by Fisher industries president trump recently criticized that section of the wall after it showed signs of erosion Bannon was pushed out of his White House job three years ago I met Donahue

Steve Bannon South Texas Donald Trump Donahue White House Manhattan Fisher Industries President Trump Erosion Bannon
Tesla Rivals are Moving Into High Gear -- and Going Public

Business Wars Daily

05:29 min | Last month

Tesla Rivals are Moving Into High Gear -- and Going Public

"From wondering I'm Elaine Appleton grant and this is business words daily on this Wednesday August Nineteenth David Brown's on vacation. Tesla has long had an image of being in both good and less good ways without comparison. CEO? Elon Musk stands out for his big vision and sometimes quirky behavior, and until now anyway, Tesla's all electric vehicles have stood head and shoulders above the competition coming from traditional automakers. Competition what competition I can almost imagine musk saying. Oh, but there is plenty coming tesla shares soared two, hundred, fifty percent this year. The company is now the most valuable automaker in the world according to. CNN. That's because Tesla which went public ten years ago is finally profitable. Tesla had a record twenty nineteen in posted its first annual profit last year despite the pandemic it's been profitable this year as well and that kind of performance and the stock market's reward for it is convincing more and more electric vehicle makers to go public and to try to woo customers away from Tesla last week, Ohio Electric Startup, Lordstown Motors Corporation, or L. M. C. said, it plans to go public by the end of the year. It's ticker symbol ride. If the deal goes through, the company will be valued at close to one point five, billion dollars. So who is Lordstown Motors to burst on the scene this way? L. LLC is a spinoff of another electric truckmaker called Workhorse. GROUP LORDS DOWN CEO Steve Burns is the former CEO of workhorse with LLC Burns resurrecting a project that we're course didn't have the money to do the company plans to release an all electric full-size pickup truck the Lordstown endurance in the second half of twenty twenty one that's according to journalist Alan. Adler, writing for trade publication freight waves. The truck will have a range of about two hundred fifty miles on a charge the same as Tesla's sci-fi looking cyber truck it'll toes seventy five hundred pounds alums. He says again, just like the chuck, the endurance will start at fifty two thousand dollars a good deal more than the cyber forty thousand dollar base price. But UNLIKE TESLA LLC plans to sell the endurance to commercial customers buying fleets of trucks since revealing the prototype on June twenty-fifth Ellen Mc says it's received more than twenty seven, thousand pre orders. That's one point four, billion dollars worth of trucks. NCO Burns says its first years worth of trucks are now sold out. That is if it can raise the money, it needs to actually make them l.. AMC. Bought the Lordstown Ohio GM plant that shutdown last year when GM killed the last Chevy Cruz that six million square foot plant needs retooling, which is costly MC plans to raise about six hundred and seventy five million dollars through its IPO. That boatload of cash could help it come through on its boast to be first to market among a group of EV pickup truck competitors in addition to Tesla that group includes Ford GM Nikola and Arabian a company backed by Ford and Amazon. So, here's the obvious L.. He doesn't yet have a product just a prototype if you're wondering how the young startup can go public without a product you should be. L. EMC is one of a handful of electric vehicle makers employing what's called a reverse merger that means the company that plans to make a product like LLC hooks up with the so-called blank check business. It's also called a special purpose acquisition company. SPAC. Is doing the reverse merger with a blank check company called Diamond Peak Holdings. Diamond peak is already publicly traded that means when the merger occurs. LLC. MC becomes public sort of like easing into a coat someone else has been wearing. This back door IPO method is easier for companies to do. They don't have to produce expensive roadshow's. Also, avoid a great deal of financial scrutiny by the SEC. One of the most famous reverse murders was Richard Branson's space company Virgin Galactic, Holdings and Fantasy Sports Company draftkings went public in a three billion dollar reverse merger. Last year according to the A. Times. The number of reverse mergers hit a record high last year. That's because the IPO market was volatile and high profile IPO's like Uber Fared. Poorly. It ain't cheap to build a new car company but Tesla's successes inspiring other entrepreneurs to try and they need oodles of money that helps to explain why another electric truckmaker nickel motors used a reverse merger to go public in June and vehicle-maker. FISKER has a reverse merger in the works. The is green truckmakers may see these back door IPO's as the speediest way to raise the cash needed to fight he'll in musk and rapidly launched their new products. Tesla's promising to deliver the cyber took by late twenty, twenty one which means that the deadline to beat yes. It may be tough to knock Tesla on it's pedestal, but LLC and a raft arrivals are sure going to try.

