35 Burst results for "Five Hundred Years"

Ancient tablet acquired by Hobby Lobby going back to Iraq

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 8 months ago

Ancient tablet acquired by Hobby Lobby going back to Iraq

"An ancient tablets acquired by hobby lobby is going back to Iraq it was looted from an Iraqi museum thirty years ago now thirty five hundred year old clay tablet discovered in the ruins of a library of an ancient middle eastern king is headed back to Iraq the relic is known as the Gilgamesh dream tablet officials believe it was illegally imported into the United States in two thousand three then sold to hobby lobby and eventually put on display in its museum of the Bible in Washington federal agents with homeland security investigations sees the tablet from the museum in twenty nineteen the artifact will be repatriated at a ceremony at the Smithsonian's national museum of the American Indian I Walter Ratliff

Iraq United States Washington Smithsonian's National Museum Walter Ratliff
Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:57 min | 8 months ago

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

"You study ones that civil kano eruptions on singular events but can continue with follow up last for thousands of years after the first eruption super volcanic eruptions are among the most catastrophic event in any planet's history then includes the earth they vet tremendous amounts of magma almost instantaneously they impact global climate here on earth that means triggering volcanic winter with abnormally cold temperatures causing widespread feminine population disruptions and e findings reported in the journal nature based on a study of volcanic debris from the turbo eruption indonesia. Seventy five thousand years ago. There's no other way to say it. Tober was the largest volcanic eruption in human history. It had a volcanic explosively index of eight the highest possible score on the chart. The volcanic explosively index is a lot of rhythmic scale for an eruption depend on how much welcoming materials thrown out to what hide it's thrown and how long the eruption lasts. Well people these days talk about events. Such as the famous eighteen eighty three eruption of krakatoa in the sunda strait between the islands of java and sumatra or more recently mount saint helens eruption in washington. State these with thousands of times smaller than tober. Thankfully super volcanoes like turbo. A few and far between the last was new. Zealand's taboo volcano. Some twenty eight thousand five hundred years ago. Should volcanoes often erupt several times with evils of tens of thousands of vs between bigger options. But it's not known what happens. During the dormant periods one of the study's authors associate professor martin denny shake from curtin. University says gani understanding of these lengthy dormant periods hope scientists workout. What to look for an young active sipa volcanoes and help. Scientists prick future eruptions

Tober Sunda Strait Mount Saint Helens Indonesia Sumatra Java Martin Denny Washington Zealand Gani Curtin
The Importance of a Fundamental Grounding in Western Philosophy

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:09 min | 10 months ago

The Importance of a Fundamental Grounding in Western Philosophy

"Let's talk about. It's what you teach the importance of least at least a fundamental grounding in western philosophy for all members of our civilization. How important is that professor williams. You know you're preaching to the choir. On this i would make it obligatory and i would start is early high school. I think when when high school students are have to confront the big questions and would philosophy gives you is not not so much a life plan as the ability to ask yourself big questions to realize that the what are the most important questions and ways that you go about reasoning to the answers and thinking about them and especially studying the history of lousy. It's very interesting as you know that. That science and technology grow so every year. We know a little bit more ever. You can do a little bit more. Philosophy doesn't grow that way aristotle. Today it's like reading aristotle. Two thousand or twenty five hundred years ago says still has meaning. It still has value because these deeper questions about the meaning of existence the meaning of of human life these bigger questions and so there's a frustration in the fact that you don't get that kind of growth is building on it like like technology does but on the other hand. There's something very very exciting to be able to still wrestle with these intellectual giants from hundreds and thousands of years ago and that is why as far as i'm concerned that is why those who believe in progress delusional that they have no sense of history the essence of man. The things man struggles with haven't changed since we left the caves. I mean truly the search for meaning the sense of Quantifying worth all of these things are the same. They were two three four thousand years ago. And that's why everybody you're absolutely right. Professors should be required to study. The you know. The the ancient greeks and some of the key modern philosophers Because it just helps helps man on his journey and that journey is a universal journey for all of

Professor Williams
Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds

The Bio Report

01:46 min | 10 months ago

Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds

"Chris thanks for joining us. Thanks so much pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about your book. The next five hundred years and what it'll take to engineer life to reach beyond earth and allow manta outlived the planet. There's a lot in this book that i think readers might find ethically challenging but the whole framework for the work that discusses begins with an ethical imperative. This has to do with the unavoidable fate of the earth and the responsibility that comes with the awareness of the extinction of life. Up will go with that. Can you explain happy to so yes it. Is you know it starts with a very simple premise. That has i think clear ethical need and then gets into. Well that's true. What does that lead to a lot of interesting questions are but in a nut show we are the only species with awareness of extinction as you just said and you know we are the only ones that can actually prevent extinction for other species. Obviously sometimes we have caused it which is not great perfect track record on this but with the only ones that can service is really know stewards and you know basically shepherds of life not just our own life because at some point the sun will boy the oceans and if we want to survive we'd have to go elsewhere so mars in elsewhere is not plan b. It's just plan a in the long run. All questions are very clear in the lens of a billion years at and then if it's true that means that we if we want to survive ourselves or other creatures as far as the only ones that know that so it's incumbent upon us to serve as the protectors next week protect current species or even to revive extinct species. I talked about in the book because we are the only ones who have this passage unique role universe in a unique responsibility quite literally a duty for our species to all other species.

Chris
A Tour of Turkish Markets

Travel with Rick Steves

01:56 min | 1 year ago

A Tour of Turkish Markets

"Joined by turkish tour. Guide lally sermon iran. Bali thank you for inviting gets a pleasure now first of all when we're in the town of konia i know from my experience taking groups around people get a little bit like an anxious. It seems a little more conservative. Women are more covered up into town like this described the atmosphere in cornea compared to a place like izmir or ankara. Well as you just put into words. It's little bit more conservative. But what's attract people's attention is not the conservatives off the town being a conservative is not a bad thing. It's just the personal understanding of how you want to practice your life and your religion. The reason i'm saying is that muslim women prefer if they are developed. They prefer to cover up but in different religions. People don't or may or may not need to show their face with what they wear because there's a visual aspect to it. It attracts attention. Otherwise cornea is not any different than any more conservative city anywhere in the world. Okay so different Groups in different religions will have their women wearing hats and their men wearing beers visual indicator. Then you to said if there was not you would not notice. A life is not different in konya than anywhere else in turkey. It's just men have more beards and women have more scarfs. That's okay we're going to go to the market now when you step into a market like anywhere. It's sort of a cultural scavenger hunt and you have a chance to learn about the culture from the market if you were going to take one of our listeners into the marketing konia. What are some of the things you would see. That would give you a better understanding own loved the marketing. First of all. What i love is that it's was a market two thousand years ago. One thousand five hundred years ago one thousand years ago five hundred years ago and today it's still at the same place in the same layout and more or less. Probably the items carried in the market are the same.

Lally Sermon Konia Izmir Ankara Bali Iran Konya Turkey
Buddhism and Atheism With Ajahn Brahmavamso

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Buddhism and Atheism With Ajahn Brahmavamso

"But this evening's talk. I'm going to be talking about a subject. i hope i never thought about before. That's unlikely sings. I've been speaking here for over twenty years and it's come up in the newspapers recently and Few people have been discussing this on the email because apparently just before easter time there was an atheist conference over in sydney and that really upsets some people in the churches in sydney and because they were talking about eighty s and it affects them. Bickers is put this an atheist religion. Does it believe in god. If it doesn't why does support his position about this and so the first part of this talk no maybe just a bit of information about the stand on a garden some interesting things which many of you may not know for the most important part of this talk is That actually as far as buddhism is concerned is better reform does not believe in a supernatural being because there some very very grave consequences such a belief in your ordinary lives. I'm going to put this view and pointed point out that actually that you can become a wiser more compassionate person without such beliefs which sometimes obstruct no one's feeling of what's right and what's compassionate. Bullets go from the very beginning. Sometimes people ask is put some an atheist religion. What is a buddhist. Take on a guard but i vote is to go to the ancient scriptures twenty five hundred years ago when the border was around and of course you mentioned just the idea of god was very common at that time as far as the buddha was concerned. It wasn't just a theory but because of these great house which you can get through meditation you understand how the universe works.

Bickers Sydney
James Twyman | The Most Powerful Manifesting Tool

You Can Heal Your Life

02:15 min | 1 year ago

James Twyman | The Most Powerful Manifesting Tool

"Why. Don't you tell everyone kind of how you came up. And discovered the moses code like how did you come up with this. How did you discover it. And what is the moses. Go okay. I it's a funny story That has a very funny ending I remember a year or so before that There was a movie that came out I don't think very many people saw it was a movie called the secret and of course almost everyone has seen it and this was right at the beginning and i remember watching thinking two things number one. This is a very good movie and a lot of people are going to see it. And i really felt like the movie stopped short and fac in from my perspective. It chronicled what. I call the egos law of attraction which is based on. How do i use spiritual law to get what i don't have in somehow field feel fulfilled and i knew that what was really needed was to take it one more step. It was a wonderful first step but the next step was. How do we manifest from the level of soul not from the level of ego which is based not on what i can get but what i can give is not so much focused on riches but richness and less upon goods and more upon goodness because of course when we have richness in our lives and goodness in our lives will then everything else follows and we find ourselves fulfilled on levels. That we can't even imagine. I know i live in mexico in a small town called heat mexico and i'm surrounded by some of the richest people ever known even though they have next to nothing. These beautiful mexican families that surround us. And i know many people who have extreme abundance and they're poor and so the moses code is meant to take us to the level of soul so that we can become the source of that goodness and it goes back historically thirty five hundred years and what i always like to say is that this was a code. That was lost thirty five hundred years ago and it is the most powerful manifestation tool in the history of the

Mexico
Dr. Steven Gundry - Tired? Low Mood? Good Bacteria to the rescue!

Untangle

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Steven Gundry - Tired? Low Mood? Good Bacteria to the rescue!

"What to do when you get up and go has got up and gone. Which honestly is how a lot of us have been feeling these days so in the upcoming conversation were thrilled to be talking to dr country. And we're gonna learn about what you can do from a nutritional perspective to increase your energy and your mood and it does not what you think. Welcome dr country. Thanks areola happy to be here. Cut your band actually sitting by beds so there you go. It's a joy a pleasure to have you because for a lot of us are get up and go truly has got up and gone these days. It sure has who would have guessed. I know so. What's one of the first things that you recommend to somebody who is feeling like they could use a little bit more zip in their lives. There's many factors that go into. Why most of us are tired and fatigue and just don't have the energy that we thought we ought to have many of us think we are modern lifestyle or code. This is normal to feel like this but in fact my research in that of many others shown that this tiredness is not normal. When it's actually a sign that something is really wrong deep inside. There's two things that i think are really important for people to understand. One is that apocryphal. He's the father of medicine. Twenty five hundred years ago. Said all disease begins in the gut and how that guy could be so smart that long ago without are sophisticated tests. He knew that for instance are mood game in our gut. Our illnesses came from our gut. And we now know that he was absolutely right that most of our issues including being tired and including having depression anxiety actually stems from gut despite basis. Which is a fancy way of saying that the microbiome within our god is all screwed up

Depression Anxiety
What Is the World's Oldest Book?

BrainStuff

01:51 min | 1 year ago

What Is the World's Oldest Book?

