35 Burst results for "First Film"

New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

The Big Picture

02:58 min | 4 d ago

New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

"Let's talk about youth or at least an attempt at representing youth. I'm talking about the weekend's big release. Dear evan hansen which is in theaters on friday. Who where to begin. Amanda dear oven has what is. Dear of enhancing amanda. It is an adaptation of a tony winning musical which will come back to and it is about a young man named evan hansen. Who is having a very difficult time in high school going through some mental health issues some social anxiety issues and has been encouraged to write himself letters of you know like self belief and pas positive thinking one of these letters falls into the hands of another person and i just i'm gonna say because we need to talk about what this film okay. Another troubled student at the high school who then takes his own life and the parents of the second teen find the letter. That evan hansen has written to himself. They believe their son wrote this last letter to evan hansen before he killed himself and then assume that evan hansen. This tea and with no friends actually had a beautiful friendship with their now deceased child and the main character. Evan hansen goes along with it. And it's like yeah. He was my friend and invents a whole story and friendship and ultimately like a philosophy on how to live and connect with other people that becomes like essentially a hit. Ted talk on the internet and then he become something of a mental health advocate but really just sort of friendship at a community of care for other people a wellness figurehead popular on the internet. And and then things sort of unravel but for the most part no one is held responsible for any of the choices made in in the in the musical and the movie and then people sing songs about discovering themselves and it ends. That is the one part. I want to underline you. You just described the bones of the story very accurately and it's a musical. This story is a musical and so of course. The character is break into song as the story unfolds. I thought this was very troubling movie. A movie that really did not work for a variety of reasons. I think neither you. Nor i saw the show on broadway and so we don't really have a relationship to the show. It was a big hit and of course it. Was tony winning. But it is. Unnerving film is unnerving in a in a variety of

Evan Hansen Amanda TED Tony
'Notting Hill,' 'The Duke' director Roger Michell dies at 65

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 5 d ago

'Notting Hill,' 'The Duke' director Roger Michell dies at 65

"Director Roger Mitchell has died at the age of sixty five according to his family details on his death were not given our margins are a letter with a look at his career you have a stomach bug I could have a step up Roger Mitchell's most famous film is Notting hill with Hugh grant and Julia Roberts for a time it was the highest grossing British film ever Mitchell also me changing lanes with Ben Affleck and Samuel L. Jackson as well as Venus with Peter o'toole Mitchell also directed for British theatre productions his TV adaptations include Jane Austen's persuasion and the Buddha of suburbia in the nineteen nineties

Roger Mitchell Hugh Grant Notting Hill Julia Roberts Peter O Toole Mitchell Ben Affleck Samuel L. Jackson Mitchell Venus Jane Austen
Melvin Van Peebles, godfather of Black cinema, dies at 89

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 5 d ago

Melvin Van Peebles, godfather of Black cinema, dies at 89

"A pioneering filmmaker who helped launch the blaxploitation Aaron movies is died some call Melvin van Peebles the godfather of modern black cinema and not just because he ushered in movies like shaft and Superfly his son Merrill says his dad knew that black images matter if a single black image is worth a thousand words how much more what a whole movie about blacks be worth novem people's answer that question when he released sweet Sweetback's badass song which he wrote produced directed starred in and scored in this two thousand and four interview he said that it did not only inspire black filmmakers you have women directing films in the one even begin to think about you have Latinos you have Asian you have blacks you have disenfranchised across the board being able to do things that made possible made on a budget of about a half billion dollars sweet sweet back or in fourteen million at the box office despite being an X. rated having limited distribution and few positive reviews by critics I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Melvin Van Peebles Shaft And Superfly Sweet Sweetback's Badass Song Merrill Aaron Oscar Wells Gabriel
Breaking the Formulaic Mold of Contemporary Christian Music

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:28 min | 6 d ago

Breaking the Formulaic Mold of Contemporary Christian Music

"To andy irwin of the famous irwin brothers. You probably remember the film. i can only imagine. There's a new film out called the jesus music movie obviously self explanatory. It's about jesus music. We were just talking. Andy about this strange moment in the culture and to me. It's there's something sad about it where we had people mainstream figures. Billy graham to some extent was a mainstream figure. But we had johnny cash. We had chris christopherson singing unapologetic. Jesus music maybe the issue is that we have separated it into a. I think a lot of people think sometimes that when you do that you sort of marginalize yourself in other words it would be wonderful if everybody in the country was listening to the music rather than just people who listen to ccm. So i don't know where. Do you think we're going with that because i feel like you don't reach people if you're just in your own little genre. Yeah i think we explore that in documentary for sure because there was there. Was this purity where it started And you know the people that there wasn't an industry around. It was his people. That kind of organically started kind of expressing their fate. And then they're kind of became something where it became a little bit more for formulaic and then people blazed trails in new directions and then it will become formulaic. And then you know that was always the struggle between you know the commerce of it of just kind of play into your base and then being able to do really great art. And i think you know the exciting thing about it. Is i think you know we try to find something. That was universally relatable and the idea of You know outside of it being genre of these trailblazers that said hey. My voice is represented and i would like to form something that doesn't exist That's incredibly romantic. But along the way you know it can get kind of formulaic and just kind of play to the base. I think the exciting thing that's happening now. With the arts you know across the board Not just with with music but also hopefully you know heading that direction in film is there's been an opportunity To kind of branch out beyond the walls and so we kind of go into where it has been the started to make those steps in that direction. Like with the lauren bagels. And the you know for king country. Mcrae's there's these modern artists that are beginning to kind of blur. Those lines a little bit more and reach a broader

Andy Irwin Irwin Brothers Chris Christopherson Billy Graham Johnny Cash Andy Mcrae
Andy Erwin, Half of the Film-Making Erwin Brothers, Talks About 'The Jesus Music Movie'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:33 min | 6 d ago

Andy Erwin, Half of the Film-Making Erwin Brothers, Talks About 'The Jesus Music Movie'

"Are you looking for a good movie D like jesus music. I've got an idea. Why doesn't somebody. I don't know who make a film about jesus music. They could call it. You don't even need a title. You could just call it the jesus music movie Why i've been thinking that and then it turns out a couple of guys. I think that they're brothers. I think that they're the erwin brothers. Have made just such a film for such a time as this. I think andy or when might be my guest right now. Andy is that you good to be with you. Buddy all your is. We're on the same plane as usual. I think so. I think so i. I love music in general but the jesus music the stuff that we call you know. Ccm whatever what made you decide to make a film about the music. You i mean we. We love the music that has really shaped career You know. Of course with john. And i started out as music video. Directors and michael w smith was an artist that took a chance on us as kids and really kind of gave us are starting the industry and that led to us telling the story of i can only imagine the beloved song And the story behind that and that was our breakout hit and so for us. We have a deep affinity for this music but when covert hit it kind of shut everything down and we read a place in time where we said what what stories can we tell. Now that we couldn't tell any other time in history and somebody on our creative team said nobody's looked at the origin of of christian debris music and for the first time in history all these artists off the road at the exact same moment and so we reached out to amy grant and michael smith said it is interesting listed knowledge and interesting but we want to produce it you guys and not many people knew at the time but amy was about a month out from having open heart surgery and she was a really reflective time so we set up the cameras actually outside her house in filled through the window of her house with a two way intercom to get her interview and she gave one of the most raw vulnerable interviews. I had heard an artist give and it just spread like wildfire. Next thing you know we have a hundred different artists about three hundred hours of interviews to go through and it kind of morphed into this beautiful all encompassing

Michael W Smith Andy Amy Grant Michael Smith John AMY
George Holliday, who filmed Rodney King video, dies of COVID

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

George Holliday, who filmed Rodney King video, dies of COVID

"A Los Angeles plumber who made history by capturing the beating of Rodney king on a video camera has died of covert nineteen complications a longtime friend says George Holliday was sixty one years old not vaccinated against covert nineteen and have been on a ventilator for days it was in nineteen ninety one that holiday who'd gotten a new video camera shot grainy images of four white police officers beating Rodney king during a traffic stop he captured Los Angeles officers punching kicking and using a stun gun on the black motorist even after he was on the ground a year later holidays footage was key evidence in the officer's trial that ended with four acquittals that triggered rioting king was so upset by the burning and looting he issued this famous statement in nineteen ninety two can we can we all get along hi Jackie Quinn

George Holliday Los Angeles Jackie Quinn
HBO's 'Hard Knocks' Will Feature Indianapolis Colts in First-Ever in-Season Episodes

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

00:44 sec | Last week

HBO's 'Hard Knocks' Will Feature Indianapolis Colts in First-Ever in-Season Episodes

"For the first time hard knocks. We'll follow one team during the regular season and the colts are the team that will be featured this year h. b. o. Will be with the team through the end of the season which would include the playoffs. If they qualify they'll be at least nine episodes and the first one will air on november seventeenth. This is all the information we have about the series. We don't know yet what the criteria is for the team being selected and if the colts were able to turn it down it's the nfl films senior executives said thanks. Hbo along with incredible cooperation from the colts we were able to deliver ground. Bake breaking new edition of the series. So that seems to hints at the colts agreed to this. We don't have an answer. A confirmation on that yet. So we're so getting a little information about

Colts HBO NFL
They Call Us Justin Chon

They Call Us Bruce

02:29 min | Last week

They Call Us Justin Chon

"Hello and welcome to another dish. They call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asian america. I feel you. And i'm jeff yang and once again we have a fantastic guest on this episode. Somebody who's an old friend of ours over the podcast. And who has just evolved into one of those interesting attorneys filmmakers creators actors writers in the business of asian american filmmaking and that is justin chon who has a new film coming out blue by you which we have seen and i'm just so deeply my feels. I just. I q much to talk about that. I can almost like talk Welcome welcome to the show. Welcome thanks guys. Thanks is so great evac back on with you guys. You know. I just first off. I want to say that this has been some kind of a ride for asian americans. You know There was a time when felt like we couldn't tell any story is truly not them the way we wanted them to and when we did they had to be a certain kind of story over just the last a three four years. We started more idiosyncratic and yet really masterful new kinds of of narrative exploring explaining and just giving experiences around very different ways of being asian american and blue by us is right up there In in that world of like the minorities so just wanted to give you props for that and maybe ask bit. What the origin story in some ways of of this film. Was you know what i mean. You know Being asian american we all know. Adopt these you know it's I'm sure we all know that. Adoption originated the idea of international. Adoption originated in south korea after the korean war. And you know the whole family went there and the kids off the streets or whatever the case that needed families place a nice christian families in the united states and over the years become a big business in and you can't tell an asian narrative that's inclusive without including that storyline Without including that experience in this in this country So you know i. I'm friends quite a few adoptees and and I've grown up with few. And i started hearing that this was taking place at adopted. These were being imported in. I thought it was absolutely shocking.

Jeff Yang Justin Chon Bruce United States South Korea
Jessica Chastain Is Riveting in 'The Eyes of Tammy Faye'

Filmspotting

02:06 min | Last week

Jessica Chastain Is Riveting in 'The Eyes of Tammy Faye'

"Mother. This is jim baker. My husband jessica chastain there as tammy faye bakker in the eyes of tammy faye which opens nationwide this weekend. Andrew garfield co stars as jim baker. Tammy's husband who people of a certain age like us josh. Remember as one of the most prominent televangelists of nineteen eighty and nineteen eighty. Nine baker was sentenced to forty five years in prison for fraud. This movie is directed by michael showalter. Who made the very good two. Seventeen rom com. The big sick. The eyes of tammy faye came up a couple of weeks ago. During our fall movie preview. You have seen the movie and as i alluded to. We lived through the eighties. The bakers were inescapable in popular culture. At seem does the movie convinced that there is more there was more to jim. Tammy faye than we remember or what we saw in parodies from the time i mean it had to for me because my only point of reference was jan hooks portraying. Tammy faye bakker. On saturday night. Live visiting the church lady. I think phil hartmann was was jim baker. Actually so i didn't really know much beyond that of the story. I mean would have been a little kid at that time. And so yeah this was interesting to get some of the background info a lot of it drawn from the two thousand or two thousand two documentary of the same name. The eyes of tammy faye haven't seen that one. But from what. I understand both at end this i can attest to very much rehabilitation projects. You know to to say that there was more and of course there was more to to this woman than what we saw on saturday night. Live or in news. Reports jessica chastain as tammy faye is going to make you believe that no matter what. She is the powerhouse force in this film. The reason why i liked it. I think overall as a movie. It's it's a little strange. It's both really obvious like hitting its themes and points very underlying them like she on like her makeup his underlying. You know

Tammy Faye Jim Baker Jessica Chastain Andrew Garfield Michael Showalter Jan Hooks Phil Hartmann Tammy Josh Baker JIM
Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | Last week

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Chicago Pennsylvania Filmmaking Independent Film American Society Michael Okay Stony Island Depression
Hollywood Is Remaking Whitney Houston’s Iconic Film ‘the Bodyguard’

Daily Pop

00:30 sec | Last week

Hollywood Is Remaking Whitney Houston’s Iconic Film ‘the Bodyguard’

"Love the bodyguard. Well now it's getting a remake in fans are divided. Are you here for bodyguard or you know. You can't remake an iconic legendary film like this. I mean it grows over. Four hundred million in the worldwide box office. It was the best selling soundtrack of all time. We got heads for wendy. Used in what we don't need another kid whitney sing that song again and i don't want to hear it. Don't do it. Everyone's trying to do it all the time. Don't do it.

Wendy Whitney
Knapp Scores Winner in 9th for Phillies in 6-5 Win Over Cubs

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last week

Knapp Scores Winner in 9th for Phillies in 6-5 Win Over Cubs

"Going on a passed ball by catcher Robinson Chirinos with two out in the bottom of the ninth inning to give the Phillies a six five win over the cubs Philadelphia led by former Chicago tied the contest at the top of the ninth inning with a solo home run by Matt Duffy G. two will be jealous forty Galveston also homered for the film to snap a two game losing streak the wind chill Reno's and Frank Swindell holder for the cubs in the loss Michael Luongo below via

Robinson Chirinos Matt Duffy G. Phillies Cubs Philadelphia Chicago Galveston Frank Swindell Reno Michael Luongo
Pastor Johnny Hunt on the New Film 'Nothing but the Truth'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:10 min | Last week

Pastor Johnny Hunt on the New Film 'Nothing but the Truth'

"Exciting a new film. It's called nothing but the truth. And i have my guest pastor. Johnny hunt pastor. Johnny hunt welcomed the program. Thank you delight. Be with you. Tell me what is this film. Nothing but the truth. It's sort of a documentary. On the life of adrian rogers and many speaking into lots of the noble truth that he spoke in his years before the lord called him home sixteen years ago and reminding us that america not just now but is always been just one generation away from paganism take one generation that no longer stands for the moral absolute truth of god's word and we find america and america's churches in a serious dilemma. He predicted it so many years ago that it would be the greatest challenge and today a more people are speaking of my truth as opposed to his truth. And it's a difficult place when it comes to how many americans still believe in absolute truth.

Johnny Hunt Adrian Rogers America
Finding Beauty in the Mundane

The Angry Therapist Podcast

01:32 min | Last week

Finding Beauty in the Mundane

"Beautiful. Things things that i find beauty in i i wanted to say that The point of this is is to remind you guys that To train your brain to seek What i call nectar to seek beauty and things in the mundane. I think that when you can do that Then you're doing less of this whole you know chasing things that you don't have i think when we have the ability and i think it is an ability In like any ability it requires a practice to find value and beauty and things that are in front of us Then we can create happy more so than Always chasing things that you know that we're we've been dreaming of or things that are you know shiny and big and all of that and this is just a reminder that there are things in front of us that are just as beautiful just as meaningful we just have to train our brain to seek them right to notice them to find them to stretch them to appreciate them. Okay things i find beauty in edges. I find beauty in the the. It doesn't matter if it's art film books. Whatever i find beauty in In risk in the obtuse in you know Things that may not be appropriate anything that moves you and usually what moves you are found on the edges not not so much in the middle where their

The Wild Ride of the '86 Mets: Inside Once Upon a Time in Queens

ESPN Daily

01:23 min | 2 weeks ago

The Wild Ride of the '86 Mets: Inside Once Upon a Time in Queens

"Nick davis. I watched your four part documentary. Once upon a time in queens. It is debut in over two evenings tonight and tomorrow. It's the new thirty for thirty. And the thing that i was struck by about your story here about the nineteen ninety-six. Mets is how much of a character the city of new york is. And i know you're a native new yorker. I am a native new yorker but i was born in one thousand nine hundred five so i could not get enough of the city as you captured it. I'm curious why it was important to you that you did it in that way. Well i think the thing that always struck me about this team was that they captured the spirit of the city as well as any sports team. I can imagine. It wasn't just. The city fell in love with the team Which happens all over the place but the the way the team came together and the the rollicking wild crazy dangerous energy on that team mirrored the city in the eighty and that was always. The goal of the film was to talk about how the team and the city were fused and became one. You think about the nineteen seventy-five cincinnati reg team lots of wonderful personalities. But you don't associate them with cincinnati in the mid seventies the way you do the nineteen eighty six minutes with new york city

Nick Davis Queens Mets New York Cincinnati New York City
'Shang-Chi' Tops Box Office Again With $35.8 Million

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

'Shang-Chi' Tops Box Office Again With $35.8 Million

"The latest Marvel movie continues a winning streak at the box office that brings our family after what was a surprisingly strong Labor Day opening for movies during the pandemic Shanxi in the legend of the ten rings the first Marvel movie to star in Asian superhero stayed on top in its second weekend in theaters collecting another thirty five point eight million dollars in ticket sales it's the second best weekend gross of any film during the pandemic edging out Black Widow on Friday Disney announced that all its remaining twenty twenty one releases including the internals will open exclusively in theaters and not on Disney plus at the same time Warner brothers horror thriller malignant with the stock debut of five point six million was also released on H. B. O. Max for subscribers disease Ryan Reynolds action comedy free guy also did well during its fifth week of release it's made two hundred and seventy six million dollars worldwide I'm Jennifer king

Shanxi Disney Black Widow H. B. O. Max Warner Ryan Reynolds Jennifer King
Djokovic's Bid for Year's Grand Slam Ends Against Medvedev

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Djokovic's Bid for Year's Grand Slam Ends Against Medvedev

"The grand slam dream another joke of it just turned to a nightmare after a straight sets loss to the U. S. open men's final lackluster Djokovic struggle from the very first game against the second state dental Medvedev and saw his hopes of a record twenty first major win and a calendar year slam taken away as a Russian pad to a six four six four six four victory the took two hours and fifteen minutes I do feel sorry for not because I I I I can't imagine what it feels I don't know this film but it definitely makes it sweeter the wear and tear of one five set and full force it matches on the way to the final obviously took its toll on the thirty four year old son it was made but its first major win I'm Graham like us

Djokovic Medvedev Graham
Annette (Featuring Kris Krainock)

Piecing It Together Podcast

02:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Annette (Featuring Kris Krainock)

"Ra. Chris crane arc is back with us today. And we're going to do our best at down this movie and net. Chris how's it going. It's going very well. Good to be back. It's been a minute. Yeah has been cited to be back. And i'm excited to be timing this movie because it is officially september in. It's my favorite movie of the year. So far it's been a weird year for movies man. I you know. I i keep saying i really hope by the end of the you know. We just recently did our top ten list at the midway point episode. And i really hope. Mortal kombat isn't still on my top ten the end of the year. I have to admit. I haven't seen that many movies actually this year. No it's my favorite amongst shortlist. Yeah but it has been a weird movie or you. Pardon me word year. He's yes and and it's a weird movie. It is a weird movie in a weird movie year but before we do get into some puzzle pieces here. I want to ask you where you like really looking forward to this movie. I i mean i know you. You like Liz carax's previous film holy motors fan big fan and while so this guy is really interesting. Film director. So he doesn't make that many movies. Yeah and he was kind of hailed as this french prodigy earlier in his career. And you know. Legend grew early around him. A suffered a lot of personal tragedy. Which holy motors and net or kind of response to some of that personal tragedy. So he's just a fascinating guy. And i really connected with holy motors which is interesting. Because it's such a bizarre movie. Yeah so strange and yet. There's this weird spell that a. casts that it's it's you must watch it. Yeah ever since then yeah. I was really looking forward to it. It was kind of kind of snuck up and bit me. I've been really focused on a lot of my own projects and when it happens i am not as up to date with everything that's happening in the movie. World's i typically am yeah. I'm just so swamped you know. And then i heard about this film. I heard about sparks being a part of it right right and i have. To make an honest. I only knew sparks very superficially. I knew there komo komo album Which was like their big breakthrough album. I think it was the seventies early eighties when they were kind of thought of. It's just like a experimental pop band

Chris Crane Liz Carax Holy Motors Chris Komo Komo Sparks
"first film" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The first film formed for Viagra. NFL ferret sample. On your wallet? Now. I thought about that. Davidson ever said this one is on the. We get the chief operating officer the tells us about five years in my wallet. Thank you. The first the first question, I have is talking about FDA because if you're going to have to give you guys guessing, right? It's not just about the drugs. You take the right? Yeah. Absolutely. So for product, obviously, it's a much different path to market and it's an FDA pathway the discuss through the new molecule however because Viagra. Known drug safety the efficacy of the drug. So now, we're delivering it better. Right. Wants to make generic and obviously you don't want want to go back to the time that absorbs gets gets worse. Yes. About. Right. Speed of onset is one of the benefits that were technology for this particular, almost you know. That's the only a couple of this conversation. Doesn't talk about talking about the canvas business because we've got well. Also you want. My favorite guesstimate history of this. What's interesting is we see a lot of investment verticals on this program. We saw the China companies that were so in vogue back in the early two thousands. Then we saw the cybersecurity rush. Cannabis is obviously one of those it's a little bit different because think prohibition into making alcohol legal. This is the cannabis has made literally millions of otherwise law abiding citizens criminals until recently, fortunately, this is a real this is a real vertical here is far as goes talking about how you guys are intersecting that with with cure cannabis. Yeah. I mean, obviously, the promise of these molecules and the understanding of the system we're just sort of scratching the surface because we haven't been able to do research for a bunch of legal reasons, but we believe that there's going to be so much benefit that will be uncovered. And but these molecules are tricky, and they're not very stable. They're sensitive to oxygen temperature. Water. And so be able to stabilize them dosage form is critical to their commercials. Molecules are like them you're saying that the cannabis molecules are different here. He goes trying to find another reason one question, I'll all. It's a great question because vitamin d is one of those kinds of molecules, which is Michael silicon fat, Pat bodies, mostly water. So that's a problem to solve utilize those drugs and get them delivered. So we've been able to achieve vitamin d and stabilising it in a film. We believe we can achieve to improve the delivery of cabinet back to soon. Right. Because there's a couple of other things like sweet. They can help you with. Molecules molecules special molecules sounds like a shirt, Sheldon. My. Okay. What? Do that. Anyway, under the..

Cannabis cannabis Viagra FDA Sheldon chief operating officer NFL Davidson China Michael silicon five years
"first film" Discussed on Grown Up Kids: A Disney Podcast

Grown Up Kids: A Disney Podcast

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Grown Up Kids: A Disney Podcast

"That's what he's supposed to be. So they were wrong and old yeller lease. They got this one. Right. So it's currently unknown. Why the change happened? However in the original book, he was always a blue tick Coon hound he inherited his colors from his mother. Misprint easy menu is never actually named young yeller in the book at all in the first film in in this whole on in the first film. His barks would later be reused in one hundred one dominations for the puppies during the ending scene. Cute. Also, I know nothing, but this lady's, then I know, right? Also in the first film old yeller, his whimpering is recycled sound effects from lady from lady and the tramp when she was a puppy door was those are real dog zones. Instead of a can't remember which one it was who like made all the other dog sounds in one hundred hundred nations, and I thought it was crazy. Yeah. I know about number man that I can't remember it right now. But yeah, hopefully, somebody knows we're talking about. And when he was fighting with a pack of wolves, the growls you here are actually recycled from his father in the first film old yeller. That's neat. Pretty cool. I was wondering why they the they change the look of the dog. But you said that I think you just said in the history that they bought the film rights before the second novel is even written. So now wondering did they just write the puppy into the first movie, and then they didn't know because the second book had been written? And the guy goes and writes, the second book, and he's like just kidding. That's not what the dog even looked like probably. That's the case. This is all acceptable. Yeah. That that makes sense good observation dig it. Do you like a dog? The up the stolen piecing me. If only I had one no continue with the characters. All right next is characters. So I I thought that we could talk about Travis because he is the main man, I think I think that he's I think he's above uncle Beck. I mean Okla back is important, obviously. But you know, Travis is there in the beginning is so much more screen time than Okla boat. Definitely. And he's the one who escapes from the native Americans find his way back gets help. I mean, it's all him. He's a he's a Griffin door in this foam. He's like, you know, he's taking charge. He's being brave. You can tell it in many scenes that he's scared what he's doing. He is scared, but he like overcomes it because he's in love wants to save her list. Bill. And then are less, you know, like just tag along. He's like, oh, yeah. I guess I'll save him to here's our list summed up in this movie. He's grown up, but he never really Kevin Corcoran summed up. Okay. On the seas plays the same character in every movie, and I love I love him. But he's so annoying in this movie. It's like, are you ever gonna learn from anything that you do know he doesn't know? He's just. I'm gonna throw rocks at people because that's acceptable. Kid through one more rock. I was gonna throw a rocket TV as you need to stop. If he ever through rocket me. I would pick it up and throw it right back at him..

Travis Okla Kevin Corcoran Beck
"first film" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"I knew that I have to do I have to find a project. Right. I think they material at the end I think now retrospect that the material the original material was was good. It was funny except I had a handle on it. I'm probably through the are not director would have been better. And I couldn't understand it could not really know. How to go night. I kept on trying to overcompensate with visuals. That's because I wanna ask you you said that up until through great expectations you were focused on. Things like my films are all going to have a green color palette and things like that. And in the grand scheme of things, that's actually not what's the reason to focus on obsess over things like that. Right. But it wasn't until great expectations, and the sort of rocky experience with that that you realize there are more important things to focus on dot. Also, I think that an important aspect here is that after my first film, and I that I landed kind of almost by accident Hollywood, I was kind of very insecure and very scare because I have to provide I need to to raise money all the time. You know, I was I was I was that. Also, a lot of creative securities and a bunch of you know, agents and executives stole now because I would al- always come and said, no, I am going to write it. I like this project this onto write it and to tubes. They wouldn't give me the project because they want to hire another writer. I never told me stop saying that your writer. You will never get a job here. Do you think that you say that you're a writer, and for many years, I became what I call it a screenplay reader writer than generating my projects and that after great speculations. I felt the frustration of Saint I end up doing some film Chuo was told me when the shook when things were we were restricted, Hugh. Come look at me and can very upset his always stores your first instinct because my first things was to say, no, right. So I at the end of that said, I I cannot keep on doing this. You know, this is not who I am. It was a good lesson is the best the businesses. I need to do stuff from my on standpoint. Right. And also enough of trying to cover yourself with form. Right. You know, it's more about the theme. So soon after that sounds like was the beginning of what we now. Call the three amigos or not. Well, yeah. The three of you all come together because there was already you and Guillermo, but now Alejandro enters the picture because. He wants you to look at a draft of a Morris peras. No he entered way before. Okay way before he called me out of the blue. I knew who he was that this guy doing commercials, and he was the voice of the DJ of this very very, very famous radio radio station. And when he called me today, I want to go to Laon chat with you. He went we cut along we've been in, touch, and he did a short film. I give my notes to the short film, and it was in a modus battles that his me the screenplay remembering that short. I said Alejandro. I this is not a success. I think you're more talented than these. I think that you have to focus more on the screenplay. He's doing that. Then he developed a modest battles. He sent it to me. It was an amazing screenplay. And then he set up to do the film and later on his send me the cost of his film. And I was I was blown away by it so much that I call Kansas. Can I? Show these two year model total as sure please. So I sent it to a year and this year, he says, the film, he calls, MRs dishes, brilliant thing. He goes on a handle and says Alejandro this Guillermo model Taurus's Ohio's taken a plane now to Mexico City prepare room and going to stay with you two or three days and going to recruit your fam-. Ricotta bunch out of that..

Alejandro writer Guillermo director Laon Hollywood Chuo Mexico City Kansas Ohio three days two year
"first film" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

Hollywood Babble-On

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

"Comes from AJ, Richards, and Sydney Australia. He said he was recently going through the entire Halloween collection. I know it's not quite the holiday we should be talking about. But as the the Halloween collection. You went to see the new film, and now he's going through all of the films. He said at the beginning of the sequel Halloween too from nineteen Eighty-one they play a clip from Halloween at the outset showing Dr Loomis killing Michael killing Michael Myers again and him backing off and falling off of the balcony to his death. Supposedly, I wonder if this is what I think it is. Well, in the first film at the end of the film Michael Meyer staggers off the roof. There is no there's no railing there on the balcony, and he just falls to his death. Yes. But they had to reshoot that segment because in this film when they shot it there is there is a railing on the balcony. Now. How do you have Michael Myers? Get safely. The actor gets safely off that balcony. Well, of course, you build them a ramp. I remember this when I first fucking saw. This was like before I knew there was a ship that should not be like that's wrong. If you watch carefully you'll see Michael Myers staggering backwards. And then slowly he goes on Baramulla. And then goes over the side of the balcony once you've seen it, you can never unsee. Here's the beginning of Halloween too. We turn those lights. More time. What did sheets what a complete cheat? That is man. I remember seeing that as a kid and be like, no, it's not real movies are. And that's when I joined the movie business. Yes, we also like to take a look at acting that sometimes not all great actors give great performances sometimes acting can be so bad. It goes all the way around to become exquisite acting. Not. Is. Welcome to the world of exquisite acting with Ralph dumb. I'm Kevin O this week's exquisite acting comes from six rain Oso buddy there in New York. He sent this in from a movie called the swarm. Wow, I see this movie since I was a kid. You're a lucky lucky, man. It was I remember looking so forward to it because I was like this could happen. These could turn on us. This good happen. They were predicting back in the day that they were on their way, they're working their way up from South America. The African is killer bee was gonna come to the United States and wipe us everybody for those of you who weren't around in the seventies. There was an era of constant what they called disaster movies, which they had all different kinds of things threatening our lives, and this one was B's Michael Caine starred in him. But also in this film was Oscar winning actress Olympia to have a length. She was gone with the wind. I mean, just a long storied career before she made this film did not help her story of her career. This film. She came from an era where you could act big and get away with it on the big screen. The seventies was not that so much here is Libya to handle and looking out the window of a school seeing the entire town. Stung to death by killer bees. She's looking through a window at her reaction is exquisite acting. That makes it. She rivals Vader there. Oh, my Lord every week. One of the reasons we all gathered together to take a look at all the entertainment news. It's a segment we call the HBO headlines. As you know, the author of the day when it comes to entertainment is the streaming.

Michael Myers Richards Olympia Michael Meyer Michael Caine HBO Sydney Australia Michael AJ Ralph South America Dr Loomis Baramulla United States Libya Kevin O New York Oscar
"first film" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"first film" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Just I I don't think that I will care unless the second sequel like completely wiles me because I was not impressed by as impressed by the technology. The first film and hammers. It was and I would actually be down for an avatar like theme park. But as a movie, I was not impressed send you out to remember what the official name of it is. But avatar land out the in Orlando, Chris what about you? What do you where are you on the where do you fall on the avatar spectrum right now? I know from working at slash film dot com. I've learned not to outwardly dismiss entire things. So soon, but you know, the first avatar made so much money someone somewhere has to like it. Right. I mean, it wouldn't have made that much money. If people didn't like it. But I don't understand who is excited for this. I mean, maybe I'll be proven wrong when it comes out and breaks all box office records, but I just feel like no one really cares about this anymore. I feel like it was very much a film of its time. And I just don't know what people, you know, even think of this anymore. I mean, maybe that'll change when the trailers come out, and it looks amazing. But yeah, I can't tell you a single thing about that first movie that's like memorable. You know, the plot is polka haunt his basically and the characters I don't remember their names. I don't remember anything. I I saw theaters I didn't dislike it, but I don't. I don't get this this multi sequel thing I'd rather James Cameron made something else 'cause that I'd be excited for that. James Cameron making a new movie, but not avatar two through eight or whatever it is. I man look at Titanic comes on TV all the time, and my wife, and I are always stopping and watching that movie and just getting sucked into the beauty of that film making. But every time avatar is on TV. I just flip right through it. Like, I never stop and watch even like two minutes in a row of avatar. So I don't know. I mean, that's certainly that's. Hollywood is his tapped into my personal viewing habits and making decisions based on that. Now, they're they're clearly not. But team at least say Hollywood. Yeah. I don't know. I mean, I have learned never to underestimate James Cameron though. So I suspect that we're going to be looking back on this as like, wow. That was a really weird period. But now the avatar movies are completely dominant. Like right back up there with Star Wars. So I I don't know. We'll see if if audiences agree, but and people if you're out there listening in you are actually one of the few people who right now in two thousand eighteen is super excited about the avatar franchise right in let us know at Peter at slash dot com. Tell us why. And what you think about what these new movies are going to do Chris tell us about trial of the Chicago Seven. This is the movie that I've been writing about probably off and on for like eight to ten years. But I don't think we've actually talked about it on this podcast yet. Tell us about the latest with the stone. Yeah. So a little over ten years ago. Aaron Sorkin wrote the script for this film, the trial of the Chicago Seven, which is based on the trial of these political activists who were arrested after a riot during the democratic convention in Chicago in nineteen sixty nine and so Aaron Sorkin wrote the script back a little over ten years ago. And at the time Steven Spielberg intended to direct it. And then try one reason or another it just never got off the ground later, Paul Greengrass was going to take her directing. But they couldn't agree on a budget. He I guess he wanted too much money to make this even though it's a courtroom dramas. I don't know why he would need all that money. But that's where it was so Paul Greengrass left and after that it laid a dormant for a little while. But now it's back on and appropriately enough Aaron Sorkin who wrote the script is now directing the film. It's going to be his he said. Director aerial effort. Having made his feature debut last year with molly's game..

Aaron Sorkin James Cameron Paul Greengrass Chicago Chris Hollywood Orlando official Steven Spielberg molly Director Peter ten years two minutes
"first film" Discussed on Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

"Do you wanna see this thing through i'm going to have to get dirty just berlin that he's back with nancy's out sorrow for the sequel to veal news twenty fifteen thrilla this time the war against the mexican cartels is escalating when it's revealed they may be trafficking terrorists across the border now autumn you i've written the review the white line yes we have a quote hair a grimly match oh action movie did we need a sequel scar well i think it's interesting that this this is the second part of proposed sakaria trilogy and watching the first film which i think we saw in canon doesn't fifteen would not have expected that to be to other things in films does make sense in effectively they've just done the same thing again click obama bigger budget so he have a few more like helicopter shots and a few more explosions effectively benita authorities character replaces emily blunt from the first film as this film's emotional center but yeah for me it was like much the same experiences as the first film started off really well kind of type is out towards the end and just left we feeding put me in a weird mood actually i felt it was very very sore so serious and cynical and not quite wide needed from a cinema going experience yeah you talk about it having seeming larger budget but it's hard not to see this almost as bargainbasement sequel when you don't have the same director you don't have the same star the same cinematographer roger deakins who shot the last one of course being one of them must feted seem tacos generation composer johann johannsson another person that was singled out in reviews for very well reviewed films carrier twenty fifteen you don't have them return and you don't have emily blunt the emotional coal it's hard not to see this as a near the bteam in a way no on the score actually i really found that quite overbearing commissions it's just full of those generic horn blasts you say she has which is shame because new han johansen passed away tragically in february this year and it's hilda goodness delta his co composer icelandic cellist to takes over here and it doesn't really find identity in the way that the the scored in last one manuela what's your relationship with the sakaria franchise and how did the sequel out v it's hard to say if it's worse or if it's just as bad but so i watched the first one the night before seeing the new one and it was completed pulled believe this is a movie that people take seriously i think it's absolute trash and is vile and the new one is kind of worse in that is trying to escape to a lot more because the first one was more about americans doing bad things but seeing well this is how it is the war so we don't have a choice whereas this one is more americans doing things and saying this is how it is but also at some point realizing that they're wrong but then doing it anyway and so they're just like trying to be the heroes at the same time as they are the villains and it's so disingenuous it's so petty and then the wolves me saying well this is what americans do you know like yeah but i don't need a movie about this and the worst thing is that at some point near the beginning i was actually crying because it was so upset because in this in the second second phone because does basically the phone makes a direct connection between immigration at the mexican border and terrorist the absolute last thing to see in a movie and it's so so dishonest and it's so vile is absolutely insane it's interesting both sakari wanna on this one they're not interested in being pious films at all then ripping from the headlines and the political situation right now and spinning into what is sort of ports rela sort of material what made the first film stand out was this narrative class filmmaking feel nephews such craftsmen and all these other craftsman behind the scenes and this film wants you take some of that away this is much more of an exploitation movie but it's it's interesting because i think in the way the first one in the.

nancy berlin
"first film" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"Mean not very simplifies here actually like trying to find a job and stuff and she gets like she basically goes on works for the lawyer who represented in like a suit that she tries to buy some guy tried to run over one hundred crush like if you don't return my calls and stuff and you didn't win this case i'm gonna come and care basically just like give up which is great liked was the like the demanding nature i think it's really american dream and it was really good like contaminate basically yeah in the area chromium something like this is the stuff i'm yeah yeah it's basically a story i think that's quite relevant to now let you can if you want may change you can take on juggernaut companies i mean it's it's hard to do it sort of reminded me in a way this is quite tenuous but you know the ups koerting bill that's been changed this week by gina martin who is actually sisters with one of my friends stevie she's just she went to a music concert someone took a picture up her skirt the police really care that much they would just delete of your phone no harm done just a pitcher it should be legal to do that and she just she's a norm she doesn't have any legal background attal and she's changed a little she's incredible it's amazing i really good film that came out in two thousand i think it was the first film that introduced introduced me to activism like an early age playing in background in my home because i had it on yeah yeah i loved how she was like judy robots character was like no nonsense because she was i think she kind of knew the when she was in a way the way that she was even like when her employer was like the gauls feeling really uncomfortable with the way that you dress and she was just like yeah i like how i look and she's like maybe you should rethink your ties absolutely that we pretty much covered in this book as well like asking for a raise all these different things and just saying she went off to do research on the delving investigate the case further and then our tissues out of the office for a week even though she'd said and then she comes back in this job anymore then they pick up the case again they go back to and she's like i tell you hire me back and i'll give you more information if you give me a pay increase give you this so you have to side yeah timeless the message is pretty much like you can watch that anytime and still get the message from it as i said it's american dream kind of thing kind of the right i mean it was amazing ending pas like it's so hollywood aside from the now here very very tree look it came out that was true story valid perceive happiness hype true stories well true when you think i ain't going google the real people like the wolf all street the guy has a cameo in the end saying it's very american made like you can be anything no i young girl what film it must i was just like that so bad you've just done and i deny the messages is a good one we stand guy's gonna watch erin brockovich featuring the beautiful and also just anything with a young julia roberts the wedding i love my friends oh and she was in that film which was a teacher in a convent what's it called forgot i think he's one these smile convent just a school loved her enough nothing hell was good my favorite prey went obviously is my favorite film i watch it like every two weeks she's she's kind of feel wonder young boy who has like dan wilson yeah because the book is doing well did you anything else she's not guiseley how long does it take you to write the multi method about three months what but it's totally different from kind of the other burqa right which was very much like kinda mile my style of writing each chapter in an essay this is agile no from the end notes like the so much research so i did all the research first and they're wanna went when i went to write to it was kind of no easy ever fiction so.

three months two weeks
"first film" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Loved each other we did and we do but it's complicated and i think that really what you you get a sense of in the beginning of the film is that they were together they tried it out and there was kind of this unresolved ending so it hasn't really ended but there's something unresolved about it and then when they come back together because of because of these circumstances on the island javi sleeves relationship plays out accordingly but it's it's something that was that was really fun for me getting to think about not only what might have happened in between but also like we've completely almost shifted dynamics like i was the character in the first film that felt or had a sense of apathy as to the situation like you know well this is you know their assets and it's black and white and this is the situation and whereas in this one it's it's much more so owen who's who's kind of like he's sort of like dr ian malcolm he's like let nature take its course you know whereas claire is like no we have to do something so we've kind of switched roles in a way not malcolm cools is back in the picture which is great news jeff goldblum to those of you don't know dr malcolm's name it's jeff goldblum it is and everyone cheers when he comes when he comes back on when we spoke last chris for it was forgotten to and you would talking about utah about the higher expectations for the second movie will making a little bit nervous so that to one side given that this is this is the second def how does this field because the last one did pretty well so you you similarly nervous for this one well i think that no matter what kind of a movie no matter what your there's always a little bit of nerves going into the release of a film i think we worked really hard on this over the last couple of years weren't credibly proud of it but you never know how an audience is going to respond.

dr ian malcolm claire jeff goldblum chris utah owen
"first film" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"first film" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Necessarily have this kind of tension that was something that was introduced and played up in the film so again that's the license that allows yourself in in helps greatly anything you can do that when you have no pretends to do in a documentary right no no but what about this sort of hybrid former talking about she by the same token she can take what she wants from what is real about these characters on offense that an actor that she recruited from los angeles couldn't do have either seen her first film now in its streaming on netflix and i really wanted to watch it before this so that i could talk about it but i didn't all shake your head well good people maybe i don't know taken yeah yeah so she's very talented in what she's gonna do potentially black rumor that was say around a block with film in the sort of lyrical style of this could be really quite great you don't ever want filmmakers he liked to get absorbed by the marvel machine so we're okay i think it's a perfect place for jim i don't want want her specific i want to see more films like this in places like this about people like this because that's not something her two films have been about places like this people who specifically this place and these people you know like she has committed to this part of the country so it'll be interesting to see where she goes from here she's she's got skills for sure i think the way she manages nonprofessional actors in dialogue and improvisation the performances here are like to a one.

los angeles netflix
"first film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"first film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Mentors for the weekend and then at the end of the weekend one director in one screenwriter will be given the opportunity to partner with studio fest to embark on the making of your first film and it's really cool because you'll also get a budget between thirty and fifty thousand dollars so anyone from any country can enter as long as you're eighteen or older your submissions are in english or with english subtitles for shorts of course the scripts have to be an english and you have not yet made a feature film and the best part is they've actually offered a twenty five percent off for no film school at listeners who enter the code studio fest nfs on without a box and film freeway so that's studio fest nfs like no film school and early deadline is april twenty second we will link to that and i'll remind you of the code in our podcast bust also here's a really cool opportunity if you're working on a short documentary about an urgent topic that can be completed and distributed quickly fledglings special fund for rapid story development provides grants ranging from twenty five hundred to ten thousand dollars to support such projects according to their site priority will be given to projects that have a plan to distribute the work in ways that deepen the debate around our most critical social issues the grant is open to projects at all stages so production post production and distribution and even outreach but again they're really looking for projects that are well positioned to make an impact quickly you don't have to be a us based filmmaker to play but the funders emphasized their interest in projects that respond in real time to us social and political changes that affect vulnerable populations in the us and abroad and all applicants must have a five a one c three fiscal sponsor based in the us even if you yourself are not based in the us so due to you know the nature of this grant and the fact that it's about responding quickly on a rolling deadline.

director us partner fifty thousand dollars ten thousand dollars twenty five percent twenty second
"first film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"first film" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Decided to go for and you're in production i think it was um i think working on in the film sets like the best part about them if you're an actor in your own and you haven't broken and you're not on like a really cushy hbo show or whatever is that you really used to doing different tasks so i mean i l my first film that i did i mean there is only five of us in a van so i mean i had to do some basic just some basic slating here and there and wardrobe makeup and everything else so it's like seemed find me like i feel as an actor i feel like when you're on a set you should be able to do a lot of different roles and not be a big baby um so wonderful but i so i was just used to having to haifa nate multitask but of course like went doing it at present completely insane but i had a really good crew and i had really good producers and i i didn't find at that different the only difference was i wish i could i wish i could look at the monitoring because there are some shots her mike who well we'll use that one i think the the lucky part of working in indy film has at you just have to do so many things anyways so yeah lyrical now so is really a couple of things that say one was that i i was trying to do something else and i couldn't get funding to do that was the biggest by a common problem so then you know than secondly you start looking around key what's close and then as he do what's called proximity cinema whatever's closest to you and then like how can i do this as cheaply as possible that's called proximity civil rights icon of coined like i was asked that to talk about this and and so it's like a word had been using artillery like the idea of proximity cinema proc cinema praxair alah oh who's that and as a secondly was then my brother like his personality i thought was really um he could implode and he would sort of do things randomly that i felt was really good for the camera and then serve i think the box that he gets put in.

haifa
"first film" Discussed on Pop Culture Continuum

Pop Culture Continuum

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Pop Culture Continuum

"At first film or i saw at least when i knew what the term film are met i like i might see the maltese falcon or something on tv but uh yeah this this is amazing story that gives all over the place in it's you know uh robert mitchem is a dude you know an x call on or whatever's trying to go straight and gets thrown back into shit uh which is a common theme but go cnn out of the past what are you have for number two as if i could guests these casa blanca yep as big villain i want to say about casablanca is the fact the coverings super underrated plan next drink it it yeah he's great in this is grade or zero was the other move it talked about his own i forget the about guess late now i forget is something else maybe i'll just thinking of catholic he's great in this nypd at the time you play the invisible man some movie i've never seen but that became the jerk for forever and that's too bad because he said oh mr smith because of washington's great matt and he's just he's he's a wonderful actor cluttering yeah and it it really is a great movie i heard bob odenkirk say he doesn't like the casablanca it was on comedy bang made a long time ago and he's saying how he didn't think it was a great film because like that middle section with the love story thought dragged it down but i have no problem with it like i think it's perfect for setting up utada almost want to know how day though each other you know yeah yeah i i hope of yeah.

robert mitchem mr smith washington matt bob odenkirk cnn casa blanca
"first film" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"first film" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"And we we talked a bunch about that about how that movie is just a very they baseline obvious take down of the bourgeoisie and of elitism and privilege and it's kind of boring i'm it seemed like for both of us it was kind of an insight into the degree to which you can agree with a films premise and still find it really dole if it's an movie that doesn't approach the things that you believe the ina remotely interesting lane i mean that that's something that you not to get to sidetrack that something that honecker has done his whole career me he his film is attacked the bourgeoisie over and over again but there's always that other layer of suspense or i think of something like cash shea and funny games right now you hate or or the the continent is first film is always some other element play rather than just straight up contempt and and uh that you see within the exterminate angel there's a formless to it and a small spontaneity everything this is unexpected there's something i mean really obscene it of scenes from couple times i love obscene as may times you have toshka but it is a perpetually exciting experience to watch it again and again because he there is so much packed into it and again i i think part of what makes a work as these characters are kind of unaware of their own alien asian and distance from people aren't of the same class and and it doesn't even really dawned on them this is that i don't think wither by the end of the scenario does either an usher anyone learned any lessons of the courses film no the wind up in a church and then for july laos bruyneel to switch focus to another institution edging of change targets letter he just changes target but that's all i was curious just as the baseline how much you've seen of bruyneel's working in where this might fit into his film agassi i think relatively little compared to keith certainly i mean i've seen the big classics discreet chairman of the bourgeoisie obscure object of desire and she an audit lou.

bruyneel chairman lou agassi keith
"first film" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"This also stars a young chanting tatum in his first film rural and his second roll ever none of those voters some tv show yeah this was his first film rural channing tatum man he's like a he's actually like a big part of this is offering a speech to look tough since 2005 ayoola chanted below the aama he's on my smaller and over minutes any of its right that was this thing for us man and lewis land away also octavia spencer has been a man she she she talked about her early movie the lion i think this is all right so the other things you need to know coach carter it may cost thirty million dollars to make some pretty hefty bugs already area is a pretty hefty budget for a sports it's all those songs you right they have mad song that soundtrack domestically it grow sixty seven million worldwide seventy six million rubber not bad not great to be honest but not bad wasn't of you know it it it it did its thing but not a huge smashing success i wouldn't say it's rotten tomatoes is like 65 percent so you know people like the film and that's all we need to say about that you're to do initial thoughts should i started this with thoughts of your here so i saw this movie when i was young i remember when i was young when i was in high school that's whose marie came out i saw it when it came out and i was like coup in theaters decided started there's.

tatum carter marie octavia spencer thirty million dollars 65 percent
"first film" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"first film" Discussed on About to Review

"Yeah exactly right over the title card and when people started talking just bette davis nadler back and forth old ring at the camera at which is like everybody give space in this movie everybody's face and all and again body and unlike on and body ideology like now though it was on federal definitely missing the days when they loved women with fuller figures i salute on on them now i mean like on this screen like you don't see merit very getting better but you don't see very many as exaggerated williams average bodied women hundredth anniversary into the earlier among hutu took it out here yet at of who'd it so for me hundreds of worth lim el hundreds it up this aguas it again on one firm doesn't offer shirt out of movement were for i'm going to watch okay now onto a movie that him recommended yes you erin the first film is unity the tune well this one actually we'll just go oneonone because now we actually almost okay now on notes uh so of each have about three points this movie chasing amy by be fantastic director kevin smith he looks out onto him i am alarmed love kevin smith fan and while they both like donald so chasing him take it away chasing amy is the story of comic book rds that falls for another comic book art is it graphic not another com or call it look artists a false for another colleague with artist turns out loop she's lesbian realized they have such a great connection hoops isn't loops i fell for allies biagio i realize acid you great connection that she's like oh.

williams kevin smith donald amy bette davis nadler hutu director
"first film" Discussed on 5 live Boxing with Costello

5 live Boxing with Costello

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"first film" Discussed on 5 live Boxing with Costello

"And as far as rocky and the whole aftermath of that first film is concerned then you started it become aware of how much of it was based around you and therefore how much you yourself should be worth and that sylvester stallone ought to pay you for having told your story in that way yell out of the airport through all the film part in a gm looked exactly all like car than actually did do some shooting from the listen training session embassy panels and of course the fight with and beat the giants which was a year after a fourth the muhammed ali uh that was him with on the lips and running up the steps with me on television before the brockie movies ever made they had it'd be four or five different and princes in air about the well about him being there legbreaker malia wasn't call the like breaker my day with call the and enforcer so so anyway the those movie they would tommy gun the kids that was supposed to be the white hole but that with don king in the movie and the iraqi one of course that was muhammed ali fighting me and the democrats have been a good ten different things in there that related to my life um my my uh championship play then this tone user and he he said killingly one time he knew about all of that and it was great stuff he says crates of why we may use it and the finally about thirty years later he was shooting he also promised be upon and movie which he did he kept his word did rocky to he wrote me into a script my name was ching member chuck weapon.

sylvester stallone gm legbreaker malia don king muhammed ali rocky thirty years
"first film" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"first film" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Mats first film valentinothelastemperor is about more than fashion it's about one era giving way to another world away the old fashioned today is redeyeradiothefed you for these abuse of the one day that's his than his northern war made with for the movies about valentino in his partner giancarlogmatti they've been together as a couple in business and in life for more than 50 years now i never pitched the movie to 'financiers that way always said it was going to be a glamour and fashion and movie stars and then i got money ifi had said it was a movie about to guide to gag guys in their seventies and their life long relationship in businessassociationi never would have gotten penny but that's what i made the movie about i think you have to sometimes you have to tell him who said it truthful hype really about about the movie or making order to get the money in the film debuted at the venice in toronto film festivals to standing ovations but the distribution offers were meagre summits team made the risky choice to self distribute theatrically in 2010 we were lucky in that one of the financiers wanted to break the parents am i was very resistant by the way i was like i can't self distribute this movie this is insanity it's it's enough to get the movie jonrahm soi was extremely resistant there have been very little self distribution in docks at that time or anna in anything frankly but it was starting to be nigeria sometimes called diy distribution so we got some money from one of the financiers and we just started to make a go of it and it's a long story a bit either some really kind of crazy breaks that we had the biggest one is that at your festival torontoi you you're actually have been partners tom because you said to.

valentino partner ifi businessassociationi venice nigeria Mats toronto tom 50 years one day