35 Burst results for "First Client"

The Targeting of Trump Lawyers for Perpetrating the' Big Lie'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:43 min | 1 d ago

The Targeting of Trump Lawyers for Perpetrating the' Big Lie'

"And back with my friend, fellow Salem podcaster, constitutional lawyer, Jenna Ellis, Jenna. Let's talk about this campaign on the part of the left, building on their big lie, to go after Trump attorneys like you and act like your representation of Trump or the Trump campaign. Somehow constitutes a fundamental abrogation of your legal duty. Talk about walk us through what's happening who's doing it and the implications of it. Yeah, it's a purely partisan theatrics and it's a partisan narrative by the Democrats to specifically target any attorneys. There are about a 110 of us that these Democrat operatives have targeted to try to disbar lawyers for simply representing zealously our client, including the Trump campaign and Donald Trump himself. And what they're trying to do is take away not only our livelihood, but so reinforce to the American public that if you stand up for truth and you have an interest in actually doing your job as a lawyer, then we are going to make sure to come after you so that everyone is intimidated and won't actually stand up and defend anyone like Donald Trump in the future. And it's so absurd dinesh because the first responsibility of attorneys is to have zealous representation of your plan. I don't care if your name is Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton in America, you can hire a lawyer to represent an advocate on your

Salem Podcaster Jenna Ellis Donald Trump Jenna Dinesh Hillary Clinton America
Patrick Assalone Gives Us the Inside Scoop on Investing

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:37 min | 1 d ago

Patrick Assalone Gives Us the Inside Scoop on Investing

"A step further. For the average person who would like to learn more besides, you know, target trading and you're actually doing this, is just regular investing the best ways you're looking at is just become passive. Is that why one of the underpinnings of our economy has become one of those and I've been on the other side. I had a series 7 to 66. I was on the retail side. I saw what the institutional side did when I was at wachovia securities. And it was strange how the institutional side would always tell you XYZ was a conviction by make sure your clients are all in it. The reason was is the institutional side had already run it up as much as they possibly could, and they needed a bunch of suckers to offload the stock on. Because without those buyers, they couldn't sell. And that's essentially what these big banks are. If you think for one moment that there's this Chinese wall protecting them from you, there's not. They know exactly what you're holding. They know exactly what you're being sold. They know what positions you're in. They know this because why? Your financial adviser is most likely selling them one of their products that create the biggest rip or commission for them. They're not managing for you. They call you when they need more money. They call you when they've got something that's a great buy and you should do this. I don't make any money off any of my students aside from education. I am the only person in this business that actually calls the levels out the session before. Where to get in, where to get out and how to do it with how many the day before. Nobody else does that. You can go