"What's the oldest book in the world. That's bulgaria's national museum of history. Their lives one top runner a book comprising six pages of beaten. Twenty four karat gold covered with a trashcans script which is one of the few writing systems that modern scholars have yet to fully comprehend mostly because there are so few lengthy examples of surviving the book also features illustrations of a horse rider. A mermaid a harp and soldiers according to reports the book exhibited in two thousand three was estimated at about two thousand five hundred years old was found in southwestern bulgaria in an old tomb and was donated to the museum by the finder. Who remained anonymous. It's a and authenticity were confirmed by two independent scientists whose names also remain unknown in. This book is often cited as the world's oldest book. It is the oldest book containing several pages that we know about there are older pages around but not bound together in any books but the case is closed. The question of what is the oldest book in the world will likely never be answered a first. There's the question of what exactly is a book. Books are slippery artifacts. Think of your most read paperback novel. It has a physical presence. A specific shape and form that fits on a shelf and requires dusting. It also has a non physical form the story itself and what it means to you in the memories and emotions at conjures and so is the book moreover physical presence or is the content more important in the shape or do they both play an equal role. Take it a step further and ask. What if your favorite book wasn't printed handwritten and that's still a book. What about if you read it on an electronic device or it was narrated to you

National Museum Of History Bulgaria
Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

Kottke Ride Home

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

"So close to a century and a half ago. A man named moses wilhelm shapira found fifteen manuscript fragments in a cave near the dead sea. They were written in an ancient hebrew script and contained. What shapiro claimed was the original book of deuteronomy blitz despite interest from the british museum to the tune of a million pounds. The manuscripts were found to be forged. Shapiro was disgraced and the documents disappeared but now a scholar named don dershowitz is questioning. If those documents might have been real all along so while the british museum was examining the manuscript fragments for authenticity themselves. Back in the nineteen th century. A few of the fragments were also on display to the public already attracting tons of visitors. The news of the possibly oldest ever discovered biblical manuscript had made headlines around the world. While awaiting the museum's official decree of authenticity. Someone else decided to take matters into their own hands. Charles simone clermont. Is you know who the times describes as a swashbuckling french archaeologist and longtime nemesis of shapiro's end quote examined the fragments for a few minutes and immediately went to the press to say that they were fake. The risk he played on his cursory examination paid off when the british museum experts agreed. Shapiro was humiliated by this and ended up. Tragically dying by suicide a few months later. The documents were sold at auction for a fraction of what they were originally expected to sell for. And most people soon forgot about the whole thing now. Dershowitz from the university of potsdam germany has published a new paper and companion book making the case that the manuscript was real all along quoting the new york times but dershowitz makes an even more dramatic claim the text which he is reconstructed from nineteenth century transcriptions and drawings is not a reworking of deuteronomy. He argues but a precursor to its dating to the period of the first temple before the babylonian exile that would make it the oldest biblical manuscript by far and an unprecedented window into the origins and evolution of the bible and biblical religion dershowitz. His research closely guarded until now has yet to get broad. Scrutiny scholars previewed his findings at a closed-door seminar at harvard in two thousand nineteen are divided. A taste of fierce debates likely to come but of dershowitz is correct. Some experts say it will be the most consequential bible related discovery since the dead sea scrolls in nineteen forty seven and quotes the times. Sagely points out that it's much tougher to prove something authentic than it is to prove. It's fake but there's an additional hurdle to be jumped. In this case the physical fragments themselves may no longer exist so back in eighteen eighty three there was a mad rush at the time to find biblical artifacts that would prove or disprove various points of contention emerging in biblical scholarship moseley around the documentary hypothesis. The idea that the first five books of the bible or the pentateuch were actually written by various authors. Not just one traditionally thought to be moses. It was in this climate of aggressive archaeology that shapiro. I established himself as an antiquities dealer in jerusalem and during which time he and clermont no became enemies. After camacho correctly denounced a collection of pottery. That shapira had sold to the german government. It's also important to note that shapiro was a convert to christianity having been raised jewish in russia so he was viewed with some skepticism from the other biblical scholars and archaeologists and also faced intense antisemitism after the deuteronomy manuscript was denounced. Fast forward to now. Dershowitz says one of the main reasons he thinks the fragments could have been real is because their contents differs quite a bit from the deuteronomy in the bible and many of those differences lineup with discoveries that were only made when the dead sea scrolls were found in nineteen forty seven sixty four years. After chapitoulas discovery of the fragments dershowitz also investigated. Some of shapiro's personal notes archived at the berlin state library and found three. Handwritten pages of shapiro trying to decipher the fragments. Filled with question marks and transcription errors. Dershowitz said quote if he forged them or was part of a conspiracy. It makes no sense that he'd be sitting there trying to guess what the text is and making mistakes while he did it end quote while some scholars of the evolution of biblical text or undershoots side cautiously believing the deuteronomy fragments may be genuine. Most pig refers people who study inscriptions are the ones that usually authenticate documents. Most of them aren't convinced they say the original fragments bear the hallmarks of modern forgery. That they agree with the notes made by the experts who examined them at the time and since no one has the fragments to examine physically now. It's a closed case and as for the content being impressions christopher rolston leading pig refer at george washington university said quote. Forgers are pretty clever with regard to content and they've been very clever for twenty five hundred years and quotes despite dershowitz his published paper and companion book. The jury is still out and who knows if it will ever truly be born ounce. It would have some pretty huge complications. If it does due to some of its key differences for example. It's missing all of the laws of the deuteronomy were familiar with in the bible. Ones upon which traditions and entire libraries have been founded. It would also bolster the theory that are tons more stories and traditions out there than just the ones that have been preserved in the hebrew bible.

Shapiro Dershowitz Moses Wilhelm Shapira Don Dershowitz Charles Simone Clermont University Of Potsdam British Museum German Government Sagely Chapitoulas The New York Times Berlin State Library Moseley Shapira Camacho Germany Harvard Clermont
Portugal's Art and Architecture

Travel with Rick Steves

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Portugal's Art and Architecture

"Let's start today's travel with rick. Steves in portugal. The architecture and the art of portugal to tell the story of that small country squeezed between spain and the atlantic ocean. You can wander through museums classical and romantic paintings to styles with the largest impact on portuguese painters or you can take in the beautiful. Blue azoulay zhou tiles. That ornament many of portugal's buildings to learn more about portugal's art and architecture. We're joined in our studio by two portuguese guides. Christina duarte and refco christina and raphael. Thanks for joining us. Average abuse here. Rick christina so often to understand the art of a country you need to understand its economy. There's money behind the art. How does money shape the art in the architecture of patrols. When you have money you want be surrounded by beautiful. Things actually is universal. Everybody wants to be surrounded by beautiful things. The thing is that you don't afford it many times and when you afford them you have them in portugal much money then because they have great art from five hundred years ago yes well. It is a combination of two major. Factors the fifteen hundreds with the discovery. Spirit that allowed us to have for the first time money enough for our trade with many places in the world so automatically the royalty had many the nobility had money and the church have many and the coincidence is that your have money and you have also religion behind it so which. She's being major catholic. Contrary in thinking that you want to give your best and you'll beauty to your your glorify gone exactly to glorify god so They were two kinds of ways of spending that money in art. Which was the private and that will be for palaces that nobody will see and to god in churches and i consider that public art so review. All you have this money coming in from the trade in fact the churches were actually nicknamed spice churches. How how does the space tie into the building of churches. Well when portugal arrived to places like india and china and we started to bring all of these new products. Back to portugal. They revolutionized portugal they revolutionized our economy and from there on the society started to change and that is one of the interesting aspect of art is that it reflects the other dimensions of society. So the spices. There were They were a major factor. For example the jeronimos monastery that began to be built precisely with the money that came from the spices. Which bases were these that were so valuable. So you had Pepper you had cinema And many others in christina. Why would people spend so much money for pepper and cinnamon app to preserve no sleaze to preserve refrigeration also to Pigments of any kind for linen. Or tying dying yes. it was something exotic. It was different. People never seen it before. So imagine the first time you are smelling coffee or you're tasting pepper or you're smelling cinema. Imagine the impact that you had imagined how it sparked your imagination so the wealthy people would want this. It would be titillating for them now. You mentioned the monastery at toronto's same just outside of lisbon b. l. e. m. I believe that was men. Welland style architecture. What is men whalen. What we're does that word come from so The men willing style is named after our kingman. Well actually the name was given only in the nineteenth century during the romantic period but kingman while he was one of the most important kings during our age of exploration so he ruled from the time of columbus until fifteen twenty began to rule in fourteen ninety five until the fifteen twenty s in the nineteenth century. They figured out that. We had a several monuments throughout portugal. That shared the same characteristics. So what are the characteristics. If you look at the front of a church what will you see and you go. Oh that's men welland from fifteen twenty so the manor line is late gothic style so you have the basic structure of the gothic and then over that basic structure of the gothic. You have a very specific declaration. You have for example. Maritime mothes you have the strong. Heraldic of manuel specially to miller rece- fear so that the coat of arms of the royal family and then themes from the sea because the money came from the see exactly like the rope the rope a rope with an art. He's a very very important symbol of maryland.

Portugal Christina Duarte Refco Christina Rick Christina Steves Atlantic Ocean Jeronimos Monastery Raphael Rick Spain Christina India China Welland Whalen Kingman Lisbon Toronto Columbus
Canaan Unconquered - Rachel Havrelock

Judaism Unbound

09:22 min | 1 year ago

Canaan Unconquered - Rachel Havrelock

"And kinda interested in talking about the person joshua. He's the title character of this book and he himself from my understanding of scholarly work on biblical criticism or otherwise. He himself has a story like an origin story. That some people think is kind of a retrospection where like after the fact. He's put into the torah in a way that he may not have always been there. And what i'm referring to is specifically. His glory story is that he's one of the two folks in the twelve spies story that goes into the promised land and says This is great all the other ten folks. All land is terrible. Joshua caleb are on the good side that god likes and because it's the land that they're supposed to go to am. I right in my understanding of that. How scholars look at that person joshua and to what extent to we learn more about him in talking about the book that's named after him. Joshua indeed has a book named after him but is one of the flatter hand more hollow biblical characters. I mean for readers. Go in sequence so you know redo romney in which moses in vary tragic psychological terms wrestles with his impending death. And you know even with the existential reality of death itself. so we're going through it moses psyche and when we can turn out of the penza out of the five books of moses when we opened the book of joshua we have an entirely flat character. You know joshua is really characterized by his obedience and interestingly enough has no title right once called the servant of god is not labeled a profit is not labeled a judge is not labeled a king. I mean we get the news of general because he leads these battles but he doesn't even have a title biblical literature does have great literature and just have complex characters. Josh was not one of them. And you can't really do. A lot of psychological depth with an icon in joshua right becomes an icon of this army of this ancient near right to really kind of like a strobe of what i would call. Ancient national is now. I believe that the book of joshua is ultimately synthesized by a group of editors that we call the or novelists they are the ones that are also very smart editors so joshua ends up becoming a kind of a tool that the nommik editors really use to kinda. We've eras together and also to contain a kind of perfect model right. They wanna leader in their language. Who neither the left nor the right right who keeps torah. You know kind of the cuff at all times. And so they give joshua authority by putting him back the times of most read someone who experienced the whole exodus and even while being a member of this desert generation right the generation of the liberated slaves joshua and his spy buddy caleb right are portrayed is the only two who believe in going to war in this land. So i think that's right. I think the shooter anonymous create joshua to be an icon of the kind of unity to which they aspire and one more piece that all add to your question about joshua and caleb who again are depicted is these faithful spies who go against the will of their generation. I love it kinda that the liberated slaves don't want to go to war. I feel like we haven't done enough to really like reclaim that biblical antiwar position expressed by that generation. But you know. John lewis show like i said he's a. He's a tutoring nommik creation. But there's a lot of northern stuff going on with joshua and caleb is a southern figure just as these editors could really say we've always been at war with canaanites. Their system could also absorb later alliances. So kayla who. This southern figure is a canoe. He's a kennedy and the candidates are ultimately a group that gets absorbed under the tribe of judah the twelve tribes structure is very good at pointing to those people who are on the outside who jumped. Don't join the alliance and saying those e mites those canaanites those jebusites there are enemies. But it's also good at absorbing groups that might join the alliance at their own pace and saying. Oh well that's caleb. He's the head of the kennedy clan and that's a sub family of judah so so both things are possible for trying to account for political alliances. Can we situated some of what you're talking about in some sense of historical time to understand sort of when the actual events that are being responded to her happening versus the time where the story is set. What's going on geopolitically. And the time of the israelites when they are making all these alliances. And then if i understand the approximate timeframe here they're basically writing and rewriting these stories that are functionally taking place around five hundred years earlier. Right i mean the so. It almost becomes like their writing and rewriting and massaging this almost like mythic prehistory. It's not just like they're telling a story from fifty years ago differently. They're telling a story from five hundred years ago differently. I'm just curious if you could give us some sense of what was actually going on in in their world at that time that was motivating them to do all this so yes. Speaking about time wine this is the kind of thing. Bible scholars go to conferences to fight of out. So let me kind of breakdown this picture together with a time line let me start somewhere with is a very important piece of poetry and it's important because because of how it serves as a historical in and that's song of deborah and the song of jabra with we believe based on its grammar and syntax is one of the oldest texts in the bible and some people even speak about the year twelve hundred bc. Jabra sings about a war and she sings that some tribes came and fought in the war in some sat home so she disparages the tribes who sat home and she sings the praises of the tribes who k. That's very important to me because it shows that the success or failure of a given tribe in war depended upon their allies. Were so we see major major motivation for these processes of consolidation. Many scholars have shown how end the nine eight century. B c e you've got these policies of consolidating clans in schreiber's into something that looks like a pro donation. This is happening in the region. And it's about war you know. Because if you're national formation right if or if you're a bunch of tribes and you've got a consolidated federation of people's you're gonna lose but then we get you know eighth century b. c. e. the rise of empires in particular syria and the threat of assyria marching. You know or the egyptian empire has its second wind around this time. It's that process. That i think gets people thinking we've got come up. You know with a larger scale organization in army. And so josh. Shaw gives this army which is kind of being configured in real time it gives this army kind of heroic prehistory behind which people can march. And so it means you know that it works and doesn't work because the syrian army takes out the northern kingdom the kingdom of israel in seven twenty two but ends up sparing the kingdom of

