35 Burst results for "Fitzgerald"

Former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani Unpacks the Trauma of 9/11

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:56 min | Last week

Former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani Unpacks the Trauma of 9/11

"You know, it's amazing. You didn't have death by panic. Do you think of all these even things where it's only a thousand people trying to get out of a theater and ten people die of panic. You had thousands and thousands of people get out. Nobody jumped on each other and nobody jumped over each other. That's a credit to your firefighters and police officers. That's the kind of conversations I get, but it almost always begins with. Oh, I was, I was on vacation. I was on vacation in the mountains, and I didn't know about it for a day. It's so terrible I missed the whole first day or the or. One of my best Friends works at Fitzgerald and I was so worried and then I said, well, what happened to your friend? And sometimes they'll say, well, they made it out or sometimes they died and I said, I'm terribly sorry. But there's almost a compulsion to identify where you were on that day. And I remember in my parents generation. How often they told me over and over again, where they were on the day and the moment they found out about where my father was when my mother was a Friends would tell you where they were on Pearl Harbor. And then I think that happened with the Kennedy assassination too. So yeah, there's no question that it's one of the significant events that has shaped us in ways that I'm not sure. I don't think we know yet, exactly how we shaped us. I really do believe. I mean, a lot of people look back on the Kennedy assassination. And they think a lot of the disruption, a lot of the social disruption that took place in the 60s and the 70s, some of it was caused by that. I do think that some of what we're going through is caused by September 11th. So, you know, some of the very strange different ways our patterns have changed. And I think it's going to fix itself, but it's a traumatic experience. We're

Fitzgerald Kennedy Pearl Harbor
"fitzgerald" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

03:02 min | Last month

"fitzgerald" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"It's a small TV and I love to just flip around. I don't like to be watching four different monitors. It's too distracting. Don't like it. I watch one, and then if I get alerted to watch another game, then I watch another game. But I don't get caught up in any of that. Does anybody have multiple TVs? Pauli does? Yeah, I got three good sized TVs on a basement wall, but then I have a little office with a smaller TV that's my emergency if people are over TV. Yeah. I like the three ts you have the main game out in the middle, then either the red zone on another TV. If it's college football, you could easily find three good college football games. I do watch red zone a lot. Just because they help me. They'd be like, this is what I need to know. And but if I want to lock in on just one game, then I just watch one game. And then you'll get the highlights during cut ins. Here's an update, and here's Carissa Thompson Kris and then you get that. But for the most part, just one. Alex and St. Louis, hi, Alex, what's on your mind? Hey, Dan. It's first time caller, longtime listener. 6 one one 85. Thank you for that. Hey. I was just curious, you're talking about bullet check. Next time you have saving all, will you ask for you ever done any, that's just Bill Belichick? All right. I'd ask you. By the way, I mentioned Marcus Freeman Notre-Dame head coach. They got Ohio State this weekend. I think it's 17 and a half point underdog. Here is the Notre-Dame head coach learning about that point spread. Well, I didn't know that I'm going to write that down you said 17 and a half points, right? We'll use that in the team meeting today, you know? It's good to know. You know, I haven't paid much attention to the spread, but I remembered at one time we were on college game that said, just keep making go up and up. You know, a few years ago, a coach would not touch the point spread. Pat Fitzgerald knew what the point spread was. Marcus Freeman. He's mentioning 17 and a half. I'm going to write that down. All right, we'll take a break. We're planning our trip to Ireland next year already with Notre-Dame and navy and Will Ferrell wants to be part of that he'll call in next here on the Dan Patrick show.

Carissa Thompson Kris Marcus Freeman Pauli football Alex Bill Belichick St. Louis Dan Notre Ohio Pat Fitzgerald Ireland Ferrell navy Dan Patrick
Why Trump Routinely Dominates Straw Polls Like the Recent CPAC One

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:06 min | Last month

Why Trump Routinely Dominates Straw Polls Like the Recent CPAC One

"At the recent cpac conference in Dallas, which concluded this weekend there was a straw poll. And the results of the straw poll reported pretty widely in the media. Trump 69%, this is for 2024. Desantis 23% and pretty tellingly, Cruz 2% Pompeo, Nikki Haley, Rand Paul, Kristi Noem all 1%, and by the way, notice who's not there. Mike Pence 0%. Wow. Now, I want to try to explain the Trump phenomenon here because there are some people who say and I've been seeing this on social media that desantis is much more kind of error free than Trump. Desantis doesn't make Trump's mistakes. He is very effective as Trump is in hitting back at the media. They both have that kind of fortitude, but desantis is less ad hominem, desantis is in some ways certainly in terms of his personal life. He seems unbelievably clean, caught, he's got the sort of perfect resume. So why is it? Why is it then that Trump is consistently not just ahead, but way ahead? I mean, Trump is over two thirds of the vote. And desantis is desantis numbers only improve if you take Trump out of the equation. So what's going on here? Well, I want to try to explain this in an unusual way. The writer Scott Fitzgerald, this is the author, of course, of The Great Gatsby and a number of other important books. Scott Fitzgerald, once said something very poignant and I think very illuminating. He said, he said, I've got the two second best things to have. But I don't have the two best things to have. And he went on to explain that the second best things to have in his view were good looks and intelligence and Scott Fitzgerald goes, I got those two. But he goes, but the two best things to have are animal magnetism, animal magnetism, and money.

Desantis Donald Trump Kristi Noem Cpac Nikki Haley Pompeo Mike Pence Rand Paul Scott Fitzgerald Cruz Dallas
"fitzgerald" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

03:54 min | Last month

"fitzgerald" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"History, 23 years old, youngest champion ever. When he won that belt, he won on he just wasn't on the street of murderers row of UFC fighters that he just dominated. Rampage don't give him, just don't give him a drug test. And that's the only thing that kind of, you know, that's the one knock against him. A lot of out of the octagon stuff. But inside of that cage, he was the man. There's nobody that's ever done it better and now he's moving up to heavyweight. It's going to fight Stipe Miocic hopefully in September. I love it. Let's see what happens. That's TJ's top 5 favorite. The big S grab bag. I love this list and I love what you're doing. It's a great list. A great list right there is what we're talking about. And obviously, people will be like, where's McGregor? Was this guy that guy? You can only have 5, sometimes 6. Where's rampage? Ronda Rousey. I mean, you're as Ronda Rousey. Where's Amanda Nunes? I mean, again, that's what I was talking about with Brendan Fitzgerald is what I love about the sport. It's not heavyweights. And it's not middleweights. And it's like it can be anybody that anyone can headline the card at that. That's the thing that people want to see. And you give credit to shows like The Ultimate Fighter and whatnot for building the personalities of these guys to then and then now you look at a guy like Patti pinglet and you're like, well, everybody wants to see this guy. If he can continue to fight, continue to be good. I love that you brought that out right here right now in honor of Brendan Fitzgerald saying here in honor of the nosebleeds, our show. I'm very excited. Maybe we'll look forward to that. Show a little promo of that or a little clip from that. And the next hour. Next hour, we're going to talk some college football with Dave revson. Obviously, things in hour two, the Big Ten is now coast to coast with USC. Big Ten country range. We're in Big Ten countries. And the big country. It's amazing. It's interesting, but at the same time, it's it'll be cool. And you look at the LA market. Will there be others? Kevin Warren just said that no more PAC 12 teams will be when I thought, oh, Cal and Stanford, they absolutely should. We'll talk about all that with rever and we'll find out where things are at because you have a potential later, the biggest game of the year, Michigan, Ohio State. Those both those teams could be 11 and oh, we were talking about a brockman. Yes, you know, Alabama is going to be great. They'll be at the top. Yes, you know, Georgia will be great. They'll be up there. Clemson may be great and be back up there again at this time. Notre-Dame looks like they're going to be good. But that mission Ohio State game could be two, three. Could be one three one four. You're looking at that could be the best game of the year happening at the best time of the year. So we'll get into all of that. Plus Brock when you got a little segment that's gone. Yeah, we're going to do a little Friday staple. You know it's coming to TJ what's more likely an NFL edition now that decreases in his back. I love it. Football, we now have think about this guys. We now have 6 straight months of football weekend. There is football every single weekend from now until mid February. And again, once you get into the college football season, that's when I'm at my absolute best because you've got a college on Saturday, NFL on Friday. And NFL on Sunday and some other college on Friday two. All that stuff coming up, hour three, love it, Randy clarifying for rich eisen on NBC sports on peacock and serious XM 85. Stay with us for hour three. Don't let this flop. The new podcast from Rolling Stone focused on the latest TikTok trends and memes with EJ Dixon and Brittany spanos. People on TikTok are becoming convinced that pandas are not real animals. There's a lot of trivia about pandas that just underscores how weird they are. Like, did you know they're carnivores, but they almost exclusively eat bamboo? No. They also pee upside down. Did you know they love to pee upside down? Don't let this flop. Listen wherever you get your podcasts.

Ronda Rousey Brendan Fitzgerald Stipe Miocic Amanda Nunes Patti pinglet Dave revson Kevin Warren UFC McGregor football Ohio brockman USC PAC NFL Cal Stanford Clemson LA Alabama
The Four Biggest American Media Celebrities of the 1930s

History Unplugged Podcast

01:33 min | 4 months ago

The Four Biggest American Media Celebrities of the 1930s

"In the 1930s, the biggest American media celebrities were four foreign correspondents, Dorothy Thompson, John Gunther, HR knickerbocker, and Vincent Shea. They were household names in their day, and just as famous as their novel writing lost generation counterparts, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. These reporters helped shape what Americans knew about the world between the two world wars by landing exclusive interviews with the most important political figures of their day, including Hitler, Mussolini and Franco, as well as Trotsky, Gandhi, nehru, Churchill and FDR. But they also went beyond state press releases and listened closely to the dissidents in Europe and heard alarming reports of violence against anyone who opposed these authoritarian regimes. The reporting made waves at home and abroad. HR knickerbocker was the only foreign reporter whose dispatches Mussolini bothered to read. Joseph gobel is called knickerbocker in international liar and counterfeiter. John Guthrie shot to fame, but the book inside Europe published in 1936, arguing that, quote, unresolved personal conflicts in the lives of various European politicians may contribute to the collapse of our civilization. In the face of increasing violence in Europe, these reporters had to decide whether they would remain on the sidelines or advocate for their readers to respond. They were the readers of the dictators wouldn't be satisfied with their territories they conquered, and the objected to the policies of appeasement and predicted the coming of the Second World War. Putting together the stories they covered, the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1935, the Spanish Civil War broke out the next year, the German annexation of Austria and the karma book Czechoslovakia, and made very accurate judgments about what would come next.

Dorothy Thompson John Gunther Vincent Shea Mussolini F. Scott Fitzgerald Joseph Gobel Ernest Hemingway John Guthrie Europe Trotsky Franco Gandhi Churchill Hitler Ethiopia Austria Czechoslovakia
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:52 min | 5 months ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"We're here? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> On this earth, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> what's <Speech_Male> the meaning of <Speech_Male> human civilization <Speech_Male> was the meaning <Speech_Male> of your life <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> individual <Speech_Male> human life? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> broadly speaking, what <Speech_Male> is the meaning of life? <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> guy for the show. <Speech_Male> Oh, boy. <Silence> <Advertisement> Yeah. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For me, <Speech_Male> I can speak personally on <Speech_Male> that only. <Speech_Male> And that's that <Speech_Male> I believe <Speech_Male> that the meaning of <Speech_Male> my life <Speech_Male> is to <Speech_Male> try to make the <Speech_Male> world a little bit better <Speech_Male> before I go. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> You know, <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> when I was in <Silence> <Advertisement> theater <SpeakerChange> in grad <Speech_Male> school, <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I directed <Speech_Male> a play called <Speech_Male> shadowlands by C. S. Lewis. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And there's <Speech_Male> a quote from that. <Speech_Male> It goes like this. <Speech_Male> We are like blocks <Speech_Male> of stone <Speech_Male> out of which <Speech_Male> the sculptor <Speech_Male> carves the forms <Speech_Male> of men. <Speech_Male> The blows <Speech_Male> of his <SpeakerChange> chisel, <Speech_Male> which hurt <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> us so much. <Speech_Male> Are what make <Speech_Male> us perfect. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Now I would take away the perfect <Speech_Music_Male> part, <Speech_Male> right? <Speech_Male> But I think I've <Speech_Male> remembered that quote <Speech_Male> for so many years <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> because I believe <Speech_Male> in the underlying <Silence> notion <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> the blows <Speech_Male> of the chisel which <Speech_Male> are the experiences <Speech_Male> that we go through, <Speech_Male> shape us, <Speech_Male> right? Necessarily <Speech_Male> so, <Speech_Male> and hopefully <Speech_Male> shape <Speech_Male> us into a better human <Speech_Male> being. <Speech_Male> And in my case, <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> human being that I hope <Speech_Male> can make the <Silence> world a little <SpeakerChange> better. <Speech_Male> You know, <Speech_Male> through those blows. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Before it's over <Silence> it's over. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Before you go, <Speech_Male> as you said, do you <Speech_Male> think about that? <Speech_Male> You think about <Silence> the going part? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Your mortality, <Speech_Male> you ever think <Speech_Male> about that. You said you <Speech_Male> don't have a death wish, you <Speech_Male> tried to minimize <Speech_Male> risk. But <Speech_Male> eventually it's going to be over. <Speech_Male> Yeah. For all of us. <Speech_Male> Absolutely. <Speech_Male> We'll speak for <Speech_Male> yourself. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Well, <Speech_Male> you've got others. <Speech_Male> I tend to merge, <Speech_Male> I'm going <Speech_Male> to merge with robots. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Embody. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Not at all. Yes, <Speech_Male> for all of us, <Speech_Male> unfortunately, or <Speech_Male> fortunately, or <Speech_Male> who the heck <Speech_Male> knows. <Silence> But <Speech_Male> do you <Speech_Male> ponder <Speech_Male> your mortality? <Silence> <SpeakerChange> Are you afraid <Speech_Male> of it? <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> live with my <Speech_Male> mortality, <Speech_Male> knowing that <Speech_Male> it's fleeting. <Speech_Male> Now that my life is <Speech_Male> fleeting and that <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> going to go into the ground, <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> just like <Speech_Male> everyone else, or maybe <Speech_Male> as ashes, <Silence> you know? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> So I live with that knowledge <Speech_Male> every day, but I <Speech_Male> don't allow it <Speech_Male> to stop <Speech_Male> me or <Speech_Male> hold me up rather, <Speech_Male> I really <Silence> it drives <Speech_Male> me. <Speech_Male> It drives <Speech_Male> me to try to get as <Speech_Male> much done as I can <Speech_Male> before I <SpeakerChange> go. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah, so the <Speech_Male> knowledge of your death <Speech_Male> <Silence> is a kind of dance <Speech_Male> partner. <Speech_Male> And you tried to dance <Speech_Male> beautifully. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This guy, you're an <Speech_Male> incredible human. <Speech_Male> Incredible <Silence> artist and filmmaker. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And it's <Speech_Male> a huge honor that you <Speech_Male> would sit and <Speech_Male> spend your really <Speech_Male> valuable time with me today. <Speech_Male> I really, really enjoyed <Speech_Male> this conversation. I did too. <Speech_Male> Thanks for <SpeakerChange> having me <Silence> likes and thanks for doing what <Speech_Male> you do. <Speech_Male> Thanks for listening <Speech_Male> to this conversation with <Speech_Male> Skye Fitzgerald. <Speech_Male> To support this <Speech_Male> podcast, please <Speech_Male> check out our sponsors <Speech_Male> in the description. <Speech_Male> And now <Speech_Male> let me leave you with <Silence> some words from Ellie <Silence> wiesel. <Speech_Male> The opposite <Silence> of love is <Speech_Male> not hate. <Silence> It's indifference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The opposite of art does <Speech_Male> not ugliness. <Silence> It's indifference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The opposite of faith <Speech_Male> is not heresy. <Speech_Male> It's indifference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And the opposite of <Silence> life is <Speech_Male> not death. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> It's <Silence> indifference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you for listening. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I hope to <Silence> <Advertisement> see you <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> next time.

C. S. Lewis Skye Fitzgerald Ellie
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:52 min | 5 months ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"We're here? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> On this earth, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> what's <Speech_Male> the meaning of <Speech_Male> human civilization <Speech_Male> was the meaning <Speech_Male> of your life <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> individual <Speech_Male> human life? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> broadly speaking, what <Speech_Male> is the meaning of life? <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> guy for the show. <Speech_Male> Oh, boy. <Silence> <Advertisement> Yeah. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For me, <Speech_Male> I can speak personally on <Speech_Male> that only. <Speech_Male> And that's that <Speech_Male> I believe <Speech_Male> that the meaning of <Speech_Male> my life <Speech_Male> is to <Speech_Male> try to make the <Speech_Male> world a little bit better <Speech_Male> before I go. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> You know, <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> when I was in <Silence> <Advertisement> theater <SpeakerChange> in grad <Speech_Male> school, <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I directed <Speech_Male> a play called <Speech_Male> shadowlands by C. S. Lewis. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And there's <Speech_Male> a quote from that. <Speech_Male> It goes like this. <Speech_Male> We are like blocks <Speech_Male> of stone <Speech_Male> out of which <Speech_Male> the sculptor <Speech_Male> carves the forms <Speech_Male> of men. <Speech_Male> The blows <Speech_Male> of his <SpeakerChange> chisel, <Speech_Male> which hurt <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> us so much. <Speech_Male> Are what make <Speech_Male> us perfect. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Now I would take away the perfect <Speech_Music_Male> part, <Speech_Male> right? <Speech_Male> But I think I've <Speech_Male> remembered that quote <Speech_Male> for so many years <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> because I believe <Speech_Male> in the underlying <Silence> notion <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> the blows <Speech_Male> of the chisel which <Speech_Male> are the experiences <Speech_Male> that we go through, <Speech_Male> shape us, <Speech_Male> right? Necessarily <Speech_Male> so, <Speech_Male> and hopefully <Speech_Male> shape <Speech_Male> us into a better human <Speech_Male> being. <Speech_Male> And in my case, <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> human being that I hope <Speech_Male> can make the <Silence> world a little <SpeakerChange> better. <Speech_Male> You know, <Speech_Male> through those blows. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Before it's over <Silence> it's over. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Before you go, <Speech_Male> as you said, do you <Speech_Male> think about that? <Speech_Male> You think about <Silence> the going part? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Your mortality, <Speech_Male> you ever think <Speech_Male> about that. You said you <Speech_Male> don't have a death wish, you <Speech_Male> tried to minimize <Speech_Male> risk. But <Speech_Male> eventually it's going to be over. <Speech_Male> Yeah. For all of us. <Speech_Male> Absolutely. <Speech_Male> We'll speak for <Speech_Male> yourself. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Well, <Speech_Male> you've got others. <Speech_Male> I tend to merge, <Speech_Male> I'm going <Speech_Male> to merge with robots. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Embody. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Not at all. Yes, <Speech_Male> for all of us, <Speech_Male> unfortunately, or <Speech_Male> fortunately, or <Speech_Male> who the heck <Speech_Male> knows. <Silence> But <Speech_Male> do you <Speech_Male> ponder <Speech_Male> your mortality? <Silence> <SpeakerChange> Are you afraid <Speech_Male> of it? <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> live with my <Speech_Male> mortality, <Speech_Male> knowing that <Speech_Male> it's fleeting. <Speech_Male> Now that my life is <Speech_Male> fleeting and that <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> going to go into the ground, <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> just like <Speech_Male> everyone else, or maybe <Speech_Male> as ashes, <Silence> you know? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> So I live with that knowledge <Speech_Male> every day, but I <Speech_Male> don't allow it <Speech_Male> to stop <Speech_Male> me or <Speech_Male> hold me up rather, <Speech_Male> I really <Silence> it drives <Speech_Male> me. <Speech_Male> It drives <Speech_Male> me to try to get as <Speech_Male> much done as I can <Speech_Male> before I <SpeakerChange> go. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah, so the <Speech_Male> knowledge of your death <Speech_Male> <Silence> is a kind of dance <Speech_Male> partner. <Speech_Male> And you tried to dance <Speech_Male> beautifully. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This guy, you're an <Speech_Male> incredible human. <Speech_Male> Incredible <Silence> artist and filmmaker. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And it's <Speech_Male> a huge honor that you <Speech_Male> would sit and <Speech_Male> spend your really <Speech_Male> valuable time with me today. <Speech_Male> I really, really enjoyed <Speech_Male> this conversation. I did too. <Speech_Male> Thanks for <SpeakerChange> having me <Silence> likes and thanks for doing what <Speech_Male> you do. <Speech_Male> Thanks for listening <Speech_Male> to this conversation with <Speech_Male> Skye Fitzgerald. <Speech_Male> To support this <Speech_Male> podcast, please <Speech_Male> check out our sponsors <Speech_Male> in the description. <Speech_Male> And now <Speech_Male> let me leave you with <Silence> some words from Ellie <Silence> wiesel. <Speech_Male> The opposite <Silence> of love is <Speech_Male> not hate. <Silence> It's indifference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The opposite of art does <Speech_Male> not ugliness. <Silence> It's indifference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The opposite of faith <Speech_Male> is not heresy. <Speech_Male> It's indifference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And the opposite of <Silence> life is <Speech_Male> not death. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> It's <Silence> indifference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you for listening. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I hope to <Silence> <Advertisement> see you <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> next time.

C. S. Lewis Skye Fitzgerald Ellie
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

08:14 min | 7 months ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Still have favorable influences. Doctor Kara Fitzgerald, welcome to the show. Thank you. I am thrilled to be here. I'm really excited to have you. You are dealing with an area that I have become absolutely obsessed with, which, so methylation, which we'll explain to people what that is in a minute, but the idea of my epigenome is really controlling how my genetics express themselves and that becomes really important. That had been on my radar for a long time, but I couldn't imagine what was actually happening. And so your book is called younger you, which phenomenal book. Thank you. And it really goes into detail on this idea of what methylation is. And I think even though for anybody hearing that for the first time, I promise we're going to bring you in, you're going to love it by the end of this and you will understand why it matters. But walk us through what I'll call the three layers, genetics, epigenetics, and then what methylation is and what brings them all together. Yeah. For sure. So, you know, genetic are genetic material is static. It's not changing. We inherit some from mom and some from dad and it's kind of packaged relatively carefully. And it doesn't change. And can you explain the packaging part? That's where this all starts to get interesting. And people that know it well sort of throw that one off the cuff. How is one's DNA? Which I assume is what you mean? Packaged. Yeah, well, I mean, we have a lot of it. You know, if we end to end, I think it wraps around the world twice if we did, like all if we spread it all out from all of ourselves. One single strand of strand within a cell is about 6 feet. I mean, it's a ton. It's like, you know, but it's microscopic. We have to rapid up extraordinarily carefully to fit it into a cell. I mean, it's just, it's mind boggling. And so it's wrapped around proteins called histones, and then histones are grouped in four, so there's just wrap, wrap, wrap, grouped in four, and these little groups of four are nucleosomes, and then they're packaged together in what's called a chromatin, and then ultimately a chromosome. What's extraordinary is that wrapping helps regulate. So this is the epigenetics that you're talking about. So we need to open it to allow a given gene to be expressed and then we kind of wrap it and tuck it back in or we keep it on and so again, gene, DNA, genetics, epi, above the gene. So it's all of these variables that go into allowing genes to turn on and turn off. It's all of the biochemical marks or imprints, whatever you want to call them. And many of them, hundred plus, that are in working together, engaged in allowing genes to be on and off. And is it the sirtuins that are doing the actual reading of the DNA and putting the methylation markers on the DNA? Is that what does that? No, the methylation markers are placed down on the cytosine nucleotide using DNA methyltransferase. And then there's a family of DNA methyltransferase enzymes that will do it at different times. I mean, I think this is where we can get in and have our lifestyle actually influence what happens during cell division. All right, so to bring this back up a level for people that probably now feel like I've drugged them down in the weeds too much. So what became really interesting for me is to, okay, we've got this careful packaging of the DNA and the way that we express or fail to express a gene within our DNA is by wrapping it. So essentially hiding it and saying, don't read this. Yes. And in your book, you said something really interesting, which is that if the DNA are the language of our genetics, the methylation is the punctuation. And so it says stop reading here, line break. This is a new paragraph, so this is an eye cell. This is a heart cell. This is a skin cell and oh, by the way, you're in the eye, so I sell express yourself. And so you've got all of that in one sort of without methylation would be one run on sentence. Yeah, that's right. And so the methylation goes in and says and God knows what would be turned on. Yeah, it would just be a big mess. And we think that this big mass is part of the aging journey. But yeah. That you begin losing your punctuation. Yeah. And now I'm distorted. It's not where it's supposed to be. The word is misspelled or out of place in the wrong paragraph. See, that's really helpful for me. So once I had that paradigm, that understanding of, okay, my the DNA says your eye should be this big versus my eyes at different size. My heart cell functions like this. Here's functions like that. So we each have our own way that all of this is going to express, like you said, half a mom, half from dad. But then over the process of aging, that gets, oh, I forget the word wonky. It goes wonky. I think to use the word. I've been using my scientific word is wonky. So that begins to break down. When it's breaking down, what exactly is happening? The methylation marks are literally just missing. So a few things are happening, and that's an awesome question. I think mechanistically we have some idea, but why it's happening is a really hot topic right now in the scientific community. So when you look at the epigenome of a younger individual as compared to an older individual, it's fascinating, like genes that are on in youth are inhibited in age and it tends to be that genes that are helpful in beneficial are on in youth and then genes that are actually and those same genes are turned off in age. But it's predictable across all of us. I mean, you can't avoid these changes. I think we're working on it right now. So we can't avoid them yet. Right, that's right. We can't avoid it. Well, and we're starting to learn. I mean, this is what I wrote about. We're starting to learn, you know, lifestyle interventions that can help prevent the extent of the breakdown. So rewind them in some cases. Yeah, that's right. That's right. I was looking at the biological age class. So the question I think is with this predictability is it just damage from wear and tear in life or is there some sort of a programmed element to this that's driving the aging journey? Are we programmed to die? Exactly. Which is as predictable and sort of elegant in its structure as developing a human during embryogenesis or early infancy when we're when infants are just aging at this accelerated price. They're like superhumans. You know, I have a toddler at home and actually she's turning for it. But she's moving out. But just watching her so thinking epigenetically and watching my kid, you know, when she was an infant, sort of heal. You can see her skin knitting before your eyes. I mean, or her learning new language or her going from sitting to standing to walking. I mean, it's all happening at this record pace, and this developmental this accelerated developmental place is part of her epigenetic journey. You know, it's part of our aging journey, and that changes over time. And then we hit maturation and sexual maturation, puberty, et cetera, and then women hit premenopause and Perry in post and on and on. And all these are driven epigenetically, and then we've got this aging phenomena where things break down, where we're at risk of developing cancer and dimension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, et cetera. And when you look at the epigenome, it looks like it looks like it's programmed in there. It's something that all of us thinking about it would like to change.

Kara Fitzgerald Perry cardiovascular disease cancer diabetes
Mark Meckler Explains Why Leaders Should Support Convention of States

Mark Levin

01:36 min | 8 months ago

Mark Meckler Explains Why Leaders Should Support Convention of States

"So Mark whatever the reasons are they're misplaced and the Republican leadership always talks about how the Democrats don't do this in the Democrats Why don't they let their people vote And let their people vote and why don't these people understand that what's at stake is our constitutional system that they represent the ability to fix this This is the only way to fix it Is it not It is the only way market I'll tell you one of the things that's so astounding to me And this is going on in South Dakota right now I just had a conversation with the senators kind of on the fence I always ask at the end this question like okay if it's not this then what is it We all agree that the system is crashing the Marxist Syrian controller turned into trying to pack the courts They want to get rid of the Electoral College They want to add states So if it's not this what is it And I never get an answer Because it's usually just generally you know I don't know but I'm scared of this And that's my frustration and one of the things that I ask these leaders to do and usually it's a problem in leadership It's not the rank and files Usually in the leadership of what I ask them is to lead There's a reason we have the country we have is because at some point leaders stood up and said we're going to do this thing And other people said it's too risky It's scary and the leader said we're going to do this thing We're going to stand and we're going to fight and that's what we need right now in South Dakota We've got citizen leaders are doing that Great state leadership they're surely lovers She's over 80 years old and just absolutely cranking it Harvey Fitzgerald and his wife but we need leadership in the legislature in South

South Dakota Electoral College Mark Harvey Fitzgerald Legislature
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Smart Poker Study Podcast

Smart Poker Study Podcast

08:01 min | 10 months ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Smart Poker Study Podcast

"I'm really excited about today's podcast episode because I get to give you 8 turbo tournament tips directly from Alex Fitzgerald. If you don't know who Alex is, he's a world class poker player as well as a world class top notch poker coach, especially when it comes to tournaments, but this guy really knows his cash game stuff as well. And this morning at 7 59 a.m., his daily newsletter hit my inbox, I read it, and I knew it had to be this week's podcast episode. Not only for the fact that this coming Saturday on the 18th of 2 p.m. is our monthly tournament for smart poker study, but I'm just a turbo tournament fan in general, I don't like those really long registration periods, especially on ACR where like late Regis four hours and the tournament really starts four hours in. No, no, no. I'm a big fan of turbo, so this article hit me like a ton of bricks. Absolutely loved it. And I asked Alex if it's okay that I read his article for all of you in the podcast and he approved. So good news everybody so you have to go to the show notes page for today. Smart poker study dot com slash turbo Alex. There are two critical links for you to click on there. The first goes to his website, poker head rush dot com and that's where you can sign up for his daily email newsletter. Where he gives crazy strategy every single day direct to your inbox. The second reason to go there, there's another link to his new course how to destroy turbo tournaments. Now, this is a 13 part course that he did with Mike wasserman. It's normally $499 until Wednesday the 15th at midnight this week. Just two days from now. You can save $400 and get that incredible course for just $99. So it's critical that you go to the show notes page, smart poker study dot com slash turbo Alex to save $400 on that course before Wednesday the 15th at midnight. The second critical thing you must do right now excuse me while I whip this out. That's right, whip out your poker journal because you're going to want to take notes because all 8 tips are going to be useful in any upcoming turbo tournaments that you may enter including this weekend Saturday December 18th smart poker study $75 guaranteed tourney. Okay, without further ado, let's get to Alex Fitzgerald's 8 turbo tournament tips. Gambat day. Bob and all my years of calling games, and nothing I've ever been this excited. You're excited. Feel these nipples. So you're playing turbo tournaments, but you're not getting the results you have that right? It happens. Turbo tournaments are nuts. Talk about action from bliss to devastation in minutes. It never ends. Then, on occasion, you win one. And the final table was like 19 minutes long, and you're not even sure what happened. How do you tame these beasts more often? There's actually a ton of different thinness laid in strategies you can employ. Which I discussed quite a bit in my series how to destroy turbo tournaments. But here's some blunt fixes you can apply quickly to start getting results fast. Tip number one, exploit the gamblers. This is one quick tip you can employ that people constantly neglect and it will get you real results fast. Think about who plays turbo tournaments. Tournaments are not for disciplined people. Disciplined people often go, I'll play cash and I'll head out when dinner's ready. People like myself go, look at all that money for first. Let's go. Now there's another level to this. That's the guy who wants a ton of money and wants it fast. That's a lot of people playing turbos. They put money on a football game, and now they're goofing around. They see the big money and tournaments. They want it, but they don't want to wait around. Let's get to jamming stacks in now. I love those guys. The best part about these people, they're typically not terrific at poker. They'll be broke quickly. Your job is to get their money before they give it to someone else. You'll see some people just limping in a ton at the beginning of these tournaments because they're bored at halftime. Or they're half paying attention while watching Netflix. Raise these guys up. If your hand is ahead of their range and you're in late position, isolate them. So many times you can do this in mercilessly value bet down, taking half or all of the week player stack. That's a huge edge from when the turbo stack jamming war begins. Tip number two, pay attention. If you're playing a live casino tournament, the damn thing is going to play like a turbo. It goes too fast and Chris takes all day to make a decision. And once again, he's at your table. Your job during the early levels is to pay attention. Again, you see the frequent limpers? Take advantage of them. If you see a guy just raising a third of the hands or any damn thing he wants, work to bust him too if you have something halfway decent. But more importantly, pay attention to who really doesn't understand tournament poker all that well. They'll usually just tell you they normally play cash. It's amazing. These guys will not call off their chips correctly deep in tournaments. Nor will they jam as wide as they should. Don't call off versus them wide, but do move all in on them more often. Tip three late registering be careful with the late registering. You'll see people who are used to a certain site's rhythms. They know that if they register an hour or two late, they'll be fine, usually. But then they don't notice it's a turbo or they don't care and they register. Then they'll say to everyone, oops, I have 7 big lines. The truth is, they just want to gamble. They're using this as an excuse. This shouldn't happen weekly. Just pass on that tournament or register earlier. There will always be more tournament poker if you're not feeling comfortable. Tip four, play turbos on smaller sites. This is probably the best tip I could give you, but no one's going to use it. We all love playing those big tournaments on the big sites with huge guarantees. But the problem is the variance in those tournaments is colossal. My friends and I have made a ton of money playing turbos on smaller networks, which are usually fed by sports books. There's a cost to doing business this way. The software is terrible. Statistic tracking is difficult to come by. Cash out to our chore, but you can't beat 80% fields where half the people don't understand push fold math. There are other benefits to playing on these sites too, less variance, top heavy prize pools, occasional overlays, et cetera I tell people game selection is 90% of my job. If you could play in a game versus pushovers and make real money, why would you deviate? Yet a surprisingly large number of people don't want to take the time to capitalize on these edges. Tip number 5 practice push fold in your free time. This one always blows my mind. Back when I started playing sit and goes in 2006, poker tools were hard to come by. When I found coaches who could teach me push fold math, I paid good money to hear from them. Now there are affordable products that will quiz you on specialized situations and programs that will quiz you on generic situations. And no one uses them. They'd rather set real money on fire in an actual turbo, as opposed to learning in a simulation. What the hell? Take 15 minutes a day to practice. That's it. If you feel good, keep.

Alex Fitzgerald Mike wasserman Alex Regis Bob Netflix football Chris
"fitzgerald" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Saturday marks the twentieth anniversary of the september eleventh terror attacks those attacks and the thousands of deaths shook the nation and they were turning point in many ways especially for the financial services firm cantor fitzgerald which occupied five floors near the top of the world trade center of the more than twenty seven hundred people killed in new york. Six hundred fifty eight worked at cantor fitzgerald. It lost executives secretaries traders brokers support staff chairman and ceo howard. Lut nick survived. He was taking his five year old son to school that day. Despite the huge loss cantor fitzgerald didn't shudder. It still exists. And so does the nonprofit that nick started with a million dollar donation three days after the attack in the past twenty years the cantor fitzgerald relief fund has distributed more than three hundred fifty seven million dollars to families affected by terrorism natural disasters and other emergencies. Howard nick is with us today to reflect on nine eleven and the changes since. Then thank you for being here so it's really nice to be here. It has been twenty years since nine. Eleven i'm wondering if this year feels different than the others. Well you know used to be that. I felt that i had two lives sort of before. Nine eleven in after and and it would feel a sometimes that it was still so raw. Felt like yesterday in this year as reflected twenty years. Just doesn't feel like yesterday. You know it's I employ the children of people who were killed that day. I mean it's just twenty. Years is as much time since nine eleven is. I was at cantor fitzgerald before nine. Eleven so it really is. I think it feels much more separated from my life before you mentioned you lost employees in the attack. You also lost your brother. Gary in the wake of the attacks you launched the cantor fitzgerald belief. Find tell me about the mission and and how it's evolved over the past two decades so we had to Really colliding worlds right after september. Eleventh we had we had destroyed company that needed to be rebuilt and needed to be peace back together and we destroyed lives of our friends families. All our college families that were just ripped ripped apart and we had both of those together and an in order for me to survive. I had to serve. We'd them into one. And so we created the relief fund right away which was run by my sister e because she had a broken heart cheese sent off to take care of the families to touch them to tell them we cared in the nicer that to rebuild the company because we committed twenty five percent of everything we made to the families and your they needed six hundred and fifty eight families. You need a real company. I need you to make a difference. And so we wo- those two together and it really was the calling of for was let's go. We build this company but to do it with the mantra that we got to help these families and it was those two woven together at created the power that kept cantor fitzgerald going. It was we had to do it for higher purpose. Which was take your friends families because if you remember that day the one that you didn't really want to do good work there are countless ways. Your philanthropic efforts have helped this year. All of the money raised is going to the cove in nineteen family relief program. Do you think you view the pandemic in a different way because of what you went through on nine eleven well. It's you know what happens. Is people think of things like a. I remember right after the attacks on nine eleven the the initial reports were on. That was an attack on capitalism. You make it sort of theoretical and what i really understood that it's personal these a human being's lives in torn up when you lose a parent and i have friends. Lost announcer got to see the you know they. They went to the hospital. They never got to see them again. They can just saw them on an ed and just not the same. You didn't give the hug and say goodbye. It's it's it's really very much more personal for us. Because he we know our to limits. And so i think we're just mooring to with pain and what it means for families and what it means for people. I cannot make it theoretical. It's really As you alluded to earlier you had this enormous burden of keeping your company. Afloat you know wall street is a competitive place. Did it change the way you run your business. It did change. It changed me as a as a person for before nine eleven. We wanted to do things and then after nine eleven. I just wanna be partners. Flippant i feel. I feel like working with other herbs. Working with other companies worked with other people just builds a stronger foundation beneath you and an. I needed the breath in scale about sunday. She saw him. I'm much for to to work together with others. Partners with others to creating your broad coalitions and and that's when candidates you're set out to do it works really really well role switch to other companies and and that's the key part of what's made a successful. You mentioned earlier that you are hiring the children of of employees and associates. Who had been part of your firm in the past. Many of these newer hires though were children when this happened. How do you talk to them about that day. Well when when story said there was a young woman who was really we were friends. I loved her husband. Her husband got killed on nine eleven and he was extraordinary executive. Any just cause too much pain to see me and my wife and so she. She said nothing personal but she just wanted keep her distance because we reminded her s. You know of a past love live and she got remarried and then just the other day about about a month ago. She called me and her son had applied from work canvas show and And he's a great kid. Either you finish in fantastic. That young man and he joined the firm and and she called me and said okay. He is convinced me. That is time until we went out to dinner and we just spent time together and it was her son who broke at darien said. I want to work in a joke. It loved my dad. They will give me the best career and So this young man came to the -firmative. It's so i mean think of how wonderful that is light hearts. You know how it feels me. So these are.

cantor fitzgerald ceo howard Lut nick cantor fitzgerald relief fund Howard nick nick Gary new york darien
No. 9 Notre Dame Escapes With OT Victory Florida State

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

No. 9 Notre Dame Escapes With OT Victory Florida State

"Ninth ranked Notre Dame coughed up an eighteen point lead in the fourth quarter before Jonathan door hit a forty one yard field goal in overtime sending the Irish past Florida state forty one thirty eight the winning kick came after Ryan fitzgerald thirty seven yard attempt sailed wide left fitz Gerald extended the game with a forty four yard kick in the final minute of regulation Jacquelyn completed twenty six of thirty five passes for three hundred sixty six yards and four touchdowns in his Notre Dame debut I think I learned early on when I got here that was you know their plan for the offense yeah I mean I mean I think it's a great idea like I said you always need a house big chunk plays in a game how to be successful and make it easier on the offense to Sean Corbin had an eighty nine yard touchdown run for the Seminoles who have dropped five straight openers I'm Dave Ferrie

Ryan Fitzgerald Fitz Gerald Notre Dame Jonathan Jacquelyn Florida Sean Corbin Seminoles Dave Ferrie
Larry Fitzgerald Doesn’t Have “The Urge to Play Right Now”

Dave Ramsey

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Larry Fitzgerald Doesn’t Have “The Urge to Play Right Now”

"An interview with Sirius, XM's Mad Dog Sports Radio channel. This is what wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald had to say about his future in the league for now would be a radio broadcaster, right? Not to be honest with you. I just don't I just don't have the urge to play right now. I don't know how I feel in September, October, November, moving four, but I just today I just I just don't have the urge. The 37 year old did not officially closed the door on returning to the league, but did say for now he does not plan to suit up this season. Fitzgerald has been leading the leading man for the Cardinals franchise. Over the last 17 seasons. He has led the league in receptions, twice recorded 9 1000 Yard seasons earned 11 Pro Bowl selections and an all pro selection.

Mad Dog Sports Radio Channel Larry Fitzgerald XM Sirius Fitzgerald Cardinals
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Yeah somebody who throws a little bit harder than thirty two. You just mentioned. Having chris sale on the mound. I assume that that was quite the experience. Yeah got to play behind him twice in portland. And i got to play behind him again here in wooster but yeah it's it's cool. It's relaxing really. It's you don't get a ton of action but the it's it's fun to watch for sure. Yeah just how sharp was he. He was solid mean. His first start in portland was was incredible. Actually a couple of weeks before he started for us. He came down to portland to Throw some bullpens. And i got to stand in on one of them. Obviously i wasn't swinging. I was just standing. But you've got to buckle on one of them. Looked like it was coming right at my face and then dropped in so yeah his. His slider is is incredible. Unevenness fastball angle. That it comes from is is something else right yet. This podcast is scheduled to air on. Friday and sale will be making his first. Red sox start his first big-league start in two years on on saturday. Which is very much. Look forward to here with fun in mind ryan when you're playing the infield behind the guy like chris sale. You're obviously locked into the game. But do you allow yourself a few seconds to think. Hey this is cool in. I'm on the same field. With chris. Sale on the mound. Yeah you kind. Of his first pitch you know he throws. Everyone gives them a standing. Oh and then for the first. Everyone's clapping form every strike that he throws so yeah. I mean you definitely notice it and feel the energy when he's throwing but Yeah kinda by the third time around. It was kind of like okay. I've been here on that. Yeah it's it's fun playing behind him. He's he's a phenomenal guy. Who are ryan some of the The best pitchers that you faced the season out. I'd have to say so. There's this guy from new hampshire. He may be in tripling. I'm not sure. But his name was rodney. Lefty the angle. He throws out his very similar to to sail. It just left. It comes out of the popcorn stand. You can't even really see it until it's on you so you can almost guess it to make sure to make sure you get some barrel on it. But yet he was. He's definitely probably the toughest i faced. The other one is probably yawn. Eibar from the hartford yard goats. Lefty reliever used to be with us the last few years he got real five. Thank traded over to the rockies and i actually just recently face john oxford did not expect to see ninety eight with spin at the top of the zone from him. So that was that was a tough ab as well. Yeah ackford is no longer a young pop right. He might be old enough to be my dad. I'm not sure now. Not quite that old. You are twenty-seven though and rule five eligible this winter. I don't know if you own a crystal ball but if you look in it you know what do you see in your future. The only thing. I've ever seen in my crystal. Ball's me playing in the big leagues. I mean i've seen it since. I was a kid Seen it wasn't drafted. I still knew i would. I would make it here. But yeah it's the way however i get there has been completely unpredictable. I have no idea what's what's going to happen. I no one really says much to me. I don't have an agent. So i don't really know What the whole scene is like out there. I don't really have a pulse on that. So i'm just trying to control what i can control and see what happens no for sure. Do you ever wonder ryan if you'd be where you are now. Had you not become somewhat of A hitting nerd a few years ago. Yeah i don't think i would have lasted at all i. I've said it many times. That i don't think i would be here if i didn't go play any ball for year and meet the people i met you know had i had. I not met. Deputy young and ryan johannesen. I don't think i would be here. Are maybe i'd just be a career. Low level minor league player that kind of fills in wherever the organization is me just. Because i could play defense but Yeah i. I don't think i would get as many opportunities as i have if i didn't figure it out at the plate and we are running out of time but we should circle back ryan on what we started with at the outset. About view getting promoted to worcester. I believe it was on the twenty ninth of july. I assume that you know moving from portland to pawtucket. You had to get a new place to live of course how. What is that setup like in the upper levels of the minor leagues. yes so they just. They got a team hotel for us very much. Everyone stays here unless unless they got families. Even some guys at families are staying in the hotel north wife and kids but yet it's a you know paying hundred bucks a night to stay here and the red sox helps out a little bit. Give us a three hundred dollars. Stipend each month to try to help with those costs but That's only covering three nights of the week. So i'm digging and digging into my own pocket. I mean i'm. I'm making the minor league minimum. You know twenty five hundred a month. Twenty eight hundred if you wanna include the stipend for the living. So yeah it's it's tough trying to figure out nutrition and making sure that. I have everything i need to perform on the field as well as pay for a hotel and this hearkens back to the audio of weeks ago when we had jonathan parent on talking a lot about how difficult the minor league life is so like a lot of players your life will change markedly is going to say if when you make it to the big leagues. You no longer will be equipped scraping by so that that is the dream a dream and it's it's been nice having chris sale down here buying some spreads for us getting some good food and you know we all thanked him for that because we're we're super appreciated for that. Yeah and perhaps some day ryan fitzgerald can be buying spreads for for minor. Leaguers had down the road definitely. That is the goal for sure. Yep ryan thank you very much for coming onto fan grass idea you know. Good luck with the remainder of your ear with aaa worcester and everybody. Thanks for listening to fan grass audio. Hello.

portland ryan chris sale john oxford chris wooster Deputy young ryan johannesen Red sox Low level minor league Lefty rodney new hampshire rockies hartford pawtucket Ball worcester red sox
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Baseball fans. this is david laura. My guest is ryan fitzgerald infielder. In the boston red sox organization ryan was in double a portland when he agreed to come on to this podcast. If you weeks ago. But he has since been promoted to triple a. Worcester so ryan. I guess we should start by congratulating you on reaching the doorstep the big. I think that's pretty good for a guy who went undrafted five years ago. Yeah definitely thank you and thanks for having me on the podcast as well. Yeah it's it's been quite the journey for sure making it all the way here. I think if. I'm not mistaken when i've asked my big league. Debut the first guy to go undrafted to independent fall to the big leagues while that that is. Yeah you were senior sign out of creighton university a senior sign in that actual you as you mentioned you played andy ball. I i think that was for what was it. The gary south shore rail cats. I think yes. That's correct. yeah. How does that process work. Is that something like we're red. Sox scout approach you at a game in any ball and said hey. Would you like to sign. That's how it usually works for most guys but for me it was a little different played there in two thousand seventeen and going into the offseason. Twenty seventeen i went to a couple tryouts for the diamondbacks. The braves and the red sox invited me to one as well. Down in fort myers kinda funny. I went to the diamondbacks won at the end of february. And then the next day actually flew straight to fort myers saws down in arizona diamondbacks training facility dental. Try out there and then hopped. The plane flew to florida the track the red sox the next day and then about two months to pass by the indie ball season was about to start. Ii headed to the stadium for spring training. We have two weeks spring training in any ball and after the first day that was when the sox called so i didn't have to go back for my second year of any baugh. And what does a try look like when you went to the arizona complex into fort myers. What exactly they have you do. So in the arizona. Lon- we we just did like regular in and out type stuff ground balls dp and just did live at bats off pitchers and then we did the same exact thing with the red sox did more live at bats took the and all that so pretty standard nothing crazy. Just kinda wanna see what you can do. And as far as what guys could do the the red sox coutts who saw you in india ball saw a guy who's a pretty good defensive infielder but also a guy who had a six ninety five. Opiates that year. You now have Road on the number here somewhere. Were speaking on tuesday at eight. Eighty seven between double and triple a that is a two hundred point. Jump at a much higher level. That doesn't happen by accident. Yeah definitely not. Yes when i first got an any ball kind had the mentality of i got nothing to lose because you really do have nothing to lose here in any ball so i was. I was really trying to find how to hit for power. And i was trying to figure it out on my own and all i really did was more of a intent intent based Change where i tried to hit for more power. I never really did that in college. So i figured why not try it in any ball and it was like you mentioned the the six whatever up yes but i didn't really learn what i was doing until after that year i'd met a couple of guys Seventy young being one of them. He's with the white sox. Now and ryan joe another another guy who was. Also the white sox both coaches and they really kind of put me on this path to learning my body and understanding how to keep the consistency instead of just going out there and and blindly trying to hit for power more so understanding how to do it and both of them have really helped me tremendously in being able to be consistent with it so a big part of that is of course bio mechanics all exactly. Did you go bog producing more power. Yes so both ryan and devon kind of got me into a cave and forty motion which are sensors that you can put on your body and kind of gives you hook it up to either ipad or computer and you can see higher bodies moving. How fast moving. Each section of the swing use force plates and we also use like machines and stuff to hit off of instead of just doing regular flips and stuff like that. So i learned a lot about kind of the sequencing of my swing. What parts of my body removing i. In if they were moving fast enough we knew what the the pro averages were. We found that for instance. My pelvis was was moving at two hundred degrees lower than the pro average. I think i was on. My pelvis is moving at like four hundred degrees per second. I think pro averages some around like six hundred degrees per second and we just started toying around with different different moves that could make And then and then finding Deficiencies in my my body where we can improve stability or speed and the those to really go hand in hand so finding all those deficiencies and creating a prep routine before. I hit to try to activate the muscles that need to activate in order to hit in order any. I need to feel those muscles in order to have that. Stability is really huge for me. You are a left handed hitter. Of course taking a look at your portland. Opera's i think it was. Maybe seven games ago that you were promoted worcester. You had a two eighty batting average in portland and your wrc. Plus was.

red sox david laura ryan fitzgerald andy ball ryan diamondbacks arizona fort myers creighton university Worcester portland ryan joe braves white sox Baseball coutts florida india
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Fitzgerald chairs. The story of going from undrafted to indy league. Now all the way to triple a. Just one stop away from his lifelong goal of reaching the majors. The pair also talk about using camera technology to improve swing mechanics down to the smallest detail the effects of intentionally hitting for power and what it was like to play behind chris. Sale fitzgerald also talks about how he sticks out a bit in the clubhouse with his statistical approach to the game and you spend a lot of time of course in clubhouses. How many of your teammates look at the stats. The same way you do. None of them. they think i'm crazy. I've tried to have conversations with them and then a few of them juvenile of them get it a few of them understand and you know they'll they'll come around eventually but I know i mean if you want to play the game at the way the front offices are looking at it. I think it's the best way to go is is looking at. Wc clause instead of batting average after that ben clemens and eric and having extended chat about their recent travels in what is going on in the game eric has returned from the area code games in san diego and he goes into what the event was like. And how it comes together especially during a weird time like this and how the wonderful world of shared amateur data works and came to be. Meanwhile ben wants to chat about some of these teams that are realistically out of the playoff hunt but still have things to figure out. What are the guardians going to do with their roster and potential forty man crunches. Can't abraham toro pull off playing second base for the mariners. And what kind of things can the cardinals do next year. And how about the team was shohei. Ohtani mike trout now. The angels of do exactly what they should do. Which is they brought Up they're giving adele of brandon marsh chances to keep playing in the major league level. They're trying to make every otani. Starting event should be fine. I think they're handling this kind of lost season quite well. But before we get to the baseball conversations. I must point you in the direction of the fan. Graphs dot com shop and more specifically. Have you considered an ad free membership. It is not only the absolute best way to browse the website blazingly fast but is the absolute best way to support the website. And make sure we keep doing all the cool baseball things we do. Thank you so much for your support. We couldn't do it without you. Enjoy the show. Hey.

indy league ben clemens Fitzgerald eric fitzgerald abraham toro shohei Ohtani mike trout chris brandon marsh san diego mariners ben cardinals otani adele angels baseball
The Mask-Mandate Debate Is Back as COVID-19 Cases Surge in the U.S.

NBC Nightly News

01:52 min | 1 year ago

The Mask-Mandate Debate Is Back as COVID-19 Cases Surge in the U.S.

"In the us in that fourth wave of covert. There could be a major shift in the cdc's mask recommendations men. An alarming number of new cases. Nationwide making fitzgerald has the latest tonight. The worst case scenario among the unvaccinated. If you're like going back into battle again and it's definitely it's definitely a another way. The highly contagious delta variant fuelling a surge of new cases across the country dire warnings from the nation's top. Dr going into the fall with the delta variant we could have a really serious problem with a considerable surge of infections the variant sweeping through the south texas arkansas and florida accounting for forty percent of new cases in the country but in miami thousands packing a stadium for a live concert here literally drowning and people as the cdc now says they could recommend mass for the fully vaccinated indoors joining cities like los angeles. St louis and new orleans but in arkansas a new law banning mass mandates goes into effect. This week it's important and not to have the current debate about mask wearing but have the current emphasis on getting a vaccine only forty nine percent of the country's fully vaccinated those without the shots making up ninety nine point five percent of cova deaths frontline workers once again with urgent please to the public. We are seeing younger patients. All unvaccinated are sicker. Dr michael building has been working in the cove award in fayetteville arkansas. Since the start of the pandemic he seeing more kobe patients now than ever before. What would it mean. The union collie more people vaccinated less pain and suffering and call less families to tell them their their loved. Ones didn't make it.

CDC Arkansas Fitzgerald South Texas St Louis Miami Florida Dr Michael Building United States New Orleans Los Angeles Fayetteville
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"Hold on. just do ha- hold Wrong oh justin long. Every thing he's reveal is going to be all run. It really just give you the last word even bring this far to leave us alone. Brought us way too far to give a now. We are on the right side of history. We are doing. God's work by pursuing justice for black people for people who have been left out by bringing people. From the periphery to the centre. This this is. This is the work of justice. This this is the work of god on planet earth and so we. We have to keep speaking. We have to keep preaching. We have to keep singing. You have to keep dance and we gotta keep shouting we gotta keep work and we gotta keep marching we gotta keep rallying we gotta keep going because this is the work and we are called to do. This is the price. It's one person said we're paying for rent on earth and it's worth it is worth it to be in this fight that we are called to be in and we didn't choose to be beautiful in black but we are. We didn't choose to be marginalized oppressed but we are. And now we take the spirit that is within us a spirit that cannot be destroyed and we used to do the work of god. We use it to do the work of justice for people who are most marginalized for people who are most oppressed for people who are being called the past of least resistance instead of the paths of resilience. This is the work. And i am just fortunate to be a servant to lift the voices of people in box town friedman's community black folk recall property in this country. We they called us. Property weren't considered people until the eighteen seventy census. That's our that's our reality right to bring those voices those histories those those those spirits those and by our works redeem them and we humanize them against status. That would still save their lives up. So yeah we're fighting to stop pipelines. Yeah we're gonna fight to end this terror iranian of pollution and we do as a holy sacrifice to god and to those generations in generations and generations in generations in generations. That will come after us. That is justin day. Pearson and miss scottie fitzgerald. And i am revenue would your host of the coolest show. Thank you so much like what you heard on this episode of the pie on your favorite podcast. Fake one hundred and hip hop on twitter and facebook visited the coolest show that you can take action for justice right now you can also learn more about this podcast and donate to fake one hundred percent with a non profit private. Thank you for listening and all our.

justin long friedman miss scottie fitzgerald Pearson justin twitter facebook
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"This people power. We had legal power but we had god pal And the combination of bis powerful these powerful things tapped something spiritual a that built a movement memphis and revived with some people thought was a dead dream and will continue to push us forward as we create justice during this twenty twenty one environmental justice summer in this city. 'cause that spirit it cannot be broken i it will not be bowed nor will it be bent But it will continue to catalyze the necessary work to turn that spiritual power into legislative power in the city is My ma ma. My mind. listen if you don't know how these good folks than beat that oil company you hate. Been listening my mama mama. I'm a close. I just wanna say thank y'all I'm gonna start with miss scotty on this question and hundred years from now and twenty one. Twenty-one none of us going be here on this side of jordan but what will be here will be the fact that those folks will not be dealing with the behavior connection pipeline. That those folks the those folks who hunt year samantha them babies babies babies who eight even been born yet that says generations upon generations. Is they they going to look back at a market and be like they was some folks in memphis It was justin. Jay pissing and miss scottie fitzgerald and a whole bunch of other folks and and i don't even know the pitcher right here by the way the afro is a pretty beautiful women missing this gerald and everybody else they was. They was wearing mass for some reason. I said why did was wear masks. But they offer wearing masks at that time out there doing this thing. But what i do know is that there's no pipeline there was a pipeline that was in the pipeline and there's no pipeline now and they said it was because of this thing they believe in and it's forced called guy misguided a hundred years from that none of us going be here but your work will be you work will be. Your courage will be get love will still be here. How's that make you feel it makes me feel and while you're talking can i just put this verse in here That wait upon the lower serve. The lower waiting means like person waiting a day that wait upon the low. He shall renew their strength and they are wrong. And they shall mount up with wings of eagles. Eagles don't flop around. They stretch their wings. And god put stead win been needs their wings so that they can soar and this is saying to our people you can. So you don't have to flop around you can soar. And he see you run and not be weary. And i'm not gonna let you get tie and you'll and not saints and we in the sun. Nobody knew the other day how much pain i was. He but god said and walk. And i like with justin. Just see what's the point. We'll walk and not going to say. And what i'm hoping for our people is they were and finally come to understand. I'm some yes. God loves me. I'll help people that love me. I'm and i'm a forced to be. We're trophy god. Got us in a in a trophy case so that we can shea. He knocked the dust and dirt off of us and he says shine for me. I know it's going to be worked. Sacrifice to they talked about me to they spit in my face to. They said i wasn't a king. Hey god but we are way of sons of god cutting together they ship three and twenty six twenty seven on through the therefore. There is no. There's no snow agenda. No no we are. The sons of god and we are bad to the bone when they got us from over the water there. They got the cream. They didn't just come for you. Bad thing we yasser bound. No no no. That wasn't us. We are the chosen of god. Everything comes from you know wade comes from all the best you can do is be bay. That's the light as you can get from today. And the melon was taken when they went over to in the nordics and to call weather will not let that hormone create coke. They estill our brothers and sisters but if you re the first Chapter of sons of salomon. He said mass sisters in my brothers despise me because the song has kissed my skin and he said i am coming. I am black Read and study to show yourself approved. There is messages codes. All through the word of god and i would trust. You could get you a nice old bible. Nice hebrew will be real nice where you can read and find out a third. Chapter revelation said his in was burnt grass. Take your rest something. Go burn it and see what you get a god. He is deep within us. He's eating you. He's expe- right now. Then holy thing is going. That's also is moving and you right now. You'll feel his spirit because what comes from the heart which is one hundred years from the ground work has been. Lay you math at duke. Just window snippet it. I'm just land. The time it gets on. God gave me this. When i die i die before and they brought me back and an awhile. I did come back but the song he gave me was..

miss scotty Jay pissing miss scottie fitzgerald memphis justin eagles samantha gerald jordan shea estill wade salomon coke
Why 'Hunger Ward' Is a Hard Film to Watch

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Why 'Hunger Ward' Is a Hard Film to Watch

"Ward is often very hard to watch. Turns the camera on Children into hospitals in Yemen. They often look and this is difficult to say as well. Skeletal Small ribs burst through their soft flesh, their arms look not much thicker than the tubes that protrude from them. Dr DeVore. The Children are near death. In the midst of Yemen Civil war. Conflict in which is Saudi led coalition with support from the United States, the UK and France. Has blockaded humanitarian supplies. There's no narration to the film. Very few captions. And more than once we look on Children. As they take their last breaths. At one point, Dr Aida out of Sadiq looks into the camera. I don't have it. Magic changed everything. It's not my room. A reward is a nominee, the best documentary short subject category for Tomorrow night's Academy Awards. It is the second Oscar nomination for The director Sky Fitzgerald, whose other films include Lifeboat and 50, ft from Syria. Scott Fitzgerald joins us from Los Angeles. Thanks so much for being with us, Scott. It's an absolute pleasure. Thanks for having me so people you follow in the hospital, the medical personnel Seemed to want to tell the world about their world. Yeah, You know, Scott, One of the things that surprised me the most about during this project was that fact just how we were given complete and almost unadulterated access to every moment. They needed people to know that their own Children were dying for lack of food on Lee by other people, knowing especially sort of the broader World Would it change be possible and

Dr Devore Yemen Dr Aida Sky Fitzgerald Ward Sadiq Saudi Academy Awards France Scott Fitzgerald United States UK Scott Oscar Syria Los Angeles LEE
200 Dollars to Glory: Starting and Expanding a Bar. - burst 02

The Broken Cork

02:36 min | 1 year ago

200 Dollars to Glory: Starting and Expanding a Bar. - burst 02

"We got some bottles coming out this that are some pretty heavy hitters yes some really highly allocated bottles One for sure that. I know on that i'm looking for. I don't think i've ever been able to see this out in the wild anywhere. But that blatant bo. Twenty two year Coming out in april. It's going to be a nice hard to find but if you can get your hands on one is going to be about that. You definitely want to add to your collection. I've seen people do reviews on it. They've had nothing but positive things to say about it. And i just kind of scared of the price tag. I don't know exactly what the price tag on it is. I'm not gonna throw a bunch of rumors out there. But i know what's up there Another one that you can be looking for in april Old fitzgerald's releasing their spring. Twenty twenty one to kanter. I think this one was an eight year. Yes so this is going to be an eight-year bottled in bond bourbon. You're going to be hard pressed to find this one as well So also in april. You're looking at blood. Oaths annual release. Pack seven this year Last year's was finished in cognac barrels. This year i don't do it. Does anyone know the finish on that. By chance Kimball can look that up for not mistaken. it was. i can't pronounce a madera madera. Almost one hundred percent. Sure and i'm i'm may be completely wrong. I know the label is just a beautiful baby. Blue yes so high. I love the color blue health campbell's wearing a blue shirt. I like that shirt gamble. So you were talking about the Price tag for blaine. Twenty two yes Soften yay sau. T. e. r. in es casks. I'm guessing saw yeah. I don't know how to pronounce it. So let's see again sought as you. T. e. r. n. e. s. We're also from southern indiana. So far pronunciations are absolutely terrible. Y'all don't understand what we're going through around here. Please forgive sweet white wine. From the small town of salter tornay in the bordeaux region of france so definitely saw tornay or saw. Turn me a white wine. That's going to be an interesting one but by to the blatant is. Is this the last of the blatant bo. Twenty two year. Because aren't they discontinued doing in bo. Twenty two. I haven't read anything yet. just keep stay tuned to us. We'll we'll do some research and will either put it up on our facebook page or we'll lie included in a future episode

April Bourbon Allocations Old Fitzgerald Madera Kanter Kimball Salter Tornay Blaine Tornay Campbell Indiana Bordeaux France Facebook
St. Cloud State advances to its first national title game

CBS Sports Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

St. Cloud State advances to its first national title game

"ST. Cloud State Edge Minnesota State 5 to 4 to advance the national title game. So let's find out how we got to that final score is we take you through some of the highlights of that game. A cloud state of Minnesota state. We're seeking a chance change closer to what could be their first national championship. And it didn't take long for the Huskies to set the tone, thanks to an early power play opportunity admire. Now that center point Control Donnie, You serve a pass, one time shot Bar circle who did out McKay with left. Pat Fitzgerald centers comes free on the rebound shot, Scott Wanted a one Nothing lead First ST Cloud State on the power play. ST Cloud Captain had a great look off the rebound delivered just 3 18 into the first period, Spencer Myers fourth goal of the season. Thus, keys handed scored a power play goal in their previous three games. They were over five during that stretch, also a change of pace for ST Cloud, considering it fell behind. In each of its first to N C a. A tournament games after Minnesota State responded with a power play goal of its own to tie the game at one ST Cloud moved back in front to one after one and heading into the second period. The Huskies followed a very similar script to the start of the game attack early and don't look back there. Top girl dumps it down into the Mavericks till he gets to the top first as it rings up the far boards But back to the Farpoint turned over there, skating enforcer Go alone to drive Stop! Well, hammer with the wrist shot from the far circle 31 See Cloud State. Ended the lead with an unassisted goal to 40 into the second period, and ST Cloud was in good shape, thanks to Hammer's third goal of the season after

St. Cloud State Edge Minnesota St Cloud Captain Spencer Myers Huskies Pat Fitzgerald Minnesota Donnie Mckay Scott Mavericks St Cloud Hammer
Streaming music services fighting for your ears

Morning Edition

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Streaming music services fighting for your ears

"Has never been more important. You see in the new world of streaming If an artist can create that perfect single, their song will be streamed billions and billions of times, making them anywhere from 2 to $3. Welcome back to for my Mariana Trail that was comedian Trevor Noah, making a music streaming joke while hosting last month's Grammy Awards ceremony. This hour. We've been talking about artist compensation in the age of music streaming and in the age of the pandemic, I'm talking with Cody Fitzgerald and Josephine Shetty, both co founders of the Union of musicians and Allied Workers. And both musicians themselves. Josh can the CEO at Band Camp and not still going? Oh Sky associate editor here at KQED for KQED Arts So Trevor Noah joke on a stage like the Grammy shows that there's pop culture level awareness enough to make a joke that you know the audience will get nasty. Do you think this could be an inflection point? Culturally, where organizing efforts can maybe move the needle on artist? Compensation? Is this movement that will gain momentum? You think Radio. I think for so long music and art in general, such an individualistic pursue and then also not to mention artist kind of a lot of the time feel pressure to project this image of financial success, which makes it really hard to transparently talk about the economic realities of music. So I think just the fact that artists are building collective power and just talking about how much they make out in the open and identifying as workers is actually a big cultural shift, But I think we'll make this Conversation. Keep progressing. And Eric

Trevor Noah Mariana Trail Cody Fitzgerald Josephine Shetty Union Of Musicians And Allied Kqed Arts Grammy Awards Band Camp Grammy Josh Eric
US hunger crisis persists, especially for children.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:30 min | 1 year ago

US hunger crisis persists, especially for children.

"America is starting to claw its way out of the economic fallout from the corona virus pandemic but food insecurity persists especially for children and older adults. Food banks around the us continue giving away far more canned packaged fresh provisions than they did before. The virus outbreak tossed millions of people out of work forcing many to seek something to eat for the first time for those who are now back at work. Many are still struggling paying back. Rent or trying to rebuild savings data from feeding america a national network of food banks in the us shows that its members dispensed far more in the last three months of twenty twenty compared with the same period in two thousand. Nineteen katie fitzgerald. Feeding america's chief operating officer said the networks members are still seeing demand above pre pandemic levels although final numbers for this year's first-quarter anti-eta valuable fitzgerald said she expects the food banks will collectively distribute the equivalent of six billion meals this year about the same amounts. They gave away last year and far above the four point. Two billion meals given out in two thousand and nineteen america's yearlong food insecurity crisis has been felt especially sharply by children who lost easy access to free school meals and all adults who struggled to get groceries or meals that senior centers because they are worried about contracting the virus.

America Katie Fitzgerald Fitzgerald
How Three Women Re-Wrote the Story of War

On The Media

02:05 min | 1 year ago

How Three Women Re-Wrote the Story of War

"Before the vietnam war there was a law that banned women from reporting on the front lines of any war for the us. When president johnson refused to officially declare a state of war in vietnam in opening appeared no ban a handful of pioneering women bought one way tickets into the battlefield they had no editors no health insurance and little or no formal training reporter elizabeth becker former washington post war correspondent in cambodia and then npr's foreign editor and then national security correspondent for the new york. Times has just published. You don't belong here. How three women rewrote the story of war. Chronicling catherine lewa a french. Photojournalist franky fitzgerald an american long form journalist and author and kate webb in australian combat reporter elizabeth. Welcome to on the media will thank. You broke his great to be with you. I wanna start with where you started. You give your initial experience very short shrift. When asked why did you cross the ocean to cover a war. When you're so young you said the short answer was a nightmare. I was all too keen to leave behind. My masters adviser had rejected my thesis on the bangladesh war of independence after. I refused to sleep with him and he said one wasn't related to the other. Just tell me what happened. This was nineteen seventy two and there weren't that many women in graduate school and he made a move. And i said no. He pressed on and i said no he rejected. The thesis. said. I had to work harder on it. Then resisted any idea that one related to the other. That even made a pass at me. So you know you're young enough that you think that you have your whole life ahead of you and wary enough that i said i'm not leaving my life in this guy's

Elizabeth Becker Vietnam Catherine Lewa Franky Fitzgerald Kate Webb President Johnson Washington Post NPR Cambodia Elizabeth New York United States Bangladesh
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Coffee And A Book

Coffee And A Book

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Coffee And A Book

"Just.

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Coffee And A Book

Coffee And A Book

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Coffee And A Book

"Right and It's just you know like it's basically about lights starting one circle and growing into the next one because that spotlight is like is all about the circled lab in the beginning of time and that was used my team dove right in and with a million words. That's amazing fifteen. Years later. When i stopped and i took a look at that workout. I still can't believe it when i realized okay. Now why do us and then. I had the daunting task trying to go in and figure out how many books this really was You know to keep a keep a novel about three fifty four hundred pages fifteen novels and they're all under copyright. They're all ready go Three of them actually Were already in distribution. The fourth was in the process. And then of course you know we have published a problem and so those were pulled out a distribution and yeah and that is just the beginning at like writing her all right. So how did you make the transition from the novels over to children's books. Well that was kind of interesting. Because basically i finished writing and novels and then i was kinda thinking to myself. Well now what i did and literally the lord said i want you to write children's and i was. Okay how do i. Because i'm telling you to sit down and write any original fairy tale that somebody else has not come up with to to come up with characters that nobody else's they're gonna come up with names that nobody else is never thought a is not that easy to do and so what i started doing. Is i kind of started drawing from some of my personal Experiences i had a child. And i love children said oh my whole entire life. I have either been raising children teaching children doing sunday school for children. So i just basically took themes that i thought were very important to children and route. Sixteen children's books with three new ones on their way. When do you think you'll be done with those three. I will be totally an etched with my book writing career by the end of this year. Now not set. I mean. I have other children's bet threatened so it's not to say that i want just decide how i think i'll try to get another one now but evidence right now on a really think these last these next three row being The end and then that way. I can start with some of my other projects which course obviously include novels getting those guys back out and then To christian on books in in mind. Also i have to get to a stopping point with these children's books to start going in a different in a different way but i these these next three on now. We'll be finished by this. Okay great. how does your you mentioned your faith. How does your face playing a role play a role in your writing. I saw mention one other thing. If you don't mind please do well. And that is another thing that. I'm just starting to work on very excited about it and i wanted to share it and that is these audiobook movies that we have just started doing. Also so after writing these children's books and they're in distribution. I got kinda hooked in to books and an audiobook obviously is for somebody professionally. Read your book to the child. Well mine movies have taken that to a different level so basically what. This is is a professionally. It's a retard european actress who is professionally reading my books.

three fourth end of this year Years later three row Three three new ones about three fifty four hundred million words one circle Sixteen children's books european christian fifteen one
Justice Department drops challenge to California net neutrality rules

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Justice Department drops challenge to California net neutrality rules

"Earlier this week. Department of justice dropped its challenge of california's net neutrality law. You might remember. The california introduced law after the trump administration rolled back the obama era policy which was creating more equal internet access. Trumping the doj's challenge could signal a return to net neutrality. So here to get us back up to speed and discuss what the impact of a change be is. Our reporter drew fitzgerald. Hey drew thanks for joining me shortly. So it's been a little while since we've talked about net neutrality and this is a complicated topic besides start here with a little bit of a primer. Can you explain what neutrality means and where it comes from well net neutrality. Is the idea that the company providing you access to the internet whether it's through cable a cell phone connection satellites. Whatever can't pick favorites if you're shopping online or watching netflix. Video or talking to people on zoom. Your internet provider shouldn't get away of those activities by blocking traffic or slowing. Some of the data down to make other services were better. That's the principle in practice. The federal government under president obama road rules discouraging a lot of activity with some exceptions. There were some loopholes that allow for a little bit more traffic management for cell phone providers. There were other rules dealing with privacy but on the whole it prevented the sort of blocking or throttling traffic. That open internet advocates had really worried about. What's the argument on each side of this issue. Will supporters of these rules argue that the modern economy flourished really because internet providers didn't control things too much look at google and amazon also look at net flicks that exploded even though provided entertainment. That competes directly with some of the cable tv providers. That were serving their netflix videos. Over the internet deponent's net neutrality. Rules argued that they're not really needed. Because these companies provide internet service and if they blocked or seriously degraded some of the websites and content that their customers want customers. We get mad and it would be bad business. Another argument against the net neutrality. Rules especially in washington has been that it would open the door to price regulation to setting prices. That's something that companies like. At and t. and comcast are very fearful of don't want the government involved in got it so net neutrality policies again. That's the idea that internet service providers shouldn't be able to pick favorites. That was an obama era policy. What was the trump administration's approach. Where did they follow. And how do they handle. Net neutrality will the trump administration opposed those rules and the new chairman of the fcc at the time named by president trump rewrote them They introduced new regulations that completely revoked the guidelines that the democratic led. Fcc headset few years before they also tried to make rules. That would deter states from writing their own regulations and they argued that the state of california had overstepped its authority when it filled the gulf and and wrote its own rules right and let's talk about that. California's law escalated into legal battle with president trump's. Doj what happened there. And why is it so significant that this happened in california. Yeah that's right. California did pass this law during the trump administration to try to protect the types of activities that the obama administration had supported and california's not ordinary states. The biggest state in the country as we've seen with other sorts of rules on greenhouse gas emissions internet privacy. If they pass a law that is sustained. It has the effect of really setting the agenda on a national level. A national company can't very well have rules for the rest of the country and ignore a with forty million people in it so it has the effect or it would have the effect of protecting net neutrality principles on a national level if it were put into effect now. The important thing to remember is that those rules have gone into effect yet. Pending legal challenges right and among them was a lawsuit from the trump administration's department of justice. But now that the new biden administration is in office. There department of justice is dropping that suit against california's net neutrality law. What does that tell us about how this administration could approach this issue. Well it tells us two things one is that the biden administration like most democrats still supports neutrality. Rules that are enforceable and doesn't want to get in the way of what california's doing they're aligned in their ideals. They're the second thing it tells us. Is that the diner administration. Ministration should be eager to have those california rules go into effect and become the law of the land essentially because it doesn't yet have a lot of power to act on a federal level. The fcc today is led by acting chairwoman jessica rosenworcel but is a two to split by administration. Hasn't yet named another commissioner to fill the five member commission or named a permanent chair person which really ties the commission's hand in writing the sort of sweeping rules that it did under the obama administration

California Drew Fitzgerald President Trump Barack Obama Netflix DOJ Department Of Justice FCC Obama Administration Biden Administration Federal Government Comcast Amazon Trump Administration Google Washington Jessica Rosenworcel
Can Australia and China learn to get along?

Between The Lines

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Can Australia and China learn to get along?

"Tensions with china. Australia's tried stash with. China has escalated sharply with savage new tariff. Sit hit our wine industry hard from tomorrow. All australian wine will be hit with a one hundred to two hundred per cent hike. A move gross. I will devastate the industry. There was an abc news account of china hitting our wine sector of course assign deterioration of sino australian relations in the past. Gee indeed relationship between our nations have not been so dismal in more than half a century that is since before them opened ties with communist china. Mainland we give expression to new international album. No nation is on you. Aspirations symbolize law china upon our region. That was then prime minister. Gough whitlam ushering in a new era of cooperation between beijing and camber that was in nineteen seventy three. However in the past year in response to cambridge calls for an inquiry into the origins of covid nineteen. The chinese government has launched an unprecedented economic retaliation against our export industries. We mentioned one. Is bali. Beef lamb cotton lobster timber call and so on. Now you might ask not unreasonably. Why can't cambridge just restore relations with china indeed. How often have you heard the critics. Say if only camera toned down its rhetoric. Restored a dialogue rebuild trust with beijing. If the government did all these things did more to accommodate china all would be well instead where told cambra native sleep provokes trade partner by implementing foreign interference laws rejecting the wildlife. Fog j. network beat and calling for an inquiry into the origins of the crown of ours. Now that's what the critics site and you've heard many of them on this show in recent years. The hugh watt the jeff rabies. The stephen fitzgerald's the linda jakobsen's the giants lawrenson and some of them. however kanchana really rise peacefully. And is it really fair to say that when there's trouble it's invariably the fault of either washington's hawkish policies or a net australian diplomacy. How do you deal with our largest trade partner that is converting its economic might into strategic and military clout. Well we have a terrific panel is political editor of the sydney morning herald paid. His forthcoming book is called red zone. China's challenge australia's future as published by lacking books. Get i paid. I welcome back to national tomo. As a pleasure and she'll mahbubani is a distinguished fellow at the national university of singapore's asia research institute keisha. Most recent book is called. Has china won. The chinese challenge to american promessi k. Show it's also a pleasure to welcome you back to between the lines especially it'd be backed up now. Many australians as you will know are understandably anxious about what they see. Is china's discrimination against australia. What do you think is targeting. Us and abbey's measures against our exports justified in your judgment. Let me try tom to be very frank and help flow by giving you. What's that regional exception of australia. In the larger context the world has changed. We have gone from the euro than domination of world history to us. The ancient century and australia is very lucky that it is situated in the heart of issues now but australia still behaves culturally a western society in an asian dominated environment. And just to give you one simple example but you walk into an asian home. Most times you take off your shoes. That's asian culture. This not western culture the take off your shoes now with decide their fall to live and work in sight and asian home. Do you want to try and understand the issue norms or do you want to work. Only with western nas. That's the fundamental question that australia faces. Well you have risen case your that as westin palace slowly but steadily received from asia australia could be lifted stranded together with new zealand as the sole western entities in asia and paid a casual guys on following on from what he just said that quote as western power recedes. Globally australia's predominantly western population could feel very isolated and lonely. Niger asia paid a hatchet. How would you respond to katia model. Bonnie depends on how you define whist and tom If western society western values includes retaining liberties if it allows us to have free speech freedom of association freedom to choose our governments and reject them. Then i think straightens would happily subscribe to the definition of wisden

China Australia Chinese Government Cambra Hugh Watt Cambridge Stephen Fitzgerald Beijing Linda Jakobsen Lawrenson Kanchana Gough Whitlam Sydney Morning Herald Abc News Mahbubani National University Of Singapo Mainland Bali Giants Government
The Great Gatsby

Planet Money

03:07 min | 1 year ago

The Great Gatsby

"In nineteen twenty five. F scott fitzgerald published the great gatsby and like pretty much every author. He copyrighted the book when it came out which you know fair enough the way copyright worked at the time fitzgerald and his heirs could collect royalties from the book for fifty six years. All the way until nineteen eighty-one and during that time if anybody wanted to make movie or play or anything at all based on gatsby they would have to get permission and probably pay a licensing fee to the fitzgerald family. And then according to the law after the fifty six years the book would go into something called the public domain fitzgerald's kids or grandkids wouldn't get royalties any more and more importantly anyone who wanted to could print up and give away copies of the book or rewrite it from toms horses. Point of view or create gatsby on ice anything at all and you know copyright. Is this balancing. Act on the one hand you want to encourage and reward people who write books create things but you also want to let those things enter the public domain at some point so we can all share them and tweak them and build on them and make more creative stuff. The artists figuring out how long to keep something in copyright there was nothing special about fifty six years. That's just a number that congress picked and then they decided to change it in nineteen seventy six just five years before the great gatsby entered the public domain. Five years before gatsby on ice congress changed copyright law. They said among other things fifty six years not quite long enough under the new stronger rules. Gatsby wouldn't go into the public domain until two thousand one and then just a few years before that congress jumped in again and made copies of old works last even longer under the new new rules. Gas would not go into the public domain until almost one hundred years after it was written until twenty twenty one but still sounds like some meat up year from the future to me. And you know congress could have kept pushing this date making the copyright longer and longer until the three thousand or something like that but there's been some pushback on the ever lengthening copyright period. Not enough pushback to start making the copyright shorter but enough to stop making them longer and so on january first of this year. Finally the great gatsby went into the public domain into our domain. It belongs to us now. It belongs to everybody. And what we now own i have to say is a complicated book. It has the romance and beauty of america. It also has the racism and misogyny and anti semitism of america and maybe the most american thing about the It's all about money. This is a book about why people want money and what they do when they get it and what money does to them. In other words. Gatsby is the perfect story for planet money and now that gets me is in the public domain. If we wanted to we could talk about it for a minute at the beginning of the show. Yeah say hello and welcome to planet money sticking ahead break in and then we could read the whole thing. We could read the entire book the entire book and posted on our podcast.

Gatsby Fitzgerald Congress Scott Fitzgerald America
Biden to nominate Samantha Power to lead foreign aid agency

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Biden to nominate Samantha Power to lead foreign aid agency

"Lester Munson We learned moments ago from what I think is the most important signal from the nation Biden administration that they will take John Fitzgerald Kennedy's U. S aid program. Which has been a political football for 50 60 years, and they will restructure it and elevate it to a white House position was Samantha Power. What is President elect Biden signaling Well for the folks who follow foreign assistance issues and soft power and, uh, these kind of more obscure aspects of American diplomacy. It's terrific news that the power is ISA Force. She's an intellectual powerhouse. I'm not saying she's right about every single issue, but she's dynamic. She's interesting. She's going to bring a lot of energy and verve to what has been frankly, a sleepy agency in the U. S government. I think it's a huge opportunity for President Biden. To make a difference around the world, particularly the developing world, A place where we haven't really been present for the last

Lester Munson Biden Administration President Elect Biden John Fitzgerald Kennedy Samantha Power White House Football U. S Government President Biden
'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

"Today is public domain day. As of january first thousands of books movies songs and other material from nineteen twenty five are no longer under copyright protection including the great gatsby. Npr's neda ulaby has more besides the f. scott fitzgerald masterpiece books entering the public domain now. Include mrs dalloway by virginia woolf and classics by sinclair lewis franz kafka ernest hemingway and agatha christie so are other works from nineteen twenty five like buster. Keaton silent film go west and the songs week toward brown now community. Orchestras can play music in the public domain for free scholars will not have to get permission to study. This material and books on the public domain can appear online without charge all part of living cultural conversation that anyone can join netto lippi. Npr news both

Neda Ulaby Mrs Dalloway Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis NPR Virginia Woolf Franz Kafka Ernest Hemingway Agatha Christie Keaton Netto Lippi Npr News
"fitzgerald" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Broadcasting the fitzgerald theater in Saint Paul with guest host John Baptiste please welcome back to the stage new water do he ran home thank well has been some she's I don't know I like to bring out of the United States on piano your host Jon Batiste on pretty John.

fitzgerald theater Saint Paul United States Jon Batiste John Baptiste
"fitzgerald" Discussed on Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

"Nancy slight had many twists and turns to took her from television to automotive finance. Today she shares the wins the losses. The tragedies the inspiration. Let's meet Nancy Fitzgerald Welcomed extraordinary women radio. Nancy it is great to have you join us today with me. Thank you so much for having me. It is an honor to be a part of your podcast. Oh thank you so much. And it was such an honor to share the stage with you just a few weeks ago at the Colorado Women's Chamber of Commerce top twenty five most powerful women in business. What what an honor that was. Oh my gosh I'm still riding High County. I can't even believe that I got to be with the likes of you and other ladies on the stage it was. It was pretty mindblowing. And the things that were going to follow from that event in the deeper connection that we have with each other I think is going to be just amazing for all of us. You Know I. I often say there's nothing more powerful than women helping other women and I'm excited to be a part of that group as I am too. I'm so excited that they have plans for ways that we can get together on a formalized basis after the Continued to stay in touch with each other and collaborate together on lift each other. It's just so I agree with you wholeheartedly. That there's nothing more powerful women coming together to support each other in left each other up. Yup I agree I agree. It's exciting and we need that right now on all this crazy time with all the things that's going on in our world right now. How is the whole Corona virus thing? Impacting you right now. Well it's impacting. Vm Tire United. While the world. Really for for us. You know every day's a new day an auto and every customer is earned every single day so we can't afford to take a day off. I really feel for the families where they don't have. The resources of millions of children are out of school today. So what our parents able to do to continue to take care of their children and to continue their businesses in their careers I have no doubt that we will bounce back. I think As Americans were hardworking end can get through anything But these are tough times to navigate you know for us we continually you know You know there's no toilet paper hand sanitizer to be found in the city so just making sure that our employees know that they can or remotely that they put their families. I you know family is one of our core values teradyne lending direct and we. WanNa make sure that were seeking care of not only our employees on but their families and the families that we help with our auto loans.

Nancy Fitzgerald Chamber of Commerce High County Colorado
"fitzgerald" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"fitzgerald" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Afternoon I'm Jim fitzgerald the Orange County fire chief mass first responders our primary mission is the health and safety of the residents and guests of the communities we serve we accomplish this mission by working in partnership with our local municipalities as well as state and federal officials to ensure that we have the necessary response plans and protocols in place to protect both citizens and first responders we pride ourselves on being prepared and well trained to respond to the needs of our community an example of this this past week your firefighters and paramedics visited more than eighty assisted living facilities much like we did during the last hurricane season checking on our most vulnerable population ensuring that they had the necessary necessary safety literature in place and answering any questions that they may have we ask that you continue to practice those recommended safeguards of avoiding close contact with people who are sick staying at home if you're not feeling well and washing your hands frequently I also want to assure all of you that the emergency responders within central Florida are well prepared and well trained to respond to your needs we do it every single day if you need us do not hesitate to call us at this time I want to call on a candy Crawford CEO mental health association of central Florida if.

Florida Jim fitzgerald Orange County Crawford CEO