23 Burst results for "First Four Hundred Years"

Miami casino works to save beloved jai alai from extinction

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 11 months ago

Miami casino works to save beloved jai alai from extinction

"A casino in Miami is working to save the world's fastest ball sport from extinction it's highlighted highlights a racquet sport dad four hundred years old and came from the Ernie's mountains in Spain France the Basque region players use curved baskets to catch and throw a ball against a wall and score points former highlight professional Benny Plano is trying to save the sport the crowds are thin at the magic city casino in Miami the live wagering which long drove the sport has dried up in the era of YouTube and online gambling wait no son Chris is a highlight players okay basketball baseball football competitively you know I watch my dad play going on so like this is a dream come true to me I love the I just love to compete the casino Scott Saban says highlight is worth saving their dedication to the sport our belief that the sport can be kept alive and have a resurgence is what keeps us going the goal is to reach younger in online bettors I'm a Donahue

Benny Plano Magic City Casino Miami Ernie Spain France Scott Saban Youtube Basketball Chris Baseball Football Donahue
"first four hundred years" Discussed on Free audio sermons: Get free audio sermons and free audio Bible studies!

Free audio sermons: Get free audio sermons and free audio Bible studies!

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"first four hundred years" Discussed on Free audio sermons: Get free audio sermons and free audio Bible studies!

"During times of national tragedy and disaster. People often turn to god. One example. this neil testament was just read. Second samuel chapter twenty one at this time. Of course david was king of israel and during a certain section of david's reign there was a famine israel that is food was scarce israel. If you will remember was supposed to be the land of milk and honey a wonderful area for producing cross the second. Same twenty-one says that for a period of about three years those who were working the ground found that there was not much cooperation as far as the ground allowing them to harvest crops. Things were not improving so in second century. Twenty one the bible says that david sought the face of jehovah. He checked with god to see what was going on got injured. David and his answer was based upon history. There were some people known as the givi nights. Now these people are connected to time several years before they go back in time of joshua and israel's coming into the land of canaan several years before david came into power. you may remember that joshua Got across the jordan river. They overcame jericho. They brought down the city of ai. And joshua is continuing to work in the area of canaan. He's prepared to do battle with a lot of people and joshua nine says that there were some people from gabia who heard about israel success. These folks were smart they were they were thinking if we continue to stay over here. It's going to be knocking on our door next. And we're going to die just like all those other folks so the people have give me a former plant. They pretended that they were from outta town. They got some old clothes and they got some food that was stale and joshua nine tells about but all the things that they did and joshua nine six says that they went to the people of israel and said hi. We're from a far country. They said they were strangers. They were not from that area. The implication being don't kill us because we're not like the rest of the folks from around here and we the giving i want to make a covenant with you we will make an agreement that were so anxious to make an agreement that we will be your slaves. We will be indentured to israel. If you don't destroy us like you're doing the people around here verse. Fourteen of joshua nine includes an important detail. The israel israelites did not ask god about people. Give you the strangers. They just thought well. Hey here's some people and they've got the old clothes and they've got the moly foods so they're probably telling the truth and because israel was deceived they failed to ask god. They went ahead and signed on dotted line. They said oh yes you are slaves. We believe that you're from out of town and that's good will make An agreement one with another and because his remained the agreement the covenant with the gimme nights. The people of giving you were spare. Now jump forward if you will to second single twenty one now. We come to a much later time in israel's history. David is king. The gimme nights that group from joshua nine or now featured in this story david's predecessor who had been king saul killed some of the give the unites second sango. Twenty-one one verse two now notice the connection that can be made from joshua nine and second sangha twenty one eight competent and agreement had been made to spare the lives of the give unites joshua chapter nine years later four hundred years later by some estimates. This agreement was violated. Did the violation of the agreement matter. Israel said that it would not kill these people for centuries earlier but some of them were killed. Was it a serious issue yes. It didn't matter that the leadership in israel has changed. It mattered so much to god that the riemann had been violated that god began to flip the nation of israel for three years. The people suffered famine. Furthermore we would point out that the people who made the original agreement were all dead. But god said that didn't matter four hundred years didn't matter an agreement binding agreement had been made in this had to be following and because it was not followed a price to be paid seven of king. Saul's relatives lost their lives. They were put to death for six of second. Same twenty one because an agreement had been violated. They were hung when we look at the bible. We find several examples of people who did not keep an agreement a covenant especially agreement with god. I want to give you some of the ones that you could find as far as covenant breaking if you were to take a look i'm gonna read cue of joshua twenty three judges tube forget their introduced for your joshua seven verse. Eleven joshua seven eleven. The bible says that israel transgressed its covenant with god because of this israel suffered defeat at the hands of her enemies verse. Twelve god's going to suffer and battle. You're not going to prosper. How come because you've broken my agreement. Israel joshua seven for steam. Thirteen would not prosper. God said until you begin to do. What's right. I'm not willing to help you. I'm not willing to bless you. I'm not going to be on your side until you begin to live up to the terms of the agreement and other passage deuteronomy seventeen verse two. When god issued this passage to the israelites. He said that breaking his agreement was evil. I propose that that is a foreign concept to the a lot of the people now living most have no idea that god has formed an agreement with mankind. He has and the part of the agreement that we are to follow. Is the new testament yet when people are too that they often look at the new testament and a very casual way. The way the thinking is well we'll follow. Maybe a little of it some of it or maybe even most of we're not willing to follow all of it or not stay with to the letter from the old testament perspective. We find an important principle and that is when god has made an agreement with mankind. And we don't follow it. It is evil unrighteousness wickedness wrong sin deuteronomy seventeen years to some of might ask if we really need to pay attention to the details of scripture. Listen to joshua. Twenty three verse. Sixteen this is towards the end of the book and right at the end of the twenty third chapter when he transgress the covenant of jehovah. Your god you don't live up to the conditions which he commanded you and go and serve other gods inbound on yourselves to them. God says then you're going to anger. It's going to be kindled against you. That his my angering shall perish quickly from off the good land which he had given to you now i recognize and i would hastily point out that a specific kind of sin is described in this. I i also know that worshipping pagan deities is not the most common violation of god's covenant in this country the key issue is not the specific sin but a failure to abide by the word of god and given a specific prohibition of these people they failed to follow and god said because you're not abiding by the word he said i'm angry. I'm going to wipe you off for the land. Because you have not heeded the terms of the agreement we can take this information and make it practical for us and others. God has given us. His word and people are not willing to follow. Gum will respond to them in a hostile way. Not only in this life but certainly on the day of judgement people are going to be lost. Surely it will be the case that a lot of people were trying to tell god at the end of time. Oh god yes. We'd heard about the bible but we really thought it was for somebody else. We lived a long time after your word was written. We live two thousand years after jesus died. Lee didn't know we didn't realize that the agreement from christ and the apostles had to be followed. Remember the lesson from joshua nine and second same chapter twenty one four hundred years. Pats was the agreement. Lesson enforce not at all two thousand years have asked from the time of christ us but the agreement is still just as binding when people are under a covenant from god it lasts generation to generation. Now is true that the old testament covenant had a limited duration but for the new testament. There is no limitation on the generation in judges chapter two verse twenty towards the end of the second chapter. God said this. And the anger of jehovah was kindled against israel and he said because this nation has transgressed my covenant which i commanded their fathers you have not hearken unto my voice and god began to list the consequences after then all of us have had fathers or relatives just like the hebrews some of them followed god's agreement some Perhaps didn't but whatever relatives did. It didn't matter. God said you need to keep my covenant. It is an.

israel joshua david joshua nine gabia king saul jordan river canaan jericho samuel neil Lee jesus
Lenin Commanded Party Members to Exploit Race in America to Further the Communist Cause

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Lenin Commanded Party Members to Exploit Race in America to Further the Communist Cause

"So why do you think that people pushing things like the sixty nineteen project have such an animus against america that they would distort that and make it sound as though slavery was invented by white people four hundred years ago which we know it was not right well lennon in one thousand nine hundred nineteen nineteen twenty when the communist party was first being established here in new york city gave specific orders to party members to exploit the issue of race and of course that was a a sore point a weak point in american society. We did have jim crow We did have the ku klux klan. We did have discrimination but ever since then that has been the point. The weak point that has been exploited to cause strife and division which is how the communists have attained power across the globe. And so if you want to change this country if you want to change it from a republican form of government system of free enterprise and if you believe that socialism or communism is the way to go then you cast doubt on the validity of this government and this economic

Lennon Communist Party Jim Crow America New York City American Society
"first four hundred years" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"first four hundred years" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Around the world. It has to come with responsibilities. I reached out to the special media. Assistant to nigeria's president. He told me that this is an issue of stability and that nigerian separatists are using twitter to cause chaos regardless the suspension is also seen as an attack on freedom of speech. Local ngos are going to court over the issue digital rights activists boy at a says. The government is hostile towards social media in general comfortable. That's with the fox speech that he have the kind of control influence have over notre. Should i be. Many nigerians have used to express their frustration with the government am sometimes to organize protests but the suspension is having an impact in other ways to says on yoga. She's a twenty nine year old food vendor and logos because a lot of money to settle business in a fiscal story in league so being business online shoot me down on younger has more than seven thousand followers on twitter. She says the platform farm helps her attract customers now she estimates she's lost seventy percent of them because of the suspension shaved on each has been significantly because a lot of reports. I know using time appear. Vpn or virtual private network is what people use in order to get around the suspension but vpn's are expensive tesla hindu alibaba a thirty year old cells rabbit goat and snail meat online in lagos. Expensive battle That most did some data that could have lasted two weeks ago. But alibaba says the extra data casper accessing. The platform are still worth it to keep going using twitter. No matter where he goes eats my sue source is message to the government. Is this please we back. You bring back twitter. There are signs that could happen soon. Nigeria says twitter has met most of the conditions. They've set for restoring the platform in an email. A twitter spokesperson says. The company is working on a path forward for the world. I'm halima condie for the last four hundred years. You would be hard pressed to find a wild beaver. In britain the species was hunted to extinction by the end of the sixteenth century conservation groups in the uk though have been wanting to turn back time and reintroduce beavers their native lands. The government is considering plans to release beavers into rivers there after a successful pilot project to discuss joined by chris. jones director of the. uk's beaver. Trust so chris what most people know about beavers is that they cut down trees to build a big complex dams. Why bring them back. While i say huge question really our rivers on not in great health in fact cannot being great health without this animal. We need the hydrological. Cycle is incredibly important. So you get beavis. You begin to get large slow. Moving bodies of water. They hold a lot of water during dry to vents our land in the northern hemisphere Same applies in in north. America has been dried out either. Move of this animal. We need to hold water on island for longer in a few live in a settlement which is by a stream if you haven't got flooding yet you're probably gain to as a weather. Extremes become greater the swings get to stronger and if you live in a place which is a little bit prone to drought than those dreitzer going to get worse and it's gonna be really important to have a be a in upstream areas so you spoken about the benefits that beavers bring but they have not been around four hundred years and ecosystems have changed in their absence. Could reintroduction project spin out of control we think about was one of the do they cut entrees and they create localized flooding. That's what happens when they build a dam now. If that localized flooding is in a place where does not matter then a. We can say that as being a societal benefit you know because the us will improve official improves. The birds will improve. All those things plus will help to reduce the risk of downstream flooding. So that's good if they create a flood which fudge your house because you live next to the river. That is a bad. I think we've got the benefit of starting the completely blank slate. Now we can select those places where we bring beavis where they're going to have the maximum in terms of. Let's say societal benefits. We can manage those animals in such a way that we maximize goods and minimize the bats. You have hosted a family of beavers in an enclosure on your own land. What's that been like. Eighty absolutely extraordinary. They've created a large area of warta was not there before maybe only there a thousand years ago. They've brought back eight. Different species of birds turned up. We've got eleven species of bats feeding here in a time of driving twenty eighteen. We can actually pump water out onto our surrounding land. Because the beavis created reserve water for us that is if you're interested in preventing funding downstream. That is the name of the game. How does her damn look today. Pretty solid i. It's amazing you can just walk across. I use that area of land to graze some of my cows on and they just walk across the top of the dams. It's it's quite extraordinary has solid they are i mean. The beaver has a reputation as industrious. Little worker certainly the case here in the us where we have plenty of them in canada. They're revered of course even appears on the canadian nickel so after four hundred years of not having any beavers. What is the cultural connection. Brits have with be risk today. Eight kind of being relearned. You know. I think we do have that connection is still. But it's kind of through the prism of north america. You know we. We lost our b. Was a long time ago. I think yes. The last one. Four hundred years i think the vast majority of our viewers were gone. Maybe thousand years ago but we're slowly relearning it. You know a lot of school kids come and visit our site for example on they see the bbc the making stuff and they see them cutting down on. I think they learn. These animals have a real impact in that. They really move stuff. Chris jones the director and founder of the. Uk's beaver trust. He's been speaking with us. From cornwall chris. Thank you very much. Hey you're really welcome marco. Good luck more stories from around the globe are coming up your with the world.

twitter alibaba halima condie nigeria chris lagos tesla uk fox Nigeria britain us jones government bbc north america Chris jones cornwall chris marco
"first four hundred years" Discussed on Exponential Podcast

Exponential Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"first four hundred years" Discussed on Exponential Podcast

"There is an aspect of development. So we're at a point in our staff now to where you know. There's some hires from the outside. But most people that we have just developed and disciple over the years and so we have to think in terms also not five months. But what can god do in five years just just because a handful of churches blow up overnight in her huge doesn't mean at to god's called you to be and so long game right you're talking about his play the long game you know i. I'm glad to hear you articulate this beginning with with some measure of of counsel and guidance from proven leadership that can then help through prayer and fasting through discipleship communicating to the church. I'm glad to hear you talk about that. Because that's exactly what we've been working on and doing in missouri facts. Here's a little bit of a how tip folks on their website. You can go. this is real time. A church called would crest dot org would crest dot org but we recently rolled out. The new vision mission worked on as a team. The elders of the church staff Got to a point. It's on their website. And of course it's talking about becoming a healthy multi at the church and a socially gestured sector. This is a this was like a willow creek church at one time. That is now totally. Drank the koolade but i love this on the website because it it says on there when it rights went when the vision is there right under it says this is not who we are at the moment but this is who we intend to be. Congress come join us in the journey that kind of honesty. Some people you know. They're starting a church. They wanna be multi. They put stock photos on whatever. I've seen those honest. Just be on as you are in. Invite others into the journey right. I've i have seen those. And i. I think that's the beauty of transparency and humiliated. Say this is not who we are but this is who are going to be. And here's why and a want people to understand the why. This is a discipleship issue. When jesus tells his hundred twenty jewish disciples go make disciples of all ethnic groups right so think of it in a first century. Jewish perspective. jewish. Jesus is telling. His jewish disciples go to the gentiles. The nation's now history of jews and gentiles was not a good one. Four hundred years of slavery in egypt. The canaanites hittites zebbie bites the babylonians. And now romans in. It's like jesus san. Hey i want you to go reach to people over press you and persecuted you and you know people like haymond wanted to wipe you off to face the earth right. No wonder jesus says. But i tell you love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you like going on mission means..

willow creek church missouri jesus Congress jesus san haymond egypt
A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

Native America Calling

01:25 min | 1 year ago

A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

"More than a century ago nearly two hundred ojibway graves were removed from the burial grounds of a lake superior tribe to make way for. Us steals plan to develop or docks that were never built now. A new effort seeks to return those lands and reburial site to the fondling band of lake. Superior chippewa danielle catering. Reports wisconsin. Point is a remote strip of land on the shore of lake superior. It marks the ancestral home of the fondling tribe whose relatives settled there as early as four hundred years ago. Seven generations were laid to rest at the wisconsin point cemetery including the communities leader chief joseph osan gave the company uprooted the dead and those still living like calling aired parents. Aired who is ninety. Seven is a direct descendant of chievo soggy. It's hallowed ground to me. We just love dead aired says. Her father would be thrilled to see. The land turned over to the tribe. They're one step closer to that goal. After the superior city council passed a resolution supporting the transfer fonda lack chairman kevin dooby says returning. The lands would provide some closure to tribal families. Remember what happened in the past. It's our laos and we have to take care of it. Continue move forward. City and tribal officials will work with wisconsin. Us senator tammy baldwin office to petition the us department of interior to place the lands in federal trust for fonda lack for national native news. i'm daniel catering.

Superior Chippewa Danielle Cat Wisconsin Point Cemetery Joseph Osan Superior City Council Wisconsin Kevin Dooby United States Fonda Senator Tammy Baldwin Us Department Of Interior Daniel Catering
TV Reports: Fire in food factory in Bangladesh kills dozens

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

TV Reports: Fire in food factory in Bangladesh kills dozens

"Bangladesh TV stations say at least forty nine people have died in a fire that broke out at a food and beverage factory outside the country's capital an official has confirmed that a fob again Thursday night at the five story for some food and beverage limited factory just outside the capital dot com he said additional details were not yet clear while local TV says rescuers were trying to recover the bodies from of the burn factory which was locked from the inside when the fire began Bangladesh has a tragic history of industrial disasters in twenty nineteen a five the oldest part of the city a four hundred year old area cramped with apartments shops and warehouses left at least sixty seven people dead I'm Charles Taylor that's not

Bangladesh Charles Taylor
"first four hundred years" Discussed on The RobCast

The RobCast

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"first four hundred years" Discussed on The RobCast

"To their is an infinite absolute outside of time awareness. That is the deepest self of each of us That has only ever experienced sensations thoughts and appearance coming and going within this. This is why like great teachers. Said things like i am. There's an. im nece to everyone of us this indestructible outside of time impermeable. It is that within which all of our experience of life actually happening. Yeah and like the the materialist reductionism. They just talked about notice. How if if our conscious experience If this life is a product of material interactions if you think back to the most beautiful moments of your life the moments where you felt the most love the moment where you felt the most at peace if your explain the world through materials reductionist view than those feelings that you were feeling that feeling of complete bliss complete unionists. Love connect end that. What that materials. Reductionist view says that that was a re- that was a result of that was all that is it can be that can be reduced down to to interaction of neurons in your brain material reality. It's so all the most beautiful aspects of experience are just explained away as simply just material material parts interacting so actually takes the most beautiful deepest parts of life and just explains them reduces them down to these just these material parts and there's nothing actually deeper than it's just a cold indifferent neutral universe and everything everything you're feeling is just a result of that and if it doesn't explain away what often it feels is. It's almost like a strained muted. Yeah yeah that's right. That's right when a kid is born or when you fall in love. Yeah that's real that's real. it's just. Yeah but it's almost. It's a muted strained embrace because yeah but then you die. Yeah yeah and then we're we're creating a bit of a cartoon character here of this paradigm but it's very important. This is very true. And it's pretty pollen totally and we we. We don't want to demonize us this paradigm of this type of thinking at all and and that's why we've been acknowledged beneficiaries. That's why we've been acknowledging the really beautiful aspects of this type of thinking. The the main point here is that these are beautiful aspects of thinking but when these become the lens at which dominates our lives you see how it excludes and and suppresses the really beautiful aspects of life because it creates this this lens the very small view the world through. So it's just everything can be explained away by material interactions. And what we're doing here is we're were questioning that by saying that. Actually that's built upon a that's built on a belief that can't ever actually be verified. The idea that what we are conscious experience is being produced by matter is a is simply a belief that cannot be cannot be verified. There's okay so tell me. If i'm leaping ahead here or behind or back but here's those of you who have heard me talk about quantum physics. Allot here's why things got really really interesting about one hundred years ago. And that's why the whole game. I don't know in my lifetime. But that's that's why the whole game is in the process of a massive massive shift that is bigger than even the one four hundred years ago. I'm just going to say that for fun is around one hundred years ago. You had quantum physicists. who started taking apart matter Stuff the stuff that we is indisputably true in real the starting point in in the modern age and quantum physicists are taking it apart okay. So cells are made molecules. Great molecules are made of atoms. Atoms made of atoms are made of particles. What are particles. Well take apart iraq. You end up with a rock made of subatomic particles. Those particles are bits essentially bits and pieces of energy And they iraq is a cloud of possibilities because those particles don't and show you which path they took when they moved from point eight to be until they're observed. Yeah so scientists. This is key. Science began to see what things all of this hard cold matter is actually made of and it turns out matter in the end is energy in relationship with other matter clouds of possibilities that come and go. Sometimes particles come into existence. And we don't know where they came from they disappear and they don't know where they went. Yeah so okay you more on the i pause. Okay okay go. I just want to interrupt so the so the big one of the big key key ideas of of this. Materialists thinking is that there's a there's an objective reality that's fixed so what you are is different from that the the world out there because the world is made up of discrete things that are static and unmoving. There's there's particles and adams out there that are static and and not their definitive and right there now. What quantum physics with quantum physics came in is when it studied when it went to detail. Study those it actually discovered that those particles aren't static and fixed. Those particles are actually existing as a cloud of possibilities field which means that those particles exist in what's called a state of super super position in which those particles exist in a state of all possible states that could exist in until their observed and then they choose one particular one and when they're in that so when they're in that when they're in that superposition state their existing as peer potentially and then when they observed they they collapses into an actuality which is which is the reality that we observe so the the big point here is that actually when they studied they when they studied particles they found out that particles weren't fixed things in reality they were actually. They weren't anything at all until they were observed. So this is really important because notice that this realist ideas built upon this idea of a fixed objective. Reality that's right there. That's independent of the observer. That's independent of theirs. You over here and there's an you're watching in a line between the two there's a world totally independent of consciousness now when they actually studied the world and this was one hundred years ago this is in the nineteen twenty s and one hundred years ago when they actually studied this world they they found out that this world did not exist as a static fixed reality it was actually way more fluid and actually it wasn't fixed like they previously thought i the the line for me is that when i i stumbled into all this was that solidity is an illusion So like you have some things that are solid like the floor of this room iraq. A car solid body bone solid but actually everything that appears to be solid is in reality. according to science that's important say According to the according to the lens and paradigm itself actually turned out to be energy and relationship fields in which the observation the awareness and observation and witness of the matter shapes.

im nece iraq adams
"first four hundred years" Discussed on Free audio sermons: Get free audio sermons and free audio Bible studies!

Free audio sermons: Get free audio sermons and free audio Bible studies!

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"first four hundred years" Discussed on Free audio sermons: Get free audio sermons and free audio Bible studies!

"Far as the books go get the books or someone says. We'll get the dogs. If you knew that you had dogs than you would understand. Why yes. Those are dogs that i will get. These are the books or someone says You had a gathering in some ways the plates where you do understand that there is that collection of plates or there are some dogs. There's some books whatever that might be so then you talks about the book. He understood that there was also a collection their old testament. Thus we have some information about cannon. Then they'll have sometimes tried to make their own cannon. History is replete with several examples of that you find for example accepting the apocrypha eagles catholic books which we are not going to be able to get to tonight when people except those books they are trying to bring in books which were not part of god's cannon if you have something else being done in there have been multiple examples of this. People have sometimes rejected a bible book. It's been proven to be a bible book a book which was inspired by god. And people said. I don't want that look. We don't have that up here yet. But martin luther remember which he didn't have great appreciation for called a rights. Draw your pistol. It was james. So i don't think we would say that. He rejected that book but certainly is he thought about books that really merited a lot of attention held in high regard. That was not one that that he saw in those waves So accepting a book which did not designed to be accepted rejecting the book when you look at the samaritans. They had their own cannon. They looked at the books of genesis through deuteronomy and they said we believe that these books are from god however and. That's we find that last year they did not believe that everything in genesis deuteronomy was from god. They had what you might call an edited version. I have not personally seen this. But i have found over the years. Preachers have dealt with people sometimes. Who in a bible study for example. They're being asked about a certain passage purchases says well let's turn over to mark chapter sixteen and the person says that is not my bible says well sure it is no. It's not. Well yeah let me show you where it is so they turn over there and then all the sudden you can see some tear marks the person. The person actually tore it out well. They've not rejected the whole book of mark but in that particular case they did reject at least a chapter or they rejected a page from the book of mark. And that's not exactly making your own cannon but that is in the same basic ballpark so it said that people have done that but if a book or they did not like certain bible books they will do that when you look at matthew chapter twenty two verses eight for example we find that the sad jesse's. They did not accept the resurrection so there were some things there in the old testament that they also did not accept now that might be shocking to that they were people who were that will educated people who were influential jews that were not willing to accept everything as far as gods inspired old testament books but as i said before the stuff that we're talking about generally these are not new problems. Jesus in luke chapter twenty four hundred forty four want to have that passage jesus hints at an old testament canon. He indicates and he doesn't give book by book. Whoa but it does give you an indication that the old testament a specific grouping and he points to the fact that in that grouping there were books that god did design for the jews to have books that were inspired anybody there and want to read that for chapter twenty four hundred forty four all right maxine. The words which has found that all be written off. Thank you how many divisions does jesus offer for the old testament he says there is the law and there are the prophets and there are the psalms anything else a threefold division. Now you can go back and try to plug different books into those but jesus does give you a basic division there and that is information Pointing to canton now. It is true that we have more information about the new testament. Canon the old testament. I don't know that that's the problem because the old testament were under that testament and that's that's important. We want to make sure that that is reliable. But our focus is really on the new testament. There were strong incentives to determine canonists city in other words. Says you go back and you look at the first christians all the way up for about the first four hundred years of christianity different circumstances for that four hundred year period costs people to sometimes have some really strong incentives to figure out whether or not a book was from god or a book was not from god and sometimes today just as questions if you'd then a member of the church for very long you've probably been simaba classes whether it was taught by me or someone else. There was a question that came up. And you think oh. I've heard this question brought up before and this question has been discussed before and we didn't have agreement on it the last twenty two times and we're probably not going to have agreement on it today. Anybody ever been in a situation. We'll good league one day you will and when you start looking at the discussions that zimbabwe believing people had there was that discussion. Should we accept this book as canonical or should we not. One of the problems was there. Were some people running around. Who were hero. Ticks when we look at our daytime we got sacks. We have people seeing all kinds of things and sometimes those things are not just wrong. Sometimes those things are very wrong and just like now the megaphone that the people had way back when was in some respects not as loud as what we have today with the internet and other tools that allow people to put some information out in into the public domain quite easily but there were some people who were very very influential and he'll have some people out there now bear in mind. We're talking about people who are here. Dick's people who are expressing some views which are completely contrary to the truth completely. False as far as what's right is some people out there for example. Let's say that they're they're telling people. The book genes is not inspired. When that is false is not going to be a problem. What happens if they say. There's only one account of jesus life if god gave four. Is that a problem now. Somebody has that you and the hold the privately. That may not be such a big deal. But when someone has that view and they began to spread that far and wide and perhaps they began to amass followers. Now what he have. You're trying to convert the unsafe. That's about battle over here but now you're trying to put out the fires that are being promoted by this heretic and by his followers and your problems are just mushrooming so for the hair tech's important to put some of these guys down by saying look there is a canon of scripture. Marsin comes along about one forty four ad so he's about one hundred years little over one hundred years hundred and ten years after the establishment of the church and you can find some information about him online. He's an interesting character. He was someone and there are still people today who express views like he had me when he would say the god of the old testament was not the god of the new testament is was that the god of the old testament was mean. The testament was the nick of the god of the old testament was an angry gone. But when we flip over to the new testament we have in his mind a different guy. We have a god who is nice. We have a god who is loving. We have a god who is peaceful. We have a god who is merciful. We have a god that you want to follow but if you earned an old testament that god was not so much you think there's anybody in the world that believes that today. We still have people now. They might believe that a different reason but this is not a new view. If you were to go back and talk to marching. You'd find that. He believed that only. Paul taught the true gospel. Would you have a problem with it. A.

Paul martin luther last year today Marsin One Dick christianity jesus james first four hundred years Jesus tonight one hundred years jews a page four chapter twenty two one forty four ad bible
Mayflower AI Sea Drone Readies Maiden Transatlantic Voyage

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Mayflower AI Sea Drone Readies Maiden Transatlantic Voyage

"The Mayflower has left Plymouth England again this is not the same ship that arrived in Massachusetts in sixteen twenty this may flowers much more moderate and marine biology professor Richard Thompson says it's searching for signs of plastic pollution in the water to sample write down some of the smallest pieces in the ocean some of the microplastics lessen the diameter of a human head Andy Stanford Clark with IBM says this may flowers robotic no passengers on board I don't know what situation is going to come across so that itself will be a journey which discovery the old Mayflower mated to Plymouth Massachusetts in sixteen twenty red fan F. with the Mayflower autonomous ship projects says who knows what happens this time most similar thing between this project on the four hundred and the regional four hundred years ago was that neither of us are sure we were going to make it but our risk is much smaller than their risk the journey to Massachusetts should take about two weeks I met Donahue

Andy Stanford Clark Plymouth Massachusetts Richard Thompson England IBM Donahue
Eliminating Single-Use Plastic One Household Bottle at a Time

A Positive Climate

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Eliminating Single-Use Plastic One Household Bottle at a Time

"Episode is all about plastic. And did you know that every minute an entire garbage truck of plastic is dumped into our ocean. Today's episode is specifically about the plastic. We can team in a number of our household products such as looney liquid body. Wash and hanso now. Plastic is a product that is a lot of convenience to allies and it can be incredibly durable but so gerbil that unfortunately it can take over four hundred years for your hands at container to decompose. That's ri- n- alex. I'm just going to surprise you. Here with him have an impromptu. A positive kilometer trivia saw. How much plastic do you as an average australian new you above average the per year in plastic. Okay i'm gonna say fifty kilos fifty killed. Well why are you making a big number. But now it's actually one hundred and thirty kilograms per person per year. Do you know how much that is. It's it's about the white of the rockets every year. Consuming dwayne the rock johnson steaks. And then we're throwing him out in plastic correct. But it's worth being serious about this because you have to think of plastic this endless cycle of damage. And it's worth just rolling this off one by one. So firstly almost all plastic is actually derived from the materials ethylene propylene and from fossil fuels oil and gas so apparently about four percents of global petroleum production gets diverted to create plastic secondly to refund. It's usually energy intensive so let's add another full percent of petroleum gets used to refine it. Thirdly it's rarely recycled on the eleven percent is actually recycle. This means that the rest ends up in landfills or in poorly regulated nations at just gets incinerated beside the hate will get to this plastic landfills and that causes the emission of greenhouse gases. Then finally fought isn't recycled in landfill or incinerated. As alex said it's in our oceans so assistant into in disaster.

Alex Dwayne
The Egyptian Pyramids Are Crazy

Chicago Dog Walk

01:42 min | 1 year ago

The Egyptian Pyramids Are Crazy

"The pyramid appearance while we should say that the reason everybody was was hitting us up to do this because they are they are studying each all the time to the point that they found a whole city the whole city that they had never that they didn't know existed and they're calling it the golden city thirty four hundred years old they just just popped up so explain their digging and they found like turkey kinda yes. They have this technology and they're always doing like there's you can study in college and get a phd called egyptology. So there are people who do nothing but egypt and so you had an archaeologist indiana jones guy running around egypt and they have this new technology called widar and they found this city. They're calling it the golden city and they found like it's like perfectly preserved because it's just been buried with like dirt and dust similar to like that go beckley tupi and turkey. Were just everything was there. And they're finding weird skeletons and stuff and they're finding like different types of walls and structures and things that were not really present anywhere else in egypt and then the big thing like the. The tombs have been studied in egypt. Rate and Light they apparently The sphinx and like alexandria and like all these different things have been studied. But there's no evidence or study about how egyptians actually lived. This is all like. Oh here's a weird temple. Here's a weird pyramid. Here's a weird statue. And i was at there. Why was it there and like know a couple of guys like us back in ancient egypt. What were we doing Well there's no evidence for any of that stuff. This is what that is.

Golden City Egypt Indiana Jones Turkey Alexandria
Stars unite to condemn anti-Asian racism

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Stars unite to condemn anti-Asian racism

"Celebrities of Asian descent are speaking out as part of a new campaign hash tag stop Asian hate in the wake of the Atlanta massage business shootings that killed eight people six who were women of Asian descent actress Kelly Marie Tran knows first hand about racism after she was cast as a lead in a Star Wars movie now she's speaking out against the violence sweeping the country stop Asian eight joining the campaign will on actor who only we got here four hundred years ago or for we are home and M. butterfly playwright David Henry Hwang we need you to stand with us singer milk also lends her voice these women were more than somebody's temptation on a bad day you're somebody's mother friend you see and hear more on their social media pages I'm Julie Walker

Kelly Marie Tran M. Butterfly Atlanta David Henry Hwang Milk Julie Walker
How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

TED Talks Daily

04:07 min | 2 years ago

How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

"Oh firm use of fire that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention a kingdom for a stage princes to act and monarch to behold the swelling scene. Though to be totally honest right. Now i'd settle for a real school day a night out and a hug from a friend. The words that i spoke at the beginning firm use a fire etc are shakespeare's. He wrote them as the opening to his play. Henry the fifth and there are also quite likely. The first words ever spoken on the stage of the globe theatre in london when it opened in fifteen ninety nine the global go on to become the home for most of shakespeare's work and from what i hear that shakespeare guy was pretty popular but despite his popularity just four years later in sixteen zero three. The globe would close for an extended period of time in order to prevent the spreading and resurgence of the bubonic plague and facts from sixteen zero three to sixteen thirteen. All of the theaters in london were closed on and off again for an astonishing seventy eight months here in chicago in two thousand sixteen new theaters opening as well. The steppenwolf had just opened at seventeen hundred theater. Space the goodman down in the loop had just opened its new center for education and engagement and the chicago shakespeare theatre had just started construction on its newest theatre space. The yard today. Those theatres as well as the homes are over two hundred and fifty other theater companies across chicago are closed due to covid nineteen from broadway to l. a. Theaters are dark and when or if the lights are ever going to come on again. That means that tens of thousands of theater artists are out of work from actors and directors to stage managers. Set builders costume designers. It's not like it's an easy time to go wait tables. It's a hard time for the theater. And it's a hard time for the world but while theaters may be feeder as an art form has the potential to shine on how we can process and use this time apart to build a brighter more equitable healthier future together. Theater is the oldest art form we humans have. We know that the greeks were writing plays as early as the fifth century. Bc but theater goes back before that it goes back before we learned to write to call and response around fires. And who knows maybe before we learned to build fire itself feeder has outlasted empires weathered wars and survived plagues in the early sixteen hundred. Theatres closed over sixty percent of the time in london. And that's still looked at is one of the most fertile an innovative periods of time in western theater history. The plays that were written then are still performed today. Over four hundred years later unfortunately in the early sixteen hundreds a different plague was making its way across the ocean and it hit the shores of what would be called american sixteen nineteen when the first slave ships landed in jamestown virginia. Racism is an ongoing plague in america but many of us in the theater like to think we're not infected or that we are at worst as symptomatic but the truth is our symptoms have been glaring onstage and off. We have the opportunity to use this intermission. Caused by one clegg to work to cure another. We can champion a theater. That marches protests burns bills. We can reimagine the way our theaters institutions work to make them more reflective. And just we can make this one of the most innovative and transformative periods of time in western theater. History one that we're still learning about celebrating four hundred years from now. What we embody in the theater can be embodied in the world. Why because theater is an essential service. And what i mean by that. Is that theater is in service to that which is essential about ourselves. Love anger rage despair. Hope theatre not only shows us the breadth and depth of human emotions. It allows us to experience catharsis to feel our feelings and rather than ignore compartmentalize them move through them to discover. What's on the other side

Seventeen Hundred Theater Shakespeare Center For Education And Engag Chicago Shakespeare Theatre London Chicago Plague Goodman Henry The Globe Jamestown Virginia America
Ibram X. Kendi And Keisha N. Blain On The 400-year story Of Black people In America

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:54 min | 2 years ago

Ibram X. Kendi And Keisha N. Blain On The 400-year story Of Black people In America

"Professor planes. You've got the top box. I'm going to start with you. This is a different kind of history book right. It's a history book where some of the ninety writers aren't even historians collectively who are the writers. And why are their voices so important so we asked an array of writers to contribute to the volume. And as you point out so many of them are not professional Journalists to contribute we asked philosophers to contribute We asked creative writers to contribute as well as poets end. What we wanted to do was really grapple with four hundred years of history. And not you know. We really didn't want it to feel like a typical a history book. I and of course asking ninety historians Would have i think a taken away from the the sort of you know tone that we were trying to set which was bringing together a diverse community which met people coming to the history writing about the history from their own experiences but also from their unique trainings whether in the field of journalism are in the field of law and so it was important for us to create something new something special something original and that meant bringing in writers from a wide array of backgrounds. Professor professor blaine just talked about the fact that you have poets in the book and you write quote sometimes. History is best captured by poets out. Some more there's anything. I've learned in my time writing history. That is that it's deeply complex. Variegated story that in many ways. We have to imagine things that we don't have a speculate on on on decisions that we don't have a specific for that we have to stretch archive especially when writing on on people's particularly working class. Americans certainly working cost black folks who haven't left an archive who haven't left on speeches and and necessarily written records and so you know. Poets have the capacity to really show the depth and complexity and the imagination and creativity of humanity. And and so when we when that comes to bear on history. And i think they were really able at the end of each section to really flush out and contextualized. You know forty years. When i was in school. Professor blaine We're going way back like the nineteen seventies nineteen eighties black history The way we're talking about today just wasn't taught. Slavery was a chapter and not exactly told honestly the accomplishments of black americans were diminished if they were even acknowledged so has anything changed since the seventies in the eighty s. What needs to change. So i think some things have changed You know when you look at how history textbooks written. We're certainly at a place where the textbooks that are produced today or even in the last ten years i think are better than the ones that were a public. Maybe twenty years ago does not mean that we still don't have work to do. In fact we have a lot of work to do. Especially i think in the last two or three years. We've been talking about textbooks in places states like texas for example where they're still a debate about how you talk about the civil war and how you talk about slavery and like you. I certainly encounter textbooks. That didn't really flesh out are the nuances. You know an even the trauma of of the the experience of slavery in often times a glossed over eight or or perhaps had a little box to focus on martin luther king junior but other than that not really center a historical figures i and so a lot has changed in part of that. Change is directly tied. I think to the work of a professional historians. We've been working very hard odd to excavate the history in in in order to help people better write about the history. I in a way that reflects the richness than the complexity and diversity of the black experience but particularly in a way that centers black agency which is key that black voices appear. That black ideas appear in. These textbooks are still some work to do. But i think we're making progress. I think four hundred souls is certainly the kind of texts that would help us move forward in that direction.

Blaine Just Professor Blaine Martin Luther King Texas
The hidden history found in your teeth

TED Talks Daily

04:43 min | 2 years ago

The hidden history found in your teeth

"And why don't you to think about the image that you see when i say. One word migrant pictured a crowded boat in rough waters people clinging to the top of a freight train or crossing desert wearing worn out shoes. This is what we see in the news cycle. Twenty four hours day after day story after story people who are desperate fleeing wars climate change fleeing poverty but in reality most people move from common reasons to get a good education to find a job to find members or to fall in love. And this is nothing. New archaeologists like me have been studying migration and finding that people for hundreds even thousands of years have been moving around the globe from europe's earliest farmers to vikings to pirates roman gladiators and even the nfl caveman and people like you and me. Mobility is one of the things that makes us human people move and we know this because of something that you brought with you here tonight you carry it with the many places to work to the gym to bed and even in the shower. It's not your cell phone and it's not any person your pockets it's you it's your body and your bones all two hundred and six them. I brought mine because your bones will tell the story of your life even a single two and we know that teeth. Tell us many things for your dentist. For example he or she can see if you floss or if like me really like candy and you might end up with some cavities. And if my dentist is here tonight will see you monday. And i've been very good but your teeth also tell you something about migration you take your tongue and run it along. Incisors these front teeth. The back of those will be flat. If you have european or african ancestry if you feel sort of scoop or shovel shape your ancestors may have been native american or migrated from asia. If we go inside the tooth so the pulp cavity we may be able to extract the dna. And see if your ancestors came from egypt or england or both but we're not interested as much in your family's migration history as yours and we're that's where we go to the tooth enamel what it's made out of to try and find out if a person moved and even when they moved and it's based on one simple idea that you are which eats all the minerals and elements in the food like calcium oxygen. Which is the h two sodium in. Salt can tell us something about your diet. So we know if you or white bread if you prefer pork chicken or if you really like seafood there other elements that. Tell us where that food came from. And that includes sulfur strontium oxygen and even lead. Which of course you don't want very much of but these tell us where the food comes from and that can tell us where you were when you you're eating and that is what archeologists us to identify ancient migration if we look inside the tooth enamel conc- for example in your first molar. This is the one that was forming along with your baby teeth. But it's only when you still have and that tells us where you were living as an infant if we look at wisdom tooth which is the last tooth the form. That enamel would have been mineralized before you hit your teenage years. So we know where you're living then if we look at your bones and in that pause you just formed new bone cells. That's telling us what you're eating and what you're doing just about the past decade of life so we can really track where people moved and we've looked at this for hundreds and thousands of individuals to identify migration in the past. So i'd like to introduce you to some ancient migrants. If we go back in time sixteen hundred years we can go to the city of coupon where the people lived in. What's honduras if we came around the year four hundred ad who might have walked into broad plazas under really hot tropical sun was shining onto bright red painted buildings altars and carved statues in front of them. If we'd come on the right day we might have seen. The inauguration of ruler can initiate kook mall roughly translated that means son faced first mccaw. The maya rulers had really great names bird jaguar. Dark lady great but what was really neat about yash. Kusumo is that he established a dynasty that lasted for more than four hundred years. And every depiction we have him. Show him in foreign clothing. This is what people weren't central mexico which was not in the maya region and actually hundreds of miles away so for a long time. Archaeologists thought that this was a foreign king but his teeth told a different story by sampling. His first smaller has wisdom tooth and bone. We found that he in fact probably came from somewhere in the maya region so he wasn't migrant but he made lived in multiple places before coming to colpon even though he dressed like he was a foreigner

NFL Europe Egypt Asia England Kusumo Honduras Mccaw Yash Mexico
Much to repair: Bidens first day on the job

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:20 min | 2 years ago

Much to repair: Bidens first day on the job

"My fellow americans a moment we have all been waiting for the washington yesterday. A new chapter began as joe. Biden was sworn in as america's forty-six resident biden junior do solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute. The inauguration displayed the unique circumstances in which he enters office surrounded by twenty five thousand national guardsmen. The ceremony took place with neither crowds. Nor mr biden's predecessor. But it's still featured some familiar inaugural hallmarks celebrity solos and a stirring poem written for the occasion by twenty two year old. Amanda gorman being american is more than a pride we inherit is the past we step into and how we repair it. We've incoming administration used the moment to project an image of well to choose a word that was often repeated. Unity are miss january day. My whole soul is in this. Bringing america together. Uniting our people unite in our nation. Mr biden takes office. Not just at a moment of disunity. In american politics but also a moment of multiple crises among the population president biden laid out at least four big challenges facing the country. It cologne is economists. Washington correspondent this time of testing. The first is simply containing covid. Nineteen pandemic has been raging for almost a year. Now four hundred thousand. Americans have died in a century virus in silence. Stocks country is taken as many lives in one year as america. Lost in all of world war two efforts to control the virus to vaccinate enough people to generate herd. Immunity have not been going. Well he needs to get ahead on that immediately. The second that he brought up is the economic situation right now. There are ten million fewer americans working than were before the pandemic started. Millions of jobs have been lost. Hundreds of thousands of businesses closed. Another is the crisis of racial justice that we saw erupt over the summer. In protests against police brutality. A cry for racial justice. Some four hundred years in the making moves us the fourth thing that he has to deal with it he emphasized quite a lot is the lack of unity. The feeling of partisan rancor between republicans and democrats. He emphasized that this was a moment for national. Doing this is our historic moment of crisis in challenge. Nudity is the path forward and we must meet this moment. As the united states of america. He acknowledged that although payouts to unity might seem naive. That america still needs to try to do those things i mean. It's a long list that that he got started on almost the second he set foot in the white house yesterday. President biden went to the white house and immediately went to work on a stack of executive orders. I think some of the things are going to be doing them. And there's no time to start like two days so he signed one. That started the process for america to rejoin the paris accords which set emissions targets for countries around the world. He signal that it was the end of the trump era by cancelling funding for the border wall on mexico. That trump had famously promised. He canceled the so-called muslim travel ban for citizens of muslim-majority countries and finally while wearing a mask while sitting behind the resolute desk. Something that president trump had not done. President biden signed an executive order. Mandating the wearing of masks in areas that the federal government had authority that is intended to signal that this is a president that will take cove nineteen on much more seriously and someone who believes unlike the previous administration that it will be primarily the federal government's responsibility to coordinate policy as opposed to leaving it up to the states. Okay but that's comparatively easy stuff. We we know that orders but what about the more complicated stuff that will take congressional backing the first bill that is going to consume the biden presidency is going to be another cove relief measure. It's supposed to amount to two trillion dollars in spending. It includes money for a vaccination drive for testing contact tracing and it includes some economic relief measures. They've signaled that the second big proposal they're going to try to get through. Congress is going to be a infrastructure package based on what he has laid out during the campaign we imagined that it would be also quite big perhaps on the order of two trillion dollars and this would be not only where things like universal broadband and roads and bridges trucial infrastructure. Get their day but also would be the primary vehicle. For president biden's main climate agenda items including massive investment in clean energy research tax credits for wind solar all those sorts of things will probably come in that second bill. Well that's what he wants. But what is he likely to get he. He does have a democratic majority in the house and in the senate but it's by the slimmest of margins so there are two ways that biden can get things through congress. The first is to attract enough republican votes to defeat a filibuster which is basically of rule that allows forty members of the senate to stall any legislation in other route that he has available to. Him is a procedure known as reconciliation. That's a budgetary measure. Which is immune to filibuster and often used by presidents with slim majorities to get some of their policy priorities through. It is a tougher route to take than the normal one. There are limits on what you can do what we've seen so far is that he's not shy away from proposing some of the biggest seeming most ambitious legislation that he can and i think the strategy here is to go big and let it get whittled down as you go through the process of congressional negotiations. And there's still the matter of former president trump's impeachment trial i mean. How do you think that will affect mr biden's ability to agenda going so the main problem with impeachment is that it will take up time on the senate floor because all the senators will have to be present to hear the evidence against former president trump and to decide. Eventually that is floor time. That could be used to confirm. President biden's nominees. The be used to confirm judges that could be used to debate. Legislation the sentence on session that much. So that's the main problem and the biden administrations actually hinted at the fact that they are somewhat worried. That impeachment might take up some of their time. But there's no indication that it is going to be stalled. Seems like it's gonna start relatively soon and probably what what might happen is split sort of schedule where the impeachment trial doesn't take up all the time that the senate has available. It's an understatement. To say mr biden has quite a lot of work to get done here do you. Do you think he's up to it. Do you think he is the man for this moment. Biden comes to office with half a century of experience in washington dc. He comes to office as the oldest man at seventy eight years old to occupy the presidency. He is an elder statesman. He might not serve more than a single term. He sees his role as someone who can turn down the flames of america's partisan warfare right now and he sees himself as a bridge candidate between not only the flanks within the democratic party but some conciliatory republicans right now given the crises. The country faces given the problems of hyper partisanship and mutual antagonism and loathing. You know an attitude like that will make market shift from what we had before coming from the white house so with purpose and resolve we turn to those tasks of our time sustained by faith driven by conviction devoted to one another in the country we love with all our hearts may god bless america and you might be naive to feel optimistic after the events of the last year but i think that there is some grants optimism this

President Biden Mr Biden America Biden Amanda Gorman President Trump White House Federal Government Senate Cologne Donald Trump Rejoin JOE Washington Congress
Millions of Americans Don't Think Biden Won the Election

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Millions of Americans Don't Think Biden Won the Election

"Course people are going to getting prepared for the inauguration of someone that millions of americans. Don't think actually won the election. which is problematic. Is it fair to say that. that's problematic. Is it fair to say that we can say that it's problematic and then be demonized thing that it's problematic. This is where we are in america because my parents have seen communism upfront raised me. I write about this in my upcoming book. Fish out of water. That's coming up in In two weeks or less. Actually it's coming out in vicente water. A search for the meaning of life talk about being raised by parents in the shadow of world war. Two all of their memories of growing up of my mother and father lost their fathers when they were ten years old. My dad did my mom. Did they grew up during the war. They saw communism up close They saw the evil of communism a closer. They raised me differently than most americans were raised. And i noticed this growing up when we moved to danbury connecticut. When i was nine we i noticed that all these american kids that i went to public school with because before that i was in a parochial school greek orthodox school where all the greek kids there was a similar sense of the evil Whether the ottoman turks Oppressing degree for four hundred years or whether it was the communist The civil war with the communists right after world war two they all had a sense of evil of communism and that there's evil in the world that we had to be vigilant about america and liberty. And when i moved to danbury connecticut which i write about in fish out of water i noticed that the the kids that had american parents. They didn't have a sense of this. And i kind of think that's kind of where we are why we are where we are now because many americans just don't realize how bad it can get. They've never experienced it now. If you grew up in cuba or your parents grew up in cuba or you came from the soviet union You you know how evil communism is and so. It's one of the reasons that i've gone out on a limb. Some people think perhaps rectal recklessly. But i think when you're facing the possibility of marxism whether it's cultural marxism cancel culture. That's of course how it starts. You have to be vigilant. This is really really. It's not worth hanging back This is this is very very dark stuff so it's one of the reasons that i've been so outspoken. Because i've lived this through my parents. I know what is possible. I know that things don't always turn out. Well

Danbury Connecticut America Cuba Soviet Union
Turnovers Doom Saints in 30-20 NFC Divisional Playoffs Loss to Bucs

ESPN Daily

03:14 min | 2 years ago

Turnovers Doom Saints in 30-20 NFC Divisional Playoffs Loss to Bucs

"Bill. I just want to dive into it here. Because there's a lot to get to after watching the bucks. Beat the saints. Thirty to twenty so new orleans had been in tampa bay twice this season in week. One about four hundred years ago and then again in november. So what was the difference in this game vs those other two. I really simple pablo the saints. Just didn't protect the football. In the two regular season games between these teams the saints won the turnover battle. Both times there are plus three in the week one victory and then one up in the rematch. Tom brady threw five picks across those two games. Only seven in his other fourteen games. That really felt like the saints had his number and they were gonna have to flip that to win in new orleans. Well they flipped. It didn't turn the ball over the saints coughed up. Four times including three interceptions drew brees. The bucks turned the first few takeaways and two touchdowns and use the fourth to wrap up the game and kneel down. It's virtually impossible to win a playoff game. That sort of margin the saints will just sloppy in this game. Mean breeze could have thrown four or five picks. He threw an awful interception under pressure for the first one and on the same page with alvin kamara on a scene route for the second interception. The third bounced off jared cook. Who also fumbled away a completion on a drive where the saints were looking at. Go up to scores. They lost the ball and proceeded to give up seventeen unanswered points to end their season. So clearly the bucks had a formula of sorts for stopping breeze in it seemed like every aspect of this game. But it's not just that they stopped him instead. They made him look straight up terrible really often and i'm wondering how did they do that to that degree. Well i really think that todd bowles bucks defense. Look the tape from last week's game against the bears look how drew brees was playing. Look at how pal those receivers were moving and just didn't think there was anybody in that lineup who could reliably win against man coverage or beat them down field with their speed. This was especially true. After the saints lost deonte harris who had two long punt returns early in this game to a neck injury the saints did get a long touchdown but it was not with brees on the field. It was the lone snap for one jameis winston who came in and use the same trick. Play the bears ran against them last week. For a long touchdown coming across his sanders they handed to them. Refers goes to jameson mega man. Wide open trade smith at the twenty five fifteen ten five and a touchdown saints and jameis winston. What a touchdown pass against his former overall when breeze on the field it was pretty clear at the game plan was to dare him and his receivers to try and take shots towards the sidelines and get downfield and the game plan worked the bucks used heavy doses of twists and stunts upfront create pressure and then just smothered breezes receivers. I honestly it really felt the only reason. Sean payton didn't bench breeze for winston on the last drive. The game is because it was probably a last few snaps of drew brees his career.

Saints Bucks New Orleans Drew Brees Alvin Kamara Jared Cook Jameis Winston Tom Brady Tampa Bay Todd Bowles Pablo Deonte Harris Bill Football Bears Brees Jameson Smith Sean Payton Winston
A Weekend Of Chaos In Britain

Monocle 24: The Briefing

10:56 min | 2 years ago

A Weekend Of Chaos In Britain

"Been a weekend of chaos. in britain. the prime minister. Boris johnson gave a press conference on saturday which kick started a chain of events that is now being felt worldwide launch price former communications director at number ten downing street joins me now and monaco own editorial director tyler overlay is on the line from our studio launch. If we could begin with you can you talk us through. What's happened since saturday afternoon. Well basically christmas in britain has not quite been canceled. But it's come pretty close to it and it's enfold a pretty massive change of direction if not u-turn by the british government only on wednesday of last week. The prime minister was saying it would be inhuman draws people to cancel that christmas plans And then on saturday. He was forced to do a news conference in which he said that that is exactly what he was asking them to do. So that now people in in this country because of this new variant of covid nineteen essentially will be asked to just see a small number of people depending on where they live in the country on one day only on christmas day and then of course. We learned yesterday overnight. that's because of this New variant which is understandable because in great concern around the world. People struggled to see whether or not they have already with a. If they haven't they can they can contain the to prevent it coming. In from the united kingdom of borders closed all over the place huge queues to lorries trying to get to the at channel pulse dover in in particular where the crossing is to france and The french assigned that they won't take any huge queues at the an railway stations that get out of london and also chaos at the airports with likes being canceled to just about every destination you can of and it's hard to keep track of all the buddhas being closed at the moment. Tyler could bring you in here. What is the european view. We'll good afternoon georgia. European is one of not just canceling flights and cancelling connections. But also what we're seeing now. are now new quarantines going up so you know brits and also we also focused on maybe on a territory close to your heart or close to your heart also south africa as well because south africa is very much in the news as well it it. It is really in line with the uk as another country. is seeing outright bans on all travelers arriving whether the company from cape town or Or johannesburg into germany into switzerland and elsewhere as well so you have mean proper borders closes. It looked to for that moment. Yesterday we saw the dutch saying that. Okay airlinks We're going to be suspended but now we're looking at you. No one is allowed to arrive. in many countries the uk. And as you said almost minute by minute there are new measures going by countries across the continent here I mean lance one of your former colleagues listed campbell says it looks like the whole country is being put in brexit four by the rest of the world when incompetence meets venality and covert and brexit combined to expose the worst possible government at the worst possible. Time which you agree has this been woefully mishandled. Mile does have a way with words doesn't he. And he's absolutely right to in pretty much. Everything within the he says. Of course you have to separate this from from brexit brexit the final brexit deadline. Which is the thirty first of january. Hasn't yet hit us but as honestly suggests it's a taste of what we thought who's going to come anyway and he's also right to say that it raises a big question over the competence of the government other new variant of covid. Nineteen isn't boris johnson. Falls it's not anybody's walton in the in the british government but their reluctance to recognize. What so many other people around the world were recognizing and what their own scientific medical devices with telling them. Which was that the original plan for a five day. Christmas virtual virtually a free for all in the uk was just madness to only for that only to dawn on them on saturday. In the light of the new virus i think does call call call into question their their competence the end of the year when actually frankly dot competence has been called into question many times. I mean you think that johnson used the fact of the new variant to excuse his u-turn and was that then the perfect excuse for european borders to to fall like dominoes and shut us off physically from the block. Is there a little bit of perhaps schadenfreude going on here. We'll do spend a lot of speculation today georgina. You look at a number of different european news. Outlets are we also heading for some type of emergency extension Which could potentially happen. Which would again this would be of. Course be you know the perfect measure You have this new strain. You have borders. Of course being closed eros suspended cetera There there's no better excuse to if they wanted to kick this into the grass. I mean no one wants this But certainly you have to think here we have incredibly busy government Who have to deal with logistics issues. they have to deal with A media and public storm around this. I think we could be could be heading for certainly if you're listening to a lot of the correspondence at have brussels today. Maybe an extension talking about those logistical issues. Lonzo i mean. There are serious concerns about supply chains. How will the border closures affect availability of because then indeed traffic. Kent is already gridlocked in terms of traffic coming into the uk. Of course the roots are still open. If people wish to use those rates as a question ma about whether eu holiest would want to send their vehicles into the uk If they didn't get out again especially in the run-up to christmas and the other thing to remember is that a quite a lot quite a high percentage of trade across the english channel is unaccompanied freight. So it goes in containers dr flirt. It's picked up on the other side so there's no physical as a human being crossing with it and that can continue so the supermarkets and the many people in industry. I'll say don't panic yet. But we may be days away from them saying actually. Now's the time to panic I mean tyler is britain and by extension boris johnson. The sick man of europe. Is this an unprecedented crisis. Could we compare it to. I don't know one thousand nine hundred nine well if you look at some of the headlines in the papers certainly in the german press. We've been seeing the word pariah state being used at. This is not something that you throw around lightly georgina and of course. Adrian has lancer as well. You're there've been so many missteps on the part of this government of boris johnson's government over the last year You know just you fits and starts Throats and certainly near the stop start notion of of how to deal with this and then there's just the pure calms issue that you had the health secretary matt hancock. You're really using the words out of control. No one wants to be quoted and heard to be using the world words out of control. But that's of course what is what is popping up in the media all over the place so this is very much a situation Which is a on number ten. Watch and i really. I mean unfortunate viewing You know when we have just a little over week to run to the end of the year absolutely. I mean the whole thing about boris. Johnson is his popularity. He's been trying to do everything. Save christmas to just remain popular. He's he's a brinkman he makes. He puts off decisions until the last possible moment. He's had to do this thing he didn't want to do. What does this mean for his future. Well it certainly calls into question. I think quite a lot of wiser heads in the conservative party. A wondering about the man that elected as their leader elected him as the leader essentially because he was offering a clean break with the party's and and with the country's past as a member of the european union but there were a lot of alarm bells were ringing even before he was elected leader of the conservative party so prime minister about whether he had the kind of character to do the job. Not as those questions are even more relevant today but one aspect of his character is an shown this time and time and time again is that he thinks he can get away with almost anything so things he said in the past that might have ruined other people's political raise. He shrugged them off with a joke or or a struggle. Whatever it whatever it may be decision sees a potential scandals in his private and professional life. He thinks he can trump the more often. Just get on with it. And i think that Which is a kind of you know. Fly by the seat of your pants. Premiership simply isn't up to the task that now faces and and we're we're finding that out and a lot of people paying the price for it absolutely tolerate wonder. If i could just end with you. I don't know how much of an astronomer who are but saturn jupiter comes closest. They've been in almost four hundred years today. The the two giants of the solar system will be just not point one degrees part in the night sky that makes them appear to be one bright star just about the moon the great conjunction as it's being called also coincides with the winter solstice. Now we all know what happened. Two thousand and twenty years ago when there was a bright star. Do you think this is a potent from the heavens. Are we to expect the second coming or the end of days. I think we were corresponding last night. Georgina did use the word biblical then. So i didn't know if that's sort of foxfire. D'you into into that orbit certainly feels like that with this. It is really a convergence on on so so so many levels. I mean if you if you break this down thinking about the the the the ongoing political story that we've had around brexit Really pretty much a year that we've now been dealing with at least global level with this pandemic And then all of these other we call them niggly. Bits that are also I think surrounding the uk at the moment As well so this will be on. This will be revisiting. The story of sure later today and we'll be talking about it across the week for sure. Absolutely and i think just to tear each other up if we could schedule a zoom call later where we both sing. Tutsi-run emma sheet. Is christmas eve That would go some way to alleviating the absolutely. I think that's going to have to be heavily on the playlist this afternoon. We'll look forward to chatting later. Thank you very much to tyler and to launch price

Boris Johnson Tyler Overlay United Kingdom Of Borders UK Britain British Government South Africa Georgina Lonzo Monaco Johannesburg Matt Hancock Cape Town Tyler Lance Switzerland Walton Campbell Georgia France
A deep dive into American Thanksgiving

Unreserved

05:02 min | 2 years ago

A deep dive into American Thanksgiving

"Four hundred years ago a ship pulled up on the shores of cape cod mass sits. The merchant ship wasn't carrying. It's normal cargo of dry goods and wine this time it carried more than one hundred people people seeking religious freedom and a new way of life seeking a new world but the world they found across the ocean wasn't new. It was his oldest people who lived there the wont people the people of the first light. It was as old as the corn beans and squash. They grew and as old as the songs they sang. This week on unreserved. You've probably heard about the first meal the pilgrims in native american shared so today. We're going deeper into that history and finding out more about the walnut people and how that votes arrival changed everything. This year to commemorate the arrival of the mayflower celebrations were planned in the united states. Womp dog people were consulted in the lead up to the mayflower four hundred events. This time they wanted their history and truths at the forefront and to examine what it meant when the mayflower landed on this side of the ocean. Things weren't unfolding in exactly the same way in plymouth. England when art historian stephanie. Pratt was invited to advise on an art piece. That was going to celebrate the mayflower voyage. She decided to help correct. Its course and in doing so. She brought clarity to the conversation about the mayflower in. A part of the world were indigenous. History is not as well known. We've reached her at her home in devon england. Stephanie welcome to the show. Hi there so this project you advised on a part of your involvement with mayflower. Four hundred Massive program events mostly in the uk To mark the mayflower voyage. That happened four hundred years ago. So how did you get involved with mayflower four hundred well as sort of a a slow buildup i suppose i began probably in about twenty eighteen to advise on what was called the educational committee or the the educational program for mayflower for hundred and i kind of was snuck in by a friend of mine his name is danny riley and he is probably wanted to spearhead people along with his wife angeles sherlock who have really been very critical of the whole process. The help build up the complete while what they would call sanitizing of history. And so you had some reservations about taking on this role. Can you can you tell us why. That was why i think danny himself said you know this is gonna be kind of a poisoned chalice because You know that you're going to be helping. Make them feel better about what they're doing. And so i know that you were part of shaping. A massive art installation near where the mayflower would have departed plymouth. england near where you are today and it's a. It's a sculpture of lights that spells out the words. No news world's Can you tell me about that sculpture. Well the the artists that were involved in that sculpture. They're called still moving. And they've known each other for many years and i think when the first Announcement of ding for art projects under the mayflower umbrella came up. These guys took advantage but they admitted to me later on that they at the beginning had really no idea what the mayflower was. What it what it represented certainly not what representative indigenous peoples north america. So they were told at the beginning. You know you have to be careful with this but what they came up with was the idea that they would have in lights. The words the new world and they presented that to locals in plymouth. some of whom were very critical and said no. You cannot absolutely cannot do that but you need to talk to stephanie. So they came up to exeter where i live and asked me about it and my very first reaction was says. No that's ridiculous. You absolutely cannot say the new world what are you talking about. There never was a new world. We live on one planet. This is what it is. You know trying to teach little kids. I guess that's how i felt and And they were very very grateful and they listened and luckily they had another idea which was to put up a changing sign or changing signed edge. Which would move between the words new worlds no new worlds no world and so forth so they had several iterations they would use and i said yes. That's that's the one you need to go with.

Plymouth Danny Riley Angeles Sherlock Stephanie Pratt England Devon United States Danny UK North America Exeter
Family demands release of evidence in Breonna Taylor's case

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Family demands release of evidence in Breonna Taylor's case

"Her family is demanding the release of transcripts from the grand jury hearings that led to no charges against police officers in Louisville Kentucky involved in the depths of Brianna Taylor lawyers for the family including Juanita Baker say they have seen the evidence they have questions for the Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron the grand jury on the grand jury if your office make that decision yeah and where does the right to know what is it that we need to say I got it wrong when it was read by Brianna Taylor's mother saying Cameron had the power to do the right thing he had the power to help me in over four hundred years of oppression what he helped me realize is that it will always be us against them governor Andy Beshear is also calling for the Attorney General to release what evidence in the Taylor case he can I'm at Donahue

Louisville Kentucky Juanita Baker Daniel Cameron Brianna Taylor Andy Beshear Donahue Kentucky Attorney
RIP Business Suit?

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:10 min | 2 years ago

RIP Business Suit?

"Tina Ob is a professor of management at Babson College and she says, a lot of students will come to her. You know before they're interviewed for the first internships or first jobs and they will ask like Bush should I wear this job. So she thinks about the question of like how professional and professional norms a lot when I asked most people what is the most big symbol of the business world and visit professionalism almost everyone says the business eventually and Tina started thinking about why in about where these norms come from also she herself had a special relationship with the business suit because before she was in academia Tina worked in banking and I absolutely were businesses because We think about the prototype of a banker is that you have a tailored suits white man play golf. I'm a black woman doesn't play golf. So I had to get the soup right and they was. I mean I had the best. They were beautiful suits and they were tailored. It was by putting on a crown almost I felt special I. Felt you don't have on my uniform. This is my beautifully tailored uniform and people perceive me differently. So now Tina works in academia and she loves researching things and so all of this got her thinking like wait why is the business suit? The thing that we all wear to work like what about kilts or row observe why not something else so she started tracing the business suit back through time all the way back to its origins in the sixteen hundreds it turns out we have Charles the second to thank for the suit he was the. King, of England four hundred years ago. Yes and at the time when he became king, the fashion in the royal courts was like very very over the top men were these huge poofy wigs and they had these big sleeves on their clothes and crazy colors because di was very expensive. So it was a sign you were wealthy men wore high heeled shoes but all of his over the top nece in the royal courts it was it was starting to cause some problems for Charles getting all this criticism from religious and economic leaders who were saying that the royal family there were morally Herat's overly decorated, and so he was looking for a way to try to. Present himself and As more restraints, the sewage back then were made from wool instead of silk, and even though the colors were still kind of like Easter and colors just all over the place. This was still super restrained at the time and it starts getting even more strain. So details on the codes when Charles the second I started wearing, them were quite long but they got shorter and shorter and shorter and eventually the. Colors that people in suits became more muted product. We see today or at least what we used to see I, mean I actually can't remember the last time I saw someone in a suit, and you know says, she can't remember the last time. She wore one I have on a workout Sir Yoga pants but you know what typically going to work I wouldn't have the song. Oh, it's the same for me talk. It's so nice, oh. Yeah. I can actually there's been a lot of talk on social media and in all of these articles think pieces about how much people have been loving dressing down Lali living that yoga pants life right and it's not like working from home is going away. I. Mean millions of offices are closed through the rest of the year and beyond and. Even for people who do go back to the office, the setups probably going to be pretty different probably fewer people some partitions, maybe less reason to suit up there. Also Tina says that now the people have tasted this yoga pants life going back is going to be hard. There's something to say about the sigh of relief the collective sigh of relief I think the world. That tells you that there was labor associated with getting dressed in a professional way. Tina says for now she is advising her students to still put in that Labor for job interviews in banking and consulting jobs, or at least take care of the top part that people are GonNa zoom suit jacket suit jacket. Exactly and you know the suit has survived four hundred years of change electricity, the combustion engine, the Internet two world wars the suit has survived. All of that is working from home really going to be the thing that takes it down death by Yoga. Pants, seriously towards yoga pants that killed the I'm on. I like the idea of the suit as King Kong. But you know I don't know Cardiff because the business has been around as you say for a very long time for four hundred years I mean. Things change and maybe this is the business suits swansong like maybe it's time for us to start wearing other kinds of close. WE'RE NOT GONNA be wearing suits forever right drew I put this all to Tina and she said, you know if you want to know the fate of the suit right now, you've got to talk to people who work in fashion right look at fashion person at twin watcher about what we're seeing from shoppers and what designers are

Tina Ob Charles Golf Tina King Babson College Bush King Kong Professor Of Management Cardiff DI England Herat Lali