Joshua Joshua Caleb Caleb Joshua Authority Romney Kennedy Josh John Lewis Kayla Jabra Deborah Schreiber Syria Army Shaw Syrian Army Israel
Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:39 min | 1 year ago

Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

"About jeff. Welcome to the show. Thank you camping. Glad to be here happy. Have you tell us a little bit more about yourself well. I grew up in a small town in northern indiana gauchan. Indiana and i was all set to go off to college when it was time and i ended up dropping out after two days and just didn't feel like that was what i really wanted to do. After having spent my whole long life of eighteen years in school so i went to work in a factory saved up some money and then mom reluctantly drove me to the edge of town. I stuck out my son and he tried to cross country. But i did end up going back to college after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail.

Nepal Bassett Village Foundation University Of Chicago Indiana Sarah Safari Himalayas Jeff Gauchan Mount Everest Base Camp Trail
Is it too late to get in to Bitcoin?

Baselayer

08:51 min | 1 year ago

Is it too late to get in to Bitcoin?

"Back in the day when amazon i one public it shot up roughly after some fits and spurts. It went up to about ninety dollars. You it was like i'm too late. Missed it gone. And then it capitulated down at shot all the way down to two and i was like it's gone amazon's finished not even gonna look at it and then it went back up to ninety. I missed it. I missed it again then. Went up to three hundred to four hundred. It's this constant m. I too late emmett too. Early internal struggle that we have in our brain. What do you think about that. Yeah i think this is exactly so what you're really describing is Things being relative and this is actually think the fundamentally challenging concept with something like bitcoin which is a paradigm shift so people think about bitcoin relative to other assets. If you call a lot of conversations i had in two thousand nineteen twenty twenty where around bitcoins volatility right but bitcoins volatility relative to what because volatility is a relative measure price when we talk about price it's a relative measure because what am i Pricing bitcoin and typically people are pricing in dollars so relatively speaking yes. Bitcoin is volatile compared to holding dollars. But if we compare bitcoin to say equities if you quainton bonds if we compare bitcoin to precious metals the volatility doesn't look so extreme. What really happened at the start of this year. In march of twenty twenty the world shifted the world changed completely and forty years of capital markets. Beliefs were shattered like smashed with a hammer completely shattered. Now changes really hard for people and one of the things. That's really interesting For me personally. I want things to go fast right. Because i've in crypto and things fast and like wait why has it taken a six years to get to this point but in reality as you know the arc of time is very long and it takes a lot of time for the world to change for people to internalize that change and adjust their mental models right and a big part of this in a big part of ice than so much time talking and writing and trying to teach and communicate is. It's really about giving people new frameworks mental models to help them. Integrate this new way of thinking these mental models into how they view the world trade. That's really important. I think there's so many. Brilliant people in crypto. Who do this in different ways. So we have this really broad cross section of people communicating a lot of ways talking to a lot of different audiences which is amazing. The we had this fundamental shift happened. Everything got everything else got crazy. It's not that bitcoin got crazy. That everything else got way freaking crazier and what i love is when i talk to people about. Bitcoin bitcoin to extensive. I'm like let me ask you a question. Did you did you. By tesla five hundred and yeah. Of course i did. Like tesla's going to and i'm like okay. So tesla has appreciated more this year than bill. Clinton has tesla appreciated close to seven hundred percent in two thousand twenty yet you bought at the high and they clean appreciated two hundred and fifty percent and twenty twenty yet. You refuse to buy so help me understand right even if we're using the same of dollars even if we're looking at the same volatility measure somehow bitcoin Why and then he will start thinking. They're like wait a minute because math is hard this we know the people just. They're not thinking logically for some reasons for some people when they think about bitcoin their brain goes into like a tailspin and logic goes out the window. But this is again why i think the collectibles narrative is in so interesting to me because when i say to people like do you know what a honus wagner card is. They're like yeah. Of course. I know i'm like i don't know like okay. One honus wagner card is two point five million dollars. Do you think bitcoin at twenty five thousand thirty five thousand forty thousand is expensive in there. Like probably not right. So let's dig into that tesla coin thing. What part of the fact that. Bitcoin is effectively. Founded by an an-and sushi. Who we do not know if it's a he she it what vs on. Musk pop very public. Are we in agreement. That's the toshi was the aliens. Are we doing alias. I'm kidding shocking. Oh every time. I hear that especially in clubhouse. Everyone's like oh yeah. It was created by the alien somebody yeah. Let's not do that you know. I'm already speculating. That twenty two thousand one. The aliens are finally come here and just completely take over. But i don't want to hear that. The ashley also created the nsa taverners been around for a while and then there's a holiday larue like there. What what part in in psychology because you talked to a lot of institutional investors to you talked to a lot of big money. What part of that psychology. That one you have a very public figure with ilan and then too you have associate whom no one really knows who it is what it is. What part of that you place until list. Yeah so i actually think. Bitcoin and tesla are very similar in one regard both are aspirational and let me explain what i mean by that. Bitcoin invites you to conceptualize the world in a different way. Tesla what eon has done with business. Ilan has memed a new reality into existence. The way he talks about tesla right is completely detached from the economic realities of that business. Completely detached from the economic realities of that business but it doesn't matter because the vision that ilan describes the persona that he has the cult of personality he's created around himself is aspirational grit song by the way cult of personality. That's a great song. it's also great like psychological phenomenon. And what. I think eli done so effectively is. He's the zeitgeist okay. Markets are just sentiment machines. And it's it's been really interesting. Because every value investor. I talked to like twenty twenty. Made their brains explode. It literally made their slowed. They're looking at these stocks trading at fourteen hundred two thousand three thousand acts he for pe ratio rate and their brains are exploiting. That's our valued. And i'm like you forgot that nothing acid matters anymore. We don't live in the world that you lived in two years ago. this is not about value. We live in a world where there is a lot of uncertainty uncertainty about the future uncertainty about the stability institutions uncertainty about our role in this world. That's unfolding and in times of uncertainty. What people look for is vision. Right and what elon. Musk articulates when you talks about going to mars when you talks about. Putting for tesla on mars. That's vision right. I think satory she in so many ways and what we're doing with. Bitcoin is very similar. And i caught this. I've been really obsessed with the idea of building cathedrals lately. It's like five hundred years ago. Right if i was a visionary and had suggested for the future and i wanted to express that the only way for me to create something that withstood the test of time right to create quote unquote immutable. Truth was to build a cathedral and cathedrals took hundreds of years to build and people who built them dedicated tremendous amounts of resources to building these amazing like technology a technologically very advanced like gravity defying beautiful structures and. Whenever people saw them they would feel inspired. Right like cathedrals were how we painted a vision for the reality we wanted to live in. Okay tesla is a cathedral. Bitcoin is a cathedral. The stocks that are soaring the assets that are doing well their assets that are aspirational right and their people. Whether it's a non community of people an individual it's groups of people who believe in a vision for the future that is radically different from the future. We live today but it creates a motion. Right people look at it and they're like that is beautiful. And i wanna live in not future

Tesla Bitcoin Honus Wagner Amazon Emmett Ilan Larue Clinton NSA EON Ashley ELI Elon Musk
Late Triassic extinctions linked to climate change

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Late Triassic extinctions linked to climate change

"Increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can have a dramatic impact on life on earth. It has before about two hundred million years ago at the end of the triassic period about three quarters of all species died out the mass extinction was likely triggered by widespread volcanic eruptions the amended enormous amounts of carbon dioxide causing global warming. These medieval county conveyance side in time with the mass extinction events. Manfred capriolo is a phd student at the university of padua in italy. He says the eruptions occurred in bursts over hundreds of thousands of years. Each burst lasted about five hundred years by studying bubbles of gas trapped in ancient volcanic rock. He determined how much carfax each burst released. The amount was similar to the human caused emissions expected. This century campriello says his research shows that a single pulse of volcanic activity could have contributed to dramatic changes to the climate at the end of the triassic. Our world is different than it was two hundred million years ago but he says it's a warning that rapidly adding co two to the atmosphere now could have major consequences of this. Finding is absolutely alarming

Manfred Capriolo University Of Padua Campriello Carfax Italy
Like Water in the Desert

Gastropod

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Like Water in the Desert

"Philip start by introducing you all ramona. Button of ramona's american indian foods. I am Pima living on the pima reservation here on a hill river. I am also have donal them from south of here. They used to be known as the papagos. But now they're called the on them and the p. r. on them that's my other half mesa river people. And i'm gary ramona's husband terry button ramona. Interior farmers their farms about an hour. Southeast of phoenix on the way to tucson and the whole region is a desert. The sonoran desert includes phoenix and tucson and parts of california and it stretches all the way over. The border into mexico. Ramona's ancestors have been farming in the region for thousands of years and her dad kept the traditional live on the reservation where she grew up. My father did the wheat. He did the tempered. Beanstalk brown swam bob and the white tip rabin which is the start about and he did. Squash the gabon. Ceos watermelon and sugarcane and the black eyed peas just us above and chilies mostly. I don't for his chili. And those tilles are part of what brought ramona and terry together. Ramona had left the reservation to work as a nurse. In south dakota terry was there studying lakota songs and culture friends introduce them and they told ramona. That terry had picked up a few words of pima as well. That's the language of ramona's people in the south west. So terry tried out his rudimentary pima on her. And i said well you're saying it correctly but you're Die like accent is different and so it was a little bit hard to decipher. But i could understand him. So i said well Maybe we're a good match and so it happens. And then when i came when i met ramona the first experience i had with southwest cuisine was her dad's long green chilis and they were so hot they blistered my lips. They turned white. She would send him to me in the mail when i went back to school. Share with some of my buddies. Nobody could eat them and her dad. Pretty famous actually in the local community as well known for he's used to sell small brown paper lunch sacks with chilis and he'd have mild and medium hot he regulate a chilly temperature by the way he irrigated his chile's he wouldn't let anybody else water his plots not just because he was manipulating the firing of his tilles. It was because the water itself was so rare and so precious. There was never enough. A shirt is a place full of things other than water. They get a bad rap because they have low rainfall and It's as if they're empty spaces. Gay napkin is a desert agricultural ecologist. And he's written more than a dozen books about agriculture and the desert and its foods. He lives an hour south of tucson also in the sonoran desert within a mile and a half of where i am sitting right. Now we have evidence of forty five hundred years of agriculture in the form of corn remains from an archaeological site. So i am in the valley in the united states with the oldest history of agriculture. Yeah well as far back and farther back than written history can go. The people were farming. Here when padre eusebio kino who was the first non indian person to come into this country came here and visited the payments in sixteen seventy five. They were irrigating their fields with diversions from the hilo river at that time

