35 Burst results for "Five Decades"

1 to Go: Djokovic Into US Open Final, Nears Year Grand Slam

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

1 to Go: Djokovic Into US Open Final, Nears Year Grand Slam

"Well number one that a joke of it just kept alive his hopes of becoming the first man in more than five decades to win a calendar year grand slam but not before intense roller coaster five said US open battle with the full state Alexander Zverev they determine certain eventually prevailed six two in the fifth set I know we want to talk about history and I know it's on the line and I'm aware of it of course I'm aware of it but I'm just trying to looking to what I know works for me Djokovic has now just one win away from making history and his remaining hurdle will be the second state Daniel Medvedev they inform Russian strike setting the twelfth St Felix or share the same to reach his third grand slam finale I'm Graham like us

Alexander Zverev Daniel Medvedev Djokovic United States Graham
Sirhan Sirhan May Soon Be Free

NBC Nightly News

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Sirhan Sirhan May Soon Be Free

"Breaking news on the man who killed robert f kennedy sirhan sirhan. Could he go free. We're back with breaking developments about the man who killed robert f kennedy sirhan sirhan was recommended for parole late today after more than five. Decades in prison are stephanie. Goss has late details fifty three years ago moments after robert f. kennedy won the california primary sirhan sirhan fatally shot women l. as ambassador hotel today in a stunning decision. The parole board recommended. The gunman be released from prison. Something few had predicted house surprise. Would you be the parole board. Leads sirhan surin out on parole. I would be astonished. The parole hearing sirhan. Sixteenth drew scrutiny. Because for the first time ever know prosecutor from l. a. county attended. Da george gascons office saying in a statement. The role of a prosecutor ends at sentencing adding. If someone is the same person that committed an atrocious crime that person will correctly not be found suitable for release on the one hand. It surprising because her answer is such a notorious criminal but on the other hand there has been a trend away from locking up criminals and throwing away the key that other that recently elected gasco and told lester in may. He hopes to be transformative in his new role. My priorities are really hard. We reimagined the way that we bring security and safety and public health to our community critics. Worry the prosecutors absence from sir hans parole hearing could open the door to letting a dangerous criminal who changed the course of us history back on the streets. Sirhan is not out yet. There will be a ninety day review before the decision lands on. The governor's desk when rfk's killer could become a

Robert F Kennedy Sirhan Sirhan Sirhan Surin Robert F Da George Gascons Sirhan Sirhan Goss Sirhan Stephanie Kennedy Gasco California Sir Hans Lester RFK
AFC South Football Preview: Best Bets, Picks and Predictions

Bet The Board

03:44 min | Last month

AFC South Football Preview: Best Bets, Picks and Predictions

"Kick things off and this may be more two minute drill as we go through the division in alphabetical order. Starting with the houston texans who find themselves listed at a robust twenty three to one to win the division their win total at fan duel. Sportsbook sits at four dollar twenty. Should you want to go under. It's amazing when you look at the houston texans overall profile just a year and a half ago. This very franchise headache. Twenty four seven lead over the kansas city chiefs in the playoffs. We were all talking about them. Maybe getting to the afc championship as cinderella. And here we are a franchise completely in shambles most likely without a franchise quarterback and really lacking direction When you look at the houston texans worse record against playoff teams last year owen. Ten and this is despite to shawn watson putting gaudy numbers but pain rather than breakdown. What the texans don't have on either the offense or defensive side of the ball. should we attacked a coaching. Hire david kelly takes over as the oldest first time head after twenty seven years of serving as an nfl assistant. I'm not really sure what's going on with the organization and we're seeing the market react in a strong manner. I mean this total has been blitzed from under five in this morning. You look some places. And it's four under minus twenty five so like three point eight five the win total here. So there isn't a lot of confidence in the texans. And you start to look at what this roster is and it's tough to find wins on the schedule with who they're going to be trotting out there. I mean we talked about to shawn watson. And how fantastic. He was over. The last five decades seven quarterbacks have had as good of a season as to sean had last year and they finished with a losing record. Only seven quarterbacks. In the history of this league have played as well as the shawn watson team finished with a losing record so an shawn watson texans last year. That was the worst record of any of those quarterbacks so it really just shows how talent void this roster is and somehow you mentioned the new regime bringing in an old coach in cali but the organization really doubled down on that approach and they've managed the impossible really of having the oldest roster in the nfl with below average cap space. It's not a good combination. And so you know you start to look at the four wins last year and how they achieved it and it was still an offense that was above average inefficiency thirteenth. And now you have this. Massive downgraded quarterback and i mean tyrod taylor is what he has. He's thirty two and the best attributes about him are his athleticism his quickness. How fast he is but at thirty two those of all those things and so this is just a monster downgrade. You do look at the schedule of defenses. That the texans will play its. It's bottom six overall and against the oh. There is some hope there. I guess defensively that is going to still be a problem. You're looking at a unit that finished thirtieth inefficiency. The schedule of offense is this year are going to be really good. Can be hovering around the top. Five rate in basically overall efficiency passing offense all of those key areas I i don't really know how this team's going to get to their win. Total and i think that's probably the interesting part about

Shawn Watson Houston Texans Kansas City Chiefs David Kelly AFC NFL Headache Texans Owen Sean Cali Tyrod Taylor
What Is Joe Biden's New China Doctrine?

The Economist: Editor's Picks

02:08 min | 2 months ago

What Is Joe Biden's New China Doctrine?

"Optimists long hoped that welcoming china into the global economy would make a responsible stakeholder and bring about political reform as president. Donald trump blasted that week now. Joe biden is converting trumpian bombast into doctrine that pits america against china a struggle between rival political systems. Which he says can have only one winner between. Mr trump and mr biden have engineered the most dramatic break in american foreign policy in the five decades since richard nixon went to china mr biden and his team based their doctrine on the belief that china is less interested in coexistence and more interested in dominance. The task of american policy is to blunt. chinese ambitions. America will work with china in areas of common interest like climate change but counter. Its ambitions elsewhere. That means building up the strengths at home and working abroad with allies that can supplemented economic technological diplomatic military. And moral haft much about mr biden's new doctrine make sense. The optimistic case for engagement has crumbled under the realities of chinese power led by president. Xi jinping china has garrison the south china sea imposed party rule on hong kong threaten taiwan skirmished with india and has tried to subvert western values in international bodies. Many countries are alarmed by china's wolf warrior diplomacy but the details of the biden doctrine contain much to worry about not least that it is unlikely to work. One problem is how. Mr biden defines threat because politics in washington is broken. He seems to feel that he needs the spirit of pearl harbor to help. Rekindle a sense of national purpose. That is a miscalculation it is true. That republicans jump on anything. They can as soft on china even though every time. They say that the presidential election was stolen. They do the work of chinese propagandists

Mr Biden China Mr Trump Donald Trump Joe Biden America Richard Nixon South China Taiwan Hong Kong Biden India Washington
Warren Buffett & Charlie Munger: Taking the High Road

Squawk Pod

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Warren Buffett & Charlie Munger: Taking the High Road

"Warren buffett. And charlie munger have been business partners more than five decades. We were sort of made for each other. We've never had an argument in this whole time. We are strong minded in that time. The pair have built berkshires. Unique portfolio companies brands like the nsf. Railway geico duracell see's candies and basically left them alone. The way to get a good partner was to be a good partner and these are very effective ideas and they just work so fabulously well and they worked so well at berkshire. I caught up with squawk box. Anchor becky quick. Hi how are you. I'm good how are you over. Zoom about the buffett. Munger magic neither one of them ever really wanted to work for bosses or have a boss or work in corporate culture. They both said that they wouldn't survive it. They'd get fired. And i think that's why berkshire is the way that it is. They like to let people have their autonomy. They like to let the. They've got more than sixty businesses that they own outright and they let the managers run those businesses for a company that is now one of the ten biggest companies in the world by market capitalization. It's an incredibly decentralized organization. I mean there's twenty five people at the headquarters in omaha which by the way they don't even have a building that they run their corporate headquarters out of they. They lease a couple of floors from somebody else. And that's where the whole thing's run run from. If i were to tell you the details of this you'd think it was a scam. You know that. I'm going to tell you about one of the ten largest companies in the world. That's run out of these. Two floors in our mohammed. Twenty five people Okay yeah where. Where's the bridge that you want to sell me on top of that right.

Railway Geico Duracell Becky Quick Charlie Munger Warren Buffett NSF Munger Berkshire Omaha Mohammed
Voice of Disney's 'Sebastian the Crab' Dies at Age 72

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Voice of Disney's 'Sebastian the Crab' Dies at Age 72

"Sinewy right the Tony nominated actor famous is the voice of Sebastian the crab has died really right had an acting career spanning five decades after moving to New York he made his name on Broadway replacing Ben Farina and Pippen it was an original cast member of Jesus Christ Superstar in the nineteen seventies right played the purple grape in the fruit of the loom commercials right on only a dollar he played chronic wanted on from Disney's dinosaur but was best known as Sebastian the crab in Disney's little mermaid and won a Grammy for Best Original Song in may two thousand interview Wright said he enjoyed speaking for Disney characters I'm in seventh heaven and I don't and I know it sounds like all he's just giving us the press the you know the old sound bite no really really this is what I've always wanted to do one of Wright's daughters D. Kelly wrote on Facebook my beautiful strong loving Daddy is off to his next adventure right was seventy two according to his family he died Monday in New York after a three year bout with prostate cancer I'm Jennifer king

Ben Farina Jesus Christ Superstar In The Sebastian The Crab In Disney's Pippen Sebastian Disney Tony Wright New York Grammy D. Kelly Daddy Facebook Prostate Cancer Jennifer King
Netanyahu's war on Hamas [TEST]

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

04:44 min | 4 months ago

Netanyahu's war on Hamas [TEST]

"Hello and welcome to the may twenty twenty one podcast from the moment diplomatic. My name's joel. Miller and my guest. This month is shall end. Download a jerusalem based journalist. Who for five decades has been covering israel on the wider middle east. Charles's many publications include a biography of Jamea and most recently a book reflecting on his years as jerusalem correspondent and this month's edition of the paper he's written about the rise and rise of the israeli right. He argues that. The israeli left has consistently failed to understand the uncompromising nature of netanyahu's project despite growing evidence when i called charles in jerusalem a few days after a ceasefire between israel and hamas was announced. I began by asking him what had struck him passionately in the past two weeks. To tell you the truth sweat Rarely surprised me was getting phone. Calls from people in france including jewelries. Think what happened. Everything was quiet for years now. Suddenly everything blows up lays now a new war and what happened with palestinian. Ever seen what quiet. Nothing quite. The fire was ready to burn all the elements where here to have an explosion of violence. No basic problem was his. Netanyahu will for ten years had as his policies to make military agreement cease-fires under the conditions that he would let Qatar bring shoot cases of cash. Do gaza do finances hamas and on the other side in the west bank. No political agreement. Everything is stuck and Settlements are growing within sixty percent of the west bank so everything was just growing growing growing until it grew up so in a sense. You're saying it wasn't a surprise. Did it feel like a repetition or does it feel different this time. Listen i was expecting at some point in time this would happen. I was surprised with the rapidity with which It it became a full scale war between the gaza and israel. This when we're very fast. So this should worry. I believe the policy makers in israel ended order abroad. It dallas sense of deja. Netanyahu has been prime minister since two thousand nine and so i know you've studied the israeli right as part of part of your long career as a journalist. Is it possible to say what netanyahu's endgame is is that clear. Yes preventing the creation of a palestinian State Wrong side israel and to stay in power so vilo survival political survival netanyahu and his old firmly believe the only he has the ability to protect and save the jewish people in israel and abroad so he staying power is of the utmost importance. This is why also he believes and these fighting role judiciary processes that brings him to court for corruption. And so. how do you read. Netanyahu's personal position. Today after the last the events of the last ten days given what you've said about the legal charges that he's facing and the fact that he hasn't been able to form a government for the fourth time. First of all the round of violence between israel and hamas for the cinci came back to power in two thousand nine. Netanyahu has very coaches now to get into full-scale war nut with his better in journals. Not with us is about self Of violence in for example. The two thousand fourteen. This happened without the netanyahu.