Tesla Tesla Llc Elon Musk Ellen Mc CEO GM Ohio Adler Diamond Peak Holdings Lordstown Motors Elaine Appleton Nco Burns CNN Llc Burns Lordstown Motors Corporation Steve Burns David Brown L. Llc AMC
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Kodak Crashes 85% from Recent Peak

Stansberry Investor Hour

11:24 min | Last month

Kodak Crashes 85% from Recent Peak

"Kodak. We've been all over this for the past two weeks. Right I told you they got a seven hundred and sixty five million dollar loan to get into the drug. Business Kodak the Film Camera Company getting into the drug business. Turns out in their one hundred thirty, one year history they actually were in the drug business for six years from one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, hundred, ninety, four, it was a failure they got out and it's notable that they got in one thousand nine, hundred, eighty, two years before the recession set in right typical top of the cycle de Worse vacation kind of acquisition move for for a company is being managed into into the ground so. That's where it to the reason episode again and and we're back in the drug business with this seven, hundred, sixty, five, million dollar loan from the government I thought that was just kind of crazy enough all by itself because sent the stock soaring from to sixty two on a Monday to sixty dollars at the peak on a Wednesday in you know the third trading session of the week that week. Just insane. That was crazy enough right. Then what are we talk about last week? Well, they granted themselves stock options the day before announcement like that's not fishy like. Crony capitalist move, you know to just try to rake some of his money off the top of the management team. Okay. Now. This Week There's well other stuff going on. So so since last we talked the SEC is investigating this thing. And the loan from the. International, the government agencies called the DNC, the Development Finance Corporation the DNC loan is on hold. And the stock as I speak Ios below ten bucks again, and if you look at the stock chart of the last several days, it looks like it was flatlined. You know like somebody whose heart stopped and then wham the hit it with the paddles and now it looks like his heart stopped again it's a ridiculous episode but I feel like I need to clarify something because of at least one feedback email I got in this case. No, it is not okay for these executives to get stock option grants it's not okay and it wasn't okay for them to get them. I don't believe even back in May. Right I put together a time line I wrote a whole piece about this for the stands very digest and I put together a time line and my timeline showed that the order the executive order from President Trump. Was May fourteenth. Two days before that Kodak moves seventy million dollars from a Chinese subsidiary to a US subsidiary quote in anticipation of an intercompany transaction and quote I believe starting up a new pharmaceutical subsidiary constitutes an intercompany transaction, right? So that was actually made twelfth may fourteenth. Trump is used the executive order and invokes the defense production act and says, Hey, you know, let's lend money to companies so that we can produce drugs domestically because too much drug production is overseas in places like China and India by the way if you research that, it's not completely true. We'll talk about that. Maybe another day Kodak made the director option grants the first time on May twentieth today their annual meeting. So, eight days before they're moving money from Chinese from a foreign subsidiary to to a US subsidiary anticipation of a major transaction. Then trump invokes this defense production act, which is just appropriates money for national security right two days later, then six days later, they grant themselves these options at premium prices. Then approximately may eighth according to an interview with the CEO Kodak, and this government agencies start talking about its new drug business. Then on July twenty seven, these idiots grant themselves more options. Then July twenty eighth and it leaks out stock was up twenty, five percent that day the news leaked out. and. Then Twenty John Twenty as the big announcement right? Seven, hundred, sixty, five, million dollar loan to Kodak the shares were up four fold that day July twenty, ninth the stock price hit sixty dollars. And the volume that day is like a hundred and sixty times the previous day and the previous day was twenty, two times the David were that. Next Day July thirtieth a fellow called Mike or non gap thoughts. Which is a a newsletter that he writes on sub stack non gap thoughts. He writes this article citing these suspicious option grant dates when and strike prices next day July thirty fourth. Wall Street? Journal publishes an article citing the potential you know ninety, they said ninety five million dollar windfall for CEO Jim Continente. And there were others on on the Management Team received the options to August. Fourth Wall Street Journal publishes an article citing a new SEC investigation into the disclosure of the loan and the option grants right because it looked like the the loan with the news of the Lomas leaked out on the twenty seventh I think is really what they were concerned about. But the whole thing stinks and let me tell you something what I alluded to earlier