Ramona Terry Hill River Mesa River Gary Ramona Terry Button Ramona Pima Tucson Beanstalk Brown Tilles Phoenix Sonoran Desert Donal Rabin Philip Gabon South Dakota Mexico
On Student Debt, Biden Must Decide Whose Loans to Cancel

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:32 min | 1 year ago

On Student Debt, Biden Must Decide Whose Loans to Cancel

"This hour. We are exploring the ideas and the debate over forgiving student. Loan debt in the united states. A little earlier you heard the voices from some on point listeners. Telling us the impact that carrying student loan debt has had on their lives. We also heard from some listeners. Who did not support the idea of widespread. Loan forgiveness. I will lose my mind if they do that. Student loan forgiveness. When i went to college. I chose a college. That was a state school. Because that was what i could afford. I worked four jobs while i was in college so that i didn't have any debt when you take out you know what you're signing for and it's a choice. Life's all about choices. I'm not for it you know i. I guess i was lucky in that. I had a family who raised me to be wary of that Ultimately ended up joining the military. So i can pay for college. I just don't see where the equity is there so those are some on point listeners from west virginia and from new york professors. Odi the when we say equity right. I mean Nathan the caller. There used that that that very word it's being used in different contexts right like just in the previous segment. We talked about how the disproportionate impact of student loans on black students. For example. there's a. There's a kind of itchy trying to achieve equity there as well but i want to just get street to what does fairness mean here because i think you probably remember from the presidential primaries last year gotta might as well be five hundred years ago but it was last year. There was a moment where think it was in iowa. Where an iowa voter confronted senator elizabeth warren about this idea of student loan debt forgiveness and the voter was saying like hey. His daughter's getting out of school. He saved all his money and even worked multiple jobs so that she didn't have to have any student loans. So would he get that money. Back and senator. Warren said no and he just infuriated him because he he made the decisions to not give his daughter a legacy of debt And there would be no payoff for that or no. Other people who chose the debt path would have forgiven. So what do you think about that. Fairness question yeah. I think it's an interesting question i mean. What does fairness in this instance. Let's say we don't cancel any of the debt. He's still not going to get that money back. But it might prevent you know the next generation of people from having to work multiple jobs and do all of this Extra work to get their children educated so failing to cancel anyone's debt doesn't really solve problems here. You now Would also we does doesn't solve problems in terms of like the underlying cost of higher ed correct and also then. The same thing will just continue to happen. Is it fair to that guy that everyone else must suffer the same way. Okay well so. But i mean failing to cancel. That doesn't solve that problem. But how does cancelling the debt solve the problem of very expensive higher education in this country. I think that it has to go hand in hand with policies that address. That exact problem the fact that the college tuition year over here has increased far beyond inflation. And they're just like structural issues at universities. I think that a lot of these universities. They've had to invest so heavily in responding to the corona virus and they are out of resources and local and state governments are also low on resources. So it's likely the federal government is going to have to invest in these institutions of higher education. So it seems like a good opportunity to deal with that underlying problem at the same time as as as addressing what we've been doing for the past several decades the fact that that yeah no no no. I didn't mean it up you there but I'm agreeing like this. This to me is the core issue. Cancellation are no cancellation's short-term decision with an with impact on yeah forty-three potentially forty three million americans right now but does it you. You were talking about next. Generations do really anything to via the problem for them. There's one more question to ask about fairness and feel free to tell me that. This is a terrible comparison. But you know every single day mean especially after the financial crisis americans or the housing crisis. I should say from eight americans have been told. Don't buy a house outside your means but by the house that you can afford. Shouldn't we have the same encouragement for education. Yeah so that's interesting. I mean it might be a good opportunity. To contrast with what's happening in europe for example in denmark you get six years of free tuition room and board and a stipend to attend higher education. What they're going to have is an educated people an educated workforce and etiquette educated citizenry. If what we're going to say instead is if your parents are not wealthy don't go to a good school. don't go to an expensive school. I mean that's one way of building a society. I'm not sure that it's the best. One we know is going to be then financially. Racially socio economically exclusive. And that's not the idea that we have about america right. You're supposed to be able to go to school and move up in life. Higher education as a tool for social mobility and also and very often not even mobility but just hanging onto. Where wherever it is that you were able to achieve in the last generation just stasis just like being really part of a society. Most jobs require a college degree these days so we we want to tell people. You can't afford to go to school. So don't

Senator Elizabeth Warren Iowa West Virginia Nathan United States Warren New York Federal Government Denmark Europe
Pirates of the Carolinas

Travel with Rick Steves

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Pirates of the Carolinas

"Let's start with some wild tales of historical characters from the coasts of North and south. Carolina. Terrence Zip key is brought to life thirteen notorious pirates in her book pirates of the Carolinas. She relates stories of ships weighted down with gold crews too drunk on rum to fight treacherous colonial officials, mutineers, privateers, and the sad end of the line for the pirates who got caught. White Barents thanks for joining us. Hi, thanks for having me. Give us some background on this. What was the golden age of piracy in the United States? Well, we really don't know how long piracy's been around It's been around at least twenty, five, hundred years they are, and there was an era during its hey day that was known as the golden age piracy, and that was the light seventeenth century to early eighteenth centuries and The United States it'd be colonial America. It was colonial. America. When they came over here and Interesting Carolina had a lot of the officials had partnerships with the pirates. We were sort of commerce poor place back then. So we actually welcomed pirates like blackbeard until they had the big crack down on piracy and that was the end of that. So is it kind of the fine line between a privateer and pirate? What's the difference? It was such a fine line rick and basically a little piece of paper because a lot of the pirates started out they were privateers. And they were involved in Queen Anne's war wars all over Europe and everything, and they were commissioned to attack enemy ships in order to get money to get booty to help fund the war and they split the money with the crown. So yes. So the the king or the governor would say you are licensed to attack ships as long as they're not our ships and you p half the booty, but you gotta give the rest to us. So we can fight war whatever right and so then imagine when the war is over and your navy is no longer needed. All these men I've ever known. There's no employment. You know it was a fine line anyway between privateer and pirate. So a lot of them just became officially pirates and they got to keep everything. Nice business model. So, now, what was the basic action? It was mostly ships going from Europe to the Americas or where did they get their best opportunities at that time? That was all these merchant ships that were doing these trade routes and so you could just sort of sit out there. It was just like fishing and just block them off. They weren't very well armed or anything they were slow because they were big heavy. Ships with a lot of merchandise onboard now also, and it really didn't matter. This is one of those falsehoods that people realize people thought pirates just want gold and pieces of eight. But the truth is that they wanted what they could sell when they got these merchant ships and they had all these realms of fine linens and silks and tobacco and rum, and all this was this was pay dirt so they would. Get this stuff, and then they would go to the next port and just like you see when you travel a lot people stealing stuff off of ships and setting up a little stand and selling a cheap absolutely, and that's what they did like a lot more in partnership with the authorities here and so when they came into port and all that they would look the other way and then they would get A. Cut for looking the other way and the merchants would get discounted goods. The pilots would get money I mean everybody was happy sounds like a win win win lose situation I'm rick this is travel with Rick Steves speaking with Zip in her books called pirates of the Carolinas. We always think pirates of the Caribbean and your book is pirates of the Carolinas. Why was there so much pirate action and the Carolina? coast. Well at that time, these were pretty poor state. So we needed to get commerce wherever we could. So pirates were good for business. So we saw there were a safe haven for pirate in fact, blackbeard who was one of the probably the biggest chapter discussed in this book, he actually set up shop actually made a home and actually came part of the community and all up and north. Carolina. No,

Terrence Zip United States White Barents Carolina Carolinas Queen Anne Europe Rick Navy Americas Rick Steves Caribbean
"five hundred years" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on AP News

"More than five hundred year old copy of a letter penned by Christopher Columbus had vanished from Italian library decades ago has been recovered by federal agents in Delaware it's one of a few dozen authentic reprint of copies of Columbus is original letter which was hand written in Spanish in April fourteen ninety three and almost immediately reprinted in Latin by the Rome printers to farm pond is the fourth such return in recent years after US investigators tipped off by a rare books expert determined several authentic copies of the Columbus letter had been stolen from libraries across Europe without library officials knowledge investigators call this latest find which tells of Columbus's discoveries in the Americas the most rare of the four someone's auctioning off memorabilia related to the assassination of JFK and former California governor Jerry Brown wants to know where it came from that's because the collection of private letters and other items belonged to his dad Edmund G. brown when he was governor Sotheby's estimates the value of the collection it twenty to thirty thousand dollars and says the seller wants to remain anonymous it didn't disclose how the anonymous seller acquired the collection Jerry Brown was not consulted or informed of the sale and believes the items should instead reside at the university of California Berkeley with the rest of his father's papers Sotheby's calls brown's materials unique because it comes from a single source and that it chronicles a country in mourning the auction opens Monday remember that show punk'd on MTV well it's coming back handed this time chance the rapper's the one doing the pranks MTV and quit be said Friday they're teaming up to revive the show with the Grammy winner pranking unsuspecting A. listers quit be is an upcoming short video streaming service that's backed by Hollywood studios no date was announced but the show will be available only on queen bees mobile video platform.

Christopher Columbus Delaware US Europe Americas Edmund G. brown Sotheby MTV Rome Columbus California university of California Berke Grammy Hollywood
"five hundred years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"All been about starvation he did not come to pass it all goes to explain the slogan out there liberalism is a mental disorder have a good day there thanks to have no the idea of over population has been going on for a long time it's hit drums up business for Planned Parenthood it has no basis in reality may come a point when we you have a population have reached a tele going critical mass but it eight billion people ain't it the idea you always see these futuristic movies where and and some of them are good movies like the fifth element I love the fifth element but the earth that they depicted in the whatever year it is twenty five something or other when they got flying cars member we are promised flying cars by the end of the nineties by the Jetsons and that didn't happen now movies are doing things like you know twenty five hundred years engine twenty five hundred of your twenty five hundred we have flying cars well time cop took with a horrible John Claude van Damme movie I believe that took place in nineteen ninety nine it was made in the eighties it is without the time travel was around in nineteen ninety nine Hollywood gets the future wrong all the time but all of these movies about the future it's always kind of dystopia we never actually figured out we never do well as a species in the future we have sort of oppressive poverty but then you see that the entire planet is giant buildings with people living on top of each other in studio apartments essentially like in the vin element where birds Willis lives in a studio apartment and a three hundred story building because there are so many people it's just so over crowded you fly from Baltimore to Los Angeles today and you will see more open space than you could ever possibly imagine we are not over populated we are not at the way the point of all my goodness we're all going to starve to death we don't have enough room we're living on top that's not how it works we're not anywhere near that I think people are polluted by a new look the earth is huge it's gigantic and it's hard to put that in context two people and you think well we look at this city living in Baltimore there these tall buildings and so many people in this one area cramps together it's not because there's nowhere else to go with not because you can't buy a house with a front lawn or go to a park somewhere people choose it for convenience sake where I chose it for thirteen years to live in Mount Vernon because a I didn't have a car be it couldn't afford a car so I was right near the trains and walking distance to a grocery store the idea that my god the planet cannot survive because of too many people we won't be able to feed ourselves in the eighties there was mass famine in Ethiopia every other commercial seem to me they were doing benefit concerts USA for Africa and Live Aid were all for dealing with the the starvation over there any V. O. pia which was man caused bad government man because it wasn't nature because we had plenty of food on the planet so yeah I'm I'm by the way on Los Angeles Jeff said you know talking about how it's a it's a it doesn't rain out there and certainly that's climate change well if you if a bomb urinates in the woods it causes a mud slide there's a reason for that Los Angeles was a desert until human beings decided to make it not a desert they made a very long river out of concrete to bring water and irrigation to the Los Angeles area it's naturally a desert so if it goes a while without rain that is not climate change that's at well in theory it is it's the climate trying to change it back to what it naturally was a desert that happens and when you don't cut down the underbrush that falls in your forests guess what happens that stuff dries out and a cigarette **** or lightning strike can cause a fire it's not climate change because while cigarette **** aren't necessarily a part of nature lightning strikes are and they've been around for a long time hurricanes and tornadoes and wild fires happened long before the evil white man ever set foot on this continent and they will continue in perpetuity because they are natural weird weird thought but it's true but let's talk about Vinny steal my body with remax community if you plan to sell your home and it's pretty safe to assume that you want to make the most money possible right of course that's why I recommend you call of any steel Maryland's real estate authority but he was just here a couple weeks ago and I learned why.