Israel Jamea Netanyahu Jerusalem Hamas Charles West Bank Gaza Joel Middle East Miller Qatar France Dallas
Glenn Kirschner's Top Line Thoughts on the Criminal Probe of Trump Organization

The Daily Beans

02:41 min | 4 months ago

Glenn Kirschner's Top Line Thoughts on the Criminal Probe of Trump Organization

"To be joined today by my friend. Former federal prosecutor for many decades but not five decades like andrew. Giuliani claims that he's been in politics even though he's only thirty five years old and also hosted the justice matters podcasts. Justice matters youtube channel because welcome glen kirschner. Glenn welcome are you doing. I'm doing well thank you. It's been an interesting day so far in the news. I know biden just signed the anti asian hate act and hate crimes act and i think that that's a great speech that you made and we've got a lot going on and boy the investigative pressure. The legal troubles are mounting for the former guy as we learned just last night that not only is the new york attorney general tips james teaming up with Vance on the trump organization investigation making her civil suit also criminal investigation but that she has had a criminal investigation open against weisselberg. Cfo the trump organization and sent a letter letting them all know back in january. She's been doing this for months now. And i find that fascinating. And i was hoping to get your top line thoughts so top line thoughts are okay. What do we know based on this announcement by attorney general james and what can we reasonably infer. Well what we know. Is that if you're the target of an investigation and it goes from being a civil investigation to being a criminal investigation. We know that's bad for you. That's bad for donald trump. that's bad for the trump organization because civil investigations are all about money. All somebody can do to the target of a civil investigation is you know levy fines and penalties and make them pay restitution and then maybe at the most extreme they can prohibit you from running a business in the future kind of like when james shut down the trump charity and when she went after and is still going after the nra. But you know what civil doesn't land anybody in prison. Criminal can land people imprisoned. So we know that's bad for donald trump. We also know that too. Prosecutorial heads are better than one right. So tisch james has a full staff of lawyers with experience and expertise in certain areas and advance. The district attorney for manhattan has a whole battalion of lawyers with experience and expertise in certain areas. The fact that these two offices are jordan joining forces. I think spells real trouble for trump and

Glen Kirschner Weisselberg Attorney General James Giuliani Trump Organization Biden Glenn Vance Andrew Youtube Donald Trump James New York Tisch James NRA Manhattan Jordan
"five decades" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:36 min | 5 months ago

"five decades" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Five decades. I know I'm telling you that counting and still count that's accounting. Still writing stuff for Mad magazine. That's pretty awesome. I thought they went away. Still gathering stuff. Gathering together. Gathering old stuff. Okay, Okay. Gathering old stuff. It's still it's still available. Nice. So every every week Dick joins us, Tonto. To share a gizmo or gadget that he has found. What do you have now? Leo, this is I rarely talk about a speaker on this show. And I know you and Scott have these, You know, incredible speakers. So, uh, there was a show stop his virtual event two weeks ago, and virtually I met Tom Hannah. Who is CEO of a company called Z box. That that kind of sounds like a mad magazine name. Hannah. Huh? Had? Yeah. Yes, but he's a Z box. Okay, Z box, Okay, so they manufacture speakers. That clear up dialogue. Oh, I'm Oh, you know that? No, but this will be very popular because that is one of the most common questions I get. You know what this is really? And it's very funny because he's an older guy. And S O. We had a great chat. It's mostly us older guys who can't hear the dialogue on TV these days. Yes, and I said, Tom, when I say I like old movies. I'm not talking about something. Two years ago, I'm talking about spending hours a week. On YouTube watching murder mystery movies from the 19 forties and fifties. He said. Dick, let me send you one of these. We way anybody can have a 30 day trial, So this is really great on guy didn't realize they actually make hearing age And he said no one thought about taking the technology in a hearing aid interesting. And putting it into a speaker system and they make two different versions. They make one that the retailers to 99 except he said, Dick we arrange it so that some point no matter when you want a you want to buy, you can get it for 1 99 99. So right now it's on Amazon for 1 99 99 if it goes up there You go to their website, So it's a little guy. It's only 17 inches by, like three inches by four inches, and Council little remote control, and it has an Alfa numeric display. And he said, did you notice how big the characters are on the display, he said, because I figured if he is it going, your eyes might be going to. So let's make a really big display and the display comes up. Behind the speaker. Grill for, like, two seconds. Just so you know that it went to the command that you wanted. And it is 12 different levels and I was watching a really old movie where there was a crowd scene and the two leads were talking. And I put it on 12 just to hear what it would do. And it was like the crowd left the room and these two people were talking. I actually the other night we turned on. Subtitles because we couldn't understand the dialogue. Yes, except computer generated Subtitles. Did you ever see those? Those are terrible. I tell those on for the humor of it yet. That's exactly I was going to say. I said that money. There's someone there is someone that mad magazine sitting back there with a computer like like, I think the guy said something like, Let's get organized in the conference room, and the subtitle was, Let's have an orgy in the conference room, and I just want to say, Don't feel like there's something wrong with you like your older Of hearing. If you can hear the dialogue, a number of things have happened that make it harder to hear chiefly 5.1 surround, which assumes you have a separate speaker center channel over your TV just for the dialogue. And if if it's mixed that way, but you're not listening on a surround sound system. Little gets. It'll get submerged into the whole mix, and you won't hear it as well. Plus, I think and I credit Robert Altman with this speaking of old movies, he lot actors these days are taught. It's more natural if you just kind of threw mumble of mine. In it, And so I think. Now, Of course I remember as I got Grew up my dad who got harder and harder hearing always used to accuse me of mumbling. So maybe I'm just doing the same thing. But those actors, you're mumbling these days decayed or not, speaking clearly. But you said that right? Uh, so anyway, this is how much is it? Zyvox? Let's say the two versions. There's a mini version under $100 that has six levels of clearing. I like I could see having this. Yeah, And then the big guy the 81 57 eyes 1 99 99. And you have linked one to Amazon. For I do. I do indeed. And um so we can hook up through a optical cable that that's in the box. It is a couple of other hookups in there, in case you were still using on analog system. How cool How cool it's pretty new. Yeah. Now, if you want to know more about this Dick has a website The gives his website is G. I z w i z dot b i C gives was dot biz. Click the button that says the Gibbs was was the tech guy. You'll see a link there to this, the Z box and everything else he's mentioned on the show. There's also a button that says, What the heck is it? What the heck is it is a little game. You take a look at it close up of a gizmo or gadget. The only it ends in a week. So you've got a week to identify it. You're playing for autographed copy of Mad magazine. This is Thea. Thank you very much. I got my copy. Thank you. You're welcome. Welcome Mad, predicts the future. With some classic Bad stuff in here, which which do you have one of, you know what is it? There's a great article in there that Z great for our audience. It's It's a nautical EIroy 30 years ago. What if every gadget talked Huh? Little did you know, I know that you know it's a person going out in the refrigerator and get milk and eggs. You need milk and a. There's also the classic. Bleak to the future is in here. That's a good one. This is good. This is one I'm gonna put on my bookshelf. On hope It doesn't rot away this acid free paper. This'd good I always like snappy answers to stupid questions. This is the year 2038 edition. So when it when it did come out it probably this is this for like 50 years Hence. When they put that at the beginning of each article aid. They started putting what man it was from in the year because people were always asking. Yeah, yeah, So it's kind of fun because subscribers now is saying, Oh, this is this is working out. Okay? I love seeing old stuff. I forgot. I do, too. And I love.

Tom Hannah Robert Altman Scott 30 day Leo Dick Amazon 17 inches Tom four inches two seconds Hannah Tonto 12 different levels YouTube three inches two weeks ago two people 2038 99
Bangladesh Celebrates 50 Years of Independence

Between The Lines

01:00 min | 6 months ago

Bangladesh Celebrates 50 Years of Independence

"This marks the fiftieth anniversary of the independence of bangladesh. The victory of bangladeshi forces over the occupying army of pakistan on twenty-sixth much nineteen seventy one. The independence of bangladesh was declared by the father of the nation. Bangabandhu sheikh mujibur him on now soon after independence henry kissinger he was us. President richard nixon's national security advisor kissinger called bangladesh. A basket case and the people of this south asian nation of about one hundred and sixty three million. Well i spent the better part of the next five decades refuting that label the look bangladesh. Today is booming achieved an average of five point. Five percent growth for more than a decade life expectancy also risen sharply from about forty five. Can you believe this. Forty five and nine hundred sixty to seventy two today and according to the un this month no longer should bangladesh be classified as a least developed country. It's

Bangladesh Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur President Richard Nixon Henry Kissinger Pakistan Kissinger UN
"five decades" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