when I said I need to make something clear about this. This is not the way capitalism is supposed to work. A corporate management team is supposed to make a lot of money. They're supposed to get ninety five million dollars for creating a business that has performed well for a period of time. That has generated you know for ninety, five, million bucks. You'd better be generating you know at least a billion or more couple of billion hopefully in free cash flow over a period of time consistently, right a real sustainable business for that kind of reward. You don't get paid that kind of money just for getting a loan to be in a business that you were in for six years out of your one, hundred, thirty, one year history and sucked at. Okay that's not the way this is supposed to work. This is the ranking crony capitalism, the EST crony capitalism. And crony capitalism is when you get paid for no in people, right it starts looking suspicious back in May when they're moving seventy million bucks from China to the US, it looks like they already knew they were going to do something and then Oh, two days later trump invokes this this executive order appropriating these loans for this kind of stuff and then up six days. Later, we start granting ourselves options at prices that suggests we know the stock is GonNa take off like a rocket ship. Then we do it again on July twenty seven just to show you how utterly stupid we are. This is not the way it's supposed to work they basically what they did here was. They just took money from well, you know this government money. So you could say they took taxpayer money and they said how can we get way too much of this money in our own pockets? Oh, I know let's grant ourselves a bunch of options. Okay, your stand. Now, I don't have a problem with option grants in general I. Realize people need to be incentivized. It's just the way. Things are nowadays right to to attract good management. You gotta pay them. What looks like way too much money a lot of the time, but this is not that. This is a management team taking money from taxpayers and really taken ultimately from shareholders as well. They're given themselves equity for free that the shareholders have to buy in the market. This isn't the only episode of this. You'RE GONNA see there was a smaller episode that I I kinda filed this way I didn't think I was going to mention it but there was a guy. David? T hines in a story in the Washington. Post. July. Twenty Eighth I mean it's all allegations so I don't know I'll just say this poor fool apparently borrowed four million dollars in this federal PPP paycheck paycheck protection program it was part of the cares act. Right. The cares act was that two trillion dollar corona virus bill that was signed into law in March and included three hundred and forty, nine billion in forgivable loans for small businesses to maintain operating expenses. Mostly payroll, right? That's why it's called. PAYCHECK protection program. So you can just pay your employees even though maybe you're running a restaurant and they have to stay home because of the cove in nineteen, right. So this guy gets four million from this program and then a week later people see him riding around. Miami beach in a Lamborghini. A brand new Lamborghini Lamborghini. Hurricana. Which I guess. That's an electric Lamborghini costs more than three hundred, eighteen, thousand dollars again, how stupid is this guy? That's like granting yourself options the day before the loan announcement. And of course, these things are ripe for. For, this kind of abuse, this is what you get went when the government starts literally like throwing money around all, this is done very very hastily right because we think we have to act we have to act now. and. So this is what you wind up with. You wind up with Kodak and you wind up with this poor sad sack who who thought he wasn't GonNa get caught when he use P P peabody to buy a fricking Lamborghini. It's you know somebody's going to include that in some kind of TV you know some kind of fictional TV show because it's just too priceless. So that's where we are that. That's where we are in. You know the state of of all things financial in August of twenty twenty. Boy Twenty twenty is the weirdest fricken year. I mean things that I won't even get into some of the things that that people I know have been exposed to this year, but it's just. So it's also utterly weird when you shut who who'd a thunk who'd a thunk when you shut down the global economy because you're afraid everybody's going to get the flu or whatever. That all of this stuff would happen that you would get people you know in Lamborghinis with government money and you know Kodak Management taking money out of taxpayers, pockets would have thunk it. Anybody. With a brain is the answer to that one anybody with a brain. And what what you do about what you do about it well. Look we told I told you to avoid Kodak because. People look at that kind of action and the knee jerk. The thing that's built into your brain you know that's that's been kind of evolving for hundreds of thousands of years in complete evolved for hundreds of thousands of years completely different circumstances that have nothing to do with investing. So immediately, as soon as you see that surge Kodak you want hit the buy button but I'm telling you it's deadly and wrong every single time

