32 Burst results for "Fisk"

Interview with Dr. Tim Persons, Chief Scientist at Government Accountability Office

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:51 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Dr. Tim Persons, Chief Scientist at Government Accountability Office

"Our guest today is dr tim persons. Who is the chief scientist. Managing director of the science technology assessment and analytics team at the us government accountability office also known as the gao. So hi tim. Thanks so much for joining us today. I kathleen Me on it's great to be with you. And ron once again. Yeah we are so excited to have you with us today for folks that have been following us. Tim was also are september. Twenty twenty speaker at our ai in government event and he was one of the keynotes at machine learning life cycle conference so we will link to both of those in the show notes in case you would like to watch them in more detail. But i wanna start this podcast today in case folks don't know you To help you spend some time introducing yourself to our lists and tell them a little bit about your background in. Yes so happy to do that. So as you said in your introduction. I am the chief scientist of the gao. Where the largest of the congressional or the legislative branch agencies in the us government and we have a staff about Thirty two hundred Maybe a little bit more in terms of Full time equivalents there but our main role is to to be the oversight or also called the congressional watchdogs by the way For the us congress. So we're Known as the auditors. We have a lot of access the federal information and so on across a wide array of departments and agencies and so on an issues which actually makes it ideal the tien have conversations about a i And so that's what i've been doing with. Gao since two thousand eight but also recently. We stood up a new team. It's geos newest. Team is called the science technology assessment in analytics team and that's significant because Especially for ai. Because the second a and that's as analytics and a is really a statistical analytics and decision sciences with respect to a machine so i work across the whole. Federal government supporting. Gao and lead a team. That does a lot of oversight insight and foresight work in the science and technology area. Especially so that's a little bit of the background For today thank you you know. I think that's really interesting. Because people the average person here in the united states but probably worldwide does not really understand the mechanism by which large governments or even small governments work and these levels of oversight and trying to understand if the dollars that they're spending taxpayers or getting applied and appropriated properly and used to the value that that they're supposed to so. It's a really interesting place to be. And of course this is an ai. Podcast we're going to talk about how. Ai connects to all of that right. And i think that's one of the the interesting questions we have for you. Maybe i just looking at more broadly. I know we'll a little bit more deeper into a. Is it relates specifically to oversight but i think just certain at a at a broad brush from where you said looking across the government may be looking seeing how other agencies are using technology and using tax dollars. You know how do you what do you see as some of these interesting opportunities interesting. Applications unique opportunities that the public sector maybe in general not even just in the us has around using artificial intelligence. Yeah great question ron. We could spend now until the rest of the year talking about that one. That's that's a broad Very good question of course Happy to be too brief on that. But i think Really what a is bringing here is Really just the framework of thinking about The future of government. I think the future is in one sense the now and they're still part of the public sector of the not yet and i really do think that what is is bringing out particularly especially as we sit in the middle still of our pandemic that we hope will end soon. But really i think about the government roles of enhancing both capabilities and services. So i think those are the two key things to start a conversation with. Ai about capabilities and services and the reason. I say that because there's so much of the government that has changed over the last century When you think about it It really so much of the mission now is really a service or thing We also think about. Of course the what. I'll call the more tactile government that we we can see kinda we could feel we it's You know this is ranging from law enforcement to the military to One of the most beloved institutions are The us park service. Like whenever we go to one of america's many great parks you know we see the government in that way and yet in this day and age especially in the digital age us so much is about doing services. How do we get those Stimulus checks out in a time of economic distress. And how do we do that reliably so that. It's not wasting taxpayer dollars. It's not a fraudulent That were wise with the. You know the national fisk and things like that and so i think Really the way to think about a is starting with those sort of two things The services in that that That ladder sense of what i was talking about in this sort of their capabilities. Which is really where you wanna be with respect to law enforcement or military or other things and you want our capabilities to be more resilient. More robust into out compete Any potential Challenging nation state say to national security so those That's that's just the the the way i strongly advise doing that If only to ground the conversation. I and what does it return to do and accomplish. How do we best express our national values and And not start initially technology which i fear often begins with sort of a fear narrative right the idea of has been around for over a century. Here you know robots and things like that and it runs and jumps To the loss of control fear that we have the fear of the unknown fear the robots gonna take over our lives etc. That kind of thing. Which i i. Don't think at the end of things with a clear. Eyed look in with a cautious optimism. I think is is much more of the order of the day for this technology.

Federal Government Dr Tim Science Technology Assessment GAO RON America Kathleen TIM Us Park Service Congress
Magnets, The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

Short Wave

04:45 min | 4 months ago

Magnets, The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

"Okay jeff brumfield. Where does our journey into the world of magnetism begin. It begins with a call to carlos. And a guy named tim murphy. They both work at the national high magnetic field laboratory in tallahassee florida. Normally you know. I do research and i learn about things but this time i just i just brought some bar magnets thought i would let you. That's all we do here so they just you know they're bigger and they give us money for it so expensive too. Yeah and they're painted. We paint them. They're so ready for this interview. They were born ready for this interview. These folks work with magnets all day long. Carlos heads the k. Twelve education programs for the lab. Tim is a physicist there. And like carlos was saying earlier they really feel like magnets need respect. I guarantee you that whatever direction you're looking right now unless you're in the wilderness. Right now there's probably a magnet in your line of sight and you just don't know it well and if you're you're in the wilderness you're standing on the biggest magnet that we have which is the earth the earth is a giant magnet with a pole and the south pole and where that magnetism comes from kind of complicated so for today. We're just going to stick to smaller baghdad's like the ones we use in our daily lives. Jeff i'll be honest. I don't really know what makes a magnetic field magnetic field. So how would you describe that which is kind of fascinating. Because you've turned yourself. Into the shortwave fisk there's gaps in my knowledge the only god what is a magnetic field exactly well so magnetic fields like i just said you know based on the field. Actually they're often said to north and the south pole and right opposite poles attract and light poles repel. So magnets can pull each other together. Push each other part in actually magnetism itself is half of fundamental force a called electromagnetism which also includes electric fields. But what i think is really fascinating is aside from gravity. Magnets are really the only fundamental force that we can just experience an encounter on a regular basis right and we can kind of see this magnetism action when we're playing around with magnets and they stick to certain metals right. Yeah yeah i mean the whole metal magnet thing is kinda complicated carlos. Tell you that everybody comes up. I see on. Tv shows all the time even the education tv shows. They say magnets metal. And i'm like no you got it wrong again. There's only three medals of her naturally magnetic iron nickel and cobalt. And what carlos means there is that there are only three medals that be permanent magnets that hold their magnetism forever and never other metals can stick to magnets but then there are a lot of medals. They can't so we just moved to. A new house has a stainless steel fridge. And guess what like all our fridge. Magnets don't work on this fridge anymore. so what makes them materials magnetic and others not so much well it actually all has to do with electrons. Oh our friends the electrons. Of course these are. The negatively charged particles in adams and when they flow they create electricity. That's right and whenever electrons move in in particular when they spin around something they generate a magnetic field as well as an electric field so magnetic fields have to do with spinning electrons exactly so the electrons are spinning around the atom and that makes like a little magnetic field but then in a permanent magnet. What happens is all. The atoms are facing the same direction. Imagine all these atoms lined up in a row and they kinda wanna do what their next neighbor is doing. So if their neighbor is pointed up right there magnetic moment is up than the one next to him says. Hey up is the the direction so they go up as well. So now you end up with a macroscopic magnetic field because all of these atoms are kind of lined up with their magnetic moments so all of these atoms facing the same direction is what creates one. Big magnet exactly. That's how permanent magnets work like the magnet. Cystic to your fridge. All the atoms in that baghdad are lined up in the same way and they make this big magnetic field that polls the magnet against your fridge and keeps it there. But then there's another kind of magnet and tim the guy you just heard there he actually works with this one. It's called an electromagnet for electro magnets. We actually don't care about the spin of the electron what we care about is the

Carlos Jeff Brumfield National High Magnetic Field L Tim Murphy Tallahassee Baghdad TIM Florida Jeff Adams
"fisk" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

02:35 min | 4 months ago

"fisk" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"John. Stonestreet is president of the colson center and host of the breakpoint. Podcast thank you john. Thanks thanks nick. Additional support comes from crossing cultures international an organization that equips and trains indigenous pastors and church leaders in more than thirty three countries more at cca equipped dot org and from the master's university a christian liberal arts university in southern california that has stood firm for ninety four years on christ and scripture more at master's dot edu while the very life of texas lawyer had to have flashed before him when he realized what he done he appeared to be a kitten so he'd have eight more lives to live. Surely you saw this. When it was a routine civil forfeiture hearing via zoom that turned into a hilarious viral video. Now seen by millions. Rod ponte maintains his appearance was totally normal on the webcam as he waited to be allowed into the hearing. Judge roy ferguson presiding but when the hearing began the judge pointed out Counselor check your settings mr pot. I believe you have a filter turned on in the video. Settings No kidding a kitten filter to be precise this sober court hearing via webcam complete with a lawyer with white fur and blue eyes on the cutest whiskers. I imagine it was as adorable. Viral viewers as it had to have been horrifying to the lawyer. I don't know how to remove it. I've got my assistant here. She's trying to. But i'm prepared to go forward with it. I'm here live. i'm not a cat i can. I can see that. I think if you click the up arrow but a matter cat got your tongue. It's the world and everything. Today is friday february twelfth. Thank you for turning to world radio to help start your day. good morning. I'm nick and myrna brown coming next on the world and everything in it. A new historical drama about digging up the.

U.S. Unemployment Claims Fell Last Week

The World and Everything In It

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

U.S. Unemployment Claims Fell Last Week

"The number of americans filing jobless claims fell slightly last week. World's kristen flavin reports the labor department says new filings. Two seven hundred ninety three thousand down from eight hundred twelve thousand the week before but thursday's government report also showed an increase in the total number of americans who are receiving unemployment aid including through extended benefit programs all told more than twenty million people were receiving benefits in the week that ended january twenty third. That's the most recent data available and that reflected a sharp rise from just under eighteen million the week before part of that increase likely reflects a rush of claims that came after washington extended to federal aid programs just after

Kristen Flavin Labor Department Washington
"fisk" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

07:36 min | 6 months ago

"fisk" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Have gone for robert fisk too. I got much criticized saying that. Including by a close associate of israel in support of israel should never have done. But you you covered it quite well by just showing the picture and say this is what you might go through but mostly i have not been badly hurt. That was the worst over been hurt and compared to that kind of thing and the dangers. You do see and you'll film shows a dangerous very well. I don't care what words people chuck at me. I have no interest. And i went into it having learned of the of the vitriol and even amongst your fellow foreign correspondents the things that people say you have a lot of rumors around you obviously and about who you are and i think i've been accused of just about every secret service in the middle east and the united states includes israel by the way. But you just have to say forget it. I'm not interested. You like everything on social media you pour it into the waste bin from your carry on working. That's it exactly. And i didn't know whether the most other films i've been involved in wouldn't touch that element the fact that people for political reasons will claim that you're looking for dictators that you'll save money by the by mossad egyptian security services why they would collaborate hiring me. I don't know but there's no point in trying to reply to it and so my just chuck it out and you went has not even al jazeera so the response to that vitriol was theft. Is the eyewitness filmmaker making a film about you was. That was all bullshit. Actually a lot of that all of it. Because i was seeing somebody who is really guided by this this journalistic integrity your definition of journalism. You know on the side of those who suffer. Well it's actually not so much my definition. It's mirror haas course marya fine. Israeli journalist had mud for many years was a personal friend of mine. And i went to talk to her and she was happy food or come along and i wanted to see what the so worst bit of the west bank where the israeli is and she was the first person many years before you came along with your camera rectal and said to me that i said look with journalists in the middle east other first witnesses to history and she said no. They're not robert. Our job is to monitor the centers of power especially when they go to war. And especially when it's on the basis of ally. I also look with which she mind meeting yamane to raid and then we would just chat normany and you do your usual following on violence and i think that her account of her own wife daughter of holocaust survivors and a very brave holocaust mother who gave herself up to the guest arpaio to prevent the massacring all villages and bosnia boston again and she speaks very powerfully in front of the wall. And i think that's one of the most moving parts of film. And i think she she will be the person who most people remember not bob or anyone else who fought in the film. There's another quote. I wrote down from the film. You can correct me if i've taken this out of context but you you're talking about the the act of journalism and you say mostly it doesn't make the slightest bit of difference in what. The newspaper publishes in terms of. Its is as skating. Expose gonna get the government to yet. The prison door doesn't as whatever you right. Well this early there are times when you could point to your reporting making a small difference or maybe a big difference. I can think of one but it is at least twenty years ago. When i was able to prove the videotape that an israeli drone aircraft was filming the scene of a massacre at possibly change the results of the israeli election. That followed brought a more right-wing prime minister to power so it wasn't a victory for me but i think we're your film sort of almost promotes. This problem is when we go in the film and it was. this is seen. What good filmmaking works. I had found some documents in the basement of a bombed out building in aleppo which had been used by the nostra al qaeda group. These were effectively terrorists in the west of course and there's a lot of other people and they showed they by chance left there and there were documents connected to a mortar shipment which had left the factory in bosnia. Now they didn't go from bosnia to the middle that they must have been sent to the islamist groups and it had on the name of the guy who signed it off in in central bosnia. So let me just pause here if anyone's gotten lost in the all the names here. Essentially this is tracking weaponry yes. I'm fascinated by. Who sends weapons to kill people so then off we go to bosnia them an amazingly without disturbing the finding i found the man and degrade young just walked gently behind me and you actually see him knowing the cameras saying. That's my signature. It was the saudis. We sent them to an the great thing. The film is you see the discovery of how weapons reach the middle east through a third party in this case the saudis deny it of course and i thought well nato must take an interest in this. Nato wouldn't comment the saudis scholley admit. Now we've got the documents they said it was rubbish. Nothing happened. I went privately to nato office and i said look better deal with this. This factory sent there's off and the private reply was yeah we know about. That's my point you see here was exclusive story. What you see is me writing for the independent. Not working him and you got it all on film and it's all hail and it didn't make a damn bit of difference. That's what i mean after decade after decade of feeling putting your work in heart and intellect into these things and and filling. It doesn't make a difference. How do you reckon with that. So in your look. One of the things i thought when i first saw the film in beirut a week ago little tiny screen and i always ask myself. What did they think of it. I don't know what he thinks. My first reaction was got. How irritating fiscus he walked on and on and on. But i did realize it water. What a great job. It is to do because i saw my own enthusiasm right back in the days. When i was in belfast. Which i wouldn't your phone would do what you do. And you see me saying and thinking the same things so two years ago i what a lucky i happened to have this job. That's what the phone settlement..

israel bosnia chuck middle east robert fisk yamane marya al jazeera nostra al qaeda group arpaio west bank Nato united states aleppo robert boston bob fiscus beirut belfast
"fisk" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

08:39 min | 6 months ago

"fisk" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"The film. There's a clip where he's in the bookshop six hundred something and now. You're fast forward today. You're on page one thousand five hundred. Sixty two very readable books. I have talked about the film. So you've covered a lot of tragedy and the and the film is covering tragedies that it's still ongoing one thing that struck me in the film. You say you can't report tragedy if you're having a mental breakdown meaning you've had to professionally protect yourself. Maybe keep a distance. But i wanted to dig into that because because also i think to person doesn't get to choose when they have a mental breakdown when you take on board so much death in horror. I wonder how you feel like you've been able to manage that. Well i think first of all. I think that covering the story. The middle east is a bit like being historian. But you see it with your own eyes. You don't have to go through the archives. But i think possibly slightly misread what i meant when i was talking like that. What i meant was that some journalists i knew very tragically. One of them is committed suicide. Some years ago have been so overwhelmed by what they see what they've witnessed and this guy was a very strong character that i think that if a journalist feels he can't take anymore well he should leave. I mean you can become. The poetry correspondent become the political editor. But don't think the something manly about staying on in wars. I have to admit and maybe this sounds bad. I am not a very emotional person. I get very angry with people who are responsible and we include quite a number of western leaders as well as the ones in the middle east. I get angry when i see lies told about the millions which are which clearly lies. Because i see what's happening with my own but that's the only emotion i really allow myself. I've got the privileged privilege watching history. Cursed that may be and my job is not to start weeping for the dead is to tell you about them and say who might be responsible. So i don't have nightmares. I can go out to dinner after seeing something terrible. Because it's i'm a professional journalist. Do you think you can decode anything more about your personality that allows the protects you from every nightmares looking back and watching his film. Shortly i realized how important my dad was. My father was much older than my mother. He was born in eighteen ninety nine and he was a soldier. In the first world war he was in the third battle of the psalm. And at the end of that war he wanted to be a professional soldier in the british empire. He wanted to join the workers and he was ordered to shoot an australian soldier who joined a british regiment and had drunkenly shot dead british motion policeman in paris and he said to me he refused the order. He wouldn't shoot fellow. Soldier didn't save the guy by the way he was shot. And when i look back at it now. I think and i say in the film. We're when you see him in the film. And i said you know that was the best thing he ever did in his life. He refused the orders. He didn't go along with what he was told to do. Or say or report. If you see what. I mean i think that probably has a lot to do with me. I think you should In a way. I didn't realize until i saw the film. I want to ask about the the balance between professional and personal in the film. There's a moment where roure mentions that. He's married to a journalist. But that's all we ever hear about about that and I wonder what you were hoping to achieve. Even what robert wanted to lead to inter out. Sure i mean. I can speak on that and i'm sure you can. You can add to it. I think the point was. I think going into making the movie that it was going to be similar. I think one. I took some inspiration from a film. A few years ago manufacturing consent by about the film. Chomsky by mark akbar and peterman tonic. Great peterman tonic past. Who died not too long and and that film. There's a little bit of background biography about gnome. Chomsky but to be honest you know. That wasn't the intention of the movie. The movie was a film essay. And what i wanna do is make an essay about about journalism and see it through the eyes of someone. Like robert fisk. Who's been around. Who's sort of a part of this lost generation of reporters in this new world of how we engage with the media. And let's let's let's let's listen and and and we can criticize. We can listen. we can we can. We can consider what robert thinks about. Journalism. and that way you know that was sort of the intention of the movie not to get so held up into the world of roberts private life which i can tell you to be honest if i can be honest with quite boring. You read books. I go to concerts. you go to concerts. You don't really eat a lot. So i don't know what that is you know. We had a scene where he's gaas occasion. We had a we had a scene. Where he's you know. He's a balcony on the cornish in his apartment. In beirut and often you like to lie down and read the book and there's fun to film for a few minutes but it's kind of boring after a while but you know as a journalist you guard you have to protect your privacy. It isn't just that when i'm working as a reporter in the middle east. Even back in. Belfast i might ask someone if you're married if they had kids. But i always thought private life is this it was not me to drive an invading invading tank into it and to make part of something. If you're interested in journalist. It's the work that you're interested. So i never in my professional career of asked about anyone's private life and i don't let them ask me. I'll add that we did get a shot of you and your pajamas and dance and that is hard to do down and i did it and it works. I don't hate me for a young. You talked about a theme in the film of how journalism is changing. And one of the things that we've seen especially in the middle east is a rise of citizen journalism. I think about conflict like syria. Where syrians themselves. In the absence of journalists being there might take cell phone video posted. I think about the group rock is being slaughtered silently. There was featured in the film city of ghosts and an robert in the film you make some observations about this changing worlds of how we receive news and and my perception of citizen journalism of look. We're getting these videos straight from the heart of a conflict. I've often tried to see the positive side developed is like. Isn't it good that we've got this. We're we're journalists. Wasn't able to to bear witness but but i feel in the film that you have a different concern about that and i wonder if you could elaborate. Well i think. I think the technology's fascinating if only we'd had some pictures film movie film of sub russia taylor and eighty two weeks. Learn a lot more about it with a seen the dead when they were still alive. And i like after looking at you with spectacles made by someone with a lens right but my concern about it is when the journalist accepts with only a slight hesitation. We can't fully confirm this film. A constant stream of images harrowing as they are and must be without trying to go the other side and saying is something. We're not saying one of.

middle east roure mark akbar peterman tonic Great peterman robert robert fisk paris beirut roberts Belfast syria russia
"fisk" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

06:48 min | 6 months ago

"fisk" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Robert fisk died in october at age. Seventy four after decades of reporting on the middle east filmaker young chang profiles fisk documentary. This is not a movie. And i'm tom powers and this is pure nonfiction. One year before robert fisk died. I interviewed him in young chang at the toronto international film festival for this is not a movie had its world premiere. The film follows fisk from his home base. Beirut as he takes reporting trips to syria in the west bank fisk had an incomparable knowledge of the region that he poured into newspaper columns and books like Pity the nation and the great war for civilization in the film fisk describes. His approach are very fortunate position in journalism in both street reporter. I'm on the frontline of wars. I see the war. But i'm also a columnist. Most columnists live in new york. London paris most reporters can be columnists what. I've had the great good fortune being both at the same time so when i grab a series of articles about say syria i've just come from the syrian. Frontline i'm not recording. What someone said or reporting what. I saw on youtube when i went up. Italy province all my colleagues saying italy battle about to begin but in that whole trap. I didn't see another journalist. See russian journalist. If you don't go to the scene and sniff it and taught to the people and see with your own eyes you cannot get nia what the truth is. Young chain is a chinese canadian filmmaker best known for his films up the yangtze and china heavyweight. Those topics wouldn't lead you to guess that he'd make a film about a middle east correspondent. I started by asking young. What led him to robert fisk. I don't even know what i'm gonna make necks. Usually it's driven by curiosity and this one came about because well a couple of things one of them was. I had been working on an anthology documentary about the. Us elections in twenty sixteen called eleven eight. Sixteen and i was in vermont filming a story about a guy named boots. Were dinky leftist socialist and off the grid type character and it was. It was around nine pm. Boots said this election's over close the shut down the grid and everyone went to sleep and the next morning. I woke up with the flurry of messages from my partner american and she was eight months pregnant and she was. Just you know uncontrollably upset. I had no idea what was going on. Felt like i think for a lot of people. The the election results with trump winning was was devastating for many people and for me it was drove right to the point of what the hell happened. And so fast. Forward to a the national film board of canada or the co producers of the film anita lee the producer alison lou. Check ingmar tross from germany. You know they got in touch and and presented this idea about robert fisk and i knew of his work at followed some of his work back in post september eleventh time and and said wow this this collides with with you know what is happening. Now let's make a film about journalism and this is what this movie is about. So robert p people come to. You asked to make a film about you. Did you have apprehensions about a film. Be no. I don't think that pretensions. I mean i've i've done films before you know i'll jazirah and other people at quite some length three hours with channel four discovery. I was interested to see to see young really and see. What kind of guy was i knew. Obviously he was unfamiliar with the region. And i thought it would be very interesting to see what someone who doesn't know the region would actually make of it and i thought it might be a distinct advantage as opposed to being a disadvantage and the first time he came to lebanon hit. Obviously done a lot of reading. He'd got it pretty right and the best thing and this sounds bad to some of your colleagues is we didn't come to tell me and people in lebanon for example. What he thought was going on. Listen and it was great to find someone who actually serious questions after few minutes. Listen and i listened to people all the time. And i thought this guy fevers countermands. The same grade. Raiders is an arby's iraqi. And i thank god for that. This could be very interesting. What concern me was the last big film i made. I had very bad relationship with director. Great guy but terrible relationship dominating guy i thought i could take a second shift and then i realized after we had dinner together in beirut because fund if we could make it enjoyable and fun to do as opposed to a work has to have deep philosophical background just and he said you know we want to follow you in your work. We won't interfere with them. I let sounds good if i can add. It speaks to roberts character. When i first came to meet you. I it'd be good about is fair. This fair i mean you know the his mammoth kind of credentials. The only western journalist of interviewed osama bin laden three times. I came in and also just knowing what people online kind of the world that circles you. And so i went into this wondering a little nervous. Who's this guy. And and yeah. That was good. And you know actually. He's you quite humorous person. You're quite fun to be around then. I was like oh this could work. We could spend a couple of years making a movie together and that's what it was. That was the experience for me. I may have to imagine daunting thing about. This is just the amount of history that robert has covered the amount of different vents the complexity of any one country that that he's coverages book. Great war for civilization is about that thick and the next one. Even soccer is even thicker. Then that's not a joke in the film. There's a clip where he's in the bookshop six hundred something and now. You're fast.

robert fisk fisk tom powers Young chain syria anita lee alison lou robert p Beirut west bank middle east national film board of canada toronto ingmar paris lebanon Italy italy youtube vermont
Brewers' Williams, Mariners CF Lewis win Rookie of the Year

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

Brewers' Williams, Mariners CF Lewis win Rookie of the Year

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting Seattle mariners center fielder Kyle Lewis sweeps the vote for American League rookie of the year Seattle mariners center fielder Kyle Lewis has been voted American League rookie of the year Louis pulled in all thirty first place votes in balloting by the baseball writers association of America Lewis is the twelfth unanimous rookie of the year the American League joining a list that includes Carlton Fisk Derek Jeter Mike trout and Aaron judge the twenty five year old Lewis batted two sixty two with eleven homers and twenty six RBIs in a fifty eight game pandemic shortened season the National League rookie of the year as Milwaukee brewers reliever Devin Williams hi Mike Rossio

Kyle Lewis American League Seattle Mariners Mike Rossi Writers Association Of America Mike Trout Aaron Judge Lewis Carlton Fisk Louis Derek Jeter Baseball National League Milwaukee Brewers Devin Williams Mike Rossio
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 8 months ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Sportswear Brands Race to Build the Best Athletic Mask

Business Wars Daily

01:21 min | 10 months ago

Sportswear Brands Race to Build the Best Athletic Mask

"I'm Elaine Appleton Grant, and this is business wars daily on this Thursday August Thirteenth David Brown is on vacation. Mask mandates are on the rise as of production time more than thirty states had issued some form of mask mandate to curb the spread of covid nineteen most of the mandates are limited to indoor public spaces like doctors, offices, and supermarkets but some states require masks outdoors as well, and that's been more than a little challenging for one group in particular fitness means that's right joggers cyclists and hikers have complained that conventional masks tend to stop their sweat and restrict their breathing during workouts. They demanded a mask built for physical performance and sports where companies delivered under. Armour released their first batch of sports masks in mid June and they sold out their entire stock in under an hour. The company's second allotment also sold like hotcakes. So what exactly does the sports mask offer that conventional paper or cloth masks don't under armour CEO Patrick Fisk claims it's got the airflow you need a coalfield and the best fit for running training. The company got into the mask making business way back in April as a stopgap to help with P.. P. E. shortages facing healthcare workers. Then the

Elaine Appleton Grant Patrick Fisk David Brown CEO
Journalists covering protests face assault and arrest

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Journalists covering protests face assault and arrest

"We have to talk first about what we've seen in the past forty eight hours. The appalling targeting of reporters who are trying to tell America's story there is so much that so wrong about this situation first and foremost the video seem around the world, the video of George Floyd's final minutes alive. It's so wrong that it's hard to see, but it is right that we look. It is right that we bear witness. And it is right to see protesters taking action as a result, but it is wrong to see reporters and photographers and news crews, being assaulted and arrested at these protests, police firing rubber bullets at reporters. When their pores are holding up press badges. That doesn't belong in America authorities handcuffed reporters is wrong. That's what happens in authoritarian regimes, not in America, but yet it happened again last night in Minneapolis and in New York. These threats against the press, not just coming from police. In recent days, protesters have ganged up on the press in trouble cities. We've seen a photo journalist attacked. We've seen on TV. News crew chased out of a park. That is wrong. Rioters destroying TV. News vehicles and stealing cameras is wrong. Almost everybody knows this, and it's right to call it out and say that America is better than this. Reporters don't want to be the story. They just WanNa, tell the stories of the protesters and the police and the residents of these communities that want to be able to feel safe. Some of the examples of what we see in in terms of reporters, seemingly being targeted this for example was on Friday and Louisville. is a local CBS reporter and her cameraman in Louisville, Kentucky apparently shot with pepper balls while live on the air Later, the police apologized to the station, but we've seen other reporters that here's Dallas for his other reporters being being hit by rubber bullets. Tear gas there. These situations we've seen in a number of different cities I'll read some other examples to you. A reporter in Columbia South Carolina was hit by a rock and had to be taken to the hospital. Here's a freelance photographer in Minneapolis. who was shot in the left eye while covering the protests? He says she's been blinded in. One of her is as a result in Chicago Chicago. Tribune, photographer. Photographer said looters shoved and stole her cameras in DC. This is in Washington and Lafayette Park a Fox. News crew was harassed and then chased out of the park by protesters who were cursing and screaming at Fox News and criticizing right wing media. This is deplorable behaviour by protesters. We've also seen in LAS. Vegas. The arrests of two photographers police took these photographers into custody. That is completely inappropriate Out The next morning, you know we need to follow up on these cases and make sure that people are held accountable when these incidents happen, reporters should not be the story in these cases, but it's happened again in the past few hours overnight here in New York City. A reporter for Huffpost was arrested while wearing police badge and covering the protests in Brooklyn in Minneapolis Angeles, Time staff writer had police firing tear-gas remember bullets at point, blank blank range at her into a crowd of protesters and journalists. We're going to talk to her and just a moment. Reuters cameraman also said He. He was hit by rubber bullets. Some reporters have had to seek medical attention. A news crew KCRW says. The LAPD shouted her rubber bullets as she was holding her press badge above her head, and at least one case as I mentioned. We've seen protesters being the aggressors. This is a photographer for K. D. K. in Pittsburgh. He says he was attacked by protesters downtown on Saturday quote they stomped and kicked me. He said in a tweet from the back of the ambulance I'm bruised and bloodied but alive. My camera was destroyed. Another group of protestors pulled me out and saved my life. Thank you. This is what's happening. Members of the media in cities across the country this weekend. It feels like targeting. It feels like an escalation. It is deeply disturbing. And, we're waiting for statements about it from the president and from other national leaders when about a dozen reporters were arrested in Ferguson in two thousand fourteen. President Obama spoke about that defended the rights of the press. We will see who defends the rights of the press this weekend and in the days to come. Let's talk to the reporters, so we're in the middle of this. I just showed you. One of them molly. Hennessy Fisk reporter for the Los Angeles Times, who's got some wounds on her leg. We'll talk to her in a moment and Omar Jimenez here from CNN of course, famously iconic arrested live on CNN on Friday morning I. Don't think we're ever GonNa forget that image Omar of you being taken into custody your hands behind your back There's been a lot of news sense. Then tell me about last night and what it was like when. The police officers were were moving toward your crew and you had to seek shelter on Saturday night. Well. I think Brian we expect some of that. When you come out to a protest like this, because part of trying to cover the clashes between law enforcement, and those that are coming out, is you you expect in some ways for for things to escalate just based on how previous stories like these have gone so our team actually had a plan to sort of watch. How this law enforcement team is advancing. Go back to our first safe spot. Then continue to retreat to our next safe spot, but that didn't stop. That stop us even though our camera was rolling from getting shot at Berlitz wise, my producer got hit in the back with Some rubber bullets. My talk got hitting his leg with bullets. Actually he says that he had a cellphone in his in his pocket there and he didn't get any bruising on his leg, and when he realized, or he realized the reason was because he put out his phone, he was completely shattered, and he still has that piece of that rubber. Bullet is well so so in some ways. It was the normal aspect of covering protests, but in many ways. This one felt just a little bit different. Sort of looks different same question to you, Molly. What happened to you last night? Is it right that your colleague? Photographer had to go to the hospital. That's that's correct. My colleague Caroline coal photographer. We were both standing right

Reporter America New York City George Floyd Minneapolis Fox News Tribune Reuters Vegas Chicago Tv. News Molly Louisville Lafayette Park President Trump Caroline Coal Omar Jimenez DC
Food Neighbourhoods: Fargo, North Dakota

Monocle 24: The Menu

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Food Neighbourhoods: Fargo, North Dakota

"Diverse city instead people think of the Coen brothers cult hit film really more than this pop culture depictions it's a city with strong Scandinavian influence a booming community of artists and entrepreneurs and boy can you find some interesting society and do all within a close radius of downtown and the main thoroughfare known as Broadway strolling the main strip you'll be delighted by the Quirky Boutique stores there's one pulling Scandinavian goods another sprucing ethically sourced clothing delightfully wacky variety store come bookshop but before taking all of that in make a B will naturally so dig in and fuel up before you head out for your day of exploration now after you've had breakfast and spent the morning exploring the downtown region it's probably time to start thinking about lunch now much of North Dakota was actually settled by Scandinavian migrants in the nineteenth century so why not get a little more acquainted with that culture with a visit to sons of Norway has an old buick dealership this international Nordic fraternal organization isn't your most obvious Go-to for become lunchtime you're in for a trait with venue offering Norwegian dishes like Luda fisk which is a type of Whitefish Walleye another type of fish and a local delicacy you've left Sir a type of Norwegian flat bread and freshly baked fruit pies no sons of Norway isn't your cup of tea but chicken Matzo ball soup and brisket with Ramps Schmidt and pickled rhubarb that's not even mentioning their other specialty which is freshly boiled bagels what makes burn the delight though isn't just the food the space itself is actually pretty cool it's fitted out with vintage mid century furniture effortlessly taking one back to the fifties the sixties that even sell the definitive too often lunch it will likely be an afternoon activities such as taking in the local museums where the day began just off Broadway rub it straight is Ms Luna this joint simultaneously manages to be both upscale but approachable and relaxed here you can enjoy a seasonal menu that does meat especially well so introduce yourself to a quality midwest cut like the fillet mignon and Bison meat look

North Dakota Norway Luda Fisk Ramps Schmidt Ms Luna Quirky Boutique Buick
Babies Want Fair Leaders

60-Second Science

02:56 min | 2 years ago

Babies Want Fair Leaders

"This scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christine Herman. Anyone who's ever been with a toddler can tell you if they're upset about something. They will let you know. Scientists interest had been aware of this behavior what they did not know until now is that if babies as young as a year and a half old see someone else being treated unfairly they expect the leader the parent or the caregiver in that situation to step in and do something about it. Babies evaluate others constantly rene by. Arizona's a psychologist at the University of Illinois. She led the research on baby's expecting fairness when these transgressions occur babies evaluate me wait parents and other leaders and say well. You saw this transgression. You know this is not fair. Are you going to do something about it. If you don't then you are shirking your responsibilities and it makes you less leader less of a parent. That's right babies. <music> are judging you by our own says it seems babies are born with these expectations of what a leader is and how they should behave the work is in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The researchers used bear puppets to perform skits for seventeen month old babies who sat comfortably on a parent's lap in one scenario the puppet. Puppet leader intervenes when one of the other puppets hogs all the toys in another the leader does nothing to address the injustice by our Jones says such inaction that allows an unfair situation to persist bothers the babies and they stare longer at that leader as if waiting for him to act in puppet scenarios when there was no clear leader babies did not have this expectation of an intervention patrols of they expect a leader to not just use power for his or her own self interest to use their authority to regulate the morality of their followers. Aaron Fisk is an anthropologist who studies human relationships at the. A University of California in Los Angeles he was not involved in this study. He says many people underestimate what babies are capable of understanding and figuring out about the world world since they're just barely learning how to walk and talk and so you might think they didn't understand the world because you know they don't seem to be very competent at doing things in the world but oh you know amazing things are happening there and they understand an enormous about buyers zone says the study supports the idea that babies have an innate understanding understanding about power dynamics that then get shaped by the culture they grow up in. Maybe we should lower the voting age to seventeen months for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christine Herman.

Christine Herman Aaron Fisk National Academy Of Sciences Arizona University Of Illinois Los Angeles University Of California Jones Sixty Seconds Seventeen Months Seventeen Month
"fisk" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"New hope for our real street, Fisk, Garen migos future. Big meat meal chains baby just Cardi B. And of course, we got over thirty different ads on three different stages. And at this time we gotta say happy birthday tally. Celebrate. His birthday birthday to you. Aw. Right. We definitely don't get into it. We we got a party right now. We got your favorite, but to get into. Favorite? Man. This is roscoe's roofing. How you love this? We gonna go ahead and get into what, you know, this is what it's all yet. An angry man on his way to repair his route. The guy get upset. Yes. All right. Let's go to get into your phone town right here at his favorite phone pulled this for her birthday. Big boys. Happy birthday. Hello to please. Luther from roscoe's roof, and I was calling about twenty minutes out. Yeah. I was coming to do the roofing inspection. What do you mean?.

roscoe Garen Fisk Luther twenty minutes
"fisk" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"That's what he's saying Spanish class presenting. Don't you need to present for IT? We'd say key. Here here. Did you have Spanish name in school? Don't you? Eat the doing of any vanita. Yeah. That's my teacher. Cute. I was a dealer. Daylight translation for dawn. No, you took French rate friends. Joe, son? I can't. Yes. Again. I should ask. I don't know. I should ask them. I should ask my French teacher. I'm still who I'm still friends with Facebook. Mrs Calloway is the mother of my childhood breast best friend Brett Callaway, they lived across the street. So he's the one that played Star Wars with and so I was such a fool I thought I took French instead of Spanish because I thought oh, I'm gonna have MRs calaway. This is going to be easier. I was an idiot. Because because MRs calaway knew me like I was her kid. She was way harder on me. Like, why harder on me and that didn't work out real? Well. I should've I probably should've taken Spanish. But she's a great this. She's a fantastic. French teacher, though, my all of my friends had her, and my friend, Chris Chris Fisk, who's my friend of his day. She continued French I think through college she took French and Japanese so yeah, Chris took I think seven years seven years. I mean, it's crazy. I mean, the amount of Chr Chris can speak. Unbelievable. French I can not even say my name. The way that it is six thirty three everybody. Please sit back grab some popcorn or it's breakfast time. So grab a bagel or Crump in. It's time.

MRs calaway Chris Chris Fisk Mrs Calloway Facebook Brett Callaway Crump Joe seven years
Indiana State Trooper saves woman pinned by car at toll booth

Steve Cochran

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Indiana State Trooper saves woman pinned by car at toll booth

"At a grocery store in northwest Indiana officers responded yesterday afternoon to the Miller came market in Gary following a report of a fight. Police say thirty four year old band became agitated and took a knife from a display of kitchen knives. He attacked a customer and an employee who intervened police say the band tried to stab other customers and was restrained by two employees. He died later at a hospital the city's beginning to see returns on its newly implemented ordinance aimed at eliminating illegal party bus operators. That's according to mayor Emanuel, the unscrupulous operators party buses the party is over and we have seen a difference out there. I think all of us have had in the past years of seeing and read stories of things that we never wanted to see happen, and that is dramatically down the city created a party bus task force. It also created a partnership with secretary of state. Jesse white mayor says they've already been seen fewer shootings aboard. Those party buses city officials have renamed a street in the Beverly neighborhood in honor of fallen Chicago police officer, Michael Flynn, he was shot and killed on duty back in twenty ten. His widow talked about raising their four children on south artesian avenue. New one hundred hundred street moved here to Beverly in one nine hundred ninety four and life was good on artesian our children, then and I'm sure now are still filling his heart with love and pride. Fisk was in evidence technician at a nineteen year veteran of the police department now WGN neighborhood news. Here's kim. Gordon? Berghof restaurant wants to give kids the gift of reading this Christmas trying to collect over five hundred used a new children's books. Their New Year's

Gary Fisk Michael Flynn Indiana Beverly Berghof Jesse White Emanuel Miller Gordon Chicago Technician Officer Thirty Four Year Nineteen Year
The History of Cyber Monday

TechStuff

04:18 min | 2 years ago

The History of Cyber Monday

"Welcome to tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland, an executive producer, and that love all things tech today thought change things up a bit and talk about the history and evolution of cyber Monday. So where did this come from? And are the deals on cyber Monday. Really great. And I guess the answer to that. Second question is essentially it depends. But first, let's talk about some history. So before there was cyber Monday. There was black Friday both in the sense that black Friday is a thing is older than cyber Monday. And also cyber Monday is the Monday that follows black Friday. So technically, it's true in two different senses. All right. So what does black Friday one of the United States? Black Friday is the Friday following thanksgiving. Thanksgiving in the United States falls on the fourth Thursday of November. At least it has ever since. Eighteen thirty nine when Franklin Delano Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week from the final Thursday of November. Now since November two thousand eighteen started on a Thursday November. I was Thursday that means that two thousand eighteen will see thanksgiving fall as early as it can which means November twenty second the latest. It can fall in the month is November twenty eighth. Anyway, black Friday is the day after thanksgiving in the United States. Now, there is an apocryphal story that says the origins of black Friday are deeply racist and tied to the United States history with slavery. According to that story slave traders would sell slaves at a discount on the day after thanksgiving to help plantation owners who are going to want to purchase more slaves to do work leading up to the winter. That's a horrible horrible thing. But the story isn't true at all. And honestly, I find it hard to believe that slave traders would respond to an increase in demand by lowering their prices, they already seen like terrible terrible human beings. I don't think of them as being particularly altruistic. However, we can put that whole explanation aside. Anyway, if anyone tells you black Friday is based in slavery that is not true. The term black Friday in relation to the day after thanksgiving did not appear in print until the nineteen fifties. As far as we can determine there was however an earlier version of black Friday, though, that was not the day after thanksgiving that black Friday wasn't associated with a holiday at all. But rather with a stock market crash that happened on Friday September twenty fourth eighteen sixty nine the cause of that crash was that there were two speculators named Jay Gould and James Fisk and together they were able to drive up. The gold prices way way up while they were trying to corner the market on gold on the New York gold exchange. They had even planted a story to convince US president Ulysses s grant to stop gold sales. They had this report that it was going to hurt farmers out west. Meanwhile, they bought up as much gold as they could. And that raised gold prices as a result. So they thought they were going to be rich. They're going to buy up the golden than they could sell it off at these elevated prices, however, president grant found out about it any ordered the release of millions of dollars of gold to be made available on the market and that caused prices to crash suddenly there was way more supply and this crash ended up affecting the stock market as well. However, this was a moment of acute pain. It was a sharp debt in the stock market, thus the name black Friday, but in the long term. Meant that the nation was actually able to avoid a more persistent depression. So it ended up turning out better than it. Otherwise would have the earliest known reference to the day after thanksgiving being black Friday dates to nineteen fifty one from periodical titled factory management and maintenance that it was a real page Turner..

United States Franklin Delano Roosevelt Acute Pain Jonathan Strickland President Trump Executive Producer New York Jay Gould James Fisk Turner Ulysses S Twenty Second
"fisk" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"Who've in great stuff. Do you use any apps with your mindfulness? I have I don't now, but I've used com C A L dot com. That's a good because you can have it either guided or not sometimes I'm not in the mood for guided sometimes rebellious sparked with guided and I just go shut off. I don't wanna hear you. You know what I mean? And then sometimes it does help you can even just go. It's very self directed. You've got to kind of find what works for you. But no something would fill. Some people lacked the blob, I don't make me go the bathroom. So I like, I like just nature, you know. So it just depends. You got to just come to this place inside. And, but but have this as the backdrop of everything you do you can't get it wrong. They can't get don't worry about it. Well, mindful tribe checkout, the book checkout Kim's website at Kim. Fisk dot com f I s K E dot com, and the book is monster under the bed uncovering the the lie that drives us so check it out Kim, it's been such a pleasure talking with you. And I I know that you're all over social media. I know in Facebook Jay K, Fisk and on Instagram at Kim Fisk. So connect there as well listeners, and it's just been such a pleasure to talk with you today about all of these mind tricks that we experience and how to deal with it because it's huge we need to know this knickknacks everything Bruce. And so if you're having conflicts to start looking in the mirror and go what can I do? What can I do who am I being? Well, you know, who what's pushing my buttons. And. Yeah, thank you so much for having me on. I appreciate my pleasure. You have a great rest of your day. Thanks, kim. You're welcome. Bye. Now. Thanks so.

Kim Fisk Facebook Bruce Jay K
"fisk" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"Yes. You're like I thought he was just on leave. But obviously Fisk had a bigger plan was like, wait. This is the hint that Fisk does the overt clue. Fisk is not doing what it seems like he's got I love where he he answers the phone and he's like, you're not Franklin Nelson. And he's like girl would the would the arm braces. That's in the in the in the video room with them. Oh, I don't know. There was really strange. She was just like the tech girl in intern. I think she was like there was no like why is she helping? She was he'd want to get out of the hinted that she didn't really want to be working with hell holding her. She hopes him at the end. Yeah. Clock. All the elevators and everything. I don't know. That was weird. It was an intern. She wasn't confusing. Terry. It seemed like she was destined for reveal or something. Yeah. But that was just some fucking girl air, although that one take and what was the master stroke care like when daredevil gets the English. Jude Felix manning. Yeah, he gets him from the what what's that was the key thing to this. That was a key thing because you told. About the wedding. No. So then he has to use. The flip balls. And he's like Wilson Fisk killed your girl and he wants to get married. What do you think about that? Just let them go like oh fuck it's not gonna end. Well, actually, I have a criticism about that. Should I do that or show? So through twelve episodes. It was like, this is amazing this amazing. But how the fuck is met gonna win. And then like the thirteenth episode for me. He just captures Felix manning, and then gets all this info. And it's all wrapping gifts right episode. Pretty quickly rush. Like, yeah. That's all it took just capture Felix, man. If you knew this was the guy to capture the info. Why wasn't he the first guy? And like if Felix manning is that important. Yeah. I would've liked to have seen how dare devil captured him because I can't it's hard for me to believe that Fisk being the smartest motherfucker ever and having his hands and everything wouldn't have Felix manning on lockdown every fucking step of his life. You know, there's other big criticize installed. It was too. Convenient plot. Also another criticism kind of on the same bait. It's very convenient as bullseyes accuracy, like he's accurate throughout the whole thing. But then if you notice the last episode he's fucking he gets fixed on the side. And he's missing daredevil. Like what happened to your accuracy landed.

Jude Felix manning Wilson Fisk Franklin Nelson intern Felix manning Terry
Stephen Miller, Nikki Fisk and Trump discussed on Mike Slater

Mike Slater

00:15 sec | 2 years ago

Stephen Miller, Nikki Fisk and Trump discussed on Mike Slater

"Search a former teacher of Trump aide. Stephen Miller has been suspended for she said in an interview with the Hollywood reporter, Nikki Fisk was Miller's third grade teacher twenty-five years ago. She told the paper Miller was a strange child who kept a mess. Esi

Stephen Miller Nikki Fisk Donald Trump ESI Reporter Hollywood Twenty-Five Years
"fisk" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"First for daily guys live shoe. You do live short wild things planned for. Yeah, yeah, us too. I'm gonna get arrested. Egger we're gonna get to know you even better. But first we're gonna tell our listeners a couple of things we're going to be talking about today. We're going to be talking about Florence and some weird racists shit that pops up. Every time. A hurricane is bearing down in the media and social media. We're going to talk about the fact that Paul Manafort p. Diddy might be taken a plea deal, and we're gonna tell you to get your fucking flu shot. People among other more fun things. But I figure we like to ask our guest, what is something for me, search history, that's revealing about who you are. I googled Fisk, walk through and el-akel cares for the Spiderman game. Well, listen, some mother fucking boss. I didn't understand how to get rid of the turrets. All right. The terrorists. I was like, okay, let everybody know. We just jumped in this conversation. You're talking. So people don't know. There's a Spiderman game that just came out on PlayStation last week and most people who play games are fucking just not nonstop playing. I solve included myself also. So you search Fisk how to be Fisk and this last hurts. Oh, got you. This is like one of the first accounted Jamie, the first ten minutes of the. How to kill those two mushrooms at the beginning of super, super smash. That's truly. Running into. You know how to get rid of it. Look, I was talking about this with Sam Richardson namedrop and I think that a video games now are to like, assuming that you know what the fuck is up and how to fuck play them like they really are just like, you'll go in there already. Know this man got like fortnight. I remember I had to like Google play because there was no to'real or anything integrates how we're just showing our old oldness. Of course. Yeah. I, I don't disagree with that, but I have to go. All right. How to fuck do I do this, right, right, right. There's an assumption you're going to be googling and like doing the walkthrough industry for people like us to be like, how beat this fucking dude. And it's like a ten minute YouTube video shows. There we go. Yeah, now I know how to beat a brute. Yeah, exactly. Got a web, the shit out of you. Gotta web the shit out of them down maybe do a little swing kit yet. I mean, he gets the wall. If someone's holding a weapon, you have to airstrike them and fight them. I always fight them in there. You always think to the air, especially when there's like forty foot and dues, you don't get punched in the back of your head. Yeah. This running that slowly a you gotta slide under somebody with a shield. You had them in the bag. Also just listeners who figured this out on your own and didn't need to Google Egger doesn't need to hear that like it's all right. You don't need to tell us how good you are. Video games. I mean, tell me how good you are at video games. I'll just remind you that I'm living my best fucking life. Mashes twist stream if being high and playing.

Fisk Egger Google Egger Paul Manafort Google Florence Diddy YouTube Sam Richardson flu Jamie ten minutes forty foot ten minute
Tesla, Elon Musk and Bloomberg discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Tesla, Elon Musk and Bloomberg discussed on Masters in Business

"In. The Bloomberg nine sixty newsroom tesla won't be, going, private after. All in a blog post yesterday CEO Elon Musk scrapped his privatization plan for tesla a. Reversal after blindsiding employees sent investors two weeks ago in a, tweet that he was considering it in the blog post mosque said he'd met. With the tesla board and let. Them know tesla should stay public musk said the board indicated they agreed the securities and

Tesla Elon Musk Bloomberg Susanna Palmer Cannabis John Tucker Diaz Gio Papa John Bill Fisk John Schnatter Bank Of Twitter Chief Executive Officer CEO Exchange Commission UK Marijuana Lazar Toronto
As Google Maps renames neighborhoods, residents fume

Daily Tech News Show

04:11 min | 3 years ago

As Google Maps renames neighborhoods, residents fume

"Skills. So all kinds of good uses for technology. Maybe not to cure anything, but certainly to improve the quality of life. You know, I was making a point earlier this week. I'd like Google glass. You never see that anymore Thomas? No, I mean, but it's very widely used in the enterprise. And this is one of those use cases where you're like, wow, that actually makes a lot of sense. However. Ever especially when you're dealing with if glass is going to tell a person who is maybe not reading motions, the way that their peers are. You certainly hope the AI is giving you the right emotion. Yeah, exactly, right. Yeah, I was just going to say, so I actually have a younger brother who is autistic in the first thing I thought of was you gotta make sure this is right because he does have trouble reading tubes too. So so I wanna make sure that if you know if you're doing this, this is great, but don't have me thinking that, you know he's going somebody who looks like they're happy in wanna hug in. They're having the worst day ever. You need to get the the queuing right in this in and you need to get that test group just to make sure it's actually do know exactly. I'm, I think machine learning is good enough now that you can get a high enough percentage of this to be correct that if you tune it right, it just won't respond if it's unsure. Lonely responded a high enough confidence level. It shouldn't have that issue. But yeah, whether it's actually having an effect or not is still yet to be determined. But I think it's promising. Let's move onto Google maps, which is upsetting people, but because they don't know where they're going where than sixty three percent of people who access to map or a smartphone or tablet in may of this year used Google maps versus nine nineteen point four percent for Elliot Baba's maps, five point, five percent for apple maps. This is according to calm score, apple maps or Google maps. You know, runaway hit right. Google says it creates. It's maps through lots of things. Third party data, public sources, satellites and user feedback. However, the New York Times has a story that implies at least in some cities. There's motivation behind some name changing of neighborhoods and sometimes unpopular ones. For example, in San Francisco neighborhood recently renamed the east cut. I just have to laugh because I used to live there is tied to a nonprofit group that paid sixty eight thousand dollars to a brand experience design company to rebrand the district. So there's some motivation there. One of the east. Cut nonprofits board members happens to be a Google employee. So some people are saying, why are we reading in our neighborhoods and not just an Francisco. There was a person in in Los Angeles who started jokingly referring to his house on a hill in Silverlake neighborhood in Los Angeles as Silverlake heights. And suddenly someone had submitted it to Google maps, and now his neighbor discounts over like heights. There was another map maker in New York who was just making a reference guide and had some Typos and made some mistakes and use some reference materials that he no longer has. And suddenly that got used a source material for renaming neighborhoods and he's like, well, that that isn't the way it should work. There is a neighborhood in Detroit that is now called fish corn instead of Fisk horn because of type on Google maps. So, yeah, I mean, it's crazy. How people look what like, oh, it's a map that is the name, even if there are decades of experience of calling it something else. And then mean going back to San Francisco, there is a neighborhood that was the western addition that became Nope. And it was sort of a real estate thing because they were trying, you know, it's, it's, it's always sort of smoke and mirrors. This is this is not new. I think what a lot of folks are. Crying foul on is so many people use Google maps. If you're in an employer plays and you don't know where you are and you see something called the east cut. You're like, okay, that's where I am. And everyone who lives there is like I lived here for fifty years..

"fisk" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on KOMO

"Zero visibility and fisk kearns awake even in areas not fully submerged helmets bulb just above the water with barely enough room to rescue heads below the ceiling as they used ropes to pull themselves through the cave rescue diva's death sent shockwaves through this underlining to everyone about just how much danger those boys are really in meanwhile rescuers continue to pump billions of gallons of water out of that cave we now know that waiting for the water to recede on its own is not an option authorities confirming that the boys have a limited amount of time before they run out of oxygen the large number of rescue is in and out of the cave also using up the usable supply all maybe one or two days and the strongest coming for the big problem with a lot in in the case so we'll they move them before the storm yes definitely still the seals are hopeful posting a promise to some on facebook writing today you get some good rest we will complete the mission for you though seals keeping the faith stone front moving in an oxygen running out this rescue has never been more desperate abc's james longman our team coverage continues with abc's matt gunman who spoke with members of that team who did not go into the cave with the rest of the group those team members said that they were only not in the cave with their friends right now in the cold and damp because one of them got sick and the other was up all night watching the world cup but what is chilling about this is that they say they have been in that case multiple times one of them going three miles farther than those boys are right now in literally in those very same caverns but they always seem to come out now one of the things i mentioned is that they would stay in there for six hours at a time sometimes with flashlights and food and water but they said they were never afraid inside not of the bats in the dark because they were with their coach they said they trusted him with their lives but perhaps what's most chilling about this is that sometimes these kids said they wouldn't even tell their parents where they were going once again that is abc's matt gut fed a federal judge in sacramento has mostly upheld california's sanctuary log john mendez and sacramento decreed california can limit police cooperation with immigration authorities it can also require inspections of detention facilities however the judge ruled the state cannot enforce a key part of a third law barring private employers from allowing immigration authorities on their premises without a warrant a justice department spokesman called that a major victory california asked the judge to dismiss the administration's lawsuit the judge took no immediate action richard cantu abc news and is now eleven fifteen time for another propel insurance business update here's rossa with your money now just a month before the first wave of us tariffs on foreign goods the nation's trade deficit shrank six point six percent in may nineteen month low the commerce department puts the trade gap decline at three billion dollars us employers created a higher than expected two hundred thirteen thousand jobs last month but not across the board the labor department reports the manufacturing sector added thirty six thousand but the retail sector shed twenty two thousand physicians the unemployment rate ticked up to four percent from three point eight percent as the strong labor market and the end of the school year encouraged more people to look for work but analysts are puzzled by the slow growth in wages considering a record six point seven million jobs remain unfilled the annual increase in average hourly earnings was unchanged i'm rasa kaye with your money now then right now we continue a very nice day on wall street with the dow up one hundred fourteen points the nasdaq up ninety five that's a point and a quarter or excuse me one and a quarter percent raise the five hundred.

fisk kearns three billion dollars nineteen month eight percent four percent six percent six hours two days
"fisk" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Two fifteen program or fisk opinions had stayed in the united states so you're gonna have to face judgement you know he would probably be out of jail by now and and be making millions of dollars a year sort of on the speaking circuit and so i don't know what the sort of appropriate punishment is at this point but in some sense sort of his self imposed exile in russia strikes me as far worse than than what the united states justice system would have done to him so you know i i don't know how you think about that in terms of general karma but but i do think that's probably descriptively accurate do you think what he disclosed the importance of that to the public should be taken into account and how we evaluate his actions is this is sort of the core debate around the espionage act whether or not there should essentially be public interest defense so you just close information and you do it for a really good reason and therefore it's mitigating the the problem with that is that we can't have individual people substituting their their personal judgment for sort of the larger classification system and unlike i i'm not going to say that the entire classification system is is infallible certainly we have a problem of sort of over classified information but but ultimately it reduces down to sort of the reality that one person doesn't have the full context they don't understand that information as it relates to other agencies as it relates to other forms of sources and methods collection right no one person is really able to even appreciate the gravity of disclosure and so you know if we create a situation in which you know any individual with the clearance is allowed to two four themselves decide whether or not this is something the public needs to know that is not just a sort of a problematic situation it's it's potentially dangerous one and so you know look i there are tradeoffs seyran and there are people who have disclosed classified information that is you know is within the public interest and has prompted important debates but i think at the end of the day sort of the the higher value of protecting the united states is ability to conduct intelligence for genuine national security purposes i tend to believe that that is the higher order value to protect here no i know law fair has specific rules in terms of disclosure and clearances for contributors so there's a little bit of an apples and oranges question but if you were the intercept would you have published reality winners revelations you know like i can't begin to speak for for the intercept i'm so far removed from that particular mindset you know what i will say is that if i was a publication that had made the decision to publish classified information i would have done it really differently and i think this case is an example of a publication that was extraordinarily careless and was so sort of anxious and eager to publish any classified information of any kind of just for the sake of of of the headline and for publishing the information you know they they could have done all of this reporting in a way that actually didn't identify their source and while i'm someone who thinks that it's a good thing that the person who who released cost guide information was identified and prosecuted for for other individuals that thank you know.

united states fisk
"fisk" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Did you have the option after when you report to congress to suggest that they hold off on a peach mint and that bill clinton simply be tried after he left office great great great clashes i was a reply chosen to replace bob fist because bob had been appointed by attorney general janet reno so it's sort of like the system is now then congress on june thirty nine hundred ninety four reauthorized the independent counsel law that provided for that different mechanism of appointment namely by the special division of the three judge the three judge court so according to the order that the three judge court issued replacing yours truly with the great replacing the great bob fisk there was absolutely nothing that was critical of bob fisk nothing whatsoever in the order it was simply the structural anomaly so to speak that he'd been appointed by the attorney general who reported to the president who is under investigation so it was just sort of make a clean the clean break and i'm sure i am the second question peter was finger listening to today's washington journal with former whitewater independent counsel ken starr discussing special counsel robert muller's russia probe you can catch more of that on c span dot org and now we continue with our sunday tv talk shows that we replay each week here.

bill clinton bob fist bob janet reno bob fisk president peter washington journal ken starr robert muller congress attorney special counsel russia
"fisk" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on KOMO

"We're talking about post surgical pain control here's dr fisk and shannon those major news going down to the extremity that's causing pain for about a week and that allows them to reduce the amount of pain medications they otherwise need to take improve their ability to do physical therapy and just reduce their general level of suffering so is your understanding and the understanding medicine that the surgery obviously you know the surgical procedure can irritates inflames those nerves as their approach and they're doing the technique surgical technique and that nervous just hypersensitive philo alvin exactly actually that's commonly misunderstood most people think that post surgical pain is just inflammation but there's also elements of neuropathic pain which means the nerves themselves become hypersensitive and so being able to numb those nerves stopper provide medications not only that just treat generalized inflammation but also sometimes the treat nerve pain specifically can be very effective in managing post operative pain and to get that you described it as a straw next to that nerve you're using some guidance techniques in your in your office ultrasound to guide the needle which is a tiny little needle right next to the nerve and subsequently to guide extra so that it's sitting next to the nerve as well so it's very specific you're right there right it's very safe procedure because of the ability to use your sound guidance tell me about is it ketamine infusions is that is that another thing that is out there another technique out there.

dr fisk philo alvin ketamine
House GOP limping to Election Day as farm bill implodes

Into Tomorrow with Dave Graveline

01:05 min | 3 years ago

House GOP limping to Election Day as farm bill implodes

"Royal family tweeted it's thanks to people who watched prince harry mary meghan markle yesterday abc's maggie rulli has what's next for the newly married royal couples stayed here last night but the heading back to kensington palace today and then making their first official appearance as a royal couple on tuesday for prince charles seventieth birthday russell told they plan to go on honeymoon sometime soon we don't know where yet but i'm sure it will be somewhere at a former doctor is headed to prison and after slipping in a portion drug into his girlfriend's t brooke fisk was dating arlington virginia dr sue candor imron when fisk says the doctor slipped in abortion pill into her drink causing her to miscarry fisk says she was seventeen weeks pregnant when he poisoned her imron was arrested in may of last year and pled guilty in march two fetal homicide faced between five and forty years in prison but fisk pleaded for leniency saying homerun was dealing with depression imron was sentenced to three years in prison after which he could be deported to his native pakistan dave packer abc news linda lopez abc news it's time now for your connect fm news update this.

Royal Family Prince Harry Mary Meghan Markl Maggie Rulli Kensington Palace Russell Imron Official Brooke Fisk Arlington Seventeen Weeks Forty Years Three Years
"fisk" Discussed on FBE Podcast

FBE Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on FBE Podcast

"Really you're going to say like fisk grading oh i was still very much in that like cudi phase yeah yeah no wonder you don't want to stay still who's gonna know your crushes name from i like watches all my stuff too it's always like comments on my stories and i'm just like okay cool who you are you know because you watch this podcast all right and lewis a laker also gave us another hundred bits if you give if we give you bits you keep this podcast oh to try new different show again safeties questions in anything you have for the end of the podcast yeah all right i hope it's not yellow i don't like the purple purple you my question for you is best prank you ever pool oh praying trying to think there's one time i think in like the six grade that i looked up all of those like really easy april fools pranks yeah to do on my brother and my mom so i think that was a morning but like oh god i think i put like mayo and the vanilla ice cream that we had in the freezer this is just all small food pray that i was like i'm really just gonna mess them today 'cause i even did like the putting toothpaste and oreos and put them in my my brother snacks and stuff and like this evil or is this praying like now i'm just really second guessing.

fisk lewis hundred bits
"fisk" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Before the first pitch fisk spins and throws over to i back safely tailored i mentioned tibo mania when the rumble ponies came to new hampshire last week first pitch to tim breaking ball he checks his swinger ditty no he did not according to the third base umpire ryan below and that's strike one i had a very brief moment to shake a hand tim tebow at the team hotel and he was more than gracious very nice fellow and that's saying something with all the crazy attention that the guy gets oh one fastball high when baldwin strike and you think about a guy in his situation he's thirty years old internationally known yet trying to be as normal of a minor leaguers possible not an easy task one off speed over for a called strike too from jacksonville florida of course you skyrocketed to fame thanks to his left arm national championship winning quarterback for the university of florida a playoff winning quarterback for the denver broncos in the nfl but here tonight in the third inning strikeout victim is the one to pitches cut on missed for now so after the lead off single for kevin taylor it's gone at eight strikeouts swinging counter fiscal need to get through by michael to hang another zero they keep this is six nothing rumble ponies lead.

new hampshire ryan tim tebow florida denver broncos nfl kevin taylor michael fisk baldwin jacksonville university of florida thirty years
"fisk" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on WTVN

"The line my dad stood up and yelled stay fair stay fair and it's as if any thought of my mom sleeping was completely gone and disappeared with crack of the bat stay fair he kept screaming even fisk was standing on the plate with both hands waving trying to will the ball fair my dad and i were both now standing screaming stay fair some people would say that my dad and i had nothing to do with the world series that year some would say that a father and a son can't make a ball state fair but i know in my heart i know that's not true the ball banged off the metal mesh of the poll and it was fair it was a home run it won the game my dad and i were just screaming we were jumping so much i think we woke up the entire neighborhood in the process well everybody except my mother we didn't care and once everything's calmed down who was just me and my dad's standing there staring at the tv and then at each other our shoulders were squared back fisk could hit the ball but we were the ones that kept it fair the red sox would go on to lose game seven but it didn't matter i had spent a night with my dad that neither of us would ever forget my dad and i won game six of the world series and we want it together.

fisk
"fisk" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"fisk" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"That i making on fumbling around the sorry but the point really that mccabe made in december 2017 again no surveillance warrants would have been absorbed from the fisk the foreign intelligence surveillance court without the steel dossier information that means that nothing else they had up to that point generated that amount of interest or had that significance so the information they got from a political source which they didn't tell the court about the fact that didn't tell the court about this source is devastating and they did not have grounds to execute any of these warrants before they got that information john jet this is a scandal that really goes to the very heart of our democracy if they could do it to them they could do it to anybody can do it in 2018 they can do it in 2020 in other words they changed administrations why wouldn't a new administration use this same device if you can intimidate and spy on and smacking europartition forever because of the information you can you can gain because of these warren's well and that's why we have a fourth amendment constitute can prevent against to protect against the sort of unreasonable search and seizure you know if you have a cop just on the street say you're you're having an argument with your neighbor and the neighbors sends an anonymous letter to the local police chief saying you're peddling drugs and the police chief goes on the basis of that letter and go to the court and says i want a search warrant to investigate this guy for drugs and he gets it that would be an enormous abuse of police power the same thing here i mean any politician any politician look is is political opponent could say i think this guy's embezzling something right well they've got to investigate them and tells the fbi and the fbi goes off on that and gets a search warrant to investigate his house his communications his his car you know that's the kind of thing that is in a beauce of power that our constitution protects american citizens against but in this case that constitution did not stand in the way of these people who were hellbent hellbent to investigate and find dirt on trump and that's really what it came down through they wanted to threaten our election process they wanted to make sure that trump was not in a position to win or even if he did there were in a position.

mccabe fisk warren fbi