23 Burst results for "Five Hundred Million Years"

Determining the Age of Earths Continental Crust

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Determining the Age of Earths Continental Crust

"And you study claims its continental crust. First emerged some three point. Seven billion years ago. The findings presented at the european geological. Union's general assembly showed that the planet's light continental crust formed within the first nine hundred million years of the earth's existence. The continental crust is the layer of grew natick sedimentary amid them offic rocks which forms the continents in the areas of shallow seabed close to their shores is the continental shelves. It's list dance. The janik crust material and therefore floats on top of it unlike previous research which is based on strontium isotopes and marine cabinets which are usually either scarce or altered in rock more than three billion years old new study by scientists from the university of bergen looked at the mineral barrett which forms from sulfates emotion water mixing with barium from hydrothermal vents and thus holds an unchanging record aversion chemistry. Going back through time. The authors calculated the ratio of strontium isotopes in six different deposits of barrack from three different continents range in age from three pointed three point. Five billion years this allowed them to determine win with continental rock populated into the ocean and was incorporated into barrett the authors determined that the weathering started about three point seven billion years ago. That's around five hundred million years earlier than previously thought. The findings provide a new understanding of early ocean chemistry. As well as the onset of plate tectonics and even hope understanding the evolution of the biosphere because once process is like plate tectonics hope established the continents processes like erosion can begin to where the crucial minerals and nutrients into the ocean.

General Assembly University Of Bergen Barrett
How Do Cuttlefish Work?

BrainStuff

03:59 min | 2 years ago

How Do Cuttlefish Work?

"Cuttlefish are among my favorite aquatic animals. Because they are smart and cute as heck. If you dig tentacles they belong to the class of molluscs called cephalopods along with squid and octopuses cephalopod meaning head foot in Latin thus named because these creatures feet arms really encircle their heads several pods have been around for about five hundred million years much longer than most other marine life including fish. And there's some of the smartest animals in the sea and even in this group of smart animals. The cuttlefish stands out for its intelligence more than one hundred twenty species of fish call. Earth's waters home. They can be found in virtually all Sion's although they do tend to migrate to deep areas during the winter before returning to shallow waters and reefs in spring and summer to mate. They're identified by their eight short arms and two longer tentacles. They also have a hidden weapon underneath. The cuttlefish is many arms lies a razor sharp beak much like that of your average parrot. This tool allows the cuttlefish to knock on crab mollusks and other hard shelled animals. And it's extra effective because it's sports a toxin designed to freeze pray in their tracks once bitten and cuttlefish are masters of camouflage similar to the Chameleon cuttlefish can change their color and texture to blend into their surroundings. But that's not the half of it. Researchers found that they can freeze their camouflage Palette by locking hundreds of tiny structures and their skin in place for up to an hour all this without consuming any energy from their main nervous system to stay in place sorta like an e reader that lasts a long time between charges because only uses juice when you turn the page. A cuttlefish only expend energy when they change the pattern. This trick allows them to hold their disguise. For long periods to avoid being detected or eaten it also helps some snatch their prey by allowing them to remain almost invisible as they wait for fish and crustaceans to come by they. Also use patterns to communicate with or sometimes trick other cuttlefish in the world of cuttlefish mating. The big brawny males usually win the female. Codfish BY SCARING OFF smaller males but every once in a while. A smaller mail gets his chance he can do this. By splitting his colors to show typically female patterns on the side of his body facing a larger male while showing masculine patterns to the female of choice then he sidled up to her and commences mating before the other male has figured out however when the odds are a little more. Even cuttlefish aren't afraid to brawl. Scientists have long known that cuttlefish are capable of aggressive behavior but twenty eleven footage captured this behavior in the wild rather than in the laboratory in this footage a male and female cuttlefish heff just finished meeting another male tries to steal her way he succeeds at first but then the first male follows them for awhile and finally strikes back. The two male start fighting flashing INC biting in showing other types of angry cuttlefish behavior. This is interesting because it confirms that. The aggressive behavior was based on mutual assessment rather than self-assessment when applying game theory models in other words. The cuttlefish didn't determine its actions based only on its own strength but also on considering the capabilities of sparring partner to that takes a lot more thought than simply throwing Braun around further. This discovery might prove to be a valuable way to learn more about the cognition and aggression of other animals. Also cuttlefish can count twenty sixteen. Study plays fifty four. Different Pharaoh cuttlefish tank along with a transparent to chambered box each side of the box contained a different quantity of shrimp to eat forcing each To choose the better deal. The two researchers changed the shrimp ratio each time and even played around with larger

Sion Partner Braun
Who Was First on Earth?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:35 min | 2 years ago

Who Was First on Earth?

"Today are mysterious past the first the people on Earth. Where did they come from? Leonardo Davinci. Tesla is dying these three in one hundred others over the centuries all with ideas. You were ahead of their time. Where did these ideas come from? Metal Staples at held Mexico's Ancient Pyramids together yet. Local indigenous business people had no knowledge of metallurgy. The NASCA wells relied on air pressure to bring water up from underground rivers and the unexplained tunnels on on the two thousand five hundred mile. Inca road that are carved through solid stone. How did that happen? How were these deeds? Possible where to disadvantage. What's knowledge come from could survivors of a long extinct species of Homo Sapiens have somehow passed on the tiniest spark of knowledge through DNA? What a silly question indeed based on science I guess not so silly before you dismiss this premise? Completely let's take a look at the evolution universe. Science would agree that the planet earth is about four point five billion years old to put that number two perspective consider that a billion is a thousand million and a million is a thousand thousands for no less than a century. It has been believed that the earliest earth was covered with the see of vocally magma however evidence of this of the rocks have either eroded with time or stay down underground inaccessible enter Zircon crystals. Not the man made versions but tiny crystals pulled from the Jack Hills of central Australia. The oldest of which have revealed that during the first five hundred million years so the planet earth was not covered with the see of magma indeed that it was cold enough for the formations of continents were above sea level. What is revolutionary is these ancient crystals have revealed that early earth and some aspects? Wasn't that different from today. These science-based facts are less than a decade old. That already gaining aning the respect of mainstream science in one four point one billion year old crystal carbon was found suggesting that life existed justed on earth. Three hundred million years earlier than scientists previously thought. Twenty years ago this would have been heretical. This carbon resembles modern carbon. Though this all adds up to the conclusion that early Earth was more hospitable to life than science thought and begs the question could could the environment of early Earth supported. Humans could earth's I people have crawled out of an ancient ocean. The primordial soup so to speak and evolved over the next two hundred thousand years if we run with that rough figure man and is developed brain may have been walking walking around over a billion years ago not two hundred thousand. But where's the evidence of a civilization that all the answer is. Where's I the evidence of anything? Over one billion years old science degree so there have been five periods of mass extinction. Four hundred forty four million years ago. When eighty six percent of all species became extinct? Three hundred seventy five million years ago. When seventy five percent of all species became extinct and in two hundred million years ago with the loss of eighty percent and finally sixty six million years ago when seventy six percent fell to extinction keep keep in mind that the tortoise of the Galapagos has evolved over twelve million years each of the known periods of mass extinction did not eliminate all all the species and some fossils remain science agrees that there certainly could have been far earlier periods of mass extinction and extinction say over a billion years ago? One that would leave. No fossils. Time would take care of that. If Homo sapiens were among the victims uh-huh of an early earth extinction. Of course there would be no fossils. But what are the carbon found in Australia's ancient zircon crystals and what of the advanced knowledge displayed by South America's earliest indigenous people. Where did they come from? Your guess is as good as mine and only time time will tell

