35 Burst results for "First Nation"

Pastor John Amanchukwu Shares His Personal Journey

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:57 min | 5 hrs ago

Pastor John Amanchukwu Shares His Personal Journey

"John. I should have done this right at the beginning. I just jumped in because I know you and I wanted us to just get busy with the meat of our discussion. But tell us your story because you said from the beginning you don't see America as a racist country. You see it as the greatest country. You do see it as a sinful country, which of course it is, because why human beings live in the country, and we are all fallen. And if you are a country of sinners, then the nation will be sinful as well. Will you tell us your personal journey and how you got to be past the John today and how you arrived at where you are? Yes, thank you so much. I was born and what we call are the wrong side of the tracks. I wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth. My mother took care of four children taking care, making no more than $28,000 a year. We lived in a shelter for nearly a year when we moved from Elizabeth city, North Carolina to Raleigh North Carolina in just the fast forward to today. You know, you can go from living in a shelter in America to now having your book on a shelf in Barnes and nobles if you work and if you labor. And if you are productive. As relates to me writing the book erased during the summer of 2020, while liberal mayors and governors were telling people in their state to defund the police and to stand back all around the country and allowing anarchists to burn down city after city while being at one of the busiest abortion clinics in the southeast, a black father walked up to me and he said, why are you out here fighting a white man's issue? And this day he was wearing a BLM shirt. He was out there to abort. His child, but he tells me why are you fighting a white man's issue as if fighting against abortion is a white evangelical problem or issue alone.

John America North Carolina Elizabeth City Raleigh Barnes BLM
Pastor John on Black Americans: The Democrats' Cheap Prostitutes

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:32 min | 5 hrs ago

Pastor John on Black Americans: The Democrats' Cheap Prostitutes

"Let's start with your message. From that panel from that speech and New Jersey, let's talk about what you think is the status of courage amongst your fellow Americans pastor John. Well, you know, when you consider the fact that Marxism seeks to destroy the patriarchal system and the United States of America and in the world in particular, we must resist that so goes the father so goes the family and the home as well as to blacks in particular, you know, blacks have become the cheap prostitutes of the Democratic Party. They screw us and barely pay us, but they keep, but we keep coming back for more. And the general message that I'm pushing across this nation is that as a people as a society, we must move away from these ideologies that seek to pit white versus black. Against each other. I believe that critical race theory is racism. And racism is not a color. It's a sin. The Bible says in Roman story in 23 that all have sinned and come short of the glory of God. When it talks about sin there is talking about sin in general, all kinds of sin. And the sin of racism in particular. There are many people who are woke who would tell you today that America is a racist country. I don't believe that. America is a racist nation, all right? I don't believe that.

New Jersey America Democratic Party John
The Case for Ending The Fed With Steve Bannon

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | 8 hrs ago

The Case for Ending The Fed With Steve Bannon

"Joining us right now is Steve Bannon. Steve had a very big weekend at cpac Steve. Welcome to the program. I want to play a piece of tape at you at cpac and we'll go from there. Let's play cut ten. We don't need to audit the fed. We need to end the Federal Reserve. The federal reserve has you surf as you surf has usurped its power and the power of the American people in our elective representatives. And no, they do not have the consent of the governor. We will not comply. We will not submit. And it must be ended. Steve, that sounds like Ron Paul, floors yours. Exactly. I hope to take it, you know, he was a great inspiration, but we hope to take it one step up. Ron Paul, who had his entire presidential campaign around about money and currency, you know, is a great warrior and a brave man. I'm not a libertarian. But I understand that the administrative state and particularly the global apparatus is funded by the central banks. And it's outrageous that the evidence today is so much even more overwhelming than when Ron Paul laid it out for us. From 2008 to right now, Charlie, you know, what the $23 trillion they've printed, the 9 and a half trade they put on the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve is just increased the power and concentration of wealth in our nation. 0.5% of the American population own more assets and wealth than the bottom 90%. This is exactly what the framers fought a revolution to avoid. They wanted to get away from the landed aristocracy in Great Britain and the mercantile class in Great Britain. And we are back to this oligarchy. What we have is a combination of state capitalism and authoritarian government

Federal Reserve Steve Bannon Cpac Steve Ron Paul Steve Cpac Charlie Great Britain
Why Did Meghan McCain Block Todd Starnes on Twitter?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:57 min | 8 hrs ago

Why Did Meghan McCain Block Todd Starnes on Twitter?

"Chad McCain was a conservative. How dare you? Oh, really? Well, why would he hire a leftist like Steve Schmidt to run his campaign? Steve Steve Schmidt, the founding member of The Lincoln Project, a former McCain campaign manager. Also, a political analyst for MSD and C? That's exhibit a let's talk about exhibit B Nicole Wallace. A former senior campaign adviser, she was the one who handled Sarah Palin. She was the one responsible for literally bludgeoning Palin in the back with a political knife. And what is she doing now? She's one of the lady host on MSD and C. But the real reason she blocked me is because you see, we have a mind like a steel trap. Here at the Todd stern's radio program, ladies. So we don't forget anything here. And that's why she blocked me. You see, misses Dominic, Meghan McCain. Misses Dominick, she blocked me because I reminded the nation about her daddy's most egregious sin. Would he betrayed every single one of us. He had the power in his hands to kill ObamaCare. And while the cameras were rolling on C-SPAN, what did he do? He looked up at that C-SPAN camera, and he put his, he put his hand in the air. With his thumb exposed, and then he did the big thumbs down. A big blank you to America. That's what he did. All I was doing was asking misses Dominic to explain her daddy's political strategy. But you see, this is what the establishment thinks about all of us. You vote for Donald Trump, you're an irredeemable deplorable. You vote for Donald Trump, you're a Neanderthal.

Chad Mccain Steve Steve Schmidt Lincoln Project Nicole Wallace Steve Schmidt Todd Stern MSD Sarah Palin Mccain Meghan Mccain Dominic Palin Dominick America Donald Trump
Liz Cheney: How Do We Call Ourselves a Nation of Laws?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:32 min | 11 hrs ago

Liz Cheney: How Do We Call Ourselves a Nation of Laws?

"Literally said that. In this scene, this CNN CNN conversation was stunning. Listen to what she said to Cassie hunt over at CNN about prosecuting Trump for January 6th. Some have expressed concern that prosecuting former president Trump would turn him into a martyr and potentially add to his political strength with a base that's follows him pretty rapidly. Do you share that concern? Do you have any concern that a prosecution would strengthen Donald Trump's political hands? I don't think that it's appropriate to think about it that way because the question for us is, are we a nation of laws? Are we a country where no one is above the law? And what do the facts and the evidence show? And certainly, I've been very clear. I think he's guilty of the most serious dereliction of duty of any president in our nation's history. You've had a federal judge in California. Say that it's more likely than not that he and John eastman committed two crimes. So, you know, I think that we're going to continue to follow the facts. I think the Department of Justice will do that. But they have to make decisions about prosecution, understanding what it means if the facts and the evidence are there, and they decide not to prosecute how do we then call ourselves a nation of laws.

CNN Cassie Hunt Donald Trump John Eastman California Department Of Justice
Ship carrying grain from Ukraine arrives in Istanbul

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 12 hrs ago

Ship carrying grain from Ukraine arrives in Istanbul

"The captain of the first grain ship to arrive out of Ukraine under an international agreement spoke to reporters at the dock in turkey Ahmet Eugene Ali Baylor is the man at the helm of the polar net of Turkish flagship that em loaded cargo at the Ukrainian port of chana Moors before the Russian invasion in February He says this sad incident happened war broke out in the port was under blockade by the Ukrainian military They were finally able to leave on Friday forming a convoy with two other ships in a harbor guide near Odessa then followed a predetermined 17 leg route through dangerous corridors that had been cleared and deemed The latitudes longitudes and positions were provided by the joint coordination center They arrived at the Turkish port of Dorinda today with the 12,000 ton load of grain The first of a dozen ships authorized to sail under the deal between Ukraine and Russia brokered by turkey and the United Nations I'm Jennifer King

Ahmet Eugene Ali Baylor Chana Moors Ukraine Turkey Joint Coordination Center Odessa Dorinda United Nations Jennifer King
The Christian Foundation of Our Nation With Bill Federer

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 1 d ago

The Christian Foundation of Our Nation With Bill Federer

"People will say that there's nothing exceptional about America. And that America is not a Christian nation. Tell us why that is historically incorrect. So Muslims invading Europe, the Catholic king of Spain tries to stop them, can't, then Martin Luther starts the reformation. The king of Spain tries to stop that and he can't, and he finally makes a deal with the protestants. And he is called a piece of Augsburg of 1555. I took German in college and you know how to say 1555 in German? Film styles from 404 from sake. I think it sounds funny. Anyway, 1555 piece of Oxford, it let every king decide what's going to be believed in his kingdom. And so suddenly Europe, you have England being Anglican, Scotland, being Presbyterian, Holland being Dutch reform, Greece being Greece, orthodox, Germany being Luther in Switzerland, calvinist in Italy, Spain, France, et cetera, Catholic. And if you didn't believe the way your king did, you fled. And those were the people that spilled over and founded colonies in America. So I read through every charter of every colony. England, you had the anglicans founded Virginia, Puritans founded Massachusetts, congregationalists founded Connecticut and New Hampshire. Baptist founded Rhode Island. Dutch reform founded New York. And the Swedish lutherans found that Delaware and New Jersey and Catholics founded Maryland and then the quakers on the Pennsylvania. So just like Europe, there was a different denomination per country in America was more or less a different denomination per colony, and they didn't get along. And