Kodak Twenty Twenty Management Team President Trump United States Ceo Kodak Executive John Twenty Lamborghinis SEC David Kodak Management China Kodak. DNC Lamborghini Wall Street Journal FLU Miami Beach Film Camera Company
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"The matter may go get them out and what the rallied heavenly leg absolutely not banned blackish now i have been waiting on this episode they absolutely did not disappoint the whole the scene that really got me was like when all the women in the family came together like so this would have been a third elassad cried on during this season only reason i didn't cry as because i was eating at the same time so so half my mind was kind of dedicate food said owns like a little district with that moment where they all came into the room and sat around her and was like you know women new sin lies that we go through girl and here i don't know why couch we all had these different perspectives they even i as a man could just be like i know this is a story like he's one of these things is forced some one year and i got choked up and they my chicken was still there quickly by doing really back now bring of agdam definitely weeped on the first episode this season i'll yet that will win the aerial heart jerk a postpartum episode i cry yet that one was the the postpartum was so much what he had class ruby adam kick ruby at their house i was in i had had like that was an acting ass yes he tracy things got have a contrast between the kids how wag diana's like stressing out over growing up right ends jack is like dying to girl leg lowering whether they're her like really be like reiter rushing to adulthood and girls like i'm growing up and it's not have a breast now and boys are looking at me different and what is this i just feel like we're taught to dread starting our periods because everybody's like well girl that's the beginning of the end i hope you'll get your period in your life farc vets.

diana reiter tracy farc one year
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"That extent open your package from amazon it was me very sorry that's me in fifteen f come see me if you have a proud long run but you don't like signing to the situation so that people know who to come to if there is a fucking issue about a similar like that happened to me one he will be scared when somebody got a package of mine but it was like the building across the street while left it in the lobby like tapes it up and put on note on if that said i open this by mistake because like it was the same apartment number or whatever and a header as they put their name a number on it yeah ththat's literally what i did i was like says so sorry you see we have the same name apartment numbers are really similar nothing was open but the packaging but i have appreciated type 2 back right after just i just know she was go get that bag rely world hang on on the trial don't do know beats made acid in the buildings i agree especially if you're going to do it with attitude sodano cya name i don't know if i'm only by personal muffler but the black people i've seen in that building i think live with white people i'm not the only by offering more the slovak during that first time i definitely was and i don't think that the other black whereas the muffler with ours mendieta i really do i doubt it i think it was a and did at the first time well adding to the list of quick fuck hughes i wanna say one to jan shed who decided to get on facebook into white women on facebook do which is hate on black girls who are amazing oh my gosh their favorite pastime if you haven't heard of dimitri ah oba lower she is um a news journalist in dallas texas i bleached as the traffic report which god bless 'cause dallas is one for some har riff ig traffic but anyway she is gorgeous is the thing she's add have you seen this girl dimitrios trying to groups she is absolutely be let it looks like she could very easily made a living vulgar video girl your history the fat it's a go to college it's fair so um dimitrios beautiful in addition she's carvey she looks like drake's type um that's always love just.

facebook dallas drake amazon ththat
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"So you want me to go to jail and you wanna remind career lake for what do you feel you just want me to be uh no so i would really like for this to be addressed there is already a petition that's like well over matter of fact let me see where it was before i left house it was leg and one from forty to fifty thousand signatures i'm sure it's well over there by now but yeah this says he got arrested twice this year so it's kinda like it looks like the sort of thing that you could have been it could have been allowed to just like skate by and even with everybody else being like okay this doesn't it you know this doesn't warrant jailtime her own personal feelings about ahead her being like a fucking him he's going to jail he to put my name on the record i'm annoyed so i dunno might be another straw cellular that have this kind of power if the process ninety two thousand signatures if the progress there if the prosecutors are saying look he's been in relatively good with the requirements for the for the probation he's been cleaned since january or whatever like he smokes them we'd give him an ankle bracelet are standing for or whatever the fuck i was like two years and fucking praise and have you been on probation for almost ten though what the fuck is that i'm just i'm sorry i with this to me is absolute bullshit in i really want to hear more about this bucking story i hope that there yeah like let me tell you land is side of the especially after that attorneys claims of her talking about label ryan giggs is where i on all of this stuff because that is odd and i wouldn't be surprised if there are judges looking at these matter of fact and just being like they're rat trash and light gives the fuck about you anyway nobody's going to challenge me on this two to four years come on bre lay you got be asher my the fucking mind passed that i think for yeah i think i just looked at it like i guess i can see a judge being lednicky you have come before me too many times and untied.