twenty five hundred years thirteen years
"five hundred years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Almost five hundred years ago four as similar situation where a cardinal a former cardinal was lay is sized this announcement follows an investigation which found the Charaka guilty of sexually abusing minors as well as adults a group representing victims of pre sexual abuse of what the Catholic Church to overhaul its board that oversees such cases CBS's but Michigan explains a group is called the survivors network of those abused by priests or snap it's asking bishop James Johnson junior to make boards that review allegations against priests more transparent inclusive and willing to identify predator priests publicly bishop Johnston was recently appointed chairman elect of the U. S. Catholic church's National Committee for protecting abuse victims snaps request comes after an AP report last week that found that these review boards have intimidated victims projected sexual abuse claims failed to oust abusive priests and help the church avoid payouts but Michigan CBS news voters in Hong Kong are turning out in record numbers for today's election over one point five million people cast their votes by five PM local time that's more balance in the entire twenty teen election pro democracy activists are viewing these elections as a referendum on the protests that are a rafting overseeing gong activist Joshua Wong spoke after casting his ballot calling on any activists who have not voted to do so before the polls close urge people in Hong Kong if they first to stop police brutality coal on free elections it's time for them to what everyone was calm well we still have election meanwhile some students still remain in hiding areas on the grounds of Hong Kong's polytechnic institute bring the situation between the government and students to a stalemate the students who want direct elections for Hong Kong's leader and legislators and an investigation into alleged police brutality are afraid once they leave they will be arrested officers have also surrounded the campus the students are facing writing charges of very serious crime in selling gone sports in a minute.

Catholic Church CBS Michigan U. S. Catholic church National Committee Hong Kong Joshua Wong James Johnson bishop Johnston chairman polytechnic institute five hundred years
"five hundred years" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on KTOK

"Who's to say that about presidents I was told very clearly that the horrible sign for humanity if you were to cheer lock them up at two towards a candidate that's gone that is it abandoned that policy is no longer in effect that's that's absent that's incredible that that happened now not to a surprise you know in Washington DC ninety five percent I think are Democrats we had this that I think it's I think it was a I know five percent were Republic yeah five percent but I think it's there's other like net on I was a nondenominational but in the end I can't well nondenominational works now it does yeah I don't you think the Democratic Party is absolutely religion watch here is Washington DC voter break down seventy five point six percent Democrat five point nine percent Republican so I mean it look yeah that doesn't mean everybody there is from DC exactly but you you wouldn't expect a Washington DC audience necessarily react positively to Donald Trump though I will say you know go back to the date of birth of Barack Obama yell you exactly what I did on the air which was drink a beer to celebrate Osama bin laden being dead on the air that is a certainly not just an excuse to drink on the job that was because I was not I was celebrated drinking forget no no no was it in reality was that it was the best Davis president well can you it wasn't just hand when we didn't know that it was the hardest decision in five hundred years until a few days later yeah well it was one jun we that was only ten week torched but that wasn't a hard decision that was because I know him or his decision of five hundred years this is just by Joe Biden being the typical Joe Biden that he is but you know looking back at it you can certainly make it into something that it is not which was it was not a difficult decision at all no in fact everybody whose life was actually on the line in the mission would tell you wait is there a one percent chance we can get for some of the model in the let's go live fire at the helicopters let's go because that's what those guys were therefore we talk to how many of them over the years that we've done anything yet over there and and shot at him we have talked to the guys who were on the on that mission to kill Osama bin laden and you know what we didn't know what the time was barackobama made it almost impossible if anything goes wrong with your helicopter good luck because we're not coming in to rescue and we know now that there was a very long delay from the initial indication as it was six months thing was six months I mean but again I don't think I still think he handled it well but still on that day we get your happy right we gave him Hey thank you for killing this really bad guy now some people say that al Baghdadi is not Osama bin laden well yes jar jar Binks is not Darth Vader but when you kill jar jar Binks it's still a very good day it's too port charges are yeah well he was even the same side as Darth me how you will then to use against him I guess he was so then right because Darth wasn't Darth yet yeah how.

"five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Also on Tuesday extinction rebellion activists in San Francisco staged a protest and Diane and house speaker Nancy Pelosi's offices demanding she take immediate legislative action on climate change and those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot org the war and peace report I mean you got and I'm one consols welcome to all of our listeners and viewers across the country and around the world well one before we move on to the climate crisis and that is enveloping the globe today we are watching events unfold in Porter Rico where it looks like the governor Carter SCO is about to resign yes well not with the eyes reporting that maybe as soon as the by noon today there will be an official announcement and the if so this is going to be a stunning an unprecedented awe turn of events so in point thought he'd go up people have to understand what political has a long history it's five hundred years of governance importer regal there been during that period of time of five hundred years there been two hundred and eighty six governors of the island of what the people most of them about a hundred and forty seven were under Spanish rule and then there was a period of wind of direct American control of the island when the president appointed about twenty seven governors and it's only been in the past sixty years or so there's actually been elected governors by the people themselves and they've only been twelve elected governors of point that he called us since the Commonwealth of what the vehicle was created in nam it'll be actually on sixty seven years a goal you tomorrow July twenty fifth is the anniversary the funding of the Commonwealth to put the vehicle toward all those two hundred eighty six governors never has and governor been forced to resign by popular protest so this is really unprecedented in the entire history of political going back to Bonn said LA all who was the first governor of point of people back in fifteen oh wait so it and the power of the what the heck on people to be able to force this governor to resign as a result of the scandalous stuff ugh chat messages that were on cover to a couple of weeks ago is really going to put the island in in in in a very difficult situation I mean on the one hand all these young people a whole generation of young people now have a new sense of power of the power that people can have to affect governance but the problem becomes now what happens next the even the the succession issue is going to be tough because the woman who's going to come in as as Aug interim governor is not at all doesn't have a whole lot of experience being in that Ricky Rossi all which is one of this the the real stories here that this was actually a very incompetent that on an experienced person from the beginning with a certain arrogance and the way he dealt with his own population but history is replete with examples of popular uprisings that got rid of a corrupt dictatorial government but the people ended up with war situations on the let's can we forget to rear square in two thousand eleven and the overthrow of Mubarak after several weeks of protests by the people of go back a little further to the Philippines in nineteen eighty six and the overthrow of Markle's by the popular of protest or even further back to nineteen seventy nine and in Iran and the overthrow of the Shah in each of those cases people for their country was going to change dramatically and ended up with in some to in some cases in worse situations than before so there's going to be a real test now among the leaders in the activists of put the vehicle can the United can they come up with a a political force leadership that it really accountable to the point that he can people and that's going to be the the big test in the future well will certainly continue to follow the same encourage people to check out our broadcast yesterday we spent the entire hour interviewing the head of the center for independent journalism which is the independent journalist a group that were leased to these explosive exchanges between the governor and and his staff with emails.

San Francisco Diane five hundred years sixty seven years twenty fifth sixty years one hand
"five hundred years" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:05 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thanks everybody thank you all for coming this special rate given that the weather outside it is nice to be inside was dry as close as I worked with one thing I realized so my first book was that's the science and when I went and talked about that book I realize that many people come to the talks because they have their own sleep disorders and they want to talk with somebody about it this book is about the play I think you have to play this is not the place for you I think there's a hospital about three blocks that way that's the better that's that's we should go instead so one of the questions people always ask me is how did you get interested in this book well the last book I wrote was about Malibu was that the family that used to own all of Malibu and how they got and how they lost it and that story one of the main characters comes up to San Francisco around nineteen hundred and he writes a letter back to his wife saying this is the work is place I've ever seen and there's rumors that the plague is here I got stuck by the work rumors seem like one of those things that you do that no plate was there for you would not you know everybody know about the outbreak so I started looking into it and I learned that there was a conspiracy between city officials the governor of California and the elders of the state's most powerful newspapers to conceal the truth of the plague and by extension put millions of people's lives at risk I I you know I had never heard of this before and I started realizing that this was actually three stories and one is the story of a disease is the story of a place and the story of people so we can go through it will go through all those so starting off with product plague most people have heard of it because you know middle school or high school here if the plague decimating Europe and kill half of the population it's the same disease it never really went away and what happens when you have to find a plague is that you get what's called approval it's a swollen lymph is this one plan and if you're growing your armpit and if those of blood so this is where we want to play comes from you typically die within forty eight or seventy two hours and then the longer it stays in your body before you die if it can change in different forms so start to panic plague then becomes septa Simic plague which means it gets in your blood stream and then finally it becomes pneumatic play which is the most virulent form of the disease you can get it just by you can spend just by coughing and this is what decimated Europe people coffin and just has a white everybody out there at the time there was no room it was kind of this outbreak was and into the early twentieth century there's no cure for the disease and there is no vaccine I we we still have no vaccine now so what happens is this the start of the steam ship age where the world was connected people and goods for closer connected than ever before some disease could travel faster than ever before plague me most in China in about eighteen seventy people don't know why but it started spreading in a certain spending heavily rapidly so reaches Hong Kong decimates the city hospitals there are reporting something like in ninety five percent death rate among patients eventually kills ten million people in China I have a close another five million people in India it spreads to Australia it spreads to Scotland and it seems like it's only a matter of time before the play reaches North America for the first time and this is an important thing to realize too is that this is an era where science and medicine is still an independent infancy you know it's on the doorstep of the modern age so this is a time we're many doctors are considered a good doctor if you're just if you're fast because it's not Matt there's not pain medication is not everything out the idea that science and medicine is something that you know people in white lab coats to ruin with microscopes and X. ray machines and everything else that's still only back in its infancy songster becoming accepted so this is a time when science is real for really fighting for legitimacy and this is a disease that no one knows what to do with even though it's almost the modern age medical science and and medical understanding of this disease really still was not that different from the Middle Ages you know nothing is changed in five hundred years they just know that this is a disease that you can't fight that has no cure and you don't know what to do with so you have on one hand you know the most terrifying disease in human history and it's spread in again and what is that spread to it spreads to San Francisco which is perhaps the least the worst place in the world for to spread and there's many reasons why well the first one to that too before that one thing to know when you get the disease yes you know it is a gruesome death I read a little bit from the book and you know this is this is probably one of the the closer scenes in the book so if you're a little squeamish that's why I learned a lot of many but I learned a lot of rose how working on this book I held back on most of them so if you really want to hear like the grossest stuff come up to me afterwards and I tell you but so before they reached Sam Cisco it within reach Honolulu and it was found and Chinatown there as well so in this season doctor Lee is a doctor in Chinatown the victim's name is your way and a man who brings him to doctor Lee is an and man named Fong and they lived in the same essentially flop house in Chinatown Fong saw that your Cory was near death he picks them up put them on his back and rocks and two to three blocks to the doctor's office trying to save his life so this is the scene so doctor was alone when founder Stan and lady of corn in front of him the man was covered in feces environment and received an apparent madness doctor we struggle to hold his new patient still all the while wondering how he was still alive a finger to his arrest reveals a racing polls as if the body was facing an internal terror well his forehead was so warm to the touch that doctor Lee fought the instinct to pose hand away when your call yelled his stream sounded wet as if emerging from below the sea the man's skin which days before had landed in the bombing alliance on was popular with black spots in open sewers leaving the line between bodily tissue in the outside world and unsettled question the lymph nodes in this fight were so swollen that it looked as if it's like you've been pumped full of air and is at risk of floating away an extra blood in phone began leaking out of his mouth a sign of ruptured blood vessels and he soon fell into a coma from which doctor Lee knew he would never recover so you have a terrifying gruesome disease coming to San Francisco and San Francisco at the time was still central route last you know the census group was the most important city on and then tired in the western half of the country the biggest city is the richest city it was the most connected to the rest of the world through trade you know what's coming through the Golden Gate before the bridges there obviously about will come in it could be from Alaska it could be from Russia it could be from Hawaii could be from Japan could be from Australia it could be from New York people going around the the horn to to get up and go to great distances because there was a round of this is the meeting place of the world at the efforts of San Francisco was still a almost like a boom town you know this is only fifty years after the gold rush and only fifty years after statehood so you still have people walking the streets of central school who were little real gold miners that was the mindset of the city was you know I I describe in the book as a place approved in fate rather than skill because that's when you think about what a gold miners mindset as you don't mind for girl because you think you're better at mine for girls than everybody else you're doing it because you think you can be lucky you know I'm gonna find the right spot I'm gonna get the biggest not get I'm going to become a wealthy personal assistant and if that's your mindset that you are counting on being lucky you don't want anybody to get in the way of you becoming lucky so so that there was no idea that you could have public health were public goods or this idea that you have the of civil society one thing I was struck by the book was as Sam Cisco grew its spending on public health the client so you had a big city with a festering problems of the boomtown it was a place where you walk in the street and you know if the horse carcasses around and people just throw trash and food in the street rain for expecting for rats to take it away in the book to it and close somebody who said it talking about rats is you know god made them scavengers so let them scavenge that was the mindset and not only that but San Francisco you know it's every man for himself type of place it's also the reverse first time kind of hitting its middle age where people can't get jobs as easily as before so they start looking for someone to blame and they find it and Chinese immigrants Chinatown in San Francisco is the largest Chinatown outside of Asia at the time and still is has about twenty percent of the city's population and like immigrants anywhere Chinese or are willing to do the jobs nobody else well I'm so it's laundry is its crux its its supporters and hotels as everything else and there is red rampant and blatant anti Asian bigotry and racism and ways of you as a mother you know now you look back at it's it's shocking so the man at the time was named James Fallon he later becomes and runs for and when when's the see the US Senate seat in California and his campaign signs really say what are the key California white that was that was the focus that you know it was a very easy scapegoat for all the problems that were happening in San Francisco and for that the governor at the time was a man named Henry Gage and like politicians now he pioneered the idea of calling anything he didn't agree with or anything that was negative fake news black death and the Golden Gate.

fifty years ninety five percent five hundred years seventy two hours twenty percent one hand
"five hundred years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Its heyday about twenty five hundred years ago the city of Babylon was the biggest in the world some two hundred thousand people lived there you may have heard of king Nebuchadnezzar the second credited with the hanging gardens of Babylon one of the seven wonders of the ancient world or the tower of Babel from the Bible believed to be based on a real old Babylonian temple well that one is still there fifty miles or so south of Baghdad in what is now modern rock and for today at least Babylon is back in the headlines UNESCO has just officially named as a world heritage site and your skin around his in a rock she joins me now he Jane hi Mary Louise I have to start with my amazement that Babylon was not already a world heritage site why not yeah well the main reason is that it hasn't been treated very well so if you look around at the houses in neighboring villages they used to be made of bricks that were actually removed from the site of Babylon and then there were really big projects the British built a railway threw it in the nineteen twenties recently there been oil and gas lines laid through it the Saddam Hussein era he inscribed his own name in some of those bricks hi and then we have to mention that in two thousand and three the US led coalition put a helicopter landing pad in there so a lot of damage done to that site but the argument has been now that you should see that as a part of its history have not as an argument for not listing it as a world heritage site sounds like so much damage done to the original site over the years you've been there what does it look like when you visit Babylon today okay I'm gonna be honest here because it is one of those sites where you really have to use your imagination because it's huge and only ten percent of it has been excavated so you can see the original walls not all the way down because it's been built on layers but you can see these very high walls and on weekends it's packed with Iraqis if you go other days it's kind of desolate and empty but he was a magical thing that you want to that processional entryway and you can still see the original bricks from more than two thousand years ago with those figures of the dragons with the serpens heads and you're walking on four thousand years of human history and that in itself was absolutely magical modern Iraqis view it they are surrounded by so much history so much of it so ancient Roman what has been the reaction to the news today well there's been quite a lot of jubilation I reached American conservationist Jeff Allen by phone the indelible on tonight he's with the world monuments project and he's working on a U. S. funded project to help restore Babylon Austin how people were celebrating there are a number of people on the entrance of Babylon tonight you just want to be near the plates are there was a box full of local government officials who showed up get the picture site and July you're having a bit of celebration street people out in your cars being happy and glad that you're lacking and that's a wonderful thing that she's doing our records are just really healthier for once they're in the news for something good instead of like chaos in car bombs and and just briefly Jane what will this listing mean for Babylon diss me more resources to go in and you said it's only a fraction of that that's actually been excavated it probably will not be more resources for excavation but it will mean potentially more resources to protect what they have it will give the department of antiquities more power against ministries like the oil ministry that builds oil pipelines there in my free up some other ranking government money when I went there a few months ago there was no museum open there's no gift shop yes tell gift shop there's no cafe but mostly it will give it more publicity and and a rack is really hoping that tourists will start to come in for the first time in decades and here's gene arrive talking there about the ancient city of Babylon which UNESCO name today as.

Babylon twenty five hundred years four thousand years two thousand years ten percent
"five hundred years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on KGO 810

"Ninety three puffing Columbus created it's not just people who come here and Mary have offspring that are mix of all cultures and different continents. It's also biology plants. We've talked about tobacco. We can also we will speak of the sweet potato moment that may be important in spreading and growing China's population. Math arithmetically geometrically over the last five hundred years as well because of the improvement in diet, but right now, silver Charles, whereas Potosi, and what is the significance? All this stuff that we've been talking about about the ecology. And so that was not known to people back, then, and you know, it's happening in the margins, but they're focused on with golden silver, and particularly from the European point of view the biggest event after Columbus within fifteen forty five the Spaniards discovered in what is now southern Bolivia is close to a mountain of pure silver. Jealousy allows it was the biggest silver strike in history by huge margins as the way up in the end and potency, which now is hardly known to anyone was for a long time. The biggest city in the Americas. And it would have been bigger still if the Spaniards hadn't done everything they possibly could to keep people out. You say. Silver poured out of fifty thousand people in fifteen sixty six by sixteen eleven it had one hundred sixty thousand people bigger than London bigger than London. And it was up thirteen fourteen thousand feet at a place where you can't grow anything every bit of food every descrip- of furniture, all that had to be imported by Lama up these and and mules up into the heights of the Andes where where the great silver where the great silver mines word. Isn't extraordinary place was a BoomTown par excellence and. So much silver poured out of there. And also the Spaniards also found silver in Mexico that the historians at the university of Pacific where the biggest Saudi carefully believed that the world's supply of practice middle which say the world's supply of money because that's what people use back then silver. Doubled. Or even tripled in the space of one hundred hundred and fifty years, you write the estimate that they extracted and transported between the sixteenth and eighteenth century one hundred fifty thousand tonnes of silver. Just an enormous sum in it had any huge impact on the entire world. Because prior to the discovery of the western Europe intimate actually been a relatively poor part of the world, it they were very inches to go to China after all what Columbus is trying to do what all the Spaniards and Portuguese who are going across the trying to get to the civic. We're trying to do. They're trying to go to China. China was the wealthiest most fisted place in the world and. But there's sort of pathetic records where they would show up. And what would the, you know, the English or Spanish or Portuguese? Or who have you would want to trade and the biggest industry in sixteen hundred year textiles in the big wall? And so they would show essentially with a load of sixteen scratchy sixteenth, century bathrobes and tried to trade it for silk..

Silver Columbus China Andes London Mary Bolivia Charles Americas Europe Mexico university of Pacific one hundred fifty thousand ton thirteen fourteen thousand fee sixteen hundred year five hundred years fifty years
"five hundred years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Medicare. All it is now. Not just employer. See they see Bernie Sanders. Turn that around the employee said changes in the system, if you have individual insurance, you're getting the system changed all the time. That's happened. To me. I mentioned CIGNA's great company a couple years ago. We got the note like eight different letters doctors going that was gone, by the way, we appreciate your business, but we're outta here on that particular policy. Have a nice day. You like your doctor keep production? Save twenty five hundred year except not. Well. And I was like, let's let's Medicare works. Pretty darn well for people who have Medicare the time to worry now where they say, well, let's just expanded. It'll be great governments. Fantastic. Government can't organize a one car funeral procession. One eight hundred seven sixty KFI B get some calls coming up here. One eight hundred seven sixty five three six two. I want to remind you about Stanley steamer why? Because Stanley steamer can do what you need them to do at any time. They are fantastic. There are a lot of reasons why people clean Stanley steamer, first and foremost, you clean the carpets and a great especially after the long winter after the rainy weather man after today, but there's a lot more remove the dirt the germs the allergens. It's allergy season get that stuff out of their clean the air. Ducts get it all done at the same time. Take a look at the spots and soiled animals areas. Repents kids, maybe both have left things in the carpeting, there's those spots. Tired of looking at them..

Stanley Bernie Sanders CIGNA twenty five hundred year
"five hundred years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"On Google and come back to ancient life world dot com and per to CD today, non GMO, and all organic, you don't wanna be using a petroleum product. You want to be using the cleanest CBD product on the market patient life, oil dot com. We even have CBD for your pet. Help your pets discomfort help your discomfort. Log onto ancient life oil dot com. That's ancient life oil dot com. Newly reduced prices to pass off the savings to the most important person you ancient life, oil dot com, and one more thing we have topical. To. So if you have joint pain and some different issues that are going on in your body. You might wanna use a topical think about it. Ancient life oil dot com. Are you Doug, Andrew hair? I call my favorite financial vehicle. The laser fund laser is an acronym that stands for liquid assets safely. Earning returns delays are fun to limits. The dangers of rising taxes inflation and market volatility. You know, losing money when the stock market goes down is unacceptable to me. Learn how I protect myself when that happens I want you to have a free copy of my latest bestselling book the laser fund how to diversify and create the foundation for tax free retirement, especially if you have money trapped in an IRA or 4._0._1._K come and learn what you can do better for a half day. Learn how to retire by design in Layton, Salt Lake and Provo where teaching from ADM to two PM wherein. Layton, Friday, April twenty-sixth, Salt Lake Saturday, April twenty-seventh and Probo Saturday may fourth their free. Call now. Eight to six one eighty one eighty one call eight two. Six one eighty one eighty one trying to find them for twenty five hundred years.

Andrew hair Salt Lake Layton Google ADM Doug Provo twenty five hundred years
"five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And because the atmosphere as six percent more moisture in it right now as a confident digits fifty years ago as a consequence of global warming. We're getting massively more rain. This by the way is the new normal. This is this is not some weird thing. This is absolutely now the NAR the the norm. And you know, if if you in fact this morning, and the the Missouri river, they were showing some. Before. And after of the flooding pictures on the Missouri river on TV. And if you looked at the before pictures, you could tell where the flood plain was right because you can see that the, you know. You know, where the vegetation was and where we're basically where the flood plain was, and you can see that there's lots and lots of construction that flood plain then then the after picture, of course, the flood plains now flooded now might not have been flooded for the last four hundred years or six hundred or eight hundred years it's an unusual event, but you know, five hundred year floods one hundred year floods. Thousand-year floods are now becoming thousand floods are becoming tenure floods. Five hundred year floods are becoming three year floods one hundred year floods are becoming every other year. It's in parts of the United States. And this is, you know, very simple this this is not rocket science. I mean, you know, there's the this article Laura Riley in the Washington Post. The headline is maybe it's a sign from God is a she's quoting one of the farmers who has floods devastate, Nebraska farmers. No, it's not a sign from God. It's it's science. It's a sign from vile weather that we have been polluting our atmosphere for the last two hundred years in ways that the atmosphere can't deal with. And its allies.

Missouri river NAR Laura Riley United States Washington Post Nebraska one hundred year eight hundred years four hundred years Five hundred year five hundred year two hundred years Thousand-year fifty years six percent three year
"five hundred years" Discussed on Barstool Radio with Dave Portnoy

Barstool Radio with Dave Portnoy

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on Barstool Radio with Dave Portnoy

"What what what do you think it will make this one different than maybe some of the other collectively the people the leaders that we have in charge? I mean, we got close to five hundred years NFL experience involved in our league. And I just think the fans they want more football, and we want to build a trust with our players and really it's an opportunity for them to showcase their talents. Because let's be real. I mean preseason really doesn't give you a lot of opportunities to make squad. And there's a lot of players that get cut from NFL teams because they aren't giving the opportunity if you get hurt in that first before that I crease is a game. Chances are you're not going to make the team because it won't allow you a chance to get out there and play. So I'm super excited and having a bunch of guys playing with a chip on their shoulders. It's going to be exciting football. We just left training camp down to San Antonio, man. And those guys are eager to play an Anna I still like the game of football. I mean, it's still out there hitting guys making some outstanding plays. And so I'm. Cited for their opportunities to showcase everyone that they can play show starts February ninth on CBS super now. Look on this show. We've been doing a lot over the last couple of weeks about the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yes. And and I would say you're one of the most iconic Steelers in recent memory for the second generation. Yes. It pains me because I do think of the Steelers as one of those, you know, notable bedrock franchises of the patriots one of their archrivals. So it hurts me to see basically. It's turned into a clown show essentially year, that's a great. It has it culminating. Well, there's a couple of things culminated with Antonio Brown's showing up wearing a purple hippopotamus suit. Then we have this fall, you're mentioning this is your fence Frankie played us call. I felt so bad for the Steelers who I consider my rival. We did an our radio just to memorialize death play this call this guy this happened. Pittsburgh. I'm twenty six years old. I grew up about two hours east of Pittsburgh. I've watched every single Steelers preseason regular season postseason game since the two thousand one season. I'm a die hard fan. I grew up watching the Hines wards of the league that Jerome Batasuna's detroi-, Paul them all is on defense. The Casey Hamptons, those guys and what I'm seeing right now is an absolute disgusting embarrassment. And I put most of it on Mike Tomlin. Did you? So where were you when Antonio Brown took off the hippopotamus hat funny story. So last night, you know, met my office hanging out on my computer. I come downstairs to get a drink. I the TV's on. My dad's watching this this match singer show, and I sit down just to talk to them because we talk sports a lot. And I'm telling him about the latest on Brown, and they're down to the last three mascots, and they're going to reveal one of them. And it just so happens that while him, and I are conversing about our disappointment in Antonio Brown. This purple hippopotamus pulls off it's mask. Believed. In. I mean, this was for an our people our therapy session as somebody who wore the black and gold. What are your thoughts on what's happened in this? Once proud franchise what man it is embarrassing to be honest with you. I mean, you know, that's just not the culture to still coach, you know, look at what happened with Malcolm Butler. You don't being late for meeting and missing the Super Bowl. You know, that's the culture, and that's the patriots ways. No one guy that's bigger than a team. You do coach Belichick says and everyone else is held accountable while just think the cultural the culture in Pittsburgh has changed a little bit. It's more about the production on the field outweighs what the overall team aspect is. And and then when you start to get a bunch of individuals worrying about how many catches they get how many this or how much who's making this type of money. It just sets up for disaster for team fix it. Just get rid of guys giving you think so well starts coach Tomlin. I like, you just said that me, there's no way that you know, Jewish settlement is worrying that that outfit bell Padilla check. That is not happening with Bill. Like into a brownie was FaceTime..

Pittsburgh Steelers Antonio Brown Mike Tomlin Pittsburgh football NFL San Antonio patriots CBS Malcolm Butler Casey Hamptons Frankie Bill bell Padilla Belichick Hines Jerome Batasuna Paul five hundred years
"five hundred years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"But imagine if you could put a no Thomas car on the ride that would run now for the next five hundred years, and you couldn't take it off that history. History. Had history has do you wanna know the reason that atomic energy was able to be regulated by the US government was because when they developed the bomb it was during wartime, and so the president had special wartime powers. So the whole fact that the entire like atomic energy is an entire industry, but it's entirely regulated and controlled by the US government because it was during wartime in the president had wartime powers to make that happen. Had it been developed by private industry to be a completely different issue. Yeah. Non actually, I agree with you, the I think, you're right. But if it wasn't at that point in time, all of the governments the world United to agree that nuclear power had to be controlled because of the risk. So they only needs to where the here's the difference industry. Here's the difference. It's still very hard as as Kim Jong UN will tell you to create an atomic bomb. It takes a lot of skill a lot of expertise and a lot of tests. It turns out crisper is something you could pretty much do in your basement. Yeah. It's not that hard. And that's the real problem here is that this technology, whether it was developed by government or private labs, or whatever it will get out and unlike an atomic bomb, lots of people. Yeah, there's a lot of technology like that isn't there? We got the same Kane and heroin people doing that at time and look at the damage that that's look how easy it is to make meth. We'll be thing. I'm confident Christopher. We'll be at the inaugural. Yeah. Oh, yes. It one hundred percent. And ultimately, it has great potential to make things better. It's just, you know, human humans and humidity is Mitch. No, not ready to hit actually deal is with this in time. But the time is certainly not there yet. We'll such early days, you know, one of the of mentioned this several times, I'm reading I love you've all Noah Harari, the philosopher from the from Israel who wrote sans and homo dis his newest is Twenty-one lessons for the twenty first century, and one of the things he's pointing out is as we're doing this kind of regression to nationalism, and it's happening in many countries worldwide, this kind of nostalgic desire to close in it's happening in Britain, as you know, Greg, and it's happening in the United States, the problem that is many of the problems that we have to deal with in the future are not national but global you clan. I can't deal with climate change nationally, you can't deal with Christopher nationally. It's going to take a global effort, and in many cases countries are moving in the wrong direction. You know? A country can't ban crisper, and then expect it not to be used everywhere else right effect nuclear nuclear weapons as a global issue not a national issue, and they attempt to deal with it nationally is is fraught with peril as we will know if they've got so we have to have them. It's a global world. And you can't turn back the clock on it in the things that are happening. You know, they're ultimately going to be blips on the radar. We know that this is the way history moves right is often Tuesday for one step back. And you know, it's funny because one of the greatest examples of this is China and US and their trade relations in all of that. We are so intertwined and interdependent. On each other commercially that it's ridiculous. A lot of this thing is so much posturing and so much. You know, really negotiation tactics in many ways from from both sides because it would be catastrophic to both the US and China to not have a really strong trade relationship. That's just what ample right. It's just that promotes peace. I mean, that's. As one of the reasons we haven't had a nuclear war is because it would be catastrophic for both sides and everybody knows that right?.

United States president Christopher Kim Jong UN Thomas Noah Harari heroin China Kane Israel Greg Britain one hundred percent five hundred years
"five hundred years" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"So I love this piece the native American versus Nick San man face off is reminiscent of European versus native American conflict. First of all, let's go back about five hundred years. Let's say the group of white guys five hundred years ago in then America, not the United States in in the colonial. Territories of America. What's Bush white guts sitting around? They're like standing there and native American saunters banging a drum in their face painting. That goes. Yeah. It goes the same way five hundred years ago. It does now probably not probably there's no comparison. But here's what the peaceful Katie Mettler says in eighteen sixty nine I love this Elvis it happened in two thousand nine hundred and it wasn't racist. So let's let's go back. Ooh. One hundred and fifty years that probably a great idea in eighteen sixty nine as a way to end the violence inflicted by white settlers upon native American land in the west president. Ulysses s grant's implements in his peace policy. Let us have peace had been his campaign slogan. The previous year and after his election native, people were forcefully confined to reservations where they would become civilized to sidestep the abuse and corruption within the government's Indian bureau reds awarded contracts to religious groups run reservation, boarding schools. Those would eventually be dominated by Catholic missionaries who took native children from their parents and place them in classrooms where they were taught to dress speak and pray like white people. So here we go. Now, it's the Catholics. All right. Did everything that happened in like now that's the Catholics because back then Catholics did some bad things. I love this stuff. They say the native now fast forward fast forward grants government policies. Also, set the stage for the contemporary horror stories still fresh in the collective memory of native communities, the ones that have been invoked since Friday when a native American elder a group of mostly white Catholic school teenagers met face to face on the mall in Washington. The native man, Nathan Phillips was singing a soul of unity that encouraged strength against the ravages of colonialism. He was banging a drum in people's face in a language. They didn't understand while defending the black. Hebrew, Israelites a group of out and out anti semitic racist that but no you see he was the symbol of unity. The kids standing there doing nothing that guy. He's reminds you gives you like a weird sensation of European colonialism. The teams from Covington Catholic high school in Kentucky had attended the March for life and wore make America. Great again caps. Invoking President Trump's campaign slogan. Ooh, what was painful about that safe for indigenous peoples scholar said afterward was the tension. It invoked evoked. I love that line scholars said afterward. Oh, okay. So we have to go to the scholars the tape didn't show you wanted to show. So let's ask the scholars about their broader lessons. They took from an incident that wasn't racist. Amazing the length the media will go to to avoid talking about the real issue, which is there suck at their job. People tweeted this out to like this right here is the real issue the five hundred years of bad relations between the white man in the native American now. Pretty sure the real issue. Is you guys? Are you got low at your jobs? I'm pretty sure that's the real issue here in just a second a little bit more of this. And then I'm get to the hall of fame voted, I know baseball. But I will explain what we're talking about that in a second. I let me remind you. There are three hours of the show those three hours are visible.

America Nathan Phillips white Catholic school United States Nick San Covington Catholic high school Bush Katie Mettler president President Trump Ulysses Washington baseball Kentucky Elvis five hundred years three hours fifty years
"five hundred years" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