Spain America Europe Augsburg Greece Martin Luther England Anglican Oxford Holland Luther Scotland Switzerland Germany Italy France Massachusetts Virginia New Hampshire Connecticut
What Makes America Exceptional? Bill Federer Explains

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:38 min | 1 d ago

What Makes America Exceptional? Bill Federer Explains

"Bill, I've been following you for years. We've shared so much time together. You have the ability to be able to analyze the arc of history and then be able to apply it to today. I've asked you this question before in our podcast. But I think it's really important for our audience to hear this. What makes America different and exceptional from a biblical standpoint and historical standpoint is America like every other nation that's been on the face of the earth and if not, why? In answer to that, I decided I would research every century of recorded human history to see what the most common form of government was. So I went back to Sumerian cuneiform on clay tablets and the elamites and the Persians and the Greeks and Romans and the most common form of government in world history is kings. Hands down, it's kings. Nimrod tower Babel pharaoh Caesar's power wants to concentrate into the hands of one person. It's no different than you put some kids on a playground and one's the bully. You put them junior high girls in a clique and one of them is the diva. You put some people in the Woods, one of them's an Indian chief. You put them in an inner city, one of them is a gang leader. And all the king is, is a glorified gang leader. And it's a hierarchical system. If you are friends with the king, you are more equal. If you are not friends with the king, you are less equal. And if you're an enemy of the king, you're a slave or you're dead. Well, I thought slavery started in 1619. No, wherever you had the first king on top you had slaves on the bottom. And this model continued with technological advancements, kings could kill more people, right? So instead of cane killing neighbor with a stone, they're killing with a bronze weapon or an iron weapon or a failing spear, similar sword gunpowder. The weapon improves, but it's that same fall in nature, it can't kill enable. And also with technological advancements, kings could track more people. Do you know Augustus Caesar wanted to have a worldwide tracking system? It was called a census that was like modern technology 25 BC, right? He wanted to count. If he could have had 5G and cell phones and cameras, he would attract him that way. But as the centuries go on, the king of England had the biggest empire that Planet Earth had ever seen, 13 million square miles, half a billion people. Anyway, the sun never set on the British Empire, the king of England was a globalist. He was a one world government guy with him at the top and America's founders decided they didn't like this one world government guy telling us what to do. We broke away and flipped it. And made the people the king.

Babel Pharaoh Caesar America Bill Augustus Caesar England Planet Earth
David Goldman Paints a Unique Picture of China

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:46 min | 3 d ago

David Goldman Paints a Unique Picture of China

"Is a place where a lot of things are kicked down the road for a very long time and in the short run don't make sense. From China standpoint. And this is not simply the fact that there's a communist government from the standpoint of any government in China, the nightmare of the emperor who sits in Beijing is a rebel province, because China is not a nation state. China is a polyglot collection of different peoples who speak 200 dialects, Cantonese, can't understand a word of Mandarin, the citra needs can barely understand Mandarin. And many times at its past, countless times China has broken up into warring provinces and had long periods of chaos with terrible suffering and in each of these cases foreign intervention typically made the internal divisions worse. So the nightmare of Beijing of Xi Jinping is Taiwan becomes a dependent and long so province, canton decides why should we be part of China either. Sichuan does the same thing. And China begins to break up. So in order to prevent the possibility of the fragmentation of the empire, as has had so many times in the past, China will go to war to prevent any part of its territory. Being split off. And that's why the Taiwan issue is more than a matter of 23 million Chinese living 90 miles away from the mainland, a country of 1.4 billion. The symbolic end, if you will constitutional value of Taiwan to China, is inestimable. So

China Beijing Taiwan Canton Sichuan
Dick Cheney: Donald Trump Is the ‘Greatest Threat to Our Republic’

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:15 min | 3 d ago

Dick Cheney: Donald Trump Is the ‘Greatest Threat to Our Republic’

"It's really tragic. This is a tragedy. This isn't just political fodder. This is a tragedy. Here's the spot that was taped by Dick Cheney for his embattled daughter, congresswoman Liz Cheney. And our nation's 246 year history. There has never been an individual who is a greater threat to our republic than Donald Trump. He tried to steal the last election using lies and violence to keep himself in power after the voters had rejected him. He is a coward, a real man wouldn't lie to his supporters. He lost his election and he lost big. I know it. He knows it and deep down. I think most Republicans know it. Len and I are so proud of Liz for standing up for the truth. Doing what's right, honoring her oath to the constitution when so many in our party are too scared to do so. Liz is fearless. She never backs down from the fight. There is nothing more important she will ever do than lead the effort to make sure Donald Trump is never again near the Oval Office. And she will succeed. I am Dick Cheney. I proudly voted for my daughter. I hope you will, too. I'm Liz Cheney, and I approved this message.

Liz Cheney Dick Cheney Donald Trump LIZ LEN Oval Office
JFK's Moonshot Speech Inspired a Nation to Greatness

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:48 min | 3 d ago

JFK's Moonshot Speech Inspired a Nation to Greatness

"Into space, this was something that was not looked at as easy. There was not a genuine consensus by the time of this speech that this was where we know to be spending money, that there was a real fascination with what can we do and what can we become if we choose this path towards space exploration. It was interesting that he also then quotes William Bradford and the founding of Plymouth bay colony. Who said that all great and honorable actions are accompanied with great difficulties in both must be enterprise and overcome with answerable courage. In other words, this angle means he's laying it out. He doesn't want anybody to come to think, okay, this can be just easily conquered. This idea that we could go to the moon or space exploration is going to be something that is going to be fraught with without danger that everybody can do it. He's laying no, this is not what is happening. But what he also then continues on. He says that man in his quest for knowledge and progress is determined and can not be deterred. The x-rays of space will go ahead, whether we join in it or not, and it is one of the greatest adventures of all time and no nation which expects to be the leader of other nations can expect to stay behind in the race for space. He also then as an interesting paragraph, the next paragraph basically is a real direct threat, direct shot across the ballot, Russia, when he says, look, we're going to go there for freedom and we're going to continue invention and we're going to go to space with a manner of freedom and peace, unlike the conquest that many would fear Russia or others would have. Again, setting it up in being very contrast terms that the people would understand and what they're looking at. This gives a speech that is looking forward, examines the reality of the world, and then looks forward as we go. Then

Plymouth Bay Colony William Bradford Russia
AP correspondent Walter Ratliff has the Religion Roundup.

AP News Radio

02:09 min | 3 d ago

AP correspondent Walter Ratliff has the Religion Roundup.

"And this week's religion roundup an AP investigation and covers abuse reporting failures in the Mormon church a Christian flag flies over Boston and Iraq's Yazidi community commemorates a tragic decade on stage Three of 6 children who accused their father of sexual abuse are suing the Mormon church for not going to authorities and letting the abuse go on for 7 years It didn't stop The eldest daughter of Paul Douglas Adams says when she reported abuse on a phone helpline it was kept within the church It didn't go away They just let it keep happening AP investigative reporter Michael resendez says the Arizona case follows a pattern found in other states The Associated Press has received nearly 12,000 pages of sealed records from another child sex abuse case in West Virginia which show that the helpline stands at the center of an elaborate system to divert child sex abuse complaints away from law enforcement And instead send them to attorneys for the church who may cover up that abuse leaving children and victims in harm's way Attorneys for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints say church officials feel they were constrained by confidentiality rules To lay at the feet of these bishops the blame for that is absurd and it's wrong Arizona's child sex reporting law says anyone who reasonably believes a child has been abused or neglected has a legal obligation to report the information The Christian flag that became the focus of a free speech legal battle that went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court has been raised outside Boston city hall The flag raising took place about three months after the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the city unjustly discriminated when it refused to fly the banner in 2017 Artists from the Yazidi community of Iraq commemorated their tragedy during a stage performance in Iraq's Kurdish region It has been 8 years since the lives of the Yazidis were torn apart by Islamic State militants The United Nations has called the attacks a genocide I'm Walter ratliff

Mormon Church AP Paul Douglas Adams Michael Resendez Iraq Arizona Boston West Virginia Boston City Hall U.S. Supreme Court United Nations Walter Ratliff
DeSantis suspends elected prosecutor over new abortion law