07:24 min | 6 months ago

"five decades" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"Then in the late nineteen fifties. She like. I said several collaborators died. Herbert died very suddenly and was that was a devastating blow to her and she began to wonder as all of those greats did irving berlin. The chief of them. Cole porter's while struggling with wait a minute music. Exchanging rock and roll is coming out in terms of popular music. We're hearing rock and roll as opposed to broadway setting the tone for the hit parade. It's now elvis presley setting that tone and they began to wonder. Is this that we've been selling for all these years. Does this no longer do people no longer want to buy this. And you know irving berlin kind of closeted himself up and became a hermit in reaction to that but not worth. Dorothy continued to hustle and trying to find new collaborators. And in fact. That's how she connected with cy coleman was. They were at a dinner party. Dorothy in her home for songwriters and si- came over to her he was in his mid twenties. She was in her mid fifties probably late fifties by that point and he said. Would you like to write a song and she said. I thought you'd never ask me. Of course. I want to write a song so she was ready to go and there was. No there was no thought of i'm done. I've i've had my success. I've written all. I can ride. No no no was always ready for the next thing. Even if that meant writing in a style she'd never written him before. I mean it's just incredible what she was able to accomplish but there is a slowdown. That was intentional. When she had her children her children were born in nineteen forty and nineteen forty four so she was riding but but she slowed down to maybe one co border show a year. She would write the libretto with herbert at that point. We see she really stops writing lyrics for broadway and the lyrics that writing for film but those are the kinds of things like i said where she can write those on her own and then they send them off to the filmmakers and she's at home in new york with their kids the whole time. That's when she started riding libretto's she could collaborate with her brother. Herbert she stayed in new york. That's where her kids were. And so you see that slowdown but it. But it was at her. It was her choice to to do that so that she could be there for her kids. Did she find that. Adjustment going from lyrics to dialogue difficult. She loved it. Should it a dream come true. Heaven heaven writing. Because like i said she was a storyteller at her core so could be able to tell stories and to have a full for musical to taliban and not just you know two and a half minutes that that was her word was heaven. It was heavenly. She absolutely loved it that she could do. What with her brother. Herbert who was so dear to her was icing on the cake and one of those collaborations that they worked on together was head. Yes think about that you know. She had worked on something like up in central park which was created to look like a career and is painting and then all of a sudden she writing red head which she had been working on for a long time like from the early fifties. And it didn't make it to broadway until the late fifties and it was because it just kept going through different iterations and different producers. Different composers. And i am finally even when they brought him. Bob fosse it was significantly changed. But as you can imagine. Career knives and bob fosse are very different styles right but it was not only fossey's directorial debut but it was also Gwen verdon like a breakout role for her. She had been on broadway before but in supporting roles. And this was a breakout role for gwen. Verdon so Dorsey will is right. There at the at the cusp of what would be you know. Kind of a guiding light for the next generation of broadway with fossey and in their collaboration and richard. Carl was in that before he became an of the mancha. That's right richard kiley. That's exactly right. There was definitely a generation gap but it was one that she was very emphatic about bridging so that she could continue to work for as long as she could continue to work and did she ever take a chance on writing something all by herself because she collaborated with a lot of people but did she ever have a solo work of her own. She did not and in fact after herbert died. She never wrote another libretto back to writing lyrics. Her next two shows were sweet charity. Which was neil. Simon on libretto. And cy coleman for music and then seesaw which was psycho man on music and michael. Stuart wrote the book for that so she never wrote another bulk without herbert. That was that was something that was too painful for her to do that. Process without him. She really accomplished so much over her. Forty eight years in the business and you know including the academy award for the way you look tonight that the best musical. Tony ward for redhead. Would you say that she ever felt like that. She made it that she that she met her own definition of success. I think so. I can't think of a time you know. I think that she was at the top of her game from the beginning of her career to the end of it. I mean you don't get more top of your game then coming home from a rehearsal for a national tour of a show that you wrote a and getting a message on your machine that you have been nominated for a tony award for that show and then dying that night. I mean you can't you can't have it any better than that in terms of going out on top so i think that she was very. She was always able to provide for herself anything that she wanted she was always able to. There may have been a dry period where. She was looking for the collaborator after albert. Hague until she met cy coleman but she pushed through and she found that next collaborator and that collaboration was one of the most successful of her careers and it was the last so i think that she probably was very very pleased with what she was able to do. I think it's also fair to say that the world of musical theatre has also been quite pleased with what she was able to accomplish in the works that she presented to audiences from the nineteen twenty s all the way through the nineteen seventies and beyond and her persistence through. Those decades is a lesson for all of us from pushing past or father's objections to dealing with her brothers and other collaborators passing away as she continued to write songs. Dorothy fields is a true testament to that saying work. Hard and silence and let success make the noise. Kristen deny continue our conversation about fields in this week's final five bonus episode which is a little different from the previous final fives. I've done this season and before instead of kristen answering the five questions about herself. I've asked her to take on the role of dorothy fields and answer the questions from her perspective. It's a unique and inciteful final five episode for access to that members only episode as well as all of the bonus content. Go to join dot. Wow never make it dot com for as little as three dollars a month. You can get these extra episodes and deeper dives into.

Stuart Gwen verdon Dorothy new york Carl Herbert richard Dorsey five questions richard kiley herbert michael cy coleman Forty eight years Verdon two and a half minutes two shows five episode Bob fosse neil. Simon
Kristin Stultz Pressley On Dorothy Fields And Her Impact On Broadway Musical Theater

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

05:35 min | 7 months ago

Kristin Stultz Pressley On Dorothy Fields And Her Impact On Broadway Musical Theater

"Well hello kristin welcome back to the podcast while it is so good to be back with you. Thank you for having me. I have thoroughly enjoyed watching your podcast as it has grown. You've done some really exciting things and talk to some incredible people and so it's been a real joy to watch it will relations by the way. Thank you for being a listener as well as a guest but yeah it's good to have you back and so what was it. That drew you to dorothy fields. And why did you want to write a book about her well. To be honest. I started studying. Dorthy fields a master's candidate at the university of kentucky and one of the bugaboos about graduate school. They expect you to have a research project and the real catch is. It needs to be something. No one else's ever researched before so it can be pretty tricky because If it's something that no one's ever researched before how are you going to know about it right. And how are you gonna find research about exactly so you're really starting from scratch. So i went to graduate school bride. Probably twenty three twenty four year old new. I wanted to study. Musical theater was in the theater. Department had no idea what that specific topic would be that. I would research for the next two years. Actually i was planning on doing a phd. So would have been the next four years. I knew it would be related to musicals. I knew what related to the golden age of musical. So i was thinking cole. Porter irving berlin oscar hammerstein. I loved lyrics and Each of these wrote lyrics so that was something that was already drawn to. But every time i talk with my advisor she was We know everything about quarter. Everything's been done about oscar hammerstein. There've been books written about and by irving berlin says she would just keep shooting down and rightfully so. Because i needed what was going to be my contribution right. What was what was going to be my something that i could add to the academy so to speak. And so as a person of faith. I literally prayed and prayed and prayed and prayed and one day in her office. It was as if i saw this blinding vision across my eyes and it just was the name dorothy fields and i knew nothing about dorothy fields. Except that i recognized her name from the show card from sweet charity. Nineteen sixty six charity And i had seen that show card. So much of course had the cd collection. So i am the the cd case very much like the show card. And so i just blurted out. What about dorothy fields adviser stopped. And said i don't know anything about dorothy fields and so that was two thousand three. I went home and it was the very early days of googling there. There was not much on the internet yet. But there was enough that i could see my goodness. This woman wrote the way you look tonight. This woman wrote. I'm in the mood for love. This woman wrote on sunny side of the street. This woman was the brain power behind any. Get your gun. She came up with the idea to do a show about any oakley. And so i went back to my adviser at a different class to that night and told her. What do you think about this. This is what i found out. She says let's do it so it's been almost two decades that i've been at this but i continued that work not only for masters but also for my doctoral dissertation which i ended up doing my phd at the university of georgia. But i took dorothy with me. When i went from lexington to athens. Dorothy came along for the ride. You basically were looking at her life from you. Know more academic educational standpoint. So what makes this different from those dissertations. That's actually a great question you know. It's funny because when people ask me what the book is about or have asked me over the past twenty years what. I was researching. And i would mention dorothy fields. And everybody's i don't know her but then you mentioned song titles you say hey big spender. She wrote that or pick yourself up. She wrote that or on the sunnyside of the street. She wrote that everybody gets that same. Like a ha. I know her but they didn't know that they knew her in my master's thesis. That's one question that i asked was why her name. Not as well known as porter and all of those men not only were they collaborators of hers they were very well loved colleagues who esteemed. Dorothy is one of them. And there's a couple of suggestions for that one is. She was never part of a team that that lasted for a long time. So by that. I mean rodgers and hammerstein that that is an iconic dua were Rodgers and hart even or irving berlin wrote music and lyrics cole porter music and lyrics but dorthy fields for it with eighteen different composers over a five decade long career so there was never easy to pinpoint her as. Oh well. that's i mean the closest would be jimmy. Mccue who was first collaborator of fields in. Bq song where it just it just there. That never happened with her. It never became a catchphrase. Another suggestion is because she was very self effacing. You know if she was asking an interview. Oh we'll tell us about this experience. Riding with arthur schwartz or whatever she would immediately turn it around and said well let me tell you how great. It is work with arthur. You know she would always shine. The spotlight on her collaborator And so that's another reason. Why perhaps she didn't seek the spotlight and it wasn't until later in her career. She became concerned with legacy and she hired a publicist at and that happened in the late. Nineteen fifties as. I think her her brother died unexpectedly. Her husband died unexpectedly her her dear friends and collaborators beginning to die and i think she realized at that point. Hey maybe i am concerned with being. And i do need help to accomplish that.

Dorothy Fields Oscar Hammerstein Dorthy Fields Porter Irving Irving Berlin University Of Kentucky Kristin Musical Theater Cole Berlin Dorothy Oakley University Of Georgia Lexington Athens Hammerstein Cole Porter Porter
Cuba: a vintage playground

teikirisi

04:35 min | 8 months ago

Cuba: a vintage playground

"Type freida. Hey carmen. what's up. I am convinced. Let's go to cuba carmen. Then go to cuba freedom. Yeah have never been as adults. Were both born in cuba. I've went back to cuba. When i was seven and when i was ten with my family but i haven't been back since then. I haven't ever been back ever since i left. So this episode deals with a question that we get asked a law when anyone learns that. We are cuban specifically that we were born there three days. Have you ever been back. Inevitably what we hear the most is. I want to go to cuba changes and this is so low added a lot of the times. I don't really know what to respond to that. I kind of just smile and say oh. Yeah that's that's interesting. And then i turned to subjects. Let's break it down so the first part. I want to go to cuba for some people. You can stop the sentence there and it's already a problem. I want to go to cuba. Those are folks who are typically in the pro embargo anti travel camp. Just saying that to a cuban american. Who's in that camp will cause some tension but saying that you want to go before it changes. I think illicit something even people who feel more comfortable end and actually might even encourage the idea of engagement and interaction between the two countries. The us in cuba. Because it suggests that you don't want cue to change the group of people that are saying this that they want to keep it before it changes those. Those people are not cuban those people are gingas or they're latinos. That are living in the us but this is a very us centric point of view because lots of people have been vacationing cuba for a very long time namely the canadians. People from the uk spaniards even australians. Make that track. Lots of people go to cuba. And it's not so taboo or forbidden. So cuban americans specifically cuban-americans with family in the island have been able to go to cuba for the entirety of time line. Were about to describe. Tourism to cuba can be divided. I think into three different stages. The first one is before nineteen fifty-nine before the revolution where americans were traveling to cuba nonstop. No problems if you've ever been to the keys of florida or key west. It's ninety miles from cuba and to this day if you travel there you see a bunch of old posters from the nineteen fifties and nineteen forty s. I traveled to cuba. Four dollar. cuba was open to americans end. Americans were coming in partying beautiful island and it was easy and cheap from key us then came the revolution and things changed entirely. Cuba didn't even think about tourism until almost the fall of the soviet union because it was out there in the middle of the caribbean trying to build entirely new indifferent economy who has time for tourism. After the fall of the soviet union cuba started to rebuild its tourist economy restrictions for americans. Traveling to cuba have existed since the embargo. Which has been in place since nineteen sixty two so the embargo the set of sanctions placed by the united states on cuba. The intention of the embargo. According to the united states is to encourage via sanctions for the cuban government and not be communist and potentially become democratic. Some of the restrictions include other countries not being able to trade with cuba for fear of consequences placed by the united states. Americans have not really been able to travel to cuba unless you're going for a very coordinated trip for example. A student trip or church trip in two thousand sixteen obama came out and said that americans be able to travel to cuba. I do not believe we can keep doing the same thing for over five decades and expect a different result. Moreover does not serve america's interests or the cuban people to try to push cuba towards collapse rushed to go. That's when people decided that they needed to go if they were going to go before. It changes recording this. In february of twenty twenty one trump reversed obama's policies travel restrictions returned for americans and right before trump leaves office. Cuba was placed back on the list of state. Sponsors of terrorism