ryan giggs asher four years two years
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"The fact that you a black jobs i know many people can easily say while you violated probation in exericse at as he should just free if you really think that after almost a decade that you fail a drug test probably because he was smoke in some we i'm just going to go i'm sure it was way like why i mean white house wayne that it makes sense to take some ari away from their fucking kid in their family people they taking care of her two years the minimum possibly four like that doesn't seem harsh especially when the fucking district attorney like the prosecutors are recommending no jail time yeah now why what i don't know why that happened he that thought i read some details that says she wanted her cousin has a label as she went to meet is not us said okay all right so his attorney said that some time during i guess all of this back and forth with meat millon court she suggested he he leave first of all she wanted him to do a cover of on bended knee by boys to demand and give a shout out for chain decay is lion wing in early on maybe she want him a sample the b o occur his attorney says as she wanted him to give him give her a shout out at the end of the song and he refused to do it obviously because that is a dumb idea has share also they she showed up to his community service allow like i guess feeding homeless people are doing something we're almost people what judges do that none she's his attorney also says that she who want him to leave rock nation and sign with her cousin and his label or whatever to which he also denied because i mean grow rock nationwide eleven would lucky i.

district attorney attorney two years
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"Wherever i go what uh on thin ice will me because i still don't know if she used their babies voice for that gorgeous so i'm going to invest probably i'm trying to try not to think about the bring positive and i just don't like us that bitch out assist out at babies life you gotta be kidding nodded and maybe add at the most she saw that and thought it was had some other baby to where you know and they're better be it h you better not has stolen priebke's war it's but we'll talk about the here now facts going on in the moment and the fact that matter is that you really had these white paper and change in an email to this rider and say they needed to take down this letter because so are you whitesupremicist then like what is it why why even why even be upset with people questioning this or affiliating you with these people they did it first clay i'm so lost how chameleons in those seasoned assists two other white supremacist talking about a stop using my sheets that talking about how much you love me out of iraq with child nedim shit like why aren't you doing bad why are you instead more worried about the people who are pointing out the dump shit because your time as witnesses what you do so so a mighty faq is going out to her once an ganpath happen i mean she going for right aga um also a mighty fuck you goes to uh jim niece brinkley the judge that sentenced meek mill two two to four years oh yeah aim praise dairy for violating his probation from a gun in drug case back in two thousand and eight so this is almost ten years of probation for this case lay back when they're saying that meatmeal violators probation by failing a drug test and allegedly a leaving the state of pennsylvania without approval getting arrested and he get arrested a couple of times maybe not no i don't know what i'm talking about either way.

white paper iraq jim niece brinkley pennsylvania aga four years ten years mill
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"And thoroughly this stomach know damn sense so here's the thing taylor and again people want to know why can't when people wanna know lack sza is perfect shit like this so your legal team you angelito team and got nothing to say now when real life white supremacists are calling you they're living god it that you have nothing to say then i won somebody writes a letter went and saying that you should say hey people that stuff is wrong right now you wanna threatened to sue papal and now works right about it is everybody over there had enough seems to be like you may not sewer even a girl aclu you know you can bulliest it's the rider was like i i think said bed the writers say that he went to law school words i'll a man wrote it although i don't think he was a blogger for the aclu though i think he just had his own blog and aco yes the story the blog is called oh i lost her it's not the point i told your identity of fucking o taylor swift is a bit with her priorities in the wrong spy is the moral of this story a really how you more upset over the aclu in this blog it in the fact that white supremacists like champion your work shit i just don't understand how sham you'd be eyeing uh they about kkk to leave much it alone leave me after the fact that she won't say that and she wants you gotta stop calling her racist or associating her music with racist people wake which is not we're not even doing it we're just pointing out that it happens like right no advice making it up right snowing like polling there should added asked you worried about as opposed to publish saying hey white supremacist dow fuck roma music all fuck with that she won't say a because she knows good damn well we're her money comes for xtrac osgood good entail.