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 4 d ago

DeSantis suspends elected prosecutor over new abortion law

"Florida's governor has suspended an elected prosecutor over the state's new abortion law I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest Florida's Republican governor Ron DeSantis has suspended the elected state prosecutor of Tampa Hillsborough county state attorney Andrew Warren was suspended for pledging to not enforce the state's new 15 week abortion ban and for supporting gender transition treatments for minors Warren is a Democrat who is a reelected by the county's voters in 2020 Warren says that desantis is trying to overthrow the results of a fair and free election The governor's executive order focuses on warns decision to sign on to statements from prosecutors around the nation pledging that they will not pursue criminal cases against seekers or providers of abortion or gender transition treatments I'm Lisa dwyer

Lisa Dwyer Ron Desantis Andrew Warren Florida Hillsborough County Warren Tampa Desantis
Sebastian Welcomes Breitbart's Editor-In-Chief Alex Marlow

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 4 d ago

Sebastian Welcomes Breitbart's Editor-In-Chief Alex Marlow

"Mahler, welcome back to America first. Doctor gator is a blast to be with you and I what a great story and I never ask you for silly number that was very stupid of me. And I probably should have, because in retrospect, he did let me pull the trigger and some first class travel a few times. It was probably not necessary. Well, we have so much to discuss, especially your latest series of articles about in America this summer, the summer of rage. But first, let me share with our millions of listers across the nation, a story you told me in one of those very, very early editorial mornings that we used to have what like 9 a.m. every morning with the key editors. And you told me every story, anything that gets up onto this hallowed ground of bright dot com has to have certain elements. Number one, it has to be interesting. It has to be fun to read. Number two, it has to push the mission forward of saving America of standing up for our values, the values upon which our republic was founded. And if I miss any out, please add them. And then the one I find so interesting, especially now as I'm writing a television script for a new show, is in each story because they're there. You've got to find an identify the villains and the heroes. Am I missing anything out from the breitbart style book? Yeah, no, that's it. It's if there's anything I would add to the last point that we like content that fights. We like content that puts our audience in the fight. And bonus points, if you can do that without actually having to literally write, go fight with this person or fight on behalf of that person, but yes, absolutely we see ourselves as not just part of the news landscape. We think we're the best part of the news landscape. But we're also a part of the activist landscape as well. And I think that that's a part of that is identifying what are the battles that matter for this country and for the free world, but

America Mahler
The GOP Can't Compromise With the Left

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:50 sec | 4 d ago

The GOP Can't Compromise With the Left

"A suspend a Soros backed state attorney who has refused to enforce the abortion ban right here in Tampa, Florida. I'm in Central Florida, so this is very big news. The desantis says Andrew Warren had refused to enforce numerous Florida laws and would not work with the police. Guys, this is exactly what we don't want. This is exactly what I mean. Decide what type of Republican you're gonna be. Are you gonna be the type of Republican that understands the existential threat that the left poses to our nation or are you not? I don't know that there's necessarily a thing as a moderate or a rhino. I tend to believe there are people that get it and there are people who do not. And sadly, I still think we have people in the Republican Party who don't get it. Desantis isn't one of those people. Guys,

Andrew Warren Soros Desantis Florida Central Florida Tampa Republican Party
Sri Lankans missing; Thompson-Herah wins Commonwealth gold

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 4 d ago

Sri Lankans missing; Thompson-Herah wins Commonwealth gold

"The nation which is experiencing a major economic crisis has confirmed a wrestler a judoka and a judo coach have disappeared from one of the game's villages housing athletes and officials and our police are investigating their absence at the 2018 games on Australia's Gulf Coast almost one third of the Cameroon team went missing after the event and Rwanda's weightlifting coach also fled during a toilet break at the host's stadium Charles De Ledesma London

Gulf Coast Cameroon Australia Rwanda Charles De Ledesma London
'The Geography of Nowhere' With James Howard Kunstler

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:38 min | 4 d ago

'The Geography of Nowhere' With James Howard Kunstler

"A time, we had small towns. And in the small towns, the town elders, they cared about creating there'd be a green and there'd be a beautiful bank building. For urban design, there was based on the human body and human scale. And once we threw that in the garbage with in the traffic engineers became literally in charge of all the dimensions of how we lived and the deployment of all of the things on the landscape, then we lost all of that knowledge, all that vocabulary, and we started making a huge number of mistakes. And we produced environments that just destroyed people's minds. And now we can see the result of it. You know, we're living in a politically psychotic nation now. After about 70 years of that, there's no question about that. I think about, I mean, again, I'm just trying to process this for my audience a little bit, but I remember when I was reading your book, I started thinking about this, I thought everywhere I looked, this is true. There were downtowns that were beautiful and Danbury, Connecticut, where I grew up. It had a downtown, and it had a Civil War monument. And it had some beautiful buildings, and people would go there from wherever they lived, and they would do business and stuff. And over time, the energy and the life and whatever kind of got sucked out of the downtown and they would create a mall or strip malls or whatever. And so the downtown fell into, this is my favorite gym kunstler word, decrepitude. Well, I didn't invent it. I know, but you're the one that popularized it in my mind. All

Civil War Monument Danbury Connecticut
Where to Begin With James Howard Kunstler's Many Books?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:59 min | 5 d ago

Where to Begin With James Howard Kunstler's Many Books?

"To James Howard kunstler. Jim, you were just talking about the long remedy. The long emergency. Now that's your book from 2005. Would that be the primer to read on what we're discussing if somebody is listening and they say, I don't get this. And the 2012 companion, which is called too much magic. Wishful thinking, technology and the fate of the nation. And what does that reference? Well, it's about what the response to the lung emergency is tending to be a kind of techno narcissism. This idea that technology is going to rescue us from this dynamic set of problems and quandaries that we face, the problem we face with our basic primary source energy supply, petroleum, the quandaries we face over the disorders of finance, the quandaries we face with farming and food production, geopolitics, these things are all related with the winding down of the global economy, which was our mode of operation. But you make 40 years. You make it sound inevitable. It is inevitable. And to me, I guess my question is whether when you talk about people acting crazy and you talk about it, a lot of these things to my mind, at least do have answers. And others, I think it's not like we just have to say, okay, everybody's going to be confused about how many sexes there are or whatever. We all know there are two. I mean, most people just know that. But we live in a world where the elites who have the microphones act as though. No, no, no, no, that was ten minutes ago. We all decided it's no longer true. You're not going to have any success with those arguments because those arguments are all a deflection of the greater question, which is how are we going to live in the decades ahead? How are we going to reorganize American life?

James Howard Kunstler JIM
"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

01:32 min | 2 months ago

"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

"It beyond that. I really do feel like it's a dream come true to do this. And I don't know if I'll ever do such a meaningful show. I had no idea that what I needed as an artist what I needed to see in the world was what so many other people needed to see as well, and that people were yearning for that, that they were looking for it. They wanted, they wanted a story like this. And that has been, it's been overwhelming to experience. Corey payette is the writer and director of the musical children of God. That piece was produced by Jennifer for a previously aired episode of unreserved. In December, 2019. That's it for this week's episode of unreserved. We'll be back in this radio space next week for more community culture and conversation. This episode was produced by Stephanie kram, Kyle new Zika, Zoe tennant and Anna lazowski. I'm your favorite cousin Rosanna dear child coming at you from Winnipeg in treaty one territory. Thank you for listening to unreserved on.

Corey payette Stephanie kram Kyle new Zika Jennifer Zoe tennant Anna lazowski Rosanna Winnipeg
"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

04:54 min | 2 months ago

"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

"Approach musical theater writing. And whatever that is, it's about situation. It's about that they, for whatever reason, can not speak and as the case of a residential school and people dealing with intergenerational trauma from residential schools, it is something that is a widely known thing that that silencing that feeling that you can't connect or you can't put into words what that is that music helps to access that place that is perhaps unspeakable for people. And so it felt very natural for it to use music as a way of expressing emotions that were beyond words..

"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

02:18 min | 2 months ago

"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

"Lost me as well. So I remember thinking, Mary, mother of Jesus, I merely. Noah needs cuckold. You above all mothers must know what it's like to lose a child. I'm ready to let go of this. But I'm hoping you can help me. Could you please do one thing. And that's touch my mother wherever she is, a with a and let her know that if she ever had any regrets, that.

Noah Mary
"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

05:51 min | 2 months ago

"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

"And I was born in grace hospital..

"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

01:55 min | 2 months ago

"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

"Sally Hart lives on Vancouver Island in the small West Coast city of Duncan. Her home is less than 18 minutes down the highway from the community of cheminis, where the mystery of her birth and her identity began almost 70 years ago. My mother wanted to do her last two years of high school in one and the only way she was able to do this was to go to a Catholic school, so she lined up a summer job down at the cannery in near Victoria in a squamate actually. And it was there that she met my father, he had worked in the can re since he was a kid, and they met when I guess they were 16 and 17. They carried on a relationship over the few months and when my mother returned home to shebna, it was revealed that she was going to have a baby. And so my father who had been always quite enterprising had quite a bit of money put aside from his work and so they decided to elope. And so they set the date and on the evening that they were to elop my mother was caught coming down the stairwell with a suitcase. And that was the end of that story. It was revealed that she was pregnant and that and that was not going to happen with my father being native and my mother's father said there won't be any Indians in this family. So they were separated my mother was basically confined and sent away to Vancouver to finish out her time,.