Australia Leonardo Davinci Tesla Mexico Jack Hills Galapagos South America
"five hundred million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is wrong the chief minister of the northern tier tree turned out and held the press conference denouncing the whole thing it's quite extraordinary the John red rock blues stands in the middle of Australia in the news in terror tree rising more than three hundred meters out of the planes is believed to date back at least five hundred million years into the consonants original inhabitants it's sacred I dont know anybody who's been there hasn't come back one of the well I have beautiful of these have big it is it's the fundamental meeting place in the middle of a stride and there were stories around the rock the river the thing places of the symbolic places the the the places aboriginal people believe that ancestral spirits made at the beginning of time to the the the dream time when they created the land of the animals and the people deeply secret but back then in the in the sixties and seventies and and eighties that wasn't how will route was seen by many Australians was it well it was saying purely as a white tourist spot sorry for example up until the early eighties there with motels built at the base of the rock Sir a bit like I guess positive building a a fast food restaurant next witcher fishing chip shop in the lobby of sin polls cathedral Australia first newsreel pictures of an expedition to the desolate center of a vast continent the destination is as wrong the first to arrive today is wrong because it was then in the nineteen thirties by the fifties what had been an aboriginal reserve have been turned into a national park at least was given for a motel later an astro tribesmen bill with suspicion.

Australia five hundred million years three hundred meters
"five hundred million years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of one another like how weather can mean both to wear away and withstand something the size of our empty universe can mean that we are both alone or one of many another example of this ambiguity is the very presence of life on earth something that people who believe that we're not alone in the universe point two is evidence is that life here on earth seems to have emerged the first chance that it had the famous astronomer and science writer Carl Sagan was one of those people he was an optimist when it came to the fair me paradox he believed that life was out there we just haven't found it yet second pointed to evidence from the fossil record that here on earth let's begin as early as five hundred million years after the years for it's almost like it was waiting to emerge and since it emerged quickly here on earth it stands to reason that life should emerge were ever gets the chance anywhere in our universe when you take into account the idea that there are perhaps three hundred billion stars in the Milky Way alone even if some small fraction of those have habitable planets that could host life then we should expect to encounter it sometime soon as we spread out to explore the countryside around planet or there's a problem with basing our view of the rest of the universe on our own existence the idea that we can gain insight into our universe from our existence is called the anthropic principle in its vulnerable to a logical fallacy called selection bias being the only intelligent life in the universe where the only data point and our data set and so we tend to skew the results a little bit it's hard to resist the temptation of cherry picking the data when there's only one chair yes of course life can arise our very existence proves that fact but what it does not prove is that the emergence of intelligent life or any life really is easy or inevitable what is instead life emerging in our universe is really really really hard perhaps.

writer Carl Sagan five hundred million years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Alone in the universe point two is evidence is that life here on earth seems to have emerged the first chance that it had the famous astronomer and science writer Carl Sagan was one of those people he was an optimist when it came to the fair me paradox leave that life was out there we just hadn't found it yet second pointed to evidence from the fossil record that here on earth let's begin as early as five hundred million years after the years for it's almost like it was waiting to emerge since it emerged quickly here on earth it stands to reason that life should emerge were ever gets the chance anywhere in our universe when you take into account the idea that there are perhaps three hundred billion stars in the Milky Way alone even if some small fraction of those have habitable planets that could host life then we should expect to encounter it sometime soon as we spread out to explore the countryside around planet earth there's a problem with facing our view of the rest of the universe on our own existence the idea that we can gain insight into our universe from our existence is called the anthropic principle in its vulnerable to a logical fallacy called selection bias being the only intelligent life in the universe where the only data point and our data set and so we tend to skew the results a little bit it's hard to resist the temptation of cherry picking the data when there's only one chair yes of course life can arise our very existence proves that fact but what it does not prove is that the emergence of intelligent life for any life really is easy or inevitable what is instead life emerging in our universe is really really really hard perhaps the existence.

writer Carl Sagan five hundred million years
Fossilized Proteins Unravel Dinosaur Mysteries