taylor law school
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"Being uh i guess us sort of annency princess yes they love her like all right is their huge fan to today love taylor swift white supremacists nazis everybody else the mariah carey we talking about one thousand out her hey publicly live for taylor swift now i don't know if this is just a thing that they do just to be dick's are funny or durant they believe everything i believe i don't know what it but they have like chosen taylor swift i think that the she was in the kkk newspaper some shade they're out of order like anyway so this person row a story on saying basically that taylor swift should denounce white supremacy and racism to further herself from that movement and talked about the impact that something like that shouldn't wouldn't make why pop should do it and essentially used taylor swift as an example in this whole thing so taylor swift s legal taine sent a ceaseanddesist letter to the aclu and the spurs amtra riots saying that they needed to take down this this letter uh because it was defamation or some shit but also they wanted it to be taken down without it being said publicly i think that they set the latter are something like wow so the aclu got a lot of nerve at this i'm i i want to believe that she just surrounded by sharks suit wearing white demon at some bad just do all of this you know why do i want to believe that she does has a team a why people who have taylor so dungu baluarte and anytime her name come up with some negative said they're just like stand in the papers you know i dunno because the aclu certainly like almost immediately was like okay so first of all here's a screen child for what she's beaches by the way we're gonna try and secondly you may not do this sunday goes against the actual law.

taylor mariah carey dick aclu spurs durant
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"Aside from wanting me to feel comfortable or have a place to go on party what do you getting out of being at these types of carre what are you and funding you have here you know because it's easy for me to look at a lot of people in these situations like i just said about niggers who love they just like getting off on the fact that men are attracted to them even though you would hike no literally never say yes to and don't you just enjoy being hit all year uh others the same way that women it's not the firm there are a lot of hag that go out to the club i think they just love being a rounds men that they are attracted to but don't have to worry about being sexually harassed by yeah um and they can also sexually harassed to them and i feel like there's any retaliation or let me get your number or that i'm teasing you yeah and and if as somebody who has had this sort of relationship we gave me and before there can be as sort of back and forth fake sex will tease in thing going on here but not with strangers that i've never met before in the club like that's just not i wouldn't act like that with somebody i don't know and have an already established that kinda like fake to be circa two super clear totally fake kind of back and forth shit we i don't understand why you i'll go to clubs and be like i could just grab gained because the ecsc like mitch no uk you can madoo because maybe they want to grab a dick but you can go to a strike club and grab a dig at us twitter nba don't big yuval like better going her a italy that is all four zero i agree with you don't get the grab gained next digs either i'm saying so that's why would ask lai what is were you getting out and rise because this is essentially a gay club or a bar for resume m most men who are coming to this bar are expecting to be around other gay bisexual cui or whatever you want to call yourself man ray the community anyway i say so.

mitch italy lai
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"How how good was the how long is the ask because in the woman is more in a strap on as she were to do that happen frequently how the fuck are you like how the for her you a bigger and events super free on it up i like bisexuals wind and so you had a plastic dick a your as an a ruining your mouth or was the vice versa the every oil your own now could have just been a triangle of activity real quick yourself were getting on that spot one so since we did a question from a about a homophobic moslem man i'm going to do one from a selfdescribed black queer muslim man whose name is therion he says i live in the south have done a pretty good job of building some more supportive communities for myself wherever i go this may seem like a nonissue to some people but i have a couple of sis white straight guy friends can't roy okay armor and they are the sorta straight guys to have almost exclusively queer friends uh what tunnel white man is that i have never met a straight sis white man i know stray why guys they're like like gates ours are like really like you know like straight guys who are so like match sexual are so vat be that they just love gay i'm donald lack yarram who aren't homophobic and who are like totally cool having gay free in arming like in the sense that they like like they like the flirtatious energy of gay guys oh fine but even in a friendship.

donald
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"I know it is him because he has very distinct who tattoos and he has micheals his name tattooed shoulders the goes down they were taken turns getting jigi with his booty how better i said i don't know the girl who sent me this video but i'm assuming she must another mbote since she's friends with them on facebook my question is should i give this video to my cousin or just man my black ask business thanks so much stay black love dominique did i would assume it's just so far so bad ooh islam is not fun when the homophobes end up being gay is linked curl could you be more predictable i know but it is also a blast at this i thought it was really satisfied myintu beaches are always so how always sold last hour why is in just keep that had internal hatred internal mentoring how wanted to be so hateful and gay at that same time are bisexual right that should be quiet heat's billy really getting caught up on video camera knowing you gotta to why is that of doesn't care about heart should work for you at the two of them pay no attention to the what was going on around jakarta maga's what would you do would you say you're because maria south so here's the thing brian mona no yeah i mix i'm yeah what i would do um is i would hold on to that because it's always greater when he lenders and would have been a time tests have something you pack that kind of petty is like a fine wine you know when you just let it said of the i mean some good ole hard concrete evidence like that we just kind of leaded stooges for us and let them it share the moment that shoot even all most imply from homophobic shit i mean like hey coming here let me talk to really knowledge i'm twenty real quick so i'm a hit you with my libya pope shit.

facebook dominique billy jakarta maga brian mona myintu maria south libya
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"If my time that's your time your words on were bad some one one one one so that could stay right there out of there let's ride uh it's time for listener ladders all right here we go singer questions to ask the read a gmailcom we may just read them allowed on this show our first question comes from dominique who says first of all let me just say i absolutely love you guys at centered cetera lies thank you so much i'm anne a now onto the fakhury my cousin is a beautiful one euro baby girl who absolutely a door in a baby daddy that i do not care for it all a merger they are a muslim family in that is perfectly fine but her baby daddy isn't idiotic homophobia cheese we have a gay cousin that he continuously calls the f word to his face amd behind his back worldwide is in his garden no this is their cousin her and her sister cousin okay they have a cousin who's gay over and so the husband calls him faggot which not shocked but anyway she says needless to say checked his ass on more than one occasion but my cousin who's married to him continues to take up alarm about a week ago so about a week ago i was sent a video of this homophobic baby daddy on facebook by grow i have never met in this video he is having sex with both a man and a woman oh no woman is now my cousin and they were using a strap on.

dominique
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"M and got me a little worried or whatever by it more recently he he got on instagram and set for so he public a video or something i guess he was on the phone with jada pinkett smear is phone said are ac arcturus jada pinkett smith why is hard why is her misspelled career title in her contact in your phone what other j two one other data even if it was just jada after like automatically would have thought pinkus myth so why unless you have data kiss number two okay jada kiss would not be or not beaten two different uh you know a antiracist file a ali first name j last name gave you now have now rather thought about these things put words the other integrum apart so their own why is that in there and then why are you showing us that you're on the phone which i ate so here's what he posted he said that i'm actually going to read because i'm tempted to do it in the voice and i really don't want to k so he said that he had gotten off the phone with them now will and jada promised him our sense them five million dollars to help keep us a flow that's what he's saying he said they asked him to get off and stay off the internet now that his daughters legal fees will be paid and he said he will listen he also agreed to get to that it's okay okay so that is what he posted right it's strange to me is that.

pinkett smith jada pinkett jada five million dollars
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"At flex with these girls now because of me such a show me aloma fucking respect as nothing about gedin dopey out her again assad asked when i can begin alsadd as to you know my niggers and opportunities for sex ads turned down every day be at him a relationship would you and i could be out her fuck amazing negative but no at though we was in this thing together like with the fidelity bullshit how come you have extramarital ask an arcade that's not fair tell me you cheat and so i can go gives them dick to nigger equality um as the so i'll wendy sean kingston um for whatever reason was asked to sir in front of a microphone into vile things in two thousand seventeen and uh by home who did their cbc radio oh wow x one bbc radio on okay one i don't know is it multiple one that'll one but i don't know that whatever bbc and so on some dummy asked him who is the most famous one man that he is ever adult wrestled with oh god rarely images adult cyber can just say have sex league however as well right even snagged another british slang right for fucked or maybe it's just kiss our rings sparking uscca's oh well don cromer let's just say in anything other than adult wrestling how dumb to use army yeah that's where it hurts are we five so he says immediately like without missing a beat almost like he heard the question asked.

bbc don cromer assad
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"I felt from the moment this she said i'm sticking by my man he's another one who has had years and years and years of stories about being hot as well right right so you can buy your man saying that to me means that you've been aware of this and y'all have some sort of agreement or understanding or whatever like this could have been shocking to you rank mao thing is what's his name care of him i don't know what he does for a mighty outside of his business with wendy williams i think they he's like part owner or he has like a super high position in terms of her production company and all of our other little businesses many of them manages her right i think subtle he gives a ten percent off top of our ideals either way your business is your wife pierre your eyes so euboea now hear us looking like a slaughter s full right right around here with girls with rings on their finger and stuff affects her business so does then i in turn affect you argue already so rates because you could put ski owes and sat of a fucking sa chelsea bradley dial a house you uber comfortable light anywhere any you i'm worried about muscle you not worried at all about the visit like i don't get it you could stick by your man but i feel like you also need to be tomer clean it up right six this see how are you gonna be out here really in public make the washington post could track unique his fouryear why is there at no point john noticeable is the white man pecan in the mailbox they know which grand slam in hair.

wendy williams pierre john washington ten percent fouryear
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"All of the information about this one was i was like lease interested about the case and more interested in bat like who these people are this is eighteen years old i told you he play he just got to college he just started playing college by ucla 6foot5 an well here late is i'm carding ev yeah yeah care one of these things like on may and and that's why you in jail now apparently he was playing basketball in china uh against georgia tech now why why are why is the nc in china i do not know the answer to that i'm sure it has nothing to do with money but i do not know why so that obama in rhode island ask about their closely monitor will bears pressure those facts um so they guy arrested for shoplifting out of the louis vuitton store next to their hotel next to their hotel lease it better be a misunderstanding there currently facing this is lee angelo and two of his teammates jaylen in cody none of the other brothers are involved by now this one and his friends are facing three to ten years in prison if convicted which is just so in chinese prison is just so that thought his unique with why why which i'll carry out black asas all the way over to china to bootham shit out a louis the time i don't understand it you could do that in la and not have to go to chinese president but why does but if your brother says five hundred dollars shoes he can rally woman on the end he plays in the nba yelling not broke by any stretch of the imagination now he's still in for the fun of it not because he can't afford it and it omega no better for levada bhilai yao making a big deal out another thin will take care of it everybody's acting like is some big deal but it's not like.

basketball china nc obama rhode island lee angelo president nba ucla georgia shoplifting la five hundred dollars eighteen years ten years
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"No nudes fi lome mariah carey is being accused of sexual harassment after a former security company she was working with uh filing a lawsuit are preparing to file a lawsuit against her now here's the thing they're claiming multiple sheets claims first of all they say that michael and nello is the lawyer preparing this so he says that they were promised two hundred twenty one two hundred in twenty one thousand households matt san three hundred twenty nine dollars and fifty one american sense they did not get their also promised another two years of business which would add to five hundred eleven thousand dollars okay they say that mariah carey malta constantly humiliated them bar referring to them as nazis skinheads kkk members and white supremacists this is the head of the security compound talking about whom slocombe said um i don't know exactly why but that is what he alleges and also says that mariah wanted to be surrounded with black eyes not white people where's the sexual harassment we're getting the oscars i alan is good sense right so then the lawsuit alleges that once during a trip to kabul san lucas mariah asked to this man owner to come up to her room to move some luggage and when he got up stairs she was wearing a seethrough negligees that was open he said he tried to leave but she insisted that he move the luggage he left the knows no physical contact so i guess that is the sexual harassment now here's my thing oh.

mariah carey harassment michael slocombe matt san alan five hundred eleven thousand d three hundred twenty nine doll two years
"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"five million dollars" Discussed on The Read

"Fling oh i have all the odyssey's i have all of them in their wedding outfits were analysts ridiculous it is no it is anyway mario looks finding address all deadly it like apply yet with a veil and off the shoulder here i was like mario you will regret across the area and if you five browser in the jersey tells you how cue to healthy is not what you look good well this lead on hot tops in the breathable albin um all right so draig apparently drake his working on being a film producer and is taking a quite seriously apparently he's going to be working six two six months to a year okay on films um so he's working with net flakes right now to revive our series called top boy it's not what i thought how ansa high at hind it argues fares reina was hoping for some vein that i'm not going either way otherwise actually a show a british drama crime thriller land that's what i'm shown i always see a compared to the wire and when i watch like some clips and a trailer two of aid i can see you again it looks really good uh so i think that this last like two seasons in ended in two thousand thirteen so they're going to be running the first two seasons through netflixing and then drake through lebron james's products oh yeah are going to be producing the third season okay well assembly from fox so he's super excited because it's one of his favorite shells allegedly indiana knowhow jake is about certain things from certain places saw inaugurum.

producer reina lebron james fox mario six two six months