Wachovia Securities
93: Find What Tickles the Soul - burst 03

How to Live A Fantastic Life

07:59 min | 3 d ago

93: Find What Tickles the Soul - burst 03

"I think a lot of I think a lot of the, you know, at a certain point, I think we reach a place where, you know, listen, I don't need any more character. Life can take it easy on me now. And so I think I had a lot of the grit again just rural Tennessee and especially rural Tennessee where I was, I mean, I wasn't in the absolute deep, deep, deep, deep, deep Woods, but in the 70s and Tennessee where I was out by Hendersonville and gallatin, not like it is today. There was not a whole lot around. So I had quite a bit of what we would call character building and grid just growing up in a single parent home. By the time I got to Los Angeles, the LA part was just trying to build a career in an exceedingly difficult profession where I didn't have I didn't have any nepotism. I didn't have anything, I didn't show up here with anything on my side for lack of a better phrase. Yeah. Well, national was a totally different city back then in the 70s than it is now. I mean now it's the home and hard of a lot of productions, both movies and radio and television. That was not happening way back then in the same way. Now it's Nash Vegas. First of all, it's the number one bachelorette weekend destination in the south. It's number one, even more so than Atlanta. And number two, I mean, yeah, my mother was a country singer, but there's a very famous train station Alan in Nashville called union station that actually country songs have been written about it. It's beautiful. They refurbished it. When I was in high school, it was boarded up in dilapidated. So yeah, you didn't go past, you didn't go past 20th or 21st street towards first street to downtown. When I was a kid or you were looking for trouble and that would be just past Vanderbilt. So it's a very different city now, yes. Yeah. As I say right now, I mean to Nashville and there are many areas that you would stay out of. I mean, it's a totally grown up city and it's safe. It's prosperous. It's really become uptown. Whereas it used to be a hole to begin with. You are correct. There were distinctly places you did not go. That is correct. And now it is. It's just, it's just blown up in the last 15, 20 years. Unbelievable. Yeah. For sure. So do you remember any stories along the way that you can tell the audience? About that journey? Several of them depends on which ones we can allow on air. No, I think we, when we tend to use the word journey, doctor leica, we, a lot of times, as a country that we're very result oriented and I respectfully understand that certainly as an athlete, your result oriented, taking tests where result oriented, and so when we look at journeys, sometimes we wind up just looking at the end of like, oh my gosh, that person is so and so they've gotten to it doesn't matter what industry it is. And so when I tend to look at some of those years, I tend to look back at some of the moments when I should have looked at myself and gone, what the hell are you doing? And one of the key ones for me would have been what I chose to go to Atlanta for two years. I won an event in New York. And I could have gone to New York, but similarly, New York back then, Manhattan back then is not the Manhattan you see today. I mean, people who have not seen Times Square from a perspective of the early 80s to where it is today, Times Square was a place after one or 2 o'clock in the morning, you would just get killed. And so I had been there and for this event and as a guy who grew up in the rural south and who also was a golfer, I didn't really see myself hanging out in Manhattan trying to haul my sticks on the subway somewhere to go play golf. So I chose Atlanta, but I also went to Atlanta with a very old car, $200 in my pocket, and the only person that knew I was coming was the gal who was to be my agent. So I had to I slept in my car for three days in this abandoned Sears parking lot. That is in really upscale Buckhead at the time. It was just this big abandoned building. And it was kind of downhill and there was behind the building thing and I thought, oh, that seems safe. And I literally slept in my car for three days, and then my agent had a client that was in the catering business. And she had a couple of kids that they had moved out. She was an empty nester. And she was kind of a whack a doodle. She might have been kind of a functioning alcoholic. She was funny. And she didn't live that far down peachtree. And I rented a room from her for $50 a week. For about 6 or 7 months and then one of her neighbors was a lawyer and he knew somebody who worked at this really fancy restaurant downtown and he helped get me a job. And once I had a job for 6 or 7 months, I had enough money to finally move out and get my own place. So that's the beginning of a journey right there. That is the beginning of a journey and how did you get motivated? A lot of things were stacked against you. You know, a lot of things, you know how many actors try and never meet their dreams. How did you stay motivated during that process? You know, that becomes the intriguing part about that question for me, which ironically, I've asked a number of people on my own myself. Is we get into the we go the direction in my opinion of nature versus nurture. And I'm someone who believes, I don't think that it's 50 50 personally as a guy who was almost a psychology double major. I do believe we're a little more nurture than we are in nature personally. I think our environment of how we grow up has a little bit longer lasting effect on us and maybe the nature part of us remains a little more a little more hidden, but not always. I think that the way I grew up with just a sister and a mother who was not home very much and was sort of a latchkey kid who learned a lot on his own and had to grow up pretty fast. I think there was just a nurtured part of me that quitting wasn't really in my vocabulary. I don't know if you want to put words to something like that such as stubborn or cocky or defiant or I don't know. It doesn't much really matter. Even just going to the event that I went to in New York that I won, we didn't have any money for me to go to that. I literally had to go around and raise the money to be able to even go on that trip and when I wanted and that's a trophy that sits right

Tennessee Hendersonville Gallatin Los Angeles LA Vegas Atlanta Nashville Alan Manhattan Times Square New York Vanderbilt Sears Golf
Jason Pye and Doug Talk Political Gridlock