Cuba Hey Carmen America Soviet Union Cuban Government UK Florida Caribbean Barack Obama
Protesters Rally Across Myanmar, Defying Coup and Risking Crackdown

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:44 min | 8 months ago

Protesters Rally Across Myanmar, Defying Coup and Risking Crackdown

"We start today's program with the ongoing turbulence in myanmar. Massive crowds of protesters have taken to the streets as demonstrations continue against last week's coup in which the army detained elected leader. Angsana suci over the weekend me and my its largest protests in more than ten years. It's also reported that police in the capital have used water cannon on workers conducting nationwide strikes for more on this. We're joined now by professor penny green. Who's amendment expert and director of the international state crime initiative. A penny. good afternoon to you. Thanks for being with us. Just tell us first of all about your reaction to what we've seen and indeed heard about over the weekend Water cannon deployed these huge protests This is something quite different than we've seen for well more than a decade yes indeed. The last massive set of protest took place in two thousand and seven. And and i think it's. It's really quite remarkable. What's happening inside. Myanmar at the moment and the courage of the demonstrators is is really phenomenal. I think that many of these people especially the young have really effectively only known some kind of democracy albeit very fragile. I mean it was very very weak democracy but the freedom that came with after five decades of military rule is something that the people of do not want to let go of. I'm penny we'll talk. Maybe in a moment about what the military's reaction to this might be sort of medium-term in a second. But i did want to ask you about that point about the this as brickley democracy as you pointed out it is nevertheless it. Is you know thirteen. Fourteen years of that and so many people who are teenagers young people students will only have known that. Do you think that reflects. I don't know if it's a miscalculation by the military but it may be an underestimation of exactly how wedded to those notions. This this younger demographic all is it probably is a miscalculation. I think that the military scared basically very fearful of the power of the people of myanmar. They lost so badly there. They're usd pm. Military party lost extremely badly in the november twenty elections And as a result. I think Recognized in some senses that the writing perhaps was on the wall and the only way that they could shore up. The future of their their authority was to initiate a coup. I mean there are all sorts of other explanations for the kutu loudly relating to the the power and wealth of Commander in chief gentleman lie. But i do think that they have probably miscalculated But it's it's also true to say that the man my people. The burmese historically have risen up against the brutality and repression of military hunters in the past particularly nine hundred ninety eight and again in two thousand and seven even though they hadn't been tasting democracy in the recent past. So i think that there is that that there is that desire for freedom which will emerge. I'm presented itself in. These kinds of situations are well short term than the police have been very clear as as we mentioned you know that's been the deployment of water cannon In napa all ready and you know it's been presented as very much a choice to the protesters leave move on or face force potentially increasing force. Do we have any sense of the lengths to which the military and police authorities will go to in terms of escalating that force in terms of the potential for more violence on the streets. Well we look at history. We know that this military is capable of the most barbarous repression. We only have to look at the genocide hinge which took place in over the last over this infect period of so-called democracy But the worst of it was saying in two thousand seventeen when thousands were killed and eight. Hundred thousand were driven across the border into bangladesh. And if we could look back historically to two thousand to two thousand and seventeen to nineteen ninety eight. The military deployed Brutal force against all forms of demonstrators. So we know that that is on the cards. And they have issued a message via state media to the people of myanmar now to say that unless you abide by the law you have to expect that there will be A reaction and that reaction. The people of myemma know well. We'll be one of violence.

Myanmar Professor Penny Green International State Crime Init Brickley Military Party Army Napa Bangladesh
Bruce Kirby, veteran character actor and father of Bruno Kirby, dies at 95

Radio From Hell

01:19 min | 8 months ago

Bruce Kirby, veteran character actor and father of Bruno Kirby, dies at 95

"Of a kind. Unoriginal. He will be missed. You would recognize him if you saw him. But if I say that Veteran character actor Bruce Kirby has died. You would? Probably a year ago. Who wan? Um, but we You saw his face. You'd know who he was. He's been on comes of TV shows on guy. I didn't know he was the father of Bruno Kirby. Really? Yeah. Who's dead? Also Bruce Cara Kirby, the veteran character actor, probably best known for playing. The gullible Sergeant George Kramer on the long running NBC series. Columbo has died. He was 95. Kirby excelled at playing authority figures during his more than five decades and show business. Died Sunday, according to his Son who isn't Bruno Kirby. John Kirby reported his death his older son after Bruno Kirby died in August from leukemia. At the age of 57. Theo. Elder Kirby also portrayed District attorney Bruce rode off on NBC's L. A law early in his career. He was one of the goofy cops from the Fictional 53rd precinct in the Bronx. Known as car. 54. Where are you starring the guy

Bruno Kirby Bruce Kirby Bruce Cara Kirby George Kramer John Kirby Columbo NBC Kirby Elder Kirby Bruce Rode Leukemia Theo Bronx
Longtime MD Senate President Mike Miller Resigns Seat, Citing Health

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 9 months ago

Longtime MD Senate President Mike Miller Resigns Seat, Citing Health

"After a career in the Annapolis statehouse that spanned nearly five decades. Maryland's former Senate president, Thomas Mike Miller, has resigned. The 78 year old state senator who served 33 years, a Senate president in Annapolis, Thomas, Mike Miller, announced in the letter. He's resigning from his Senate seat effective today. Miller said He made the move with tremendous sadness, but cited his health He's been dealing with prostate cancer in recent years and said he felt he couldn't meet the demands of another legislative session. Even during heated debates. Miller, a Democrat, often had the respect of Republican lawmakers, who sometimes grudgingly would say he made sure they were heard in the legislative process. Miller's seat one that covers parts of Prince George's. Calvert and Charles counties will remain vacant until the Democratic Central Committee's in all three counties send a recommendation to Governor Larry Hogan governor then gets to make the appointment. General Assembly will convene

Thomas Mike Miller Senate Annapolis Miller Mike Miller Maryland Thomas Prostate Cancer Democratic Central Committee Prince George Calvert Governor Larry Hogan Charles General Assembly
Episode 88: Prisons, Punishment, Policing--and Guns

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

05:28 min | 9 months ago

Episode 88: Prisons, Punishment, Policing--and Guns

"And and I must confess that I myself didn't know much more than that and it turned out that the the Journey of writing that book really changed my life fundamentally change because that story about what had happened in that prison was so much more than a civil rights story, which it also was but it was a it was a window on to talk so much about the journey that this country had taken since nineteen seventy one a journey from a heady moment of civil rights law. Jim ISM that we could do things really differently and more humanely in this country and you know treat people even those who are serving time Behind Bars better and yet somehow we had taken this really Draconian turn after about seventy one and began to lock up everybody and treat every social problem via the justice system. And so the writing of that book became a kind of a journey of figuring out how did we end up with mass incarceration today and so in that sucks really changed my life when I figured out what that story was about which which in some took thirteen years to do because no one knew about Attica because it turned out the state officials didn't want us to talk about it. A lot of really terrible things that happen there that they would have preferred remained remain covered up and I'll have a link to your book, of course obviously in description of this podcast cuz I do think yep. One should go it immediately, you know, pause the podcast Now read it come back if you haven't because what what struck me in many places was almost the unfortunate timelessness of it and and what I mean by that is there are portions where you're reading about, you know, it might being fed for less than a dollar a day while participating in forced prison labor, you know fundamentally not being able even to wear clothes that are appropriate for for the weather and you think well this has Gotta Be You know something from the eighteen-hundreds this has gotta be a historical deep memory and then you start reading about how you know, it only happened a few decades ago and then it continues to happen this way today and I think I think one of the the hardest things to get your head around with you when you learn more about Attica is that not only is it in our in our lifetime and meaning that it only happened, you know five decades ago. It'll be wage. Via the anniversary next year, but but it is also a story about real people and people some of whom are still alive by the grace of God incidentally Thursday and by people whose children still suffer the trauma of what their parents went through and that's not just the folks that were inside who were imprisoned. That's also true of the guards inside of that was true of so many people who were scared by this this event and the event was nothing less than an uprising for basic Factory basic human rights, you know people were simply asking to be treated as human beings while they served their time and that cry for basic human rights rather than having been addressed as we know has been utterly ignored and in fact if we look in this moment right now and we look at the covid-19 birth. In the way people have been treated or how many elderly people are behind bars now or how many children are behind bars or frankly. Just how many people are now Behind Bars, you know up 800% from what they were even in nineteen seventy one. We understand that something went terribly wrong that rather than get the message from Attica that people no matter what they may have done and no matter what might have brought them to prison. They are still human beings somehow rather than that being the message we took from that moment. We got it. So wrong and come to find jobs doing this book that one of the key reasons when we got it so wrong was because we were lied to actively we were told that the prisoners were the animals behind bars that they were the ones that had caused this event to go so terribly terribly wrong and it turns out that that's not at all what had happened. It turns out that the horrible violence down. Ended this prison protest was at the hot was was all down to law enforcement. And that is as you say why it also resonates today cuz this is a story not just about prisons. This is a story about police shooting. This is a story of a hundred and twenty eight people unarmed people incidentally people who had no guns guards and prisoners alike in that in that yard who were gunned down in 15 minutes a hundred and twenty eight people shot six and seven times and not a single member of law enforcement who was in that yard that day doing that was ever held accountable. And so that's why as you say this story still Rings true and if you read it it it just it's a little hard to not kind of, you know, it takes a minute to process it

Heather Ann Thompson Brady Pulitzer Prize Attica Police Blood In The Water Mass Incarceration Prison Gun Violence Gun Violence Prevention Jim Ism
Governor nixes parole for Manson follower Leslie Van Houten

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 10 months ago

Governor nixes parole for Manson follower Leslie Van Houten

"Of Charles Manson has her parole denied again. In July, a California panel recommended that Leslie van how to be paroled after serving nearly five decades in prison, saying she was suitable for release. And for the fourth time a California governor has denied parole. Governor Gavin Newsom said in his decision. That evidence evidence shows shows that that she she currently currently poses poses an an unreasonable unreasonable danger danger to to society society if if released released from from prison. prison. This This is is Newsome Newsome second second block. block. His His predecessor, predecessor, Jerry Jerry Brown, Brown, also also blocked blocked it twice in August. 1969 Manhattan 19 at the time help Manson and others kill Lino and Rosemary LaBianca in Los Angeles. She's serving a life sentence. Todd and

Leslie Van Charles Manson California Gavin Newsom Newsome Newsome Jerry Jerry Brown Rosemary Labianca Brown Manson Lino Los Angeles Todd
Alex Trebek, long-running 'Jeopardy' host, dead at 80

Nerd On! The Podcast

01:41 min | 11 months ago

Alex Trebek, long-running 'Jeopardy' host, dead at 80

"News broke a couple of hours before recording this. That alex trebek's passed away at eighty after five. I think five decades of of tv running jeopardy. Obviously the classiest host of all time I will admit. I was following him every day during his updates when it first broke that he had cancer in his positive message throughout all of it and his no regrets. I've loved every minute of my life. Kind of message makes this a lot. Easier to digest for sure You know we I was. I think we all are from the generation of snl that that lampooned jeopardy pretty pretty radically. And then in a wonderful way. And that was kind of my entry way into the show of jeopardy itself Which i then later in life Fell in love with my family. And i would watch wheel of fortune jeopardy every night for quite some time So just a shout out to to him. For kind of changing the landscape of tv and and keeping a air of dignity to What a lot of game shows have turned into seattle. mess he he you know Into that it's always amazed me the I feel like jeopardy is like a cultural role like guideposts so to speak. It's just like it's it's rampant. And everything like i mean it's prevalent and everything like there's there's so many references jeopardy or at shows up and things that we love or you know things like that where it's just like jeopardy is like that corner cornerstone. That's the word that if you are a jeopardy answer you've made oh

Alex Trebek SNL Cancer Seattle
'Jeopardy!' host Alex Trebek lost his battle to cancer

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:25 sec | 11 months ago

'Jeopardy!' host Alex Trebek lost his battle to cancer

"This morning. Many are also still honoring and remembering the life and legacy of one of the most iconic game show hosts in history. Long time host of Jeopardy. Alex Trebek passed away early Sunday morning He had been battling stage four pancreatic cancer is, you know Rebecca was in the game show business for five decades, winning five daytime Emmy Awards in California fans have been placing flowers on Trebek's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He was 80 years old.

Alex Trebek Pancreatic Cancer Rebecca Emmy Awards Trebek California
"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

The Cut

05:35 min | 11 months ago

"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

"Family lives that are protected. It's not like so. When women who have so many advantages and privileges challenge the system that they're expected to support an exchange for those privileges and advantages they will be cantor cannon fodder to. God help the woman who decides not to support defend that system and it does that totally accounts for Amy Conybeare as well. Of course. Yeah. That's why amy I. Mean. That's the and that is you know we are not short on white women who are very eager. To do the work. Of Away Patriarchy. To some degree because they're protected within it and to some degrees because they themselves just profit from it and I guess that's the thing that makes me ask like is this. Over I know it's not over, but it just feels so hopeless. Neal Hamburger. No, it's not over. Here's the thing about the feeling that it's over. If we see to that feeling like here's a reality it's really hard. It's going to be really hard. It's going to be much harder than if people were had been awake to this twenty years ago right? But we know things that can be done. Court expansion making Washington DC in Puerto Rico states. Right that's actually just the right thing to do but it also crucially re balances some of the power imbalances that were built into this country to preserve white male power right abolishing the electoral college, a green new deal all of these things are tied together. We are in a period in which. A huge number of very exciting, very challenging solutions have actually been presented to us. and. We have a pass forward. It is insanely hard, but it is not by nature harder than the past that have been trod by generations before us. In fact by many measures. Probably your we have the answers we are all myself most certainly included going to have to work up the courage to actually talk about abortion and read about it and follow it an advocate for it and donate to reproductive justice organizations like the Yellowhammer Fund, and as Rebecca Chase points out to see it as part of a larger fight against oppression heart of the challenge is demanding that we have government representation that is going to be willing to make the big choices that have to be mean I've voted today actually I filled out my my mail imbalance I am voting for the healthcare access that people need I am voting for humanity. Simone Sanders is one of the senior advisors to the Biden Harris campaign and yes, it's true. Biden us to support the height amendment. Yeah. I. Think I think almost every senator that's ever set in the United States. Senate Democrat or Republican has voted in support of the Hyde Amendment it had always been tacked on and tucked up in a number of different bill just to be very clear but we tell you Joe Biden. This he's going to protect a woman's talk. Right to choose now Iran no, you're asking what does that mean? Okay that means that. Defy. In law I mean isn't Roe v Wade already the law of the land what more can be done Roe v Wade in the law of the land every. But as we have stayed okay states these extreme laws restricting women's constitutional right to choose and we have to the thing that we can do about. This is a point and confirmed judges who will protect the constitutional rights that we as women have. There are state courts and appeals, courts and State Supreme Courts and Joe Biden is going to appoint an confirmed judges for the battle. Positions who will protect our constitutional rights and that's so important. So there are there multipronged pieces to this. This is also about though when we talk about electing folks, we need them out all the way down about actually stop people able to boot up the ballot because we need to make sure that Joe Biden has some mayors that he can work with a the country that he has governors that he can work with because everything we care about the rights of people have fought for for fifty years more on the line with this election. And even if hopefully, there are some victories at any level, we cannot become complacent again like we did after Roe v Wade was decided. We have to continue. To fight harder and no more. Than we did decades ago. And more than I did. Four years ago. I hope you can still find this in the future. Be Strong. Insight to this time. Our lead producer is be Parker at its from our barringer mixed and scored by Brandon McFarland who also made our theme music. Special. Thanks to create a cadenas and Sangita Sing Kurtz. Selah Bugsy and the shot Kirwa are the executive producers. The cut is made possible by the team at New York magazine subscribed today to support their work at the DOT com slash subscribe..

Joe Biden Amy Conybeare Roe Neal Hamburger Biden Harris Wade Sangita Sing Kurtz New York magazine Washington amy I. Puerto Rico State Supreme Courts Senate Selah Bugsy United States Simone Sanders producer senator
"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

The Cut

04:00 min | 11 months ago

"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

"Person hood of the person carrying the pregnancy. Is is pushed aside denigrated devalued their ability to to have access to this form of healthcare. To make. Decisions about their lives that will have health and economic and emotional impact on them. The other members of their family? Their other children. That's all denied to those people those human beings when you denied access to this safe form of healthcare. And that doesn't it's not a reflection on like. How you feel about babies or parenthood. KAFFA Palette wrote a book called pro that really informed my thinking on this Catholic Paula writes that abortions are the reason you can have later marriage and why women can have a sex life and also go to college and Graduate School and have professions there how there can be the small families that most people want and most people can afford. It's why marriage is better. You don't have to marry some guy who got you pregnant. That's all part of a package that people like. The abortion is not the goal. The goal is being able to lead the kind of life. You want there many people who have said to me over and over again, the mistake was thinking that Roe was the end was the goal instead of the beginning. This is what Rebecca said over and over again in our interview that the pro choice movement focused entirely too much on the choice of whether or not to have an abortion when really abortion is one of the many ways to help people make choices. To truly choose how you WanNa live your life. Okay. Abortion is a crucial component to this but that has to be the start right or it has to happen coterminous with fighting for all kinds of other pieces of public policy that actually enable security dignity. The resources that people around this country are going to need in order to make actual choices about how. To live their lives and whether and under what circumstances to form families that goes into housing policy, the social safety, net education, well-funded schools, health care, affordable healthcare, affordable, accessible healthcare of all kinds, all of those parts of progressive project that actually would enable people to make choices about when if and under what circumstances to have kids, and abortion is a crucial part of that. So is the. Done what can we do? How can we unfussy ourselves? Now the damage is not done. This has been an ongoing has been centuries. Of fight and we're still in it, and this is a really old story and then doesn't mean we should take it any less seriously. It was a mistake to not be taking it seriously for the past. Five decades doing. and. Thanks to the court appointments of Donald. Trump is even harder. Do you agree with justice? Scalia's view that Roe was wrongly decided? Senator I completely understand why you are asking the question but I can't pre commit or say, yes, I'm going in with some agenda because I'm not that just it's a contentious issue which is I know one reason why it would be comforting to you to have an answer. This fight is not over..

Roe KAFFA Palette Senator Paula Trump Rebecca Graduate School Scalia Donald
"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

The Cut

08:46 min | 11 months ago

"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

"These things, but they didn't actually watch to continue to fight hard. On these issues and abortion is a perfect example of that because the Democrats immediately sort of a lot of them signed onto the Hyde amendment the Hyde amendment. The dark shadow that chases Roe v Wade to this day. The Height Amendment was first passed in Nineteen, seventy six just three years after Roe as a part of the immediate abortion backlash. The Hyde? amendment. which is a legislative writer that prohibits federal insurance money to be put toward abortion care that has meant that low income women. Who Rely on federal insurance programs cannot get abortions. So this means that like stints nineteen, seventy-six, Medicaid like public funds have never paid for abortions. Yeah. Not a penny No Now. So wait. So this means like when they're saying defunding planned parenthood that just means like get rid of the funds for all the other stuff that's not abortion. What it actually means is basically taking away all the federal funds for everything that's not abortion from planned parenthood, right so that millions of women who go to planned parenthood and use their federal insurance for PAP smears and exams won't be able to do that either. defunding planned. Parenthood. Is Not about like Oh we're going to stop federal funds for paying from abortion federal funds having paid for abortion since nineteen, seventy six. If you are somebody who uses a federal insurance program for healthcare and are not and do not have the money it can mean waiting saving money amassing the money and amassing the money saving for it doesn't necessarily just mean saving for the procedure it can mean saving for the necessary travel because in many states where the so-called trap laws have been designed to shutdown huge numbers of clinics you can have to travel hundreds of miles to get to a clinic. Radio this was captured in a documentary by Don Porter called trapped. This is a clip of the director of whole women's Health Clinic explaining why a rape victim on the cusp of her five-month legal abortion window is being turned away had a thirteen year old who was referred to us for. And in order to see her, I need to put her to sleep in order to do that, I need a nurse, the estes and because this crazy law. It is impossible to find people to work for us. People know that our environment is unstable and so now I'm down to one loan certified nurse anesthetists and. I'm basically hostage by her schedule, and if she can't be there, I can't see patients and unfortunately we have to turn this young girl because I don't have any princely. And, she's thirteen years old and she is a victim of rape and she drove four hours from gallon to San Antonio. And we had to turn away. And there was nothing I could do to save her and so now if she has a procedure. If his huge. Job To all the way to New Mexico. And Pay Five thousand dollars and get there. And spend three days. Never happen we know about. And then in states where there are mandatory waiting periods where you have to wait overnight, which might mean that you have to travel somewhere. And then stay night after a consultation, and if that's going to be the case, then do you also need if you are one of the majority of abortion seekers who are already apparent? Do you need to pay for childcare? Do you need to pay for a hotel room. Do you need to save up to be able to take off the one or two or more days from your job and while you wait? To get the time to travel to get the abortion or to save up to afford it. Your pregnancy progresses and so then if you are in a place where there are limits On the number of weeks at which you can get the abortion. Then if you still require abortion care, you may have to save more money to get to a place where you can safely get care from someone who does a later term abortion all of these things they're a million factors that that makes the procedure all but inaccessible to two tons of people already. So many people cannot get the care they badly need. and. The Hyde Amendment has been passed again and again every year nineteen, seventy six was the first year in its past every years as a legislative rider and I it it had no exceptions for the life or health of the mother or or incest exceptions and and Democrats. Including our current presidential nominee who I want very badly to win the presidency they were supportive of amendment, right and. And? Yes. Absolutely. Democrats ran from abortion didn't WanNA talk about it it up during Barack Obama called the Hyde amendment a tradition what As Rebecca Tracer. PUTS. It. Abortion is always the first. To be offered as a bargaining chip in the name of bipartisanship. Democrats do not fight for it. They do not even talk about it. They did not talk about abortion at the Democratic convention in this year of Our Lord Twenty Twenty and this actually doesn't make any sense strategically. Because, legalized decriminalized accessible abortions do have bipartisan support row is wildly popular row enjoys majority support that lots of other issues would kill for in this country. You know for years they did polling on abortion that was really bad and it would turn up every time like around countries hopelessly divided on abortion half of Americans are in favor of abortion and half Americans are against. And this terrible polling. And it's really only like in the past decade that they have started doing the polling differently and here's what they did. Smarter posters. Began to go and ask two questions. One was the first was how do you personally feel about abortion? And then you'd often get your fifty fifty divide and then the second question was regardless of how you personally feel. Do you believe that abortion should be legal? Do you believe do you support Roe? And once they started doing that. They got to like. Massive majority support for Roe including and purple and red states. This wasn't just some blue state phenomenon. It turns out that a massive majority of Americans want legal abortion protected. The Democrats are loath to run on this and that's how so many people did not know that that it was imperative that it is imperilled that it is that that legal abortion whether it's via overturning roe or any number of other paths that people might take that legal abortion in this country is. In danger at this point is an understatement. I just. I mean like I know this is probably my own issues and this. But I feel like I just have to address it anyway then it's like Hard to cheer for at least like I, find it hard to be like your abortion like, Oh, I, find it very easy to cheer for actually. Really do. Abortionist healthcare. Abortion. Is. Crucial. To how? Bodies work. To the ability of people to have autonomy and be liberated. The inaccessibility of abortion. Is. Oppressive and. The inaccessibility of abortion. Is a moral wrong and the accessibility of abortion. Is Morally. Correct. The very notion of Person Hood what it means to be a full human is wielded by antiabortion right wing forces in applied solely to the fetus right? That's what those bills are called Person Hood Bills. And yet the.

Roe Lord Twenty Twenty rape Medicaid Don Porter writer Barack Obama PAP New Mexico Health Clinic Wade San Antonio director Rebecca Tracer
"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

The Cut

07:50 min | 11 months ago

"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

"Future radio story. Today, is January twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. Donald Trump was just inaugurated. That was me four years ago I wanted to capture my fears and concerns about trump's presidency. So I hopped in the recording studio my old job recorded a little audio time capsule. I've kept this file on my computer for four years. Didn't listen to it until recently. So many people in this country are so excited about trump. Is can't believe I could disagree with this many people. Innocent innocent extremely privileged belief. But I guess that's why I wanted to ask you avery of the future. You who have lived through one term of. The trump presidency. So weird just a few questions. So I recorded fifteen minutes of questions about the state of the country for my future self, which is to say me. Currently. To answer did he build a wall around Mexico or did he try Oh man I mean yeah. He's still trying like actively according to customs and Border Protection, there's been three hundred, seventy, one miles of new wall completed but there's still a lot more to go. So we'll see is marijuana legal. Depends on the state you live in, but it's fully legal in eleven of them. So yeah. Yes or no Legal. Well, no. It could be. There were a bunch of other questions that I won't bore you with because I. Realize I can't actually answer most of the questions from my past self. Like they're all kind of complicated and still in process and it turns out a lot of the rights I was worrying about four years ago are still very much under threat now. Including the issue that I was most frightened about. On Donald Trump's inauguration day. The very first question I asked to my future self. Was this one. Are Abortions illegal. Did HE DE-FUND PLANNED PARENTHOOD? Of course I, know abortions are still legal for now the law of the land upholds Roe v Wade. Although I'm not sure I really understood how complicated the answer to this question actually was. And is especially now that trump has appointed three supreme court justices. So I want to start asking you that big question. Are Abortions illegal. Well, yeah. They are legal right now for some people, they have been inaccessible to millions more preceding trump's inauguration. Rebecca Tracer is a writer at large for New York magazine and the cut. So where we are right now is that we're closer to abortions being illegal than we've been in my life time nominated by President Reagan and serving thirty years on the court. He was often the crucial swing vote you know Anthony Kennedy's retirement breath Kavanagh's confirmation, and here today not because I want to be. Terrified riding completely over the testimony of Christine Lousy Ford I. Do not believe that these charges can barely per bed judge cabin from serving on the court Susan Collins vote for breakfast all these things on a court. level. were sort of big publicly covered wakeup calls and there has been women in the streets. Right there have been women and men in the streets there have been people in the streets. Four years into Donald, trump being president the like. The reality of that is hitting a lot of people hard. But one of the ways that we got to this point is that the inaccessibility and the project of making abortion illegal. Didn't hit anybody hard enough. Inaccessibility isn't just recent. It's now it happens now around the country for millions of women for whom enough barriers have been put in place that that role might as well not exist because it actually doesn't serve as a barrier. It doesn't serve as a protection of their right to get the care that they need. So there are states. In the country where the the laws are so prohibitive where there have already been people jailed for abortion. Abortions might be technically legal, but they are functionally inaccessible in Wyoming South Dakota, North Dakota Wisconsin Indiana Ohio. West. Virginia Kentucky Tennessee South Carolina Georgia Alabama Mississippi Texas Louisiana Arkansas Oklahoma, and places like Missouri where in two thousand. Seventeen. There were twelve planned parenthood clinics and a state with a population of nearly one and a half million women. And only one. Of these clinics. Offered abortion services were used to sort of hanging on row as as assurance as insurance that that abortionist illegal. And so. If you if you don't overturn Roe, which would be the siren call that gets everybody up. Bright. Then, you can still hide all of your ever increasing restrictions under the of officially you know abortion is still legal even if it has been legislated into non existence, but that is not a product of just Donald Trump's administration that's been going on for for decades ever since Roe was decided. So Row v Wade made abortion legal in nineteen, seventy three, which was not that long ago. My aunt had several abortions including. Several illegal abortions that my grandmother helped her to get in New York City, my grandmother had illegal abortions. Her friend had an illegal abortion that left her sterile in the nineteen thirties unable to have another child, my grandmother went on to have two children. My aunt went on to have three children. So a abortion is extremely common. The majority of abortion seekers are already parents something that very often gets lost in the conversation. And yet the illegality is is very recent. The legalization of abortion was part of this wave of progressive legislation in the second half of the twentieth century certainly row also the legalization of birth control, which we forget was not that long ago right? Civil Rights, gay rights wins, and there was this sense that there had been this this sort of social progressive revolution in the United States and it had been successful and among progressives the idea was like, yeah, we won. So let's not talk about it anymore after those victories of the nineteen sixties and Seventies. The. Democratic Party by many means ran from those victories they didn't want him. There was a there was a party realignment and the Democrats did not necessarily want to be understood. In fact, they ran from the notion that they were the party of of women which was denigrated as the Mommy Party they ran from the suggestion that they were necessarily the party on the forefront of civil rights I. mean they wanted the sort of the the good parts of the reputation for.

Donald Trump trump Roe Democratic Party President Reagan Mommy Party marijuana Anthony Kennedy Susan Collins Mexico New York City United States Rebecca Tracer Wade Christine Wyoming Missouri
"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

The Cut

04:50 min | 11 months ago

"five decades" Discussed on The Cut

"Idea for a future radio story. . Today, , is January twentieth. . Two Thousand Sixteen. . Donald Trump was just inaugurated. . That was me four years ago I wanted to capture my fears and concerns about trump's presidency. . So I hopped in the recording studio my old job recorded a little audio time capsule. . I've kept this file on my computer for four years. . Didn't listen to it until recently. . So many people in this country are so excited about trump. . Is can't believe I could disagree with this many people. . Innocent innocent extremely privileged belief. . But I guess that's why I wanted to ask you avery of the future. . You who have lived through one term of. . The trump presidency. . So weird just a few questions. . So I recorded fifteen minutes of questions about the state of the country for my future self, , which is to say me. . Currently. . To answer did he build a wall around Mexico or did he try Oh man I mean yeah. . He's still trying like actively according to customs and Border Protection, , there's been three hundred, , seventy, , one miles of new wall completed but there's still a lot more to go. . So we'll see is marijuana legal. . Depends on the state you live in, , but it's fully legal in eleven of them. So . yeah. . Yes or no Legal. . Well, , no. . It could be. . There were a bunch of other questions that I won't bore you with because I. . Realize I can't actually answer most of the questions from my past self. . Like they're all kind of complicated and still in process and it turns out a lot of the rights I was worrying about four years ago are still very much under threat now. . Including the issue that I was most frightened about. . On Donald Trump's inauguration day. . The very first question I asked to my future self. . Was this one. . Are Abortions illegal. . Did HE DE-FUND PLANNED PARENTHOOD? ? Of course I, , know abortions are still legal for now the law of the land upholds Roe v Wade. . Although I'm not sure I really understood how complicated the answer to this question actually was. . And is especially now that trump has appointed three supreme court justices. . So I want to start asking you that big question. . Are Abortions illegal. . Well, , yeah. . They are legal right now for some people, , they have been inaccessible to millions more preceding trump's inauguration. . Rebecca Tracer is a writer at large for New York magazine and the cut. . So where we are right now is that we're closer to abortions being illegal than we've been in my life time nominated by President Reagan and serving thirty years on the court. . He was often the crucial swing vote you know Anthony Kennedy's retirement breath Kavanagh's confirmation, , and here today not because I want to be. . Terrified riding completely over the testimony of Christine Lousy Ford I. . Do not believe that these charges can barely per bed judge cabin from serving on the court Susan Collins vote for breakfast all these things on a court. . level. . were sort of big publicly covered wakeup calls and there has been women in the streets. . Right there have been women and men in the streets there have been people in the streets. . Four years into Donald, , trump being president the like. . The reality of that is hitting a lot of people hard. . But one of the ways that we got to this point is that the inaccessibility and the project of making abortion illegal. . Didn't hit anybody hard enough. . Inaccessibility isn't just recent. It's . now it happens now around the country for millions of women for whom enough barriers have been put in place that that role might as well not exist because it actually doesn't serve as a barrier. . It doesn't serve as a protection of their right to get the care that they need. . So there are states. . In the country where the the laws are so prohibitive where there have already been people jailed for abortion. .

Donald Trump trump Roe Democratic Party President Reagan Mommy Party marijuana Anthony Kennedy Susan Collins Mexico New York City United States Rebecca Tracer Wade Christine Wyoming Missouri
"five decades" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Called the mission more dangerous than the bin laden raid the US military launching a daring operation in northern Syria targeting the leader of ISIS fox's Lucas Tomlinson with the detail the president said it took over an hour for the American strike force to reach his target up to seventy US special operations forces spent two hours on the ground to kill ISIS leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi and collect with the president called highly sensitive information on ISIS a large number of ISIS fighters were killed some were captured alive president trump called Baghdad yet coward for debt needing a suicide vest with three children next to him no U. S. special operations forces were killed or injured during the raid reaction coming in from around the world we have gotten a statement from Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu who congratulated president trump calling all of this an impressive achievement also French president Emmanuel McCrone said Sunday that this raid was a blow against Didache also adding that it's only a step in the larger fight against the Islamic state also getting some reaction from the Iranians one of their information ministers calling it not a big deal saying the United States just killed one of their creatures fox's tray yanked the successful mission drawing rare bipartisan praise democratic congressman Adam Schiff of California says good riddance this was a bloodthirsty killer to the degree that he retained operational control of ISIS it's an operational success it's a symbolic victory here fine A. B. C.'s this week house speaker Nancy Pelosi taking issue with the president for not notifying congressional leaders before that raid she notes that Russia was informed that it was in the works and said word that former Michigan congressman John Conyers is dead at the age of ninety he represented the Detroit area for five decades.

"five decades" Discussed on The MLB Show

The MLB Show

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on The MLB Show

"Window. That was their time you know and it's it's this season is really bizarre so far. It looks like a lost cause and now suddenly thing again I I don't i. I don't personally know how to feel about it but there there is this sense of of the window having shots or is rapidly shutting again and what's frustrating about is how familiar it feels right. I I WANNA talk about this season but briefly before we get into that you said that you lived in Oakland and rooted for the as quickly that perked my ears. I didn't know that on a scale on a scale of one to ten ten being the as knowing for sure that they're gonNA lose Josh Donaldson and that type and Matt Chapman Api. I love him so much. I hope he stays there forever. But where are the Indians on that sliding scale. I guess if one is the Yankees knowing they can just overpay whoever they wind. Keep him around forever. <hes> <hes> like an eight or a seven while like the Oakland the Oakland situation feels so stark because of the contrast with the giants like just the stadiums themselves like it's just go to games at that Oakland Stadium you know which you know hilariously like the dugouts fill up with sewage periodically you know and there's that cruddy little giant bleacher saying that the raiders set up you know and like the way way way nose bleeds like it's it's. It's such a fundamentally really cruddy stadium than still has this charm to it and I it's just I recognized a lot of that. Indians type feeling you know like not quite lovable losers but you know that's just the have nots you know the charming and charismatic in his centric have nots who put a team together and shock the world but only so far. You know it doesn't work in the playoffs. It's like Major League. It's like the movie you know. I was definitely a kindred spirit there in Oakland and obviously they are the most else famous proponent of this kind of thing but yeah Cleveland has always felt like that you know it's just you look at the Red Sox you look at the Yankees and you know no. The hotshot pitcher that you have today is GonNa end up on one of those teams five years years from now you know in the home is that you will get in return like the new crop of players who are going to be great and who are going to push you right to the precipice and then you know we've again yeah. It's a real doomsday clock situation yeah okay..

Oakland Josh Donaldson Yankees Oakland Stadium Red Sox Matt Chapman Major League Cleveland raiders five years
"five decades" Discussed on The MLB Show

The MLB Show

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on The MLB Show

"<hes> for Dugo has been more than capable <hes> from Thais -ment as well <hes> <hes> I love Emmy is this it's back dodgers baseball where it's just like you could have eighteen different lineups and they're all going to score one way or the other usually by home runs these days but but they're going to get on the board and <HES> and they're probably you a stronger a stronger team for for the move yeah I that ended McCullough piece was I think really illuminating because the parts that stuck out to me were you know. Dave Roberts making sure that he was on the Record Multiple Times saying I love Ya C._O.. Still text I right right right and I I didn't read a lot of the quotes as animosity or nothing like that but the Justin Turner stuff like very much surprised me because he seems like a baseball guy on a baseball guy comes out and says but he you know he named names in he likes said things that we did that bothered other him yeah and reasons that the team could have been better if we would have done some of these things some of these more chore like Things Talking About <hes> okay so now we're halfway through the twenty nine hundred season the dodgers obviously great. You have no reason to be mad at them right now <hes> <hes> I assume you're still a big fan fan of the guy one hundred percent you know I mean like how how can you not be you know I mean I'm never going to get used to seeing him in anything. That isn't a dodgers uniform <hes> you know he might not be in a reds uniform. We're very long. We'll we'll talk about that but I mean no. I mean like he's still one of the most watchable <hes> not just in baseball one of the most watchable athletes and all the sports <hes> you know it doesn't make like a single by Puig is an event. It's just thinking about him like motoring around I every single time he is not going to get a double on that single. He's going to attack I if he possibly could. That's the kind of you just you you love to see that he shaves his moustache stash in the middle of games if he gets in trended baseball some of the best brawls in baseball and I mean look as a dodgers fan any enemy of Madison Bumgarner is my friend. It doesn't matter what team he plays for if he's on the other end..

dodgers baseball Puig Dave Roberts Madison Bumgarner Dugo Emmy McCullough Justin Turner one hundred percent
"five decades" Discussed on The MLB Show

The MLB Show

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on The MLB Show

"It doesn't really drop doesn't mean they signed pollick yeah and and he's been playing well. He's often injured. He was rumored to go to the mets and I was very nervous about that because he would have probably shown up in New York with like half a hamstring and right barely any kneecaps but he's been playing pretty well for them and I think that the storm has kind of calmed on the S._E._O.. Weak Front specifically for you. When we were talking about this you mentioned one Andy McCulloch piece yeah in the Los Angeles Times Yeah Yeah so you know the the off season goes and they don't really make any big moves? They also lose grotten dolphins over kind of thinking okay where there is a time last year we were thinking where's the offense going to come from for the dodgers amazing boy oh boy yeah and <hes> and so the season starts and <hes> they're off to in Okay Ah Okay Start and then Cincinnati comes town and Andy McCulloch <hes> National Baseball columnist for the Times writes just okay a really extensive <hes> piece looking at all of the difficulties that the dodgers had with tweet now granted to this is all you know from the dodgers point of view. Andy did try to talk U._C._l._A.. said he didn't WanNA talk <hes>. I don't think that the piece was unfair. I I read it and they're they're just a lot of anecdotes about how he was he. He could be such a great guy these great person on the field but also in the clubhouse he could be <hes> you could just be a difficult guy to to to work with the coaches had problems with them stuff like defensive positioning things like that things just like the little stuff that you want a professional baseball player to really pay attention to and there are also enough quotes from guys on the team in context when I usually think that they would just want to give very like anodyne non quotes that I kind of started to do well in exactly yes yeah that I also didn't seem to be like they just wanted to just like hatchet. Yes yell. It really seemed like this is like a family thing where we've tried with this guy for so long we care about them for so much button damn he's just not he's just not getting to the place where we want him to get won't take out the trash. It's right yeah right right and you know like I I. I look at a baseball team is two different things I look at them as an entertainment product and I look at them as an organization that has to work work and when you're talking about the dodgers as an entertainment product in the last ten years no not even Kershaw has been as entertaining on a day-to-day basis as Puig right from an organization standpoint. I I read that piece and I really didn't like to come to this conclusion but I thought okay I think that maybe the organization made the right move and then you know the next few months really start to it. That was born worn out. I mean the best offense baseball. The outfield is just fine. <hes> pollock has been <hes> Nice when he's been <hes> in the lineup..

dodgers Andy McCulloch mets U._C._l._A.. baseball Los Angeles Times pollock New York the Times Puig Cincinnati Kershaw ten years
"five decades" Discussed on The MLB Show

The MLB Show

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on The MLB Show

"Podcast S. mini series hosted by me film critic Amy Nicholson unschooled and Halloween unmasked before the release of his new film once upon a time in Hollywood Quinton and I sat down to talk about five films he's programmed at the new beverly and we wound up talking about his life his work and how this movie crazy kid became a director who defined generation waiting for the lights to go down and no one knows what to expect. Is this going to be one of those special times. Is that not going to be one of the special times is going to be forgettable time the first episode of Quentin Tarantino's. This feature presentation is out later. This week is the closest thing to showing a bucket of popcorn with the man himself so subscribe now wherever you hear pod <music> welcome to I hate my team. I'm Bobby Wagner. I'm the producer of the Ringer M._l._b.. Show I am joined in studio. I don't think this is your podcast debut at the ringer is it no I'm not a podcast regular but I do drop in from time to time. Craig gains coffee chief of the ringer. This is such that's a treat listeners. Here should very much appreciate this moment. Craig is a dual dodgers tigers Spanish. It's it's it's very strange. We should probably explore that story but that's very different time today. We're here to talk about. The Los Angeles dodgers the best team in baseball. were making a sham out of the way my team bit right now right already right cannot possibly hate this team now now. No this is more <hes> my emotional journey with one team at one player why for a short amount of time I hated the team and now I'm kind of just happy for all parties. This is like a why hated my team oral history. That's right. That's right exactly all right so this is the stages of grief in your post U._C._l._A.. World that's right. Yes <hes> You were incense at the trade in this off offseason you you hated your team for that reason and I want to ask you about that. Because it was obviously beloved by the the dodgers fan base he connected with people at Chev as ravine he connected with people through their TV screens in a way that baseball players frequently you do not so I wanna get your psyche the day that he gets traded where you at I was I was despondent and you know just a backup <hes> for a minute before he was traded. The years at U._C._L._A.. was with a team. I went through every single single emotional reaction to him. One could their times. I absolutely loved him. There were times before this I myself in bars screamed out trade puig okay so I myself went through this whole spectrum. The thing is the two seasons before this trade. It really seemed like he was starting to figure things out especially at the plate. You know I mean He. Just he looked more disciplined. <hes> he was making great contact and you know I mean like you say he was. One of the most is one of the most trans fixing players players in baseball. I don't care what you're doing. When he pops up on the screen you're going to stop and you're going to watch and for a fan that just means so much and then add to that just the joy that he brought to the game and you know I mean just highlight after highlight light it it it? It really can't be overstated that day. I was in a really dark place <hes> I I just I thought it was short sighted. I thought that they just didn't have enough in the outfield. I like many other dodgers. Dodgers fans said okay well really upset about this. What's going to be the next move in so there was really like a sense of okay? We're not happy about this but let's see what the team does after that and so that's where my head was that day I really got pretty ammo. I was in tex- thread with some of my fellow L.. A. Sports fans your beard out like E._A.. Grew out that day actually I I use words like baseball is poetic and yes yell and Cincinnati isn't poetic. I'm not proud. Proud of that text message but it was if you WANNA know my emotional state that day. I think that's a pretty good window into that. Okay so you're waiting for the next shoe to drop..

dodgers puig Craig baseball Quentin Tarantino Bobby Wagner Quinton Amy Nicholson Los Angeles beverly director Hollywood producer Cincinnati baseball.
"five decades" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Five decades from four percent January actor Jesse smell that has been indicted on sixteen counts stemming from a reported attack in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois grand jury has indicted empire actor jussie smollet on sixteen felony counts related to making a false report that he was attacked by two men who shouted racial and homophobic slurs in late January smollet told police he had been physically attacked by two men in downtown Chicago as he exited a subway restaurant at two AM smell. That said the men shouted at him wrap. The rope around his neck and poured an unknown substance on him smell that was charged on February twentieth with one count of disorderly conduct for filing a false police report. I'm Mike Rossi. A judge has ordered former army intelligence analyst, Bradley Manning a man living as a woman to jail for refusing to testify before Virginia. Grand jury investigating WikiLeaks US district judge Claude Hilton jailed manning on Friday after he confirmed. He has no intention of testifying. This is town. Hall dot com. Hi this. Is Alexander green chief investment strategist for the Oxford club. Just for a moment. I'd like you to picture the perfect stock. No doubt. It would have hundreds of billions in revenue more than IBM Facebook and Google it would probably be a leader in cutting edge technology like smartphones and robotics, you would be on the verge of dozens of blockbuster announcements, but most of all it would be altered cheap trading at less than three dollars a share. Now may seem crazy that such a stock exists. But it does is a cutting edge tech company that has made deals worth hundreds of millions of dollars with Nokia, Microsoft and Cisco and a twenty nine point two billion dollar deal with apple it's set to create fifty thousand new jobs right here in America, and Donald Trump even calls it, the eighth wonder of the world yet you've likely never even heard of the stock why because it trades under a secret name to find out why the secret three dollar stock and help you retire. Simply go to one stock retirement dot com. That's one stock. Retirement dot com. Former Virginia governor Bob McDonnell says the formation of a racial reconciliation group. He leads was divine providence as a began just weeks before a racist. Photograph of governor Ralph Northerns yearbook paid surfaced the Republican tells the Richmond times dispatch that northern attended the Virginia's for reconciliation meeting Wednesday and said he planned to be a leader and appointed an advisor on race. The group consists of policy makers and other influential figures who want to change in equitable, practices and policies. Mcdonald's says there was almost no press when the group held its first event. January sixteenth. So current events have provided a truly historic opportunity McDonald who was convicted on corruption charges that were later overturned has publicly supported him saying he knows what it's like to govern under pressure. Keith peters. Washington. FAA Friday warrant Southwest Airlines. And it's the Canucks union that they're bitter fight could hurt the airline safety program. Breaking news and analysis at townhall dot com. President Trump says time will tell if his brand of diplomacy with North Korea will bring an end to the country's nuclear development. The president admitted to reporters. He was a little disappointed hearing there's new activity at a North Korean research center where it's believed long range missiles are built. It follows the abrupt ending to his talks with Kim Jong wound in Hanoi at the end of last month. But President Trump says time will tell if the US can persuade Kim to give up his pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for sanctions being lifted. We'll let you know about a year. A senior official told reporters the Trump administration does believe it can secure a deal by the end of the president's first term. Jackie Quinn, Washington. The Russian army recruitment photo shoot that didn't feature.

President Trump Virginia president Claude Hilton Kim Jong Jesse smell jussie smollet Chicago Bradley Manning Mcdonald Mike Rossi Russian army Cook County edge tech Bob McDonnell Washington army Jackie Quinn
"five decades" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"I had literally had nearly five decades of suppressing my Tinder identities supressing, my sexual orientation. It was real literally to the point of like, I mean, I was kinda thinking either I do something about this. Or I commit suicide. I mean, it had reached that level of distress the choice was that stock? And it's the point in story when you might expect a familiar resolution in this version of the story Jamie stops hiding and comes out as a woman, maybe gets gender reassignment surgery. That was indeed the path that Jamie's doctors initially recommended and for a time. Jamie eagerly listened to them. So I bought into it hook line and sinker in it right away decided I was going to transition to a female because I expected it to help alleviate by mental health crisis that I was having from all the suppression. Jimmy, also finally tool sandy what was going on. It was kind of a surprise. But I mean, not I wasn't offended. I was just kind of like. When you when you when you marry someone it's because you love them, and you want them to be happy. And you want them to, you know, be fulfilled in I just want to Jamie to be Hatton. It's not that sandy would have chosen this route. She says, of course, she would have liked to live life with Jamie as a he. But in a way, she says, this is what she signed up for when she married a soldier, Jamie really feels that. This is something that they have to do, and, you know, have always supported, Jamie. I mean, you us army wife, and you know, you that was your part of your job. You know, you just like you were support you were the one that no to care things like for the soldiers. So what Saudi support Jamie started taking hormones developing breasts wearing a wig in high heels and hanging out with transgender women, but it still didn't feel right? After hearing a few horror stories about gender reassignment surgeries that tone dot poorly. Jamie rejected that option also Jamie didn't want to wear clothes, that's creamed female, and you some idea of transitioning was okay. So all start wearing women's jeans where you know, women's casual shirts, probably put a flower, scar from my head or something like that. And in the trans women I was interacting with they have sleep freaking over that. You're like, well, you don't look like a female. We don't want to hang out with you. Because I wasn't doing enough to be hyper feminine, huge one Jamie was realizing there were rules about what it meant to be a woman or gay or trans here. The transgender community has hierarchies the you do for C cross dressers in the news. It's all about the trans women in the trans men, and you know, the the lesbian community they have their Goldstar lesbians that you know, if you if you've ever touched a male, then you're not really a lesbian. You're not are equal everywhere. You look at it in society. There's hierarchies, Jamie. Didn't like this Jamie didn't feel like a woman trapped inside a man's body. Jamie felt like a man and a woman why couldn't Jamie just be Jamie. I it was all very black and white thinking that you're either male or your female, and if you're a female. Yeah, this this is this pathway that you you do to become a female if Jimmy went to the doctor and said, I think I'm female and the doctor asked why Jamie might say because I do feminine things as a kid I played hopscotch and Jackson Perm, my hair and hated football. I feel more comfortable among girls than boys, and the doctors might tell Jamie, you'll really a woman, and you can transition to being female, but if Jimmy had gone to the doctrine said, I think I'm female because I like women and fast cars and tinkering with machines. The doctor might say, I don't really think you're. Chance..

Jamie Jimmy sandy Jackson Perm football Hatton five decades
"five decades" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"That's a forty and slip the the hoover in the komi that slip is were you say one thing but me and your mother i keep doing it i don't know why keep doing it with hoover and komi on this day in history in one thousand nine hundred seventy two j edgar hoover died after five decades running the fbi now we we talked today the we talk about the fbi is the central american institution if you criticize the fbi oh what are you in you're attacking america the fbi was created in nineteen oh eight hoover took over sixteen years later he ran the thing for five decades this ties in with today's theme by the way the fruit when the fbi was first founded the first task of the fbi in those days was to investigate and shutdown whore houses in the enforcement of the white slave traffic act of basically there was what we would call sex trafficking today and it was one of its first assignments was to shut that down who were took over in nineteen twenty four and he turned to this pretty inefficient agency into an extremely powerful crime fighting organization so who gets a lot of flack i will defend j groover at the beginning and then i'll attack them at the end there was great stuff in the early years of hoover do not believe the fake news he credentialed the massive influence of the fbi or of the fbi of the kkk the another forty and slip of the kkk that was growing in the nineteen twenties he shut that down he investigative grizzly indian murders he apprehended or killed very notorious criminals who had been on the run a john dillinger baby face nelson mob barker machine gun kelly all those names that you think of is cartoon characters basically he caught him as early as the nineteen twenties the fbi started wiretapping people to enforce prohibition this is when things started to get a little dicey but it was hugely effective they were they were able to do a lot against organized crime now the fbi also because they had all of this information on people they started compiling lists of japanese german and talian americans in the runup to world war two they said if we went to war with the axis we might have to put the.

hoover j edgar hoover fbi john dillinger nelson five decades one thousand nine hundred seve sixteen years
"five decades" Discussed on Animal Spirits Podcast

Animal Spirits Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on Animal Spirits Podcast

"And he said you know i'm in my mid argue if you had to choose a permanent portfolio for the next three four or five decades what would it consist of which is a really tough question because the whole point of my article was i don't think there is such thing because products are constantly changing there's more options now than ever life gets in the way in causes changes but what do you think about this idea i saw the traditional permanent portfolio some that i've heard about also which is one quarter in us stocks onemonth tbills longterm government bonds a gold and those are four very different acid classes and what it's done is it lagged obviously both esp five hundred and also led to sixty forty portfolio go back and nineteen seventy six but what it did was give you a much much much smoother ride so if there was ever a portfolio that you could conceivably hold onto for forty years i did the permanent portfolio was it but i think that the idea of a permanent portfolio is just not practical because of the world that we live in yet is just one thing people's behaviour kallas stick or something like that but i do like the idea that the fact that you're trying to hit on different types of you know you're trying to hit on different types of economic regimes or market regimes or you have gold for commodities and hopefully in inflation play cash is sort of your buffer longterm bonds give you some income and also act as cresa cell phone and stocks hopefully beat inflation of longterm so it's it's kind of four different quadrant so i guess it makes sense from that perspective and i think he could probably do worse than that which is always the key when making these decisions you can always do much worse obviously get you can you can do a little better than that i think in in a lot of cases depending on your circumstances but you can always doers i think the as with all asset allocations it really depends on you know your ability to stick with it and not just create it so there's no such thing as a good optimized portfolio it's more you know what's optimism suited for for your personal behaviour in.

five decades forty years one quarter onemonth
"five decades" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"five decades" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Se i just wrote for the atlantic called five decades white backlash most of the current that we call modern democratic institutions in the united states uh were built as such in the last fifty years after the civil rights movement after the voting rights act after things gave the right to vote in participate and have guaranteed civil rights to people of color to minorities in the united states and on the other side there's been a concerted very powerful movement against those policies in it's been a 50year long movement against seminar us i see trump as the pinnacle of that while the mother investigation wild perhaps congress while perhaps the courts maitre bumped the trump administration over the next couple of years i do think the president here's a power tends to stay in power and then i don't think he's been in effect from what he wants to do i think he hasn't gotten a lot of big legislation passed but he's gotten lots of little things he's got in the doj to to to stop doing sit decrees with communities of color he's restarted or reinvigorated the war on drugs he's a basically put forward this cultural war against people of color again's folks on the margins this tax bill will only exacerbate that and will only exacerbate income inequality in a country these are things that will resound through american politics and and demography for the next couple of decades these are big things and it's so long as those big things give him power with the right people that i think he'll continue to be the president and so and he'll continue keep doing those things and so that's why i am right now we'll see how the 2018 midterm shakeout and how the makeup of congress changes but i think if we are betting based on history uh as to what donald trump's future's going to be i think history shows that he's going to be there and he's gonna be making the same decision.

united states voting rights act civil rights congress president doj donald trump five decades fifty years 50year