Sally Hart small West Coast Vancouver Island Duncan Victoria elop Vancouver
"first nation" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

06:01 min | 3 months ago

"first nation" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"Media indigena, our chance to shoot the via social audio joining me. This April 21st via the calling app are Trina roach, the Rogers chair and journalism at the university of kings college. And a friend of the show, a friend of mine, and friend of us all, really. The editor and grand chief of the walking eagle news, Tim fontaine, welcome folks. Hello, Tim. And Rick. Mainly Tim, I haven't talked to you in a while. I've already I know. It's a yet another AP ten news reunion. I have say I'm loving this. We're going to go through the whole crew eventually. Okay, so as we know, many indigenous follows a three, four, 5, format, three people, four things, roughly 5 minutes each and emphasis on roughly. No one knows what the others want to talk about, including that fourth item, submitted by one of our monthly supporters on Patreon. So trena sits Tim is new to this mini business. I thought one of us should go first. Who will it be? Nominate you. Okay, perfect. All right. Democracy and action. Okay, my nugget for this week. Have you guys seen that brutal editorial cartoon out of Ontario about what some regard as the Pope's apology regarding residential schools? I have yes. I almost made that my topic. So as you recall, for those who haven't seen it, you see three people on the left is the Pope sitting in a chair, a top sum platform, and then there's a red carpet. I mean, that's where the first inaccuracy was there. He should be on a gold throne or something. But anyway, and to the right of him, are a couple of presumably indigenous people, First Nations people. One looks kind of like a lawyer. The other one, I guess it's supposed to look like a chief. He's got a full headdress on for some reason. And so the Pope is looking all sad. He's saying, I am sorry. And the lawyer is holding a piece of paper that says comp. I'm assuming compensation. She's saying how sorry. Here's the cleverest part of it. The essence sorry of what the lawyer is saying is a dollar sign. Get it. And the chief he just looks down. He's silent, kind of like a cigar store Indian. What would your reaction when you guys saw that, Tim? Well, I mean, I had joked about that in a roundabout way with walking eagle news, right? But I mean, it's one of those things where if you're a white guy and because I know what they're getting at, which is basically all these Indians all they want is money, right? So it was like screw you, man. That's lazy, and that's whatever, right? Like I just thought, if it had been an indigenous person that did it in a certain way, like my mind was part of an overall sort of look at that apology, right? I am angry at the Vatican for having billions of dollars in assets and acting like saying sorry is like they really have to twist their arm to do that. That was a whole bunch of stuff that came out about that. I mean, I get the humor of it, I guess, right? But I never saw the cartoon, obviously, only like when it hit the news. And started making headlines because I don't get that newspaper. It's simco dot com. And simcoe county. But it kind of like it just touches on that like, you know, I mean, I'm doing stories or I've been doing stories like on 60 scoop, like with Debbie Paul, and we've been looking at there's been, so I've been following news on that. And I mean, those are people who went through trauma, who were 60 scoop, who lost connection to culture, language, community, all of that stuff suffered trauma. And I think they get over 20,000, not even 30,000 is the max. That's not. So when I don't know, I don't like the money jokes, like where it's just like, oh, you just, people are just in it for money somehow. I just think it sort of degrades the real meaning of what real compensation has to, or what real change has to take place. And really, the money is never lawyers make a lot of money usually offices. But individual people who've been traumatized usually don't. So it's not like even if they get some money, it's not really about the money. The message I think the artist meant to send is, oh man, here's more Indians lining up for more money. And oh, he's the poor Pope. He's sitting. He said he's sorry. Although he never said he was sorry on behalf of the Catholic Church, he was sorry about the conduct of specific members, which I'm sort of like, God, God. I know. Sorry, not sorry. Yeah. I would prefer to see the, say, sorry about the doctrine of discovery. Let's rescind that. Like, that would be, that would be meaningful. Yeah, we need action. Yeah, yeah. And destroy the foundation of all Canada's claims to sovereignty over indigenous lands. Exactly. Okay, here's the thing. This cartoon about the apology caught a lot of flak. And now there's two more apologies. One from the simcoe county newspaper, the managing editor. He wrote a column saying, dear simcoe county readers, the cartoon we published was offensive, we apologize. It was intended as a satirical look at how the Pope's long awaited apology to indigenous people falls short without the Roman Catholic Church also delivering on his promise of providing compensation to residential school survivors, but this wasn't the way to depict that opinion and we shouldn't have published it. So you see guys, the intent was actually what you wanted. I mean, again, that as I said, it was just lazy. They could have shown the Pope in a particular way. You know what I mean? Like the ridiculousness of the fact that he's covered in jewels and he's talking about things. I mean, it's just like, it would have been funnier if he tripped over gold on the way to say something. Something like that as opposed to, you know, the way they did it, which is like, yeah, they're coming and scratching at this poor man. But Tim, don't we know that the funniest jokes are the ones you have to explain after the fact. Well, I'm guilty of that all the time because it requires a history.

Tim Trina roach university of kings college Tim fontaine Patreon simcoe county Debbie Paul Rick trauma Ontario foundation of all Canada Roman Catholic Church Pope
"first nation" Discussed on Women on the Line

Women on the Line

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"first nation" Discussed on Women on the Line

"I also spoke with associate professor chelsea. Water go among anjali in southsea. Islander woman about aboriginal and tara straight islander people's lived experience analyzing navigating and fighting institutional racism as well as systemic resistance to anti-racist transformation. He can listen back to that episode.

"first nation" Discussed on The Current

The Current

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"first nation" Discussed on The Current

"That sounds like alien nation. Wh what do you hear. No i i. I hear a lot of fear. Apprehension and an institution that that doesn't accept indigenous peoples. That's what i hear from from moloch and and you know that's her personal story. You can't deny her of that i would just encourage. I've always said this is that we need to get first nations people into visit all positions of power and authority and we have to have thick skin to bring about change in policy and legistlation To bring about change in institutions that are colonial. You know to make sure that they're more accepting and inviting of an accepting of all the contributions that first nations people have made to candidate including sharing all the land and resources. People need to understand that. So i'm going to keep encouraging people. Inuit people made people first nations people to get into positions of power and authority on the supreme court of canada. Deputy minister positions Become another three hundred. Thirty eight members of parliament. You know sit around. Cabinet table infiltrate the liberals and the conservatives in the end ep and the greens while we still work on our own first nations party in our own self determination self-governance as well More ceo's more board of directors we need to have that thick skin to persevere to to to bring about that change in and we need to get our people into positions of power and authority. That's what i think. And that's that's what i'm gonna keep advocating for. Well it's it's a great point but it also sets up a another voice that like it here it's riley. She's an indigenous writer and she's writing. A book called the reconciliation generation which she defines as the first generation that has not been through residential or indian day schools. Listen to what she told us. Indigenous youth have largely said that reconciliation to them is dead. It's not something they're interested in. And i don't think canada yet has fully embraced how profound that is and how immense political impacts that will have what they're calling for instead in my opinion is perhaps you've heard of the slogan you know land back with started as a very much an internet beam. But it's actually a really really robust policy. Stance that talks about reparations that talks about return of jurisdiction and a ton of e though. It's a very materially focused as opposed to you know symbolic thing that i think. Reconciliation has largely become in this country. Let's must talk about land back for a second because when we talk about reconciliation that seems to be an understanding but it's also rebuilding a relationship and every relationship needs to be put to a test. Will this idea of giving land back to to the first nations. Will that be a significant test for canadians. Well first off. I wouldn't call giving land back. I'll call it land restoration and i wouldn't call it a land claim policy whether it be comprehensive land claim or a specific land claim this is land restoration and first nations from a first nations perspective from from my perspective is. We're sharing the land and resource wealth with everybody ended and so for canada have some policies for example the competence of claims policy and specific claims policy. The additions to reserve policy in the inherent right to self-government policy are all policies that are based on termination of rights thailand jurisdiction not recognition of rights title and jurisdiction..

supreme court of canada parliament Cabinet riley canada thailand
"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

"So then we have roberta meeting. The parents really time is surprise. They're gonna meet each other in the kitchen and at first. She didn't seem very excited. She says oh no his starts crying. What why is she crying. I don't know it was all so overboard. Her behavior was overboard. It was so put on feeling again. Like back to this. Noted is just like it doing too much like who are you trying to prove your feelings to and young the mom and dad and i don't know like we've talked about how we're possessive and could be jealous or whatever on this podcast but like if someone just came in and started calling my mom mom in like my dad dad like that would piss me the hell off ango. Those are my parents like you. Don't get to just call them that you have not going. I agree my parents also wouldn't be that welcoming to a sister wife. Mom would not be hugging her and my dad. Sure as hell would like. Oh hey our you it'd be like whoa. No no hugs i. We can shake hands. And what the hell are your intentions right. Exactly and they were. They were very welcoming and crying and was trying. It was just very strange but at least to scott. It's like scott in the moment acts like he's cool with everything but then when he goes off to the side to the cameras he shows his true feelings yet because he says to the camera and he's like that was kind of weird that she has started calling us mom and dad. All of a sudden like huck is this lady and he's you can tell they're very much people that just don't wanna make anyone until uncomfortable and they just want to kind of go with the flow and smooth things over because you can tell. They both have reservations and they're not all onboard with this but they just act like they are. Yeah one hundred percents. This would never be our family. It would be the most uncomfortable aggressive trip if this was our family and not situation one thousand percent. I don't think they would be on the trip. Actually i think my parents would go on the trip in my mother revealing got questions like let's chat and there would be no sister wife because my parents would scare them off scare him away. Yeah that's so true..

one thousand percent scott roberta both one hundred
"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

"She has a blazer on so there's that whole though. I understand wanting to dress. Nice when you travel that this was a little too much. I didn't like this where something else. It was very confusing. And then also like she strips down to her bikini every chance she gets so it's like don't show up acting like you're this conservative businesswoman. Brian ever you're going to be naked in five minutes. Do we know what she does in brazil. We don't i remember. She said she went to college for communication mass communications. But what do not do what had action we need to find. I don't know maybe she's a business. Woman maybe she came straight from the boardroom. Okay from the board and in the bedroom exactly so yeah daring. Lets us know that he will be putting on music to hide the sound of him making babies with roberta which now i think i blocked how i think. I chose not to hear that he's like you know with the parents here. Could get a little awkward. So i'll make sure to put on some music so they don't hear anything. Yeah no right. Why would you even bring them. Why don't you bring your kids. Why did you bring your own by yourself. Why are you here. why are you on. Tv screen yes. What is your name. Garrick and derek. Questions did not like him but truly because they don't talk to him so anyway. Danielle is seems a little not excited whenever roberta shows up. Did you get that impression. I feel as though she was like not very happy to see her. I don't know it seems like a different greeting than last time. Because this time she kissed her on the forehead and not the lips. Yeah that's true. Will and i just thought it was strange. And maybe i'm like being mean. Because i don't hear eric but she comes in. Roberta comes in an immediately long. Hug embraces blah blah blah. Derek and didn't hug the kids were thing danielle at all like. She didn't a long time to even acknowledge everyone else. Who's supposed to be her family. And so yeah. I thought that was very.

brazil Roberta Danielle five minutes Brian danielle roberta Garrick Derek Will derek eric
"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

"Yeah and then actually like does the whole bendy thing. It's so funny. Because even during that like she's trying. I give she was trying to make it sound like a beautiful ceremonial thing. But what she basically said was i was here. I bitch if you really listen if you really listen. 'cause she's like you know like in the been de represents this and you know i was the first wife in so i'm gonna go and bush shou on her a bendy so that now she can be a part of our. You know it was just very like okay ashley. Look with you do in here. She's the of life. So how's that playing at your power. Move yeah i could just feel the tension and uncomfortable from ashley this entire episode. Oh you would is laying on the couch and try to hold office happy tears. The shows are not happy. Here's whatever those or not. It was like in the middle of a sentence at geneva. Make sense for her to start crying. And i was like oh. She's struggling. she really is an i think. For whatever reason this episode we could see was thank you. We could see especially ashley and chris lean. They just appeared very drained. Like you could just see on their basin. They looked exhausted like they had been a struggle emotionally. Not and we see segments for a couple of episodes but this episode. It was rough. You could tell they've really rough. Yeah it was not good and then dmitri's just sitting there with his crazy is and like fake smile and his china act like everything's cool and he's got his top not going on. How love hat down. Yeah it was rough. It was rough. So that's it. I don't know if that's the last time we're going to see this note ends on our tv screen or if we're gonna ever get any updates about this potential court case situation. That's going on. But i just hope that they can't hurt anyone else because they've obviously hurt lots of other people in. I hope now it's out there enough to where people won't get involved with them. I would hope so but there are people who defend them so you never know. That's the scary thing is that is the scary thing that is very true. We have experienced that firsthand. i was like wow. I didn't realize there were people out. Here defending the snowden. But here we are. And i'll i'll say this last thing as we transition into fields if not l. c. can make.

chris lean first wife ashley dmitri china couple of episodes geneva
"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

"People are a. Are you ready to get into the final episode. One nation Should we start with the mayor. Fielder the snowden. We only got two choices. Who do want to get out of the way. I i don't know they were equally shitty. I guess we could talk about the snowden verse so we don't end on a bad note. I like that and they had to pick the two least favorite families of the season to end the whole show with. I just thought that was so rude of them. I wish they vary offended. Switched the episodes like this should have been. Yeah asked weeks episode. And then we should have gotten the more couples with like the wenders. The clark's the joneses. That should have been the last episode. Yeah and we didn't even get a green at the end of the episode of the snowden. Family has since broken up. Nothing we got none of that. It's so weird and upsetting. I hope have some master-plan like something else is coming. Maybe maybe i don't know. Ra lead start off with this note ins and it's wedding day. I mean we just went right from the proposal in the backyard. To wedding day bam The wedding will also be in the backyard. Every is in the backyard because the snowden is no better than to go anywhere. I really don't. I'm line. I need the dates. When may arrived all the way hill. What happened with the court documents. I need all of it completely lined out for because a lot of shit happened in a very small amount of time for them to also sell me so like what was a still new schedule. Like how many days did they fill. Because didn't they go didn't dimitriou in chrissy goto that guy's house yet like in may which it should be may now because she got there in january right right yes that's up. She got this right. You got there in january and. She said they've been there for five months. So it's may now doesn't oh i don't know i can think is that. They went after filming wrapped after the wedding. That's when they went to wisconsin or michigan wherever that guy lives. Yeah no. But i mean i need an info graphic of this timeline. I need somebody to make that for me. Yeah maybe we can make it. Yeah i'm gonna have to athletes. All of the lake past sister wives taylor ari vanessa. Hey your daily allow here. Let me know how this worked out. Thank you thank. You will create a google doc and just send it out to them and they can all edit an update it for us. That would be great. So the talk a lot about this being illegal marriage and they. I wonder because they don't mention. They say you know oh. She has to be married to dmitry legally in order for her to in the country. They don't talk about the visa application process. Ira much not at all of like is she approves like. It's not just an automatic. You mary some cool. You can stay in the united states right like you still have to go through the application process right..

five months january wisconsin michigan united states dmitry taylor ari vanessa two choices One nation Fielder two least favorite families google doc may couples snowden
"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"first nation" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

"And allie. Welcome back everyone till one nation under sister wives and it should have been two nations or to families. Because that's all we got this episode and we're pretty sure this was the season finale. Yeah sure mark. What i know i was thinking what happened. I looked at by xfinity stream and it does. There's no episode records next week and then at the end of this episode. They're like. Oh a sneak peek at our new show which is like what's it called lindsay that it's because i watched discovery plus okay. What was the sneak peak. It's something extreme family. And i talked about it on news on patriotic but basically it's where kind of a polygamous family i guess you could call it lifts together so it's an ex wife an ex husband and then the new husband also live together but are they in a relationship knows like oh we got a divorce but we're still friends so i just didn't want to move out bill. You can totally still live here with us like white. That's not even that interesting. I mean i guess it could be. I mean you have the same almost the same dynamic going on like real housewives of ram new york new jersey Where i forget. I'm like i just watching this season. But she's like still best friends with her ex husband in like lives with him half the time and lives with her new boyfriend half to tie in. It's like it's not theresa theresa. S ex husband lives abroad because he was forced to leave. The country has ryan. You're all his tax evasion. Yes that's right. yeah so. I mean to me. I'm just like i want a tell all for this sister wives. I wanna see. I don't know and it's very weird that they didn't even say like this was the final episode or it was just it was just ended so abruptly. I feel like the rug was pulled out from under me heartburn and we really didn't know last episode that it was the last time seeing colton and all the other couples they finally came on their instrumentals. Like no this was just last episode of the season. But then i didn't see tasha in city and say anything like that so i wonder if they kind of cut this season short because of the snowed in drama. There we have to like hurry up and wrap this up so we don't have to cancel. I guess that's what it feels like but then also when you look back. At previous seasons this season did have more episodes than other seasons. So it's like it really was longer but it still feels like it was cut off. I don't know something weird happen. One remember they had to delay the premiere of it. You for whatever reason so there's just been all kinds of issues with the season of seeking sister wives but you know that's what made it interesting. So i think they had a delay because of the aldridge's and everything that happened. Yeah and now they're like. Oh donnas no longer with the family. This season was cursed from the beginning. I think it really. I just hope they're not thinking that the whole show is cursed because they love the show. And i don't want the show to go anywhere i don't think it will. Tlc has no integrity. We'll get another season with new couples. It'll be fine. Just start fresh..

next week ram two nations one nation mark lindsay discovery plus new york new jersey tasha in city xfinity stream ryan couples colton Tlc aldridge
"first nation" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"first nation" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Off. . Today India's Prime Minister Narendra. . Modi. . Traveled to the northeastern city of yoga which was hung with saffron flags and more than one hundred, thousand , jobs. . He came to lay the first stone of temple to Rahm incarnation of the Hindu God vishnu with believed was born in the city. . This isn't the standard fare of a politician pressing the flesh for a photo op. . It fulfils a promise Mr Moody made as a young politician to return to iota only when construction on a new temple began. . Key. . Speech at the dedication broadcast into the whole country he said the temple would be a symbol of unity that the weight of centuries and today. . Agreement nation. . Idea A symbol of unity. . It is not the weight of centuries as Mr Moody and his BJP party see it goes back to the founding of a mosque on the site that was razed to the ground nearly thirty years ago. . When we're talking about a Yoda today, , we're talking about a very specific place just a couple of acres off the center of town where there was a great big mosque built in the sixteenth century and destroyed by Hindu activists in nineteen ninety-two. . Alex. . TREBEK's is the economists India correspondent based in Delhi the site of that former mosque is what's under contention? ? It's been the most controversial. . Acre. . In all of India. . Ever since and the question is whether or not Hindus may bill the temple to Rahm right there and so how did things progressive since nineteen ninety two when the the mosque was destroyed how does that end up as a temple concentration today? ? It's been a terribly. . Tortuous story through the courts after decades of legal stasis and very bizarre humiliation the supreme. . Court. . Last November, , few months after Narendra Modi Wins, , wapping reelection decides that the most crucial part of the ground ought to be given to the Hindus go ahead and build the temple that you've been clamoring for these decades. . The court noted that the demolition of the mosque illegal in sort of compensation that no one appreciated very much allocated several acres of idle land outside the town to Muslims. . In effect, , the court just gave the Hindus white they had wanted and I mean the Hindu nationalists, , the very groups that had clamored for the destruction of the mosque and eighty is a ninety S. . And so what precisely is happening today then so today is the last of three days of the ceremony. . Put. . In which people most notably the prime minister are doing various prayers, , offering ritual sacrifices, , and so on. . Around the site itself most spectacularly in the middle of all the Prime Minister Narendra. Modi . ritually lifted into place the forty kilograms silver brick, , which serves as temples foundation stone. . Now it's consecrated and all its left is to keep on raising money and build the actual structure itself and what's the reaction been from Muslims about this this contentious building. . You know in a way Muslims and everyone cares about civil rights and the secular foundation of India knows what to say no. . One's happy about it. . <hes> firebrand Muslim leader in Parliament Assadi. . Noisy has criticized the prime minister going to a religious event and it's indeed striking that the prime minister should be there on the temple grounds with a bunch of priests and Politicos all mixed in as if they were a single class, , it's shocking if you've been sleeping under a rock as India's changed in recent years and in fact, , I was Struck that there have been no mass protests by Muslim groups either after the Supreme Court's decision last November nor today it doesn't mean they're happy about it. . But at this point, , the thing to protest, , we talked a lot about Narendra Modi's brand of Hindu nationalism I. . Guess This is kind of a pinnacle. . Then for his aims I mean what? ? What does this mean for him and his party it is a pinnacle of sorts but I think it's more important to look at this as the end of a long first stage of Hindu nationalism. . Movement. . In India. . We're looking at something more like a capstone than a foundation stone and at the same time this date August fifth was chosen for quite obvious reason. . It's the first anniversary of this government very bold move to strip the state of jump in Kashmir India's only Muslim state a year ago of its status as a state and rule it directly from Delhi that was one of the main three goals that the Hindu nationalist movement had till. . Now now, , the third of those goals creating a uniform civil code that would bind. . Muslim family law into line with Hindu and secular family law governs most of the rest of India is a less inspiring goal and it's been half accomplished. Already . what Mr Moody is going to need in future is another another series of rallying cries like build the temple and where he's GonNa find them it's just not obvious at this point. . So today's ceremony is is not a cause for for great triumph. . This is this is not <hes> the the the end of this long road for the Jay he's hindu-nationalist goals and therefore mission accomplished. . This is a triumph. . Yes. . By all rights Mr, , Modi a good one to be taking the victory lap for his party is ideologically movement but that's also very backwards looking Mr Moody was elected with a terrific share of the parliamentary seats in two thousand fourteen in the first place. . Because of these hindu-nationalist goals which attracted the devotion of his base, , but because Indians were eager for change for economic development and good technocratic governance of a sort that he seemed specially poised to offer, , there are various reforms for which he and his government can claim credit over the past six years. . But there are many many more disappointments and in particular over the past two years say before the covid nineteen pandemic and then much much worse since it's begun, , India's facing an economic crisis, , it's every indicator is worse than they've been in a generation. . So there's GonNa be a very strongly felt need. . A week the opposition to come up with some way of rallying the country some nationalistic theme or series of themes to distract from the sort of impasse in India finds itself had economically this Hindu. . Nationalist ideology offers no guidance towards what India's trade policy ought to be say or how environmental law to be fixed or scrapped. . They've got a steady ideology, , but it's not tacked onto any particular policies at this point i. . think that the government we have in place right now strong government but in dark turbulent times is going to be almost desperate to find something to replace the impetus with. . Altogether, , though these changes that have already gone through, , do you think it chips away at the basis of modern India's government? ? The the idea that religion shouldn't be a part of it. . Yeah I think that India as we know it maybe as an idea we almost to retire Mahatma? ? Gandhi. . Still on on every currency note but this is not Ghandi's India anymore you might almost say that the the anti-secularist of one it's now very ordinary to see symbols of state power mixed with. . Symbols of sectarian dominance over the hindu-majority expressing itself often revanchist terms, , which is why this template a Yoda really does. . Alex thanks very much for joining US Jason. . Thanks very much. .

India Narendra Modi Mr Moody Prime Minister Narendra prime minister Rahm secular foundation of India BJP wapping Parliament Assadi TREBEK Alex Delhi Supreme Court Jay
"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"first nation" Discussed on Unreserved

"In two, thousand and Fifteen Bob Joseph member of the Guohua Anoc nation wrote an article about the many ways. The Indian act was destructive, first nation, communities and culture. The article went viral. He has since expanded that article, and in two thousand eighteen released the book twenty one things. You may not know about the Indian Act. He's guest today. Think of him as our INDIANAP- tour guide to help us better understand the impact of this historic legislation. Welcome Bob Thank you, thank you. It's great to be here. So? Your original article on the Indian Act went viral. What kinds of responses were? Were you getting from the article lots of? Wow I didn't know that and you know sort of the <hes> <hes> moments, and we're still getting responses today you know on twitter and facebook where people are still saying you gotta read this book every Canadian Street this book and you don't know what you don't know. He'd be three times. You hear that you know we do our training workshops as well I do training for on sort of indigenous awareness. And one of the exercises that we have people do at the start of every session that they think of Dayton history and come up with a short sentence to describe it, and it's got to be specific Vo. To indigenous peoples and have a flip chart at the front and say you know we're going to put all of the old dates, the top the flip chart in the more recent ones at the bottom, and usually draw a line, know eighteen, sixty seven and another line when we pay treated the constitution that section, thirty, five and nineteen eighty two. And we get people to start putting their dates, and so what we find is shucks, Cartier and Columbus, discovering the new world and Vikings and things like that and you see a lot of recent date for two thousand ten winter Olympics things that are more. Recent oriented Ohka and those kinds of things, but always saw this gap in the middle, and it was usually between eighteen and sixty, seven, nine, hundred, eighty two. And it really just highlights what people don't know. There's a period of history there and a lot of those beats Indian. Activate fall right in that time line I would venture to say they don't know too much about the Indian Act. Most people have never even read that legislation. What is one element of it? That always surprises people for for a lot of people they think that <hes> people living on reserves and under the Indian Act live in some kind of Shangrila. Free housing free education, and they don't pay taxes. Those seem to be some of the bigger issues, but. When we when talk about things like, yes, they don't pay taxes. Section eighty. Seven of the Indian Act was put into place to protect their property from the erosion of taxes. Well, they were simulating. So that's what the Indian Act is post confederation assimilation policy tool, so we're going to protect their property from near Ocean of taxes on the face of it sounds really helpful, but you know we look at it, not more current context. It really just holds the Venetians back if If I wanted to go buy a truck for my car dealership, and if I had it delivered to the reserve, because I'm a status Indian I. Don't pay transactional taxes on that vehicle. If it's delivered to the reserve, that definitely is a benefit that people see, but what they don't see that as soon as I, declared the exemption reserves are also not subject to seizure under legal process, and so as soon as I declare the exemption, the financial services people no okay. Okay? He's a status India. Fife Thelma's the truck and he stops paying for it I can't go and take it back from him. If refuses to pay for very often, see the benefits, but they don't see some of the restrictions and some of the other things that are problematic with the Indian Act now, the Indianapolis passing mentioned in Eighteen, seventy six, and it impacts the lives of first nations people every day in almost every way it defines who has Indian status outlines chief. Chief and council systems influences the development of residential schools as a first nations person. What is one surprising way? The act influences your life. Today was just starting out my career working for a big firm here in British Columbia by then I'd had a post secondary education I was working for a really reputable solid organization, and we'll look at it from Capitol Lender perspective I I met the four CS of credit I was married had a job at a post secondary education. If I was a lender. I was the perfect candidate, but. They refused to loan me the money and wanted my wife who's not indigenous to cosign for the vehicle, which was quite interesting, just in terms of that whole understanding the impacts of you know trying to make way in the economic mainstream. Now I. WanNa get into one of the most long lasting impacts of the Indian act of the Canadian reserve system, many first nations across the country still live on reserves. Why did the government create the reserve system? The reserve system was really created as part of the old philosophy by the time we can federate Canada believed that the Indians as they're called in the Internet where a dying race of people that they're not going to be here for much longer <hes>. They were going very rapid depopulation because of to the the that they didn't have immunity to, and they weren't fitting in economically info set the stage for this dine. Race people the best thing we can do to help them to assimilate and become like everybody else, and the feeling was that we would put them onto these reserves in the context of assimilation of reserves, really a holding pen. It's the place where we're going to put them until they. Didn't if simulated, that meant obviously that they were gonNA leave the reserves and go be like all other people in. Canada And they are reserves. People live on them. Don't actually own the land they live on. You can ask people hate the audio nuthouse. Legally technically speaking, the property is that of the federal government and the band is sort of the administrator of that in which people don't know right that they don't know that this is crown land actually, and it's held entrust as the term goes. Goes, and even though the government set aside this, you know this land to first nations, there are many instances where they went back on their word, and took acres away from communities. In your book, you outline how parts of Vancouver and the surrounding area were taken back by government to create the city as it is today. Can you explain how that happened? Yeah, so there was a lot of that. Initially, we put them onto reserves often for the most part left them where they were situated, which is maybe different from the US for they relocated people, thousands of miles sometimes from. From but they put them onto these reserves I think about a place like Vancouver today there's lots and lots of people and urban sprawl, but in those days there wasn't much there, and so they put up Nice generous reserves with good allotment, but then we went back and took it away because they weren't being enterprising people's. You know they're supposed to use those lands and put them to their highest and best youth. It's Kinda this really weird argument, right? We want them to assimilate, but we don't want to compete with them in the markets and so. So, we take away, their one of the things is their ability to sell off her, or they can't sell without written permission from the Indian agent or the Department of Indian Affairs and