The Doug Collins Podcast

03:09 min | 3 d ago

Jason Pye and Doug Talk Political Gridlock

"That when we make progress, there seems to be, especially when it comes up in an election year, the halfway point to a presidential year, you know, it's one of those things and I say this I'm jokingly, as someone who tried to be in the Senate, you know, every day there's a hundred people in the world who wake up and believe they should be president. They're all found in the United States Senate. And you know, but why is it that we seem to always especially as Republicans? And some Democrats, frankly, if you look at it, go back to this idea that the only way to solve some of these societal eels is to go to a process we know really doesn't work and cost us money. When you're talking about criminal justice system, that is just this throw away the key mentality, lock them up no matter what. You don't have a second chance. You don't have a third chance. You don't even have a first chance. If you listen to some of the rhetoric. I mean, it works to a point. It's not negative ads. I mean, they work to a point, but at a certain point in time, truth needs to prevail out. And it's really frustrating at this point in time that you're seeing this rhetoric because we know we know this rhetoric doesn't work. I mean, I flip those numbers around the other side. I look at the 85% that haven't been rearrested. Those are large numbers to say, look, this is working. As we go forward, disturbing trend though I'm seeing an election. And I saw it in my election in the Senate race. I was vilified by the cities under miss laugh where four by her team for being a defense car for actually have represented clients in our confrontational system. Wow, actually upholding the constitution shocker in that regard. What was even worse is the ads run against me. We're not even clients of mine. They were actually my partners. And had Hispanic faces. We'll continue on. Again, but that goes to the heart of this sort of scare tactic that goes on. But now we're starting to see it again. But there is some hope that it's not working. I know you're familiar with the candidates in Indiana. One had helped on criminal justice. It was three candidates in the race. The third one who had had no background at all actually ended up winning this primary. So what I thought was interesting was the two Republicans, both had legislative backgrounds. Wanted health been helpful on bail reform and other things in Indiana. The other one attacked them for that and came in a distant third. Do you see some of this with the proper discussion and political will, if you would, winning out or do we still have a life? It's really hard to say right now. And speaking, speaking more to your race, because I watched that race. And I've never hid this publicly. I voted for you in the race stuck. I actually had a hard time working in a yard too. But in your race, it was pretty interesting because of the spinning that both the loeffler team and others were trying to do because they were saying that life were saying, oh, I supported first step back. It was the prison reform and redemption act that we opposed because that was the predecessor Bill the first step. And they were hitting you on that. And it's like, there is no difference between these two bills. The first step

Senate United States Indiana
Detention of WNBA's Griner in Moscow extended by 1 month

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 6 d ago

Detention of WNBA's Griner in Moscow extended by 1 month

"WNBA WNBA WNBA WNBA star star star star Brittney Brittney Brittney Brittney Greiner's Greiner's Greiner's Greiner's pre pre pre pre trial trial trial trial detention detention detention detention in in in in Russia Russia Russia Russia has has has has been been been been extended extended extended extended by by by by one one one one month month month month Criner Criner Criner Criner appeared appeared appeared appeared for for for for a a a a brief brief brief brief hearing hearing hearing hearing at at at at a a a a court court court court outside outside outside outside Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow hand hand hand hand cocked cocked cocked cocked wearing wearing wearing wearing an an an an orange orange orange orange hoodie hoodie hoodie hoodie and and and and holding holding holding holding her her her her face face face face down down down down attorney attorney attorney attorney Alexander Alexander Alexander Alexander boycott boycott boycott boycott told told told told the the the the AP AP AP AP he he he he thinks thinks thinks thinks the the the the relatively relatively relatively relatively short short short short extension extension extension extension indicates indicates indicates indicates Greiner's Greiner's Greiner's Greiner's case case case case could could could could go go go go to to to to trial trial trial trial soon soon soon soon she's she's she's she's been been been been in in in in custody custody custody custody for for for for nearly nearly nearly nearly three three three three months months months months detained detained detained detained at at at at a a a a Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow airport airport airport airport in in in in February February February February after after after after vape vape vape vape cartridges cartridges cartridges cartridges containing containing containing containing oil oil oil oil derived derived derived derived from from from from cannabis cannabis cannabis cannabis were were were were allegedly allegedly allegedly allegedly found found found found in in in in her her her her luggage luggage luggage luggage boycott boycott boycott boycott was was was was asked asked asked asked how how how how Greiner Greiner Greiner Greiner is is is is being being being being treated treated treated treated Lucy Lucy Lucy says says says we we we did did did not not not receive receive receive any any any complaints complaints complaints about about about the the the detention detention detention conditions conditions conditions from from from our our our client client client net net net price price price at at at the the the state state state department department department says says says diplomats diplomats diplomats from from from the the the US US US embassy embassy embassy in in in Moscow Moscow Moscow spoke spoke spoke with with with Greiner Greiner Greiner and and and reported reported reported she she she is is is doing doing doing as as as well well well as as as can can can be be be expected expected expected in in in these these these circumstances circumstances circumstances I I I met met met Donahue Donahue Donahue

Greiner Moscow Ap Ap Russia Wnba Brittney Brittney Brittney Bri Criner Criner Criner Criner Alexander Alexander Alexander Greiner Greiner Greiner Greine Lucy Lucy Lucy Department Department Departme Greiner Greiner Greiner United States Donahue Donahue Donahue
Pipeline operator stops gas in 1 Ukraine hub

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Pipeline operator stops gas in 1 Ukraine hub

"You you you you cranes cranes cranes cranes not not not not full full full full gas gas gas gas pipeline pipeline pipeline pipeline operator operator operator operator who who who who stopped stopped stopped stopped Russian Russian Russian Russian shipments shipments shipments shipments through through through through a a a a key key key key hop hop hop hop in in in in the the the the east east east east of of of of the the the the country country country country the the the the move move move move is is is is the the the the first first first first time time time time a a a a natural natural natural natural gas gas gas gas supply supply supply supply has has has has been been been been affected affected affected affected by by by by the the the the war war war war that that that that began began began began in in in in February February February February it it it it may may may may force force force force Russia Russia Russia Russia to to to to shift shift shift shift close close close close of of of of its its its its gas gas gas gas food food food food territory territory territory territory controlled controlled controlled controlled by by by by Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine to to to to reach reach reach reach its its its its clients clients clients clients in in in in Europe Europe Europe Europe the the the the pipeline pipeline pipeline pipeline operator operator operator operator says says says says Russian Russian Russian Russian shipments shipments shipments shipments through through through through its its its its hub hub hub hub in in in in an an an an area area area area controlled controlled controlled controlled by by by by Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow backed backed backed backed separatists separatists separatists separatists would would would would be be be be caught caught caught caught because because because because of of of of interference interference interference interference from from from from occupying occupying occupying occupying forces forces forces forces I'm I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles Charles de de de de Ledesma Ledesma Ledesma Ledesma

Ukraine East East Europe Moscow Charles Charles Charles Charle
Ex-Oklahoma officers charged in fatal shooting of Black man

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | Last week

Ex-Oklahoma officers charged in fatal shooting of Black man

"Two two two two X. X. X. X. officers officers officers officers are are are are charged charged charged charged in in in in the the the the fatal fatal fatal fatal shooting shooting shooting shooting of of of of a a a a black black black black man man man man in in in in Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma following following following following a a a a probe probe probe probe by by by by the the the the Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma state state state state bureau bureau bureau bureau of of of of investigation investigation investigation investigation two two two two former former former former Lawton Lawton Lawton Lawton Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma police police police police officers officers officers officers are are are are being being being being charged charged charged charged with with with with manslaughter manslaughter manslaughter manslaughter in in in in the the the the fatal fatal fatal fatal shooting shooting shooting shooting of of of of a a a a twenty twenty twenty twenty nine nine nine nine year year year year old old old old black black black black man man man man quadri quadri quadri quadri Sanders Sanders Sanders Sanders authorities authorities authorities authorities say say say say officer officer officer officer Robert Robert Robert Robert Hinkel Hinkel Hinkel Hinkel who who who who is is is is black black black black and and and and Nathan Nathan Nathan Nathan Ronen Ronen Ronen Ronen who who who who is is is is white white white white responding responding responding responding to to to to a a a a nine nine nine nine one one one one one one one one call call call call in in in in December December December December fifth fifth fifth fifth two two two two thousand thousand thousand thousand twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one where where where where caller caller caller caller said said said said Sanders Sanders Sanders Sanders was was was was waving waving waving waving a a a a gun gun gun gun in in in in the the the the house house house house and and and and wouldn't wouldn't wouldn't wouldn't let let let let a a a a resident resident resident resident leaf leaf leaf leaf the the the the two two two two officers officers officers officers shot shot shot shot him him him him a a a a total total total total of of of of fifteen fifteen fifteen fifteen times times times times Comanche Comanche Comanche Comanche county county county county district district district district attorney attorney attorney attorney Kyle Kyle Kyle Kyle Kobelco Kobelco Kobelco Kobelco said said said said no no no no gun gun gun gun was was was was found found found found on on on on or or or or near near near near Sanders Sanders Sanders Sanders police police police police body body body body cam cam cam cam video video video video shows shows shows shows some some some some of of of of the the the the shots shots shots shots were were were were fired fired fired fired as as as as he he he he stood stood stood stood with with with with his his his his arms arms arms arms raised raised raised raised over over over over his his his his head head head head attorney attorney attorney attorney Lee Lee Lee Lee Merritt Merritt Merritt Merritt representing representing representing representing the the the the Sanders Sanders Sanders Sanders family family family family says says says says he he he he wants wants wants wants the the the the charges charges charges charges upgraded upgraded upgraded upgraded to to to to murder murder murder murder defense defense defense defense attorney attorney attorney attorney Gary Gary Gary Gary James James James James described described described described his his his his client client client client as as as as good good good good officers officers officers officers saying saying saying saying evidence evidence evidence evidence will will will will show show show show they they they they believe believe believe believe Sanders Sanders Sanders Sanders was was was was reaching reaching reaching reaching for for for for a a a a weapon weapon weapon weapon in in in in his his his his pants pants pants pants England England England England ronin ronin ronin ronin were were were were fired fired fired fired from from from from the the the the police police police police department department department department on on on on January January January January seventh seventh seventh seventh a a a a hearing hearing hearing hearing is is is is scheduled scheduled scheduled scheduled for for for for August August August August both both both both men men men men were were were were released released released released Friday Friday Friday Friday on on on on the the the the twenty twenty twenty twenty five five five five thousand thousand thousand thousand dollar dollar dollar dollar bond bond bond bond I'm I'm I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer king king king king