Science Magazine Podcast

12:03 min | 2 years ago

Fossilized Proteins Unravel Dinosaur Mysteries

"Now we have Gretchen Vogel a staff writer for Science sheer talk with us about a new technique for looking at organic molecules user from animals from fossils from way back we're talking hundreds of millions of years Hi Gretchen Hi Sarah is that number right is it hundreds of millions of years for these molecules correct yes the oldest ones they've around our five hundred or a little bit more than five hundred million years old who and how does that compare with ancient DNA or proteins from ancient animals yet much much older so into DNA has a huge amount that it can tell us about previous life yeah animals and humans but only up to tens of thousands maybe hundreds of thousands of years DNA sequences degrade fairly rapidly relatively speaking proteins can last longer two four million years or so elbows can also give you lots of information if you can sequence the proteins you can tell lots of things about how animals were really needed beyond that some people have claimed to find intact proteins from dinosaurs but those claims have remained controversial well what about these molecules not DNA they're not protein there's something a little bit different correct. They're called protein residues essentially scientists call them protein fossils ation products and they are complex polymers that form from proteins and lipids and sugars after death during the fossils ation process they must be super super tough if they're surviving for so long yes they are they're actually similar to some molecules the you're probably fairly familiar with their formed by reactions very similar to reactions called the my yard reactions that happen in food chemistry so hey time you toast something or round something or grill something molecule similar to these form and they're the kind of things that are left over on your grill that you have to scrub off so anyone who scripted grill knows that these things are pretty tough there definitely not water soluble and yeah microbes don't eat them and they don't wash away this isn't cooking per se but there is a chemical process here that's breaking down all these components of the sal and turning them into something else so how do we know thir identify like what we know about their original four before all these chemical processes happened yeah what the researchers that I'm writing about have discovered word their names are yes me know via N- and Derek Briggs and they work at Yale University and what they found out is that these really tough polymers do still contain some of the original information that the proteins contained when the animal was alive and that's because although there transformed into the he's complex polymers different proteins form different polymers and using a technique called Rahman spectroscopy they can and get a fingerprint of the chemical bonds that are in these polymers and from those fingerprints they can compare different fossils end figure out interesting things about how I'm how those animals might have been related and even things about their metabolism whether they were warm blooded or cold blooded Would they do that. How would they be able to tease out their metabolism from this collection of molecular products? Yeah that's one of the insights that these researchers have had the dispenser the interesting they realized that in living cells similar reactions also take place and the faster an animal's metabolism fast. cell's metabolism the more of these reactions take place and so even during life some of these complex polymers build up in cells and and they realized that the more of them form after death in the fossil station process they could sort of subtract those fossils Russian polymers that had formed and see still a signature of how many of these complex plumbers might have formed during the animal's life. and that gives them a clue about how fast the animal's metabolism was that speed of the metabolism ass- is kind of an indicator if they were warm blooded or cold blooded and we're talking about hundreds millions of years ago so we're talking about dinosaurs correct exactly and people had not suspected but had started to conclude that at least some dinosaurs were probably warm-blooded had a fairly fast metabolism tyrannosaurus rex for example and another kind of dinosaur called Dina Nike's which was the basis for the velociraptor in Jurassic Park that was actually one of the first dinosaurs that inspired the idea that dinosaurs subtly some of them may have been fast runners and had responding fast metabolism and this new technique support those earlier conclusions yes they looked at the Roman Spectra from a whole range of the fossils and it looks like two legged dinosaurs like velociraptor or than an isis or tyrannosaurus rex they had fairly fast metabol- uh-huh and other dinosaurs the quadrupedal ones that walked on all fours and were probably a bit slower that they had much slower metabolisms it looks like the sisters of lizards and snakes were for example cold blooded and fossil mammals turned out to be warm-blooded as did tear sores the largest creatures ever to to live from it sounds like a lot of different specimens have been already examined using this technique. How common are these residues in the different fossils that we have and collections and museums. That's a great question so it doesn't happen in every kind of fossil it's a specific set of conditions that is conducive to the kind of preservation and it turns out that it's sort of dark brown or black fossils in light colored sediments that tend to be aclu and so yes meena human who works at Yale had millions of fossils to look at at the Yale peabody Museum of Natural History and she didn't Dan millions of fossils but more than one hundred and has gone through and built up of fairly significant database of Roman Spectra from a whole range of different fossils do we know why the Dark Brown fossils on a light background tend to have these kinds of molecules that's a sign or that's a a characteristic of oxidative conditions the environment surrounding the animal after died was rich in reactive oxygen mal molecules and dissolved metal ions and that promotes these kinds of biochemical reactions called glide cock sedation and lip pox nation which are big words but they the are the same kinds of reactions that happen when you grill something when you caramelized some okay one I really liked the part of your story you talk about how this is I happened upon can you can you talk about that as an Undergrad Freeman was part of the team that was studying color in dinosaur eggs and she and her colleagues were some of the first defined that some dinosaur eggs were blue green sort of like Robin's egg Johnny people had always thought that they were just white I she was doing this work she would dissolve pieces of fossil eggshells to remove the calcium and to isolate the pigments and she found that they're in some cases Sort of Brown crusty remains as well and she thought hm what is that she looked at it under the microscope and it looked kind of like the organic matrix of eggshells and she wondered if she was seen bits of original tissue but she didn't have time to characterize it until she came to Yale for and there she used a similar technique with pieces of bone or teeth and she found more residues and they even looked like at blood vessels and cells and even nerve actions and she thought what in the world is this so then she and her ht advisor Derek Briggs decided to look at them more carefully Rahman spectroscopy just mean a chose this technique she said because it's one that that is sort of exploratory you don't have to you're not looking for a specific thing it records all the chemical bonds in sample and then you can sort of piece together what it is that you're seeing a lot of biochemical techniques test for specific kinds of molecules but if you don't know what you're looking for then you can't find it and so and this is this is also non-destructive rights you don't have to dissolve your sample right they started out looking at these seduce that had come from destructive sampling but then they realized once they had looked at those they could also look at other kinds of fossils just ramen spectroscopy that doesn't damage the fossil and indeed they found these signs of these complex polymers that mean then recognized as the product of the he's mired reactions that happened in food chemistry oh well are they going to continue to build up this database of profiles and different dinosaurs yes right they're building a database is that can help them compare more fossils with each other they've also done a couple of proof of principle experiments for example they they looked at a fossil called the tully monster which is this really strange creature from three hundred million years ago from fossil beds in Illinois nobody has really been able to determine exactly what kind of thing it was it's it's the sort of oval shape with this long weird appendage and people visit a worm is at some weird nail is it a vertebrate and a paper in nature and two thousand and sixteen concluded that it was most likely probably some kind of really strange vertebrates rush based on morphology when they used the Romans spectroscopy to look at this critters purported teeth that looks like those teeth were probably aide of Collagen or Carrollton which are two kinds of proteins that vertebrates make rather than Titan which would be something that a an in it would make and so that chemical evidence is consistent with the morphological evidence that they had already put together and that was another sign that they're finding L. information in these in these Rahman Spectrum Not Everybody's on board with this get what else could they do to further firm this up has a a new technique for understanding the world of dinosaurs some other researchers cautioned that they're not one hundred percent convinced that all of the signatures that are being picked up these Roman spectra are really from the original animal that there may be some bacteria contamination or some other deposits that might have settled into these fossils for millions of years that's certainly a legitimate question to ask although the men and Briggs say that they have looked bacteria residues and can compare and that they've old those out in most cases they've also looked for contaminants for things like glue or other preparation materials that have been applied to these fossils beeman briggs and their colleagues also say it's early days for this technique they're really excited about the potential that it has but they're hoping that more people start to use it and help to build up the database this is and figure out exactly what kinds of questions these ancient protein residues might help to answer. Are there some big questions at these residues might help answer that people are very excited about people especially excited about this insight into metabolism because that's been a big question in paleontology what animals were warm added what kinds of metabolism's did different animals have for example some of the giant sea creatures did they have a warm lead type of metabolism or were they did they have a slower metabol- awesome or some sort of mix of the to the idea that you could get at some of those questions by a simple non-destructive scan of fossils is really exciting alright. Gretchen thank you so