Department of Indian affairs Canada chief counsel Canadian government Fredericton New Brunswick New Brunswick College of desig Emma Hassenfeld CBC Tobruk Brunswick Ben Politics Indiana Bureau Regard Gallery Bob Joseph Alberta instructor India
"first nation" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"first nation" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

"Complex Raw. I mean some of the stuff. She knows like yes like a wolf. Because that's what I am. So basically it's a representative buddy. That's all of these. It's a representative body. That is protected by enshrinement in the rule book of the nation the constitutional so I think the concentration as Roebuck own. It is assigned that the rule is that when are decisions might affect terrified by get a site and it's very simple the other all of our representative bodies in the past been destroyed from the nineteen twenties. The first aboriginal political organization was the average Australian every Progressive Association and the first president of that channel. Man was the was a woolsey like me but the that organization was destroyed by the authorities that protection bowl that control their lives attacted attack. Those people that were united leaders and as being many representative buddies since then and it will suffered that same fight and so it is extremely important that we put this voice in the rulebook so that it cannot be destroyed again. That's what it is representative. Body copy destroyed politicians and so obviously coming from from my perspective as non-indigenous Australian is like do you have conversations with people. You're not other non indigenous. Australians and theories. Don't know how to have the conversation properly. What what is your advice around that? A voice people to use the statement to have that conversation. It's a beautiful powerful eloquent words. Use that statement as much as you can. But also I read I read the Referendum Council report. The final report that That has the entire statement in which is more than what I read is actually how history of our struggle that we put together and an explanation of the reforms. Read people like professor. Megan Davis the essays that she writes team or read a young rectory. While one way am my book is helpful and then have the courage to have those conversations share the Otari statement is that that I think there's also a sense of of guilt that People Wanna. It's it's difficult truth to face for non indigenous. Australians that throughout history. You know how ancestors have been involved in in this little shop. That's I think what we have to move on that challenging thing like you know how. How do you feel about that? I think it should be divided to make change. You know if you feel guilt. That's that's natural guilty. Isn't going to change anything unless you do something about it. And that's the wonderful thing about the statement quite specifically says from national consensus as well not just the opinions of a few but a national consensus time a really well resourced and carefully designed process. It says what we want you to do. And that's to help us set up. These voice says a I it constitutional voice what I forgot this I earlier. There's a website is campaign tools. Ww DOT statement doddle. Get ON THEIR US. Is Does to help. Spread the word and it does of been on the website and there is quad load of really useful information from welcome to country to a whole range of things that people may challenged in navigating. If I don't have a local indigenous person that they can talk to and speak with an gripe collection race and a website is going to be improved substantially very things. That'll be even more news sir looking for within. What what are you really excited for? And also what you see is the challenges. I'm really excited that we've got an opportunity to change the way that this country this country's relationship with first nations people. That's our opportunity and we can't squander it because I mean when I when I started Being involved in the prices I went to trial. Don Logan in Victoria in like two thousand sixteen and I asked the question of the room because I was nervous because it was my sleep in that room heads. Have we had an opportunity like this before? United wonderful prices that we're about to embark on and the answer was no and so. I'm excited that we have this opportunity that we reached that consensus in the heart of the country and You know we just have to have the courage and the Vega to to pursue entities that the per found for me. It was a profound moment. Because you've reached that consensus and I think that that might be slightly undervalued. Probably not within the indigenous community but certainly from outside because they hadn't been the big growth coming together as you mentioned the dialogues around so it wasn't just the one earlier conference. There was a whole range of dialogues. That went on before to feed pop into that brought together a huge amount of opinions and perspectives. And and you spoke during your session about the. It was a trade conference in the tensions in because it's not like everybody just agreed. I mean Gosh. Oh you have to do is ask people what their favorite color. And you'll get difference of opinion so this is a lot more important than that. We're talking about rule of the country to you. Know like the the constitution after we had not been asked if we're interested in concentration recognition ten years ago this has been a long national discourse actually constitutionally recognizing nations people and would never been asked so that also caused a lot of attention. But you know I mean. Hell incredible you know hell. Profound is that we did reach a consensus Jordan. Fifty of around two hundred and seventy of US And to expect it we're going to have one hundred percent agreement United States to be humanize us that so it's it's great. You know we go to pursue this and I had a question and it just flew all. I know you mentioned at the beginning of the conference. That was a video that was shot. That was quat. Had An impact on really helped Sit Everyone's consciousness about the journey that you about to go on. He's that video that's widely available. Pardon my I don't understand I thought yes. Is that available? So it's been mended to suit releasing on Youtube was by Rachel Birkin's Weltklasse filmmaker a twenty minute film originally identities now but it took us from Colonisations rule these moments where people have come together and reach a consensus You know in different ways not as extensive as zero process but in different ways you caught Bach petition which was about them. You know trying to stop a l can come from from building digging up your new land the Larrakia petition to the Queen. The beranger stipe. These Sandra we've come together with proposals to King or Queen or government and had those rocks those pipes dashed against the rocks political expediency learning all of that and how that will put the kings and Queens did not realize the lesson to put it to the Australian people this time probably scientists a bit long and all that is is that something that you think would be impactful in schools like should shoot. Is that sort of education that we need to be adding so that future generations are more informed as they coming through can be there for most supportive because there's a great understanding yes some film by Rachel Perkins. It took from the impact of colonization. All the way through some wonderful moments in history where we've put things forward and And and lost is Does proposals you hearts broken. And all that you know. This film is a good way to understand that history of struggle and it's available on Youtube if you search statement teaching resource I think it is That's so people could potentially a community screening contact the school and ask the schools to viewers that the sort of thing that you were talking about this grassroots movements how we can make a difference. Is that the sort of thing people could do. That will be really useful. I have readings of the statement. Show that film have discussions have regular meetings? You're not even if it's just a regular meetings about little things that you can do. A people can do everything within the capacity to move the politicians integral buddies of the mind. Things sharing the statement using social media. As it's you know it's free. Just Hashtag Larousse statement. Politicians are watching that stuff on they get reports on how much you know. These things are spoken about so even that that'd be powerful screen. The film screened the film in your community to your family about the statement and the statement itself and just spread the word like that. But there's no action that's too small in this movement. You've just got to do everything that you can and definitely have a look at a copy of your book. Finding the of the nation I listened to you as we're walking over here. I recommend to everyone because it's such a collection of different viewpoints and I think that's what we need to do need to be empathetic and understanding. All the different viewpoints. A new that would be powerful off being on on the road for twelve months with UNIROYAL statement. What else can I do to the campaign I am? I don't like any money out of it. Although authorities go to the and the emulates putting every sentence stickers and things that draw politicians mad and we had an action in Nala where we got these benefits might up and these hot site things at say we asked residents voters in the electorate of Coq. Morrison's electorate to tell Scott Morrison to get some heart. The book is full of you. Know these really wonderful leveraged People that I met on the journey and And I realized after twelve months travel that one way I could help people understand and and be motivated to work with us to share their stories. And that's what the books of that yet because for some people it's a lot of it's impossible to spend twelve months travelling around Australia. Learning these stories so at least three will we can go on that journey. Do try and be descriptive. You know talk about areas that have been to some of the beautiful places in the country. There's lots of amazing fighters taken just with Wi fi. Attend a good. You know it's beautiful. Kathi grant the wonderful job on the cover everything so it looked on your mantlepiece as well as teaching Dividing Well Thomas. Thank you so much in conclusion. I can I ask You. Thomas Bay the drop So that your talk tip full communication. That might have end inspired. Well think do what you what you believe in your heart you know if you have the opportunity to pursue something that you feel so strongly about that you get out there and challenge yourself Grad that opportunity and use that and use it to make the change that That you need and your loved ones need. I mean how society needs that right now. Whether it's climate change indigenous voices and agency just follow. Your heart.

representative Youtube Roebuck woolsey US Thomas Bay Progressive Association Scott Morrison Rachel Perkins president Referendum Council Megan Davis Wi professor Kathi Nala Don Logan Australia Larrakia
"first nation" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

10:38 min | 2 years ago

"first nation" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

"Thomas. Thank you so much for joining me for next episode of the Drug War as well he about the banks of the River Torrens at the Adelaide Festival. Which is a pretty nice place to be. And you've just given your session on the earlier statement so I wanna ask you a few things about that and to get the episode started. I get my guest to explain an autumn of significance and for you. That's a pretty special thing and obviously very relevant. Apparently you can recite it from hot. Say obviously people can't see these but he hasn't gotten in front of him. So let's say had Thomas go together at the two thousand seventeen national constitutional convention coming from all points to the southern sky. Mike the statement from the how are aboriginal and Torres Strait Olander tribes with the first sovereign nations of the Australian Strategy incontinent. And it suggests autumn's I'm possessed it under Rhinos and customs this Saran CICIS deed. According to the reckoning coach from the creation according to the common law from Tommy Memorial and according to science more than sixty thousand years ago is seventy is a spiritual notion the ancestor time between the Land Mother Nature and the average montage right on the peoples who born there from remain attached to and must one day return to that to the united with Aransas is link is the basis of the ownership with the soil data of sovereignty. It has never been seated or extinguished exists the sovereignty of the crown. How could it be? Otherwise that a people's possessed the land for Sixty Millennia and is sacred link disappears from history. Nearly the last two hundred years with substantive constitutional change in structural. Recall where you believe sanction. Sovereignty can shine through as fuller expression of Australia's nationhood proportionately. We most incarcerated people on the planet. We are not an innately criminal. People out children alien from their families and unprecedented rights is cannot be because we have not locked with him and now youth languish in detention and obscene numbers. They should be our hope. The future these dimensions of that crosses still plainly. The structural NITRO gap problem Powerlessness we seek constitutional change to impair out people and take a rightful place in our own country. But we have ron destiny. Children will flourish by welcome to wells and their culture will be a gift today. Country we call for the establishment of a first nations voice enshrined in the Constitution. Macaroni or is a combination of their agenda. Coming together off to a struggle it captures. Oh aspirations for a fair and truthful relationship with the people of Australia and a better future for our children. Based on justice and self determination we seek Makarova Commission to supervise a process of agreement making between governments and first nations and trick telling about history anonymous sixty seven. We counted in two thousand and seventeen. We SEEK TO BE HEARD. Leave Vice Camp and star trek across this vast country. We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people or a bit of future well John and you D- Dress audit so you've obviously said that statement a number of times like in a bit a practice and the courage to not be well. I couldn't be afraid to get it wrong so wrong a few times in front of a lot of people. Well it's obviously something that's very important to you and is the combination of a journey that you've been on but not just yourself. A number of indigenous Australians have on this journey an and I like him that statement that invites Australians to come together. Join as a non-indigenous Australian. I've really that I feel included in that Hillary statement and as many non-indigenous Australians. Do sometimes think what can I do? What is my par-? How do I do things in a respectful way? Because I feel that a lot of education missing for me. I went through Education where we've got a very brief overview auditions strenuous. But realistically it was Miceli from British invasion colonization was the tim which used instead. Sorry there's a couple of questions in that. Obviously this is a big conversation to be had but like to go back. I and tell I'd like for you to explain to us why you think that statement is so important. It was the beginning of journey for me. You know as far as taking it around and fighting for what it calls full. But really the restatement catches as history from the night before colonization who we were An unbroken coacher of more than sixty thousand years and and it talks about where we are. Now you know and It is it's a collective experiences of On the people since Since colonization and it's It is important to me because I understand that there. Is this major problem that we have the injustice and the statistics lie about the effects of genocide and exclusion and and forced assimilation and then it proposes a way forward and it is a very inclusive thing. It's visionary something that this country has lacked visionary documents these and an invitation to will with us to complete that journey and and be a nation. That's in some vice that we can be proud and since then since that statement and the the conference Ilori you've been on a journey quite literally around the country Sharing the statement and the intent behind it and promotion. What it's asking for and more recently released a book Conning Code so that book titled Finding the Heart Of the nation which talks about that journey and it's a beautiful collection of stories. Thank you for sharing that. So tell us how that journey. What's that pain live? And he's still keep fighting for this until we get it. The journey for me really began straight after route. There was no money in a campaign or anything and I was fortunate enough that I had to cried. Support of the Maritime Union strata. Ma Union and onny PET ANDERSON. Who is the leader of this process that That brought about the euro statement when I met with our national secretary and asked us if if I could be lent to the calls basically so seconded to the movement and so with the resources of the Union I. I was able to travel with your statement. This beautiful canvas. It's about one point eight meters in lengthened. One point sixteen hard or something like that and a new. It was a powerful tool. That people had to see you know it was his sacred object. That really compelled people not just is eloquent words but this beautiful artwork by Law Marine Ecology. John Line brumbies Lena Culture. Happy read that symbolizes coming together. And the Toco. These ancient sorry storylines people see this thing and when you explain the significance of it in what a coastal by supported saw not set a bad on that journey as well as other Fight Orlands did as well and And with might a difference. This is still even now. The government has tried to kill this since two thousand seventeen is still alive political document that is growing in support. Yeah and you know. It's it's incredible. The number of people are talking and they don't know yet about the lure statement so we we definitely need to get more of these movement out however having said that we've just finished your session at Adelaide rods festival and to a standing applause yourself with Professor Megan Davis as well speaking on the statement. And how important is and that was a really passionate teasing my eyes. I wasn't alone so there is definitely a growing amount of support going. How you feeling on the ground? What's what happened as you went around and told these stories and collected other stories where we started with nothing really. I mean other than the statement in that wonderful moment and those proposals because almost immediately barnaby. Joyce came out and said it was a China which is alive. You know fear mongering. Try and make us think that we're gonNA steal their backyards and vetoed legislation And he's since apologized for that. Then Malcolm Turnbull continue decide that continues to this day to describe so I think but You know the the movement can feel every time I talked to people it grows. You know when I've felt a a real shift you know. It hasn't stopped growing but I felt this real shift. Recently as we've started to hit the mainstream I yes still a lot of Australians dino about it but that's that's the job to continue to relic but you know in Marie Claire. You know those described down thing with a whole lot of indigenous celebrities will be seeing a lot more about it you know in in the next. It was beautiful. Yeah it was a beautiful article and it is growing. You know when we've shifted the politicians. That's the thing sometimes in campaigning. These extremely difficult. But you need to celebrate your wins and we have moved from complete disrespectful dismissal. Back in two thousand seventeen so position. Now where the uterus type missiles is acknowledged as it might strongly Zaid and I need reform on the table. United to give us a voices at first to. I'm addressing all the issues that we need to address yeah In presentation will conversation. You were talking a law. Professor Megan devout about the three areas so being voiced treaty truth of the Hillary Statement and the reforms that proposed reforms that seat behind it. Can you perhaps explain you? Know why that voice what what. What does that actually mean? So you know for the Australians General Waad Public I mean Constitutional Law Pretty.

Australia Hillary government Professor Megan Davis John Line Saran CICIS River Torrens Torres Strait Olander Thomas Adelaide Festival Tommy Memorial Mike Thomas. Land Mother Nature Aransas Toco Malcolm Turnbull ron destiny Makarova Commission