18:59 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Paso's, News Radio six hundred KT SM. Okay. Welcome back to coast to coast, George Noory with you. Let me tell you a little bit about our guest Merle, thank Houser as lead one of the most diverse and interesting careers in music. He became one of the innovators of the surf music and psychedelic folk rock back in nineteen Seventy-three. Berlin is group m you moved to the island of Maui to further their studies of the fabled lost continent of mirror or lem urea American Indian and Hawaiian legend says that the continent existed some thousand five hundred years ago in the Pacific Ocean, where the horizon islands now exist Merle is also a longtime UFO researcher, he has accumulated some very impressive evidence of the lost continent of Muir, and he can be found right now on coast to coast. Merle welcome to the program. Great to be on the air with you tonight. George looking forward to the was just with Billy Gibbons from Z Z top this weekend. Watching their show. And I gotta tell you as a musician in you'd appreciate this these these folks, man, they I don't know where they get their energy. They just keep going. Yeah, you're right. I've seen them before. They put on quite a show Billy's quite a guitarist. Jimi Jimi Hendrix once called him the best guitarist she's ever heard Billy, of course, said that about Jimmy. But he's pretty darn good Merle. Yes. Yes. Have you been what's new with you? Well, I'm just a working on another album. We've been promoting it. It's only been out three weeks called eclipse, and it's on a UK label and their seventeen different bands on the album, George that all field. Their music has been influenced by ET's or UFO sightings in the bands are from the United States, Canada and the UK and they took one of my songs calling from a star as the lead song on the first disc. It's a two disc set. So I've been. Working on that for the last three weeks Merle. How did you get interested in the paranormal end of this? Well, my father was a pilot and he had the glider port it lake Elsinore, south of Los Angeles. If you know where that is in the fifties. And he taught me to fly piper cub when I was only fourteen and I later solo in a Sweitzer one twenty six glider. So I was always interested in aviation. And I can remember asking my dad, if he thought, you know, there was life out there in space, and he said, oh, yeah. There has to be and then as a young guy, not even barely a teenager. Just then I started reading every book I could find on UFO's and I read project blue book. Can I was always looking at the sky, you know, trying to see a UFO, but I never did. And I've been interested in it all these years has that influenced your music, the the belief in the interest in UFO's. Well, it really didn't that I know of George up until nineteen seventy four I moved from Woodland Hills a suburb of LA where I had been living in the music business since nineteen sixty eight nine found this book called the lost continent of MU by Colonel James church word, and I ended up calling the band that we had at the time. Mo and we had a couple of albums out and in nineteen. Seventy three we told our record label and our promoters agents we were moving to Hawaii because Hawaii was supposedly the mountain peaks of the lost continent of. No. And so we packed up our instruments and everything and flew off to Maui and rented a house on Maui, and we decided to go up to the top of Holly Aquila crater and watch the sunset. It was a popular thing to do and they have an observatory up there. And so we went up, and we were standing there on the top of the crater and quite a few tourists were there, and there was an older gentleman. It was in the navy in the second World War standing next to me and the sun sun went down. And we were looking at all of this star. Cars and all of a sudden this blue pulsating light came over the crater, and it didn't make a sound. And the guy standing next to me said man, he said I was in the navy, and he said, I never saw anything like this. And it's not making any sound. So it can't be a helicopter and right is he said that to other lights came out of it and went up on each side. And they started shining a beam from one to the next that formed a tetrahedral in inverted pyramid. And we were all just spellbound. And this thing must have lasted for about four minutes. And then all of the the little lights went back into the big one, and it shot straight up and disappeared. And I went okay I've finally seen. Oh, it took all of this time. And then we drove down back down the mountain our house in haiku Maui. And I immediately turned on the real to reel tape recorder that I had I remember those. And I picked up my guitar and the song just came out, and I recorded it wrote the lyrics in the cord down. And that is a first song that I can honestly say I was inspired by what I saw to write that song. And I've written several songs since that. You know, I feel have been inspired by UFO's or something. I can't really say actually that they're transmitting it to me like some people do that. I it's it comes from somewhere, and it comes so fast. And you gotta get it down real quick. And I once met John Lennon in the did you? How cool at my friend Harry Nelson's house in Hollywood at a party. And I got to talk to him for about fifteen minutes. George. Nice sky. Yes. And Harry put me on the spot. I just flown over from Maui. And he said this, my friend Merle. He's gonna play a song for us. And I'd never got nervous in my life. God John sitting there. My lips started Twitter. So I played this song. I wrote called on our way to HANA, and it was talking about seeing to silver saucers while driving this beautiful road out in the jungle with cascading waterfalls on one side in the ocean on the other in a soon as I finish the song. John said that is very interesting. What inspired that and then the ice was kinda broken? And we took a break, and I got to talk to him for about fifteen minutes. And he brought up the fact that he said isn't songwriting odd. You don't know where the inspiration is gonna come from. And you've gotta get it down real quick some way either recorded or write it down. That's right or it'll go away, which is very true. And it was interesting. He. He called it automatic writing. He was ahead of his time. Yeah. Can so songs that I'd written before I had that UFO citing a lot of songs. I had written that way. And I always found the best songs came out. You hear it all in your head the music, and if it's lyrics you hear the lyrics, and then you gotta figure out how to play it on guitar, piano and transcribe it somehow or something can you know, you can radio could come on or something, and it would like be erased from your mind. And so those songs that I wrote before that as I started out in instrumental surf they were inspired. I felt by the ocean and different things something always inspired him. But that one song calling from. Star which is on this new eclectic. The album. I really feel was inspired by USO. How many people realize when they listen to your music that it was inspired by these paranormal events. Oh. So many George when I was on coast to coast. I think it was twenty thirteen with John be. Well, that's right. That's about six going on almost six years ago. Gee, yeah. I got eight hundred sixty emails after that. And they were all about people asking me about you at foes and sightings and telling me about their sightings and a lot of them were musicians. And you know, they they get the vibe they they know there's something going on. Well, let's talk about these various aspects of the paranormal world in what you think about that. Of course, there's this underwater anomaly off the coast of Malibu, it's very strange the structure is strange looking. What do you think that is? Well. I it'll take me a little bit to explain that's okay. With me when I was playing with my serve band, the impacts in Pismo beach. And I was about seventeen years old. We used to go down to Malibu and go surfing, and we went down there. This might have been nineteen sixty two about and we had a nice day of surfing, and we came out of the water. And there were some local surfers, they're building a campfire, and we were gonna drive back up the coast up here to to Pismo. And they said, hey, you guys oughta stick around and watch the lights go in and out of the water. Only went what you know. So we're driving back in one of my buddies was laughing he said, they're seeing pelicans diving for fish, which is what they do up here, and in Pismo beach, and maybe the light glinting off of their wings looks like lights or something. So we never thought anything else about it. Nobody at that point that I knew knew anything. About an anomaly out in the water under nasc- oceans and so fast forward to whole I guess about twenty thirteen Michael Luchman who wrote the book alien rock, the extra terrestrial connection called me up and said, there's an old army radio tech that lives in the hills and Malibu, and he's picked up these very strange signals from out in the water. Can I have him send them to you? And I said, yeah. So we sent him to me. And I started playing I'm and I went in my studio, and the automatic writing thing kicked in I picked up my guitar and the only way I can describe it. It was like an instrumental surf melody, but from the sixties JAMES BOND movie kinda spooky and I had these signals playing and I was playing along with the signals to a click track, and then my band came in and they went, wow, what is that? And we put the rest of the instruments the drums. And that all of the keyboards and everything to it finish this song with the signals in it. And I called it signals from Malibu. So I was talking to a security guard at one of the casinos here, and he was a shoe mash Indian, and I played there. And he said, oh, I know all about your older recordings. In fact, I have your return to move how about that? Yeah. Isn't that kind of blew my mind? And he said what are you working on now, and I told him and he got this big grin on his face. And he said, you know, hard tribe has known about that building. He called it a building underwater there, and he said. When the ocean was down. They used to use it like a pier to fish off. And I'm just going. That's how this is really something. And so. You know, he said that it it had been there for all of these years. And he said it was built by the people that were here before us. And I somehow I started thinking this is gotta have something to do with the lost continent of MU I just thought of that. And when I lived in Woodland Hills. We used to go surfing at Malibu, and I'd hike up in the hills above there. And there is like a I would call it a small monolith. Up in the hills. There it's it's like a rock pillar. And it has these hieroglyphs on it. Nobody I've talked to know what they mean. But I noticed now that I think back it points straight out two point Dume, and where that anomaly is under the water. How big is immoral. Gosh, it's pretty huge. Right. Well, it's not that huge. It may be twenty. Twenty eight feet. I would say maybe tall. And I somehow feel that has something to do with that anomaly that's underwater there George he kind of looks like a UFO all by itself. Yes. Yes. Oh, I was talking about the rock pillar. You were talking to talking about the underwater thing. Yeah. The thing is got a opening that I think about seven hundred feet wide by now. Six hundred feet tall. Yeah. That's what I meant. It's pretty big. That's where they feel the UFO's you're going in and out of in Michael Lockman wanted to get. Aro v you know, an underwater unmanned submersible merciful with a video camera to go in there and film it, but he had a stroke and passed away and didn't didn't get that done. That's that's what big loss to the community to. Yeah. But furthering the whole thing I finished the album called signals from Malibu, and my UK label gone Zo multi-media put it out booked me on a bunch of interviews. And after I'd written the first song. I noticed there were four more minutes of signals that I didn't use. So I went out in the studio sat down to piano and put the headphones on and started to push the button to play the signals. And I thought Hm better hit record here on the multi-track. Justin case. Yes didn't. And so I just started out with this kind of. I'm not a great piano player with this meandering sort of it. Almost sounds classical spooky classical in a way with these signals playing in the headphone hold on for a second Moore, we're gonna take a quick break. But we'll come back and talk more about your adventures, then we'll move on to Hawaii and talk about those incredible stories that will take calls next hours. Coast insiders, the new version of the coast to coast AM app is now available for iphone and.

UFO George Noory Malibu Merle Maui John Lennon Hawaii UK Billy Gibbons Jimi Jimi Hendrix Woodland Hills Pacific Ocean Paso Muir Pismo beach navy Harry Nelson researcher Twitter Berlin
"five hundred years" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"It hasn't had any history. You know, it is a five hundred year old object that Emma, you Masemula. similarly, still at five hundred years someone decides me that part of the art is that it continues to evolve in change. So it would be a bit wrong for us to intervene in that natural aging process, which would be roping something away from the ought to wind time by but but can you do it digitally? If you take a picture of that. And you understand how the image has been changing over time. Chemically? Can you ask the computer will wind the clock back wherever you see? These different pigments being used and put into Hollywood have been absolutely. In fact, at team a Getty museum of nine exactly that. And they did that comparing a painting, which as age darkened of a time we manuscript illumination painted by the same artist because the manuscript has been closed in a book for five hundred years. And so has an edgy hasn't been exposed to light and smoke and at a degrading agents is they took that color, and so the digitally manipulated painting to make it look like that. When you shock does. It look does it look strike any difference. This is this what painted is even natural history. It's it's very different. And it's amazing actually, really. Yeah. So all their instances where you would want to intervene because I've I've heard it said by verse chemists and things that you do end up with various chemicals that can be destructive to a painting and actually do need to intervene and stop things. So are there ways to do that? And can you do it in a way that is sympathetic to the absolutely conservatives nowadays would intervene on a painting if someone in the past intervened in a non sympathetic way? And then you want to remove that previous intervention and make sure you preserve the paint. Well, that's true. Because of course, techniques that they would have had hundred years ago. Nothing like, Patrick so spend the restoration loads of your time on picking people's best attempts and best intentions. Absolutely. Yes. On heavily ruined it for everybody. Or can you get get that off? It depends. Sometimes they have sometimes you can't get it back, but not always. So what happens then if you come along you touch up a piece? Of art and make it look nice and stop the clock on it. And then I take it to a gallery, and they say it's a forgery because there's all these pigments that shouldn't be in there in that. Well, what we did today usually use pigments materials that are actually compatible with the history of the painting. And we also document everything that we do. So there's a pipe betrayal at very important pal. Thank you, very much, those Palo rich already, and she is from the fitzwilliam museum. And she's a research scientists they're working out how to do non destructive analysis and also preservation of important works of art and other artifacts..

Getty museum of nine fitzwilliam museum Emma Palo rich Hollywood forgery Patrick five hundred years five hundred year hundred years
"five hundred years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Gosh, don't you just know it said that was the hierarchy of beauty five hundred years BC, and it's in the twenty first century the body positive movement say it now applies to women crashing into the intersection of race class and size. Shaman Hayden again when a woman is larger and darker skin, specifically people think that they are ghetto ghetto being away to say that they are poorer and uneducated classiest, an aggressive, and that is something that just comes from simply because of their skin color, and this is and what does that feel like remember model selene she tells me, she does get work. But usually as a peripheral character, so one of my first jobs, it was for music, and then all the other girls, you call opportunities were flatter skin because only has skinny. Me too. And then they'll shift me he was caviar dark skin and just an extra now. She's thinking I'm unaware of your being a main goal and whatnot. Wherever you been for the camera. More wise that perspective. That was the model Selena ending that report from Sunday to my ska Canas. Alan are these issues. Do they just go round and round? Is this just simply the the latest generation sort of fighting for body, positively. Well, one of the things that's interesting to me as I thought that all of their points were very very important. And yes, of course, yes. It goes round and round. I think the hashtag is unfortunate because it trivializes what they're taught something very valid that they're speaking of. But other people are saying, well, you do I want my boobs to be flabby around. You know, do I agree with that? And it's really not about that. I think she needs to rethink the hashtag is is definitely raises eyebrows poorly. I'm curious what you think in the African countries that you focus on is. There a focus on the perfect physical ideal. Not really for women at the moment. The big issues access to land access to credit. It used to be access to education, but we have actually seen a lot of progress there. Now, they're far more girls in row getting as far as secondary education. For example, the news to be the case only a few years ago. But. The the rights of women in households to just have sufficient economic asset sufficient decision powder, they can choose. When do they want to get married? How much land bully half to to cultivate, feed their kids or in in for the middle classes in the city. Can they progress up the civil service or the business pyramid to real jobs have position in power? I mean, you have got women reaching ministerial jobs. You had after all the women president in Liberia until very recently. But still even as in Europe. They don't have a share commensurate with their shares. What relation a range of issues at play there. Well, thank you for coming up to the midway through the hour. Do stay with us on weekends on the BBC World Service. Distribution of the BBC World Service in the US has made possible by American public media APM produces and distributes award winning.

BBC World Service Alan Shaman Hayden Selena BC Europe Liberia US president five hundred years