Gretchen Vogel Derek Briggs Yale University Rahman Staff Writer Sarah SAL N Dina Nike Jurassic Park Three Hundred Million Years Five Hundred Million Years Two Four Million Years One Hundred Percent
"five hundred million years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on KGO 810

"So that's going to win some time thinking about this at the museum of natural history well it does on the capitol mall you see various beasts of a come and gone at home is you need really does he sit in their old I did your voice like the pictures I sent to the call yeah going up very cool the diner the the T. rex bones eaten the Stegosaurus bones or whatever was so that's the new dinosaur museum that's supposed to be just fantastic and one of the coke brothers donated a ton of money does the hall of souls I think they call it their office with Sony in museum of natural history but the couple others give a ton of money to it so some people are attempting to boycott it or something those people should be torn asunder and limb from limb by torrenta sources I want to look at dinosaur bones yeah hello yeah it's so good it looks real it is sold good it's not like they got a couple of bones and like cool one of those fox when animals attack shows really only have two good pieces of footage and they've shown to Ellen no no no no no no no there are lots a super good bones all. but you're right it does put stuff in perspective you think why am why did I ever spend any time thinking about whether I should buy this or this when time is this infant. five hundred million years and now they're just by only alike will all be makes you stop and think news no more trouble about Hong Kong chief executive Carrie lam announcing the government will formally withdraw that extradition bill it is managed to set off months of demonstrations in the city she is bowing to one of the protesters demands the bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials that's the one that sparked the massive protests from this month I and my principal officials will reach out to the community to start a direct dialogue people from all walks of life with different stances and backgrounds are invited to share their views. you are full of crap communist crap she's scared to death she got no choice of course yeah so is funny well I wasn't looking at dinosaur bones they're in the the south the the whole civil war area Virginia DC and Maryland and you know I didn't spend a lot of time like I like to do and civil war history stuff in reading but it's been a little bit and you know it's funny is reading about some of the battles that made Stonewall Jackson the great general what he wants and this is so clearly a strategic retreat on one front so the Chinese can flank the the freedom protesters but in another way I mean it's it's a temporary strategic faith it's. well that's a good one. well open a pre emptive expectations deflation advisers the former vice president Joe Biden lowering the expectations about how we might perform perform in the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary this is weird to me you're the front runner by double digits why are you loaning our expectations I think you always do in politics you you never want to have the story be he failed to reach were expected he was a disappointment lower expectations probably won't even be in the top five funny knowledge of that and then when he does well you get the trumpet it's all about span adviser suggesting they may be concerned that the front runner in the democratic primary polling might not win in those first two primary but now they're paying less crap and it's been how about the question of whether he senile or not that's the interesting one to me as as he gets out of it and you know what at least Washington post is criticizing a Democrat now and again maybe it's because he's not wildly progressive enough it is well okay so sorry tardy give many credit there for about three and a half seconds but his stories in which he weaves together multiple stories makes up details changes his role in it he's made a career of it is it just more of the same or is Joe losing his mind brit Hume who is this state and stolid an old school journalist is there a is around says he sees the signs of of what he say senility in Joe bypasses listen I'm that age I see them myself he's definitely losing his mind. I mean. and bull crap that is the. front wonder runner losing his mind is he losing his marbles. clear I'm not going to notice. is he at.

museum of natural five hundred million years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NYC studios I'm talking with David Gruber presser biology at the brook college at City University of New York about his way of gently catching Kelly Fisher I'm glad you getting funding because I don't want to see one shark tank trying to get those sharks to protect you jelly fish so see what I did there sorry what do you what are you most interested doctor Gruber in learning from the jelly fish I mean jelly Fisher are interesting to me just because they're this animal that everybody's experience everybody seen a jelly fish but we we all have different impressions some people reminds them of being stung it it'd be at the beach in through an evocation other people have as their screen savers so there it is really kind of mysterious alien life forms but they do have super powers there's a molecule by called green fluorescent protein that was discovered from a jelly fish in the sixties which led to a Nobel Prize in in two thousand eight and that's really revolutionized experimental biology how we see the inside of cells how we see gene expression there's another thing about jelly fish now is that I'm thinking about the oldest animals on our planet and jelly fish have a trade in you may have heard of the immortal jelly fish where they they once they're an adult they can actually have that capability of reverting back into youth so these animals that are kind of right under our nose just have some of these just incredibly remarkable features that that we can learn more about is it is it just the features or could be of some of the bio chemicals they have in their bodies that might be of interest everything and and it's in it's really about you know I think one of the real premise of this of this work is is about how we approach life and even something as his back water is the jellyfish is something that we should when we approach and we encounter this animal that we should we should value it and and try not to kill it as we study it it has been around a long time so yeah five hundred million years so it's still a that's the other thing I think of the state of where where humans are and how we're kind of bringing on our own extinction event and here is this mysterious drifting animal out there that has so much to teach us for you think they're gonna outlast the human race is what you're saying absolutely you must be working on the next product you know then you must be working on an improvement I'll bet there's always you know I think that's with working so I I did this fellowship it at Harvard Radcliffe fellow where I got to spend a year is a biologist to be a fly on the wall in this robotic lab and it's just include completely impressive in and how they work in the in the dedication and it's build and rebuild and build and even with this ultra gentle fettuccine anything we went through several iterations of of fail until we were able to grasp the the jellyfish crackling when it is most people in science failure is an option thank you David Gerber my pleasure taking time to be with us today good luck on your next project and on this one thanks for having me David Gruber professor of biology at birth college at the City University of New York where to take a break and after the break we're going to go back to school did you have a favorite science lesson when you were in school favorite science teacher in a lesson we're gonna meet the amazing science educators of the science Friday educator collaborative program you're not going to miss this segment stay with us we'll be right back after this break and I replied to the steins Friday from W. NYC studios science Friday is supported by indeed with indeed employers can post job in minutes set up screener questions.

Kelly Fisher NYC David Gruber City University of New York five hundred million years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Natural history because stress enough comes from a molecule that was you've all five hundred million years ago in a very slimy primitive fiscal Lamprecht so we have this molecule that never got fixed up it's like a blunt hammer and effects is all in very strange curious ways and when stress increases in large numbers of people I think the symptoms Sir coming out is this idea that yes there have to be aliens in there and yes more than two million people now George or signed up to go storm you know they make their your readers are your listeners know that works that's weird Vance airplanes are do you think the military's go let people go no I've I've told people Peter do not go is this but is it a case of this sort of mass hysteria that I think too much stress as bald on top of all this well I've never seen a time period where more people are uptight about so many different things I can't quite put my finger on it I have my suspicions but I mean people are just up tight I mean the loose cannons have you felt that yes absolutely and I've been talking to psychologists I know a bunch of them and just informally saying Hey look you know you've given practice for some years and what's the level stresses the people coming in to see you know what maybe that's about population because those people are going in because they're under stress generally but my friends say yes you know if it's getting worse and worse and worse and so the question is why is it because of so many of us is it because of technology is stress being formative fomented in us by the devices that are supposed to reduce it what's more had is that a cell phone in it what's more isolated than the cell phone and what causes more stress that isolation why don't they do something to make people feel good why don't they say something like folks were giving everybody twenty thousand dollars you got to buy goods in the United States made in the United States here's a list of these products have a great time have fun why don't they do something to make people feel good if you say that I'm I'm a child of the sixties and this is I would get into college they say Hey we got some major limited you feel because they call the drugs I think in the other room that was such a terrible bad and and for so many people at this stage it's really hard for us as a society I think to come to grips and even recognize the local stressed and everyone is increasing your best source to do experiment if we were able to there's a there's a patch you can put on them I thought you said take a blood test to measure the amount of stress hormones.

five hundred million years twenty thousand dollars
"five hundred million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Solos it's a well known phenomenon but I think our sins actually point there isn't a huge amount of scientific research into this some musicians have half a brain scan when the improvising and dot shows that brain areas involved in innovation it turned down so posted Molly Beatty that you pulled faces because you're not being self conscious and and that could account for those lost in ecstasy faces that we see during a toss up but the interesting thing is the wireless is talking about is almost the opposite of that so she's not improvising all kind of lost in the flow of the music she's actually paying very specific rhythms and she's waiting for a communication signals between the other dramas and the leader of a band so it seems like it's got more to do with concentrating the active concentrating rather than being lost in musical ecstasy and most of us do pull quite silly faces women focusing on something with the intensity of thinking really hard about something so what's going on here why do we do that to find out I spoke to a psychologist about what some of the possible evolutionary explanations could be for what we're going to cool concentration face I'm doctor Gillian Forrester and I am a evolutionary and developmental psychologists from Birkbeck university of London so humans are very gestural creatures in general so we're really tuned in to all the things that bodies do so it's not uncommon that the faces getting involved with the way we feel and the way were acting first of all we should think about are evolutionarily older selves going way way back like five hundred million years to the emergence of vertebrates so there's not a huge amount of research in this area but what does exist suggests that when we were at these primitive creatures when the hands would grasp for food the mouth would be prepared to receive it so if you had a wide grip to get something really big your mouth knew it had to open wide to fit that the food in and if it picked up something really small it didn't need to open up as white so really the mouth is shadowing yeah the grip of the fingers so if we think way back then initially it would have been this link but hand and mouth for feeding but as animals became more sophisticated and started using their.

Molly Beatty Gillian Forrester Birkbeck university of London five hundred million years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Welcome back. An amazing conversation. I wanna thank Jay Bruce are Fenton will be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy our Milky Way, and what we are talking about these days when it comes to not on exit planet, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just us. And we were wondering if they were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using. Nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have pieced together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about. This is coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy church standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are feting. This is coast to coast AM..

Jay Bruce Los Angeles Jimmy church California five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"I wanna thank MJ NIS. Bruce are Fenton will be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy and our own Milky Way. And what we are talking about these days when it comes to not only extra planet, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just us. And we were wondering if they were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using. Nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have pieced together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about. This is coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy church standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are Fenton. This is coast to coast AM..

Bruce Fenton Los Angeles Jimmy church five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years California
"five hundred million years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Coast AM. Now, here's your guest host Jimmy church. Welcome back. Conversation. I thank MJ benign Bruce are Fenton. We'll be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy and our own Milky Way. And what we are talking about these days when it comes to extra planets, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just a and we were wondering if they were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have pieced together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic. Nick displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about this coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy shirt standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are Fenton coast to coast AM. Radio.

Jimmy church Bruce Fenton MJ Los Angeles Nick California five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Coast to coast AM. Now, here's your guest host Jimmy church. Welcome back. An amazing conversation. I want to think MJ bananas. Bruce are Fenton will be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy and our own Milky Way. And what we are talking about these days when it comes to not only Exo planets, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just us. And we were wondering if there were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using. Nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have pieced together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about. This is coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy church standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are Fenton. This is coast to coast AM..

Jimmy church Bruce Fenton Los Angeles California five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Jimmy church. Welcome back. Mazing conversation. I'm going take 'em. Jay, Bruce are Fenton will be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy and our own Milky Way. And what we are talking about these days when it comes to not only extra planets, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just us. And we were wondering if they were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using. Nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have piece together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about. This is coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy church standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are Fenton. This is coast to coast.

Jimmy church Fenton Bruce Los Angeles Jay California five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on Science for the People

"Abon, if you break down, these are cells are also responsible for some of those repairs like the Bill the growth is also the built-in repair system. And it's also responsible for some of the things that go wrong their skeletons, especially in elder age. So these are cells that have a specific duties, but depending on how the regulated it makes the difference between whether you're growing up like a weed is a teenager or if you're starting to shrink and old age. And what are the things I found really interesting. Was you talked a lot in the book about the Evelyn of skeletons in the ocean of phone, and I knew this, I guess, but it kind of is weird to think about it that the first thing that happened was a spine when the spine happened, even before a brain case, do we know? Why the spine happened? First wise, the spine so important, right? So you mentioned spine in creatures that we see basically the forerunners of the spine in. So these early spines burnt like our backbone, but these stacked vertebrae it was a predecessor called not cord you'd see this in some animals today called coordinates things like tunicates, and cease course, that don't look very much like an all basically, look like living plastic bags like the live on coral on the sea floor, but the relatives of ours because we are joined by this particular structure, and we see the start to appear during what feeling tall just know as the Cambrian explosion. You maybe a little before. But amongst these little sort of proto fish like squiggly little animals are very very short shorter. You know, most cases than the length of your little finger, and you know, the most the don't have bone tissue. They don't have been realized on tissue like we do, but they have the sort of toughened rod running through. They're back basically on the upper side of the by what we call the dorsal side of the body, and that became the forerunner of our spies that basically determine where the spine is going to be. And we're not sure entirely why that king I certainly had a bio mechanical function like surrounding these forerunners of the spine. You see these sort of either w V-shaped little notch as many of these fossils because they're often found in places of exceptional preservation like the Burgess shale in Canada or the Zhang deposits in China, and those muscles are called Mayan years. So basically, this was a site that was getting toughened up for muscle tach meant to allow these little proto vertebrates, the switch around from side to side and move to the Warren, hopefully, you know, evade all the invertebrates with the gnashing grasping and climbing mouth parts that were dominant during that time, and this is important because even if we're still figuring out you'll why that not cord I. Volved the fact that it's along the back really set up the basis for our vertebrate body plan. You know, it didn't have to be there could you could've very well evolved along the stomach side or maybe off to one side and not another. So this is just sort of a quirk of history that because of that that sets something about the vertebrate body plan sort of not in stone. But set it in such a way that everything else now has arranged around that. So that's why our backs are at our back in not our fronts or some other arrangement that we couldn't otherwise conceive up, and the fact that these vertebrates we can look into the past now back, you know, five hundred million years more inside that okay? These are close relatives of ours in these our ancestors, but at the time that wasn't apparent these animals were not dominant at all they were, you know, very very rare parts of the fauna that they appeared in. There was no indication that are going to become successful or dominant in any way whatsoever. For a while thought that there's a mass extinction event at the end of the Cambrian period that basically liked out a lot of the super weird invertebrates. You know, some of my favorites like a nominal Carris. This thing that had these two grasping. Great appendages sticking out the front of its head in the shedder like mouth, Doug is the flapping flippers on the side of the the biggest ones are about as big as you..

Abon Carris Doug Canada China five hundred million years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on Science Friday

"So this magnetic field and its history and its Aleutian is directly linked to our -bility on earth for there to be life. So this is. Critical connections. So it's pretty important. Well, okay. So now, let's go back to this time five hundred million years ago when we're looking at this gigantic dip in the magnetic field. You were talking about you explained that it's one tenth of the strength. That is today. So what could that possibly have done to life on earth? At that time. It's hard to say exactly we've never seen something that week in the historical record where we have direct observations. But if the field was ten times weaker than it is today, we'd expect that solar radiation would be able to penetrate much further into earth into the atmosphere, and that radiation could be harmful to to life or DNA. And there's been some speculation about what that could mean about how life as volved in changed in response to this increase in solar radiation. I you've you've discussed the possibility that the magnetic field didn't just dip a lot. It just completely went away. At the time is is there that possibility? So we don't have any evidence that the magnetic field completely collapsed or disappeared. It got very weak. But is still above the minimum amount? We would expect just from sort of background signals. So it never completely disappeared. But it did get much much weaker intil something changed, and what we think that change was was that the inner car course, started to grow and that allowed that geo dynamo to be repower d- and to rise back up to what we see today. So what's interesting here is this happened at around this time at which we also see the Cambrian explosion all of all this life on earth happening here. Maybe you can explain if there's any sort of correlation here between this dip in the magnetic field and what happened with life on earth at that time. So that's there's been speculation about that. It's very difficult to try to directly connect. Something like this the strength of the magnetic field to evolution life. But it is intriguing and that these are happening at about the same time it could be a relation. But before this happened before the dip that we're talking about here. What was powering the magnetic field of the earth? So it was strong. And then it was weak. And then it was strong again when the core solidified what was powering this beforehand. So that's another big question that are discipline is trying to address those a lot of uncertainty, but one model is that it's just due to cooling and its a thermally powered dynamo. But this couldn't last forever, and we would expect that as the core continues to cool. There's less power available to to drive the magnetic field, and it would get weaker and weaker until it would reach this point of collapse. And that seems somewhat consistent with what we found in our study. Earlier in the hour. We're talking about the the news this week that the magnetic North Pole is actually been moving around a little bit. It seems very scary to us. What do you see when you look at? That is is that something that concerns? You is something that you can learn anything from what what do you? What do you think when you hear that? So I wouldn't be concerned, but I'd be interested. So that's one of the fascinating parts about our magnetic field is that it changes on all these different time scales. As we're seeing in this study about the magnetic North Pole. It moves around on yearly time-scales, and it can also change on hundreds of thousands of years. There's this what's termed the Celtics Lennick anomaly a weak point on earth's field that we're trying to understand if it's hundreds or thousands of years old or even older going back to millions and even billions of years, so it's all these different time scales. That it's changing at that. We're trying to understand how and why can we even predict it remains a key part? Of our studies. We just have we just have thirty seconds left Mars doesn't have a magnetic field used to. But it doesn't have one today from the best that we can tell in what happened..

North Pole repower Celtics Cambrian five hundred million years thirty seconds
"five hundred million years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Today. I can actually hear you in my headset. Things are working loud too. Yeah. Mine's working fine. Also, so. It's pretty out there. Curtis say good day to work in the garden and enjoy the garden or you don't have to work in it. Just enjoying the work. You've done already. I'm watching people work have arborists coming out there cutting trees down as we speak. Why did old well outlived their life? And I. They didn't look that. Yeah. And I think I know him I planted the replacements five years ago. So they're they're going to cut these trees down to give the replacements room to grow now. The replacements name of a group out of Dallas. So we'll good. So what did you put in place? I have I replaced tour Zona ash one with the lace bark L with a choice borough. And I also added a big tooth maple nice. Yeah. That's good selection right there. If you're looking to replace a tree any of those perfect right there. Those are my choices in some areas of the house or the yard. I do have some of those plants already except for the borough. I just don't have room down the road something that big I have a feeling that by the time. My borough could be that big not to worry about it. But I won't be around. So you'll become post so five one two eight three six zero five ninety is our number if you'd like to be a part of the program today, that's the one to call. And so. A of stuff is coming in at the nurseries. You we are onions sheds already. They're going out the door. They're probably not gonna last today fruit trees, you're in the color plants. You're starting to come in the evergreens starting to show up also trees things like that. We have a dinosaur took him awhile to get there. But we do have a data show. You you do have the dinosaur the dinosaurs there. Oh and show that will be something to come. She bring the kids along and you'll enjoy seeing the dinosaur now is work in progress. Hundreds of years. He's five hundred million years old. I believe that it's not six thousand years. It's actually this longer period. Six thousand is how long it took to finally decide what we ought to start making dinosaurs. So anyway, come out and see the dinosaurs out by what we call the Trump house where we have our tropical plants you'll enjoy that bring the kids. Now enjoy that UNLV tell you all about it, these kids know, everything about dinosaurs these days, and so come along with them, listen because these guys are all about and gals know all about dinosaurs. So it's it's a raptor. I think that we're gonna do a little thing about helping to try to name her which we've decided as she. And so it'd be a lot of fun to come out and see this beautiful rep that we've got out there authentic looking. Up high. So the staff can shit is actually or cameras. Sit in my office. And I keep an eye on everybody. And so the D rafters up right now. And there's other work to do but come to the back of the property and you'll see her up there. Well, let's see. Here wonder didn't have college. Nobody's calling in. Actually, he did. He had a busy morning and talking to you about different things. What do you think about we control? It this time of the year. I was sharp home shelf. And there's a tool called the homey and some places you'll find these little tools that will actually grabbed the weed and pull it out. The main thing is we have some moisture in the soil that might so much easier. So pre emergent we'll that would be the corn meal. We do for that corn. Gluten I'm sorry going Luton. You're too late. For the weeds. We would see in the spring, but we're a little too early for the weeds that we're going to try to take care for the summer. So we're we're gap show wins the gap in here. And when do we start December weeds who a big problem for some people, right? Flowers, especially things like the San Burs, those are really want to tackle. Give me some days. Maybe the end of next month. Maybe the end of February we need to watch the weather if we have a cold snap, which we really haven't seen one yet. We have a cold snap that extends it if we suddenly start seeing the weather getting nice and warm enough and stay in warm. We'd better get it out. Then. No, then don't be the cold snap. Yeah. Swayed is round here..

Curtis Zona ash UNLV San Burs Trump Dallas five hundred million years six thousand years five years
"five hundred million years" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Nine our theme. This week is phone a friend. And I'm your host Ryan helped and joining me to discuss things that are science things that are sort of science and things that wished they weren't science. And joining me to talk about that is Sarah mcinulty. Hey, how's it going? It's going. Well, so Sarah is a PHD candidate at the university of Connecticut studying how immune cells in squid interact with and recognize their beneficial bacteria amongst other things and is the founder and developer of Skype scientists so we've been trying to get you on for a while. And I'm really excited to get a chance to talk to. Yeah. I'm super happy had me on. Thanks. So we're on Skype. But do we want to talk about Skype? I or do I'm talking about your research. I to you. We can do either. Okay. We'll since the show is named science sort of we tend to start with the science, and then transition to the sort of talk about some science. I am a vertebrate paleontologist. So. S you your research organism in the very name of the science that I do. But I will tell you that I love squids, and I'm very excited to talk about squid love talking about squid can do it all day. Okay. You sound your website which will link to all this stuff in the show notes for the episode science dot com. But you say in your website that you study host microbe interactions, but what kind of scientists do you describe yourself as when asked when asked I usually say, I'm a squid biologist. But the part of this glad that I'm actually studying is how their immune system interacts with bacteria. Okay. So you were squid immunologist squid microbiologist. I would certainly say I'm a squid immunologists. But I think typically when I'm talking to just a family member or a member of the public. I usually say squid biologists. Awesome. And you had a video that was produced by the some other podcasts that I'd never heard of called science Friday. Yeah. I was a joke. So you have this great little video. It's like a five minute video on YouTube that I will link to as well in the show notes. If you wanna see the little squeeze that you're working with. But can you tell us you seem to work primarily with a squid called the bobtail squid? Yes, I work with Hawaiian bobtail squid. So these guys are really cool because they have a bioluminescence species of bacteria. So they glow that live in a specialized organ on the underside of this way. That's appropriately called the light, Oregon. So so when this first hatch they need to recruit that bacteria from the seawater. And so what I study is basically how this partnership between the bacteria and the squid maintains itself in a healthy situation throughout the life this web. And so the reason that they keep this bio luminescent bacteria in their bodies is because they're knocked terminal and so they want to use the light from the bacteria to effectively hide at night against light coming down from below. So they have all of these. Predators slowing beneath them, and these predators are looking up, and they're looking for like silhouettes that are above them. So that they can attack the silhouette, and maybe it's going to be a fish shaped silhouette or a squids shape silhouette, and the bacteria that light breaks up that silhouette. So that the predators can't see the squid was sort of whole agree whites. Think that surfers silhouetted against the moon? Look like seals. Exactly. Yeah. So if we just smeared ourselves with really bright bacteria, maybe great white sharks wouldn't eat us as there's a market for bioluminescence surfboards here. Absolutely free idea, we should delete this recording immediately and start developing. Yeah. So we've never had a squid biologists on before. So can we talk a little bit about squids more generally and give people a little bit of just like squid background? Sure. So squid are are members of the cephalopods. And so settled pods are octopus, cuttlefish squid and Nautilus Nautilus. We're kind of odd guys out here as so squid are invertebrates. So they don't have any backbone. They first of all and showed up in the fossil record five hundred million years ago. And so that's longer than trees existed, that's before sharks. It's when all life was in the ocean or squids possessively good question that is cephalopods broadly..

Skype Sarah mcinulty Ryan university of Connecticut Oregon founder developer five hundred million years five minute
"five hundred million years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"five hundred million years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Sunday edition. Talk about whatever's on your mind were reading off some twenty nineteen predictions. And it's dicey business making predictions. But everybody likes them and the everybody. Yeah. Pretty much a lot of people. It's a generalization. Darrell we do that in language one third of the people in this room thinks that most predictions are just absolute Bs don't have any interest in what people's ideas might occur in the future. A lot of times people make predictions generally fall into one of two categories either very specific. Yep. Which are the only ones that are useful which most of the time don't come true or very broad to where nobody what happens you can say. I was right. So either the world will end tomorrow because an asteroid will hit the planet and destroy all of humanity or it won't. That's correct in either case, I right? But when we can say that an asteroid will hit earth at some point in the next five hundred billion years. Well, actually, an asteroid will probably hit earth relatively soon. It just won't be of any size to be oh, I meant to destroy humanity. Yeah. Probably within five hundred million years, but we're dead by then you, and I will most I'm really I'm holding out for everybody hearing, my voice will be dead by then. Pardon me on except for perhaps me, I am that I have my head chopped off and put in a soup kettle at Alcorn, go to Alcoa dot org mentioned my name, and I get I can help you with that or ship in about ten minutes. He case are weird. Who doesn't want to live forever? I don't. Well. I've got I've got the most likely possibility of that occurring. My brain's going to Boston University. What I die this damaged. I know. That's why it's going to Boston University. Mine is among the most brilliant on the planet. So there you go among the walls. Your morning Anderson. I am let me tell you about bitcoin dot com, certainly somebody. There is an Andrew del has as many Neanderthal. Was it pairs genomes? What is called markers markers markers as Daryl? But at bitcoin dot com. They're they're not just a site, but YouTube channel all kinds of stuff they are the single biggest force in crypto currency. They don't just concentrate on bitcoin at bitcoin dot com. But they, you know, look at all the.

Boston University Alcoa dot YouTube Darrell Alcorn Daryl Andrew del five hundred billion years five hundred million years ten minutes
Asocial Octopuses Become Cuddly on MDMA

60-Second Science

03:32 min | 3 years ago

Asocial Octopuses Become Cuddly on MDMA

"Scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm any Snead when humans take the drug and EMA best known as ecstasy, they feel a deeper connection to others emotionally and physically because MD may affect serotonin a nervous system chemical faira Tonen is one of the oldest ner transmitters goal Dolan an assistant professor of neuroscience Johns Hopkins University who studies social behaviors. It's been implicated, all kinds of functions, lots of them having nothing to do with social, and so we wanted to know we'll how long ago was Sarah tonens function, you know, really about encoding social behaviors. So Dolan in her colleague did what any scientist would do? They gave MD a main two octopuses octopus is our social creatures and their last common ancestor with us lived more than a half billion years ago, which made them a good test sub. Check for the question at hand. The researchers set up a simple test. We have a large chamber which is basically an aquarium tank, and then we divided into three chambers. And on one side, we put a little overturned flowerpot that's clear and plastic and has lots of holes in it. And underneath that overturn pot, we have a toy object. And on the other side, we have another overturned or get pot. But this one has an octopus in it. The researchers put an octopus in the middle chamber and watched swim around for thirty minutes. They measured how much interacted with one side of the chamber, the one with the other octopus versus the chamber with the toy. Then they soak the test octopus. A beaker of MD may put it back in the aquarium and watched it for another thirty minutes. And what the researchers thought was weirdly similar to human on MD may before they received MD may when they were interact. Eating, they're very reserved even when they're spending time in the social side, they are sort of mashing their bodies up against the side wall and extending only one arm out to touch the flowerpot and very tentatively touching with one arms after MD made all of the animals spent significantly more time in the side that had the other octopus in it. And what's more is that the quality of their social interactions changed? They were much more loose in their in their body posturing. So they were allowing, you know, several arms to touch the sides of the flower pot, like sort of like hugging around the flower pot and exposing the bottom part of their body to the other octopus which you know the way that they were doing that was really suggesting that they were exploring rather than you know any kind of aggressive posturing. These observations indicate that serotonin. Begin playing a role in animals social behavior more than five hundred million years ago. Don says these findings could help scientists better understand social behavior as well as give clues about possible treatments for human conditions, like schizophrenia and PTSD. Meanwhile, we've learned not surprisingly given their anatomy that octopuses are excellent. Huggers. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Anne Sneed.

MD Dolan Scientist Johns Hopkins University Sarah Tonens Snead Anne Sneed Assistant Professor Ptsd DON Thirty Minutes Sixty Seconds Five Hundred Million Years Billion Years
Firefighter killed as natural gas blast rocks Wisconsin city

Steve Cochran

03:16 min | 4 years ago

Firefighter killed as natural gas blast rocks Wisconsin city

"And tune in and if you get too close to your radio you might sense a little bit of cherry slurpy on my breath i don't know that will ever be the same steve's steve good morning everyone seventy five degrees on our way to maybe eighty eight today one firefighter has died another has been critically injured in a natural gas explosion and fire that level leveled several buildings in southern wisconsin in the community of sun prairie thirty say that at least six firefighters were injured along with some civilians when a private contractor struck a natural gas main about six thirty yesterday laurie oakley lives there she talked about the downtown area where it happened at around seven o'clock last night just done so much work the city to maintain it and approve the structures and add more you know more restaurants for people to come downtown and now we have just devastation down here forty cents on prairie say the critically injured firefighter is improving this morning grief counselors have been sent to offer assistance to chicago police officers at the district stationed on the city's south side a veteran officer collapsed and died there yesterday on sunday an officer committed suicide in the station's parking lot a veteran cook county judge is facing a misdemeanor gun charge sarah sheriff's deputies saw him drop a pistol in criminal court house at twenty six cow wgn's pam jones with more courthouse surveillance video shows judge joseph claps walking in the lobby he has a jacket folded over his arm a handgun drops to the floor from underneath jacket representative from cook county sheriff tom dart's office tells the trip it's believed the gun was loaded judge claps has a ford card and concealed carry license but weapons are banned from the courthouse even for concealed carry holders pam jones wgn news president trump here's at nato headquarters in brussels for the first of two days of summit talks he began by lecture shering nato allies this morning and targeting germany specifically saying germany in his words is totally controlled by russia secretary general says he agrees with president trump to a point that nato allies should contribute more to the alliance in terms of defense spending but he also defended nato saying there is strength in unity it is in the interest of europe earning interest of states i ain't gonna stay together the color of bubble gum flamingos and cotton candy bright pink is the world's oldest color according to a recent study researchers discovered the ancient pink fig pigments in one point one billion years old rock deep rocks deep beneath the sahara desert making them the oldest colors in the geological record the bright pink colors are more than five hundred million years older than the next oldest known pigments and were produced by ancient ocean organisms now wgn sports here's dave bennett well for the second straight night a pitch dole between the cubs and giants in san francisco this time the cubs came out on top a score the games only two runs in the seventh inning one on an error what victor kartini devil and the cubs blanked the giants tuesday for the ninth win in eleven games jose cantata six innings at three hip ball followed by carl edwards junior and then justin wilson and then steve see shack more good news for the cavs kris bryant expected.

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