Oklahoma Sanders Sanders Sanders Sander Oklahoma State State State Sta Lawton Lawton Lawton Lawton Fatal Fatal Fatal Fatal Quadri Quadri Quadri Quadri Sa Robert Robert Robert Robert Hi Nathan Nathan Nathan Nathan Ro House House House House Comanche Comanche Comanche Com Kyle Kyle Kyle Kyle Kobelco Ko Sanders Sanders Sanders Sander Sanders Sanders Lee Lee Lee Lee Merritt Merrit Gary Gary Gary Gary James Jame England Police Police Police Police De Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jen
Former FBI Agent Steve Gray: 'The Bureau Rules by Fear'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:11 min | Last week

Former FBI Agent Steve Gray: 'The Bureau Rules by Fear'

"If I had been, I'm not a law enforcement officer, but if I had been one of the special agents, tasked to raid Roger Stone's home, an elderly man with a deaf wife, who was told to take a loaded M4 carbine, put on a body armor, hard plated vest at 6 a.m., bang on the door with a fast boat behind the building in the canal and FBI helicopters above the building. I hope I hope that I would have had the courage to give my supervisory special agent or the a sack or what have you. My badge and tell him, sir, here's my gun, here's my badge, this is wrong. This is a politically driven issue in the past you would have requested the bureau would have said to Roger Stone's lawyer, would your client please come into our field office tomorrow at 10 a.m. and not raid his house like he's a head of the Medellín drug cartel. Is that demand that I would make of myself, is that unreasonable and are you disappointed by the fact that we don't seem to see pushback in an overly politicized bureau today? That's absolutely correct. You have to understand the bureau. The bureau rules by fear within the organization. They rule with an iron fist and they rule with fear, meaning that they keep the agents in fear constantly of either losing their job or getting a high suspension. And the reason is is because they just tell, look, there's always somebody that can take your place. So there's a lot of that going on. And these guys have families. They have, you know, they have houses and mortgages that they have to pay for. But in that Roger Stone case, you're absolutely right. They should have, they would have normally just called him and said, we have a warrant for your arrest. Have your attorney bring you down to the FBI building. We'll come bring you through the back door. We'll process you. We'll take you over to the courthouse, and you'll probably be ROR and release your own recognizance that day, and he'd been back home probably by 3

Roger Stone FBI
Arthur Milikh: 'What We're After Is Political Liberty'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | Last month

Arthur Milikh: 'What We're After Is Political Liberty'

"You know, what does success look like then? What is the country we actually want to live in? How should we be able to articulate that? Well, it's a good question. Look, what we want, what we always have been is a constitutional republic. The question is, what precisely is in the way of that? And there are many things in the way. And what we're after is political liberty. And as I said before, I don't see any other way than through the states. At least for now, that that can be safeguarded, protected, and expanded. The right has simply defaulted. It has not really fought a political fight in a way that it ought to have done. To the point where it has lost institutions that it thought it worshiped and it thought it owned forever. Just as an example, I mean, you know this and your listeners know this. It would have been unimaginable 20 years ago that the fortune 500s, which the right made its main client. Would have gone the other way and laughed in the face of the right. After all of the innumerable endless benefits that were given to them. It's also unimaginable that they would have lost the military. Which is teetering, but its leadership right now has very clearly sided with the left. On anti racism on identity politics. These are very strong signals to the right that it has lost those elements of society. It would be one thing if we were just at this point the normal nation and we were still basically 20 years ago where the parties disagreed and marginal ways. But what the left now wants is a very different thing while it has the military in its hands. While it has a $1 trillion in corporations in its hands, the stakes are very different and it's a very dangerous situation.

If SC Shooter Was Released, Is the Brooklyn Subway Shooter Next?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:06 min | Last month

If SC Shooter Was Released, Is the Brooklyn Subway Shooter Next?

"Price is being represented by state representative Todd Rutherford. How about we try to get him on the phone, Derek? He's a Democrat, he'll never come on, but we can try. Why don't you call him? Maybe we'll make some news here. And he can tell me what he's told reporters, well, my client turned himself in. Yeah, so did the Brooklyn subway shooter who shot about the same amount of people. Now, the world came to an end when the guy shot up the New York City subway. Why is the column being how do you say it? Columbiana. Why is the column columbiana center shooting any less horrific? 9 people shot? How many people were killed or shot on the train? Nobody died, thank God. How many people got shot on the subway? Wasn't it ten? So I don't know. The subway shooter shot one more person than Joanne price is alleged to have shot. They let that guy out even in New York. I don't think. I haven't checked. The day is young, maybe he'll go home too.

Todd Rutherford Columbiana Center Derek Columbiana Brooklyn New York City Joanne Price New York
Victoria Toensing on the Latest in the Sussmann Indictment

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:57 sec | Last month

Victoria Toensing on the Latest in the Sussmann Indictment

"We have to discuss the latest developments in the sussman indictments, the John Durham furtherance of his investigation. It seems as if mister sussman, the lawyer for the Hillary Clinton campaign, who manages to get meetings with the chief council of the FBI via text in less than 24 hours, that he doesn't have the best legal team. Because he doesn't have the best. He doesn't have the best facts. It's really hard. So when he was indicted, the one count indictment, which was 27 pages, which is unusual. They came out. The specimen team came out and said, well, maybe baker didn't have a good memory. That was the FBI guy. Or we don't think we said that. We don't remember any later testified that he actually had a client. And then all of a sudden assessment in a filing just about a week ago says, ta-da, here's the text message. You

John Durham Mister Sussman Sussman FBI Hillary Clinton Baker
Rudy Giuliani: FBI Broke Into Trump Lawyers' Offices

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:49 min | Last month

Rudy Giuliani: FBI Broke Into Trump Lawyers' Offices

"Where do you think this goes? In other words, you're in the fight. There are a number of people in the fight. I think Americans are slowly waking up. I know what's happening. They've destroyed, they have effectively already destroyed some of the most important principles on which I was trained as a lawyer. The attorney client privilege, they've broken into my law office. They broke into three or four other lawyers offices. Who did? The FBI? When I was an assistant U.S. attorney, he was attorney, handled some of the most sensitive cases. I remember a very distinct choice about breaking into a lawyer's office. Do we have probable cause to do it? I'll tell you why. I could have taped a commission meeting. And I didn't do it because I had enough evidence, and I didn't want to, I didn't want to jeopardize my case by doing something so horrible as breaking into a lawyer's office. Even if you have justification for it, it creates a chilling effect. On legitimate lawyers or your client, you want to say something sensitive to your lawyer. I should be able to say to you, nobody will ever hear this, except they remember that Giuliani broke into a law office and now they remember, oh, well, you could break into Giuliani's office. You can break into. This office. And by the way, what do they have in common? They all represent Trump. Right. Well, this is the unraveling of the horrible thing. Of what I like to call America. In other words, once these unprecedented things happen, and they break into your law for the FBI says it did. In other words, we're losing all of these, in a sense, the barriers that the founders deliberately set up to keep us safe and free, one by one, they're tearing them

FBI Giuliani U.S. Donald Trump
James O'Keefe: It's Unusual for DOJ to Request Journalist Emails

The Dan Bongino Show

01:57 min | Last month

James O'Keefe: It's Unusual for DOJ to Request Journalist Emails

"Whether the left likes the stories you break or not is candidly irrelevant to your journalistic bona fides Nothing you do is the authenticity is in dispute These people don't say no no I'm really not the CNN guy in that video They all admit to it You've broken stories using legitimate methods This is an unquestioned attack on the press Secret warrants they were secret You were told they ordered you not to be told about it This is a huge violation of your privacy and constitutional rights You have any recourse here going forward to fight back against this Well it's so unprecedented because the attorney general's name is Merrick Garland Has expressly forbid these sort of warrants any sort of secret sneaky warrants against journalistic emails is unheard of I mean this isn't heard of It's highly even The New York Times wrote it's highly unusual for the DoJ to obtain internal communications of journalists as federal prosecutors are supposed to follow special guidelines right So they did not do that in this case And in the previous cases like for example back under Obama they slide on the Fox guy but they didn't rate his home under the Trump DoJ They reached out to Google for a source with The New York Times but it wasn't under gag This is unprecedented You asked about recourse We filed a series of motions before this federal judge who did order a special master We asked for the names of the people who did this the names of the U.S. attorneys and we asked for the other vendors They did it too because for all they know they want to Verizon And if you're listening to this program and why does this affect you Because it could happen to you Imagine the feds just got secret warrants for all of your I photos and then leaked them to The New York Times Imagine that Days after they raided my home The New York Times somehow got my attorney client privileged documents and published

Merrick Garland DOJ The New York Times CNN FOX Barack Obama Google Verizon U.S.
The Left's Scorched Earth Campaign Against Trump's Lawyers

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:20 min | Last month

The Left's Scorched Earth Campaign Against Trump's Lawyers

"The Russian general clausewitz famously said that war is a continuation of politics, a policy by other means. What I want to talk about is the scorched earth campaign by the left against the Trump lawyers. This is something that is known as project 65. It's aimed at going after the Trump lawyers who supposedly assisted Trump in challenging the election results. And what this is is it's kind of the opposite of what Klaus wits was saying. He said war is policy by other means, but this is turning politics into all out warfare. It's essentially treating the legal profession, which is always taken the view that listen, people do have the right to a lawyer, a lawyer is an advocate. A lawyer should not be confused necessarily with the cause of the client. The client wants you to defend, hey, listen, I've been accused of burglary. I want you to defend me. That doesn't make the lawyer into a burglar. Hey, I want to challenge the election results. I want you to represent me. The lawyer is an advocate. That's the lawyer's role. And that's the legal system. That's the rule of law in this country. So going after Trump lawyers for arguing on behalf of their client, this is a gross violation of a basic principle. This is going beyond the politics of left and right. This is essentially saying, we don't even want rule of law in this country. We want to penalize the lawyers for the cases that they've identified with. And this is the project that's being led by this sleazy David Brock, who actually is very explicit about its goals. He basically says, we're trying to shame these people. And by the way, if they belong to big firms, we probably can get them, but he goes to small firms. We can ruin their life. We can ruin their reputation. I think the little fish are probably more vulnerable to what we're doing. You're threatening their livelihoods and you know they've got reputations in their community. So think of the shamelessness of this of this character, David Brock. By the way, a guy I knew before, he was he pivoted left largely on the basis of his nocturnal pursuits. Now, Alan Dorsey, which is outraged by what the project 65 is doing. And he says he's actually going to use his legal influence and potentially his own representation to support these

Donald Trump Clausewitz Famously Klaus David Brock Alan Dorsey
How Does Phil Cooke Explain Himself?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:09 min | Last month

How Does Phil Cooke Explain Himself?

"Friend Phil cook. But Dennis prager is about 12 feet away. Looming over his fans. It's very distracting, but we're just going to block it out. Phil cook my friend. Welcome. Thank you. This is fun. Listen, I don't know where to start with you. First of all, your name cook is spelled with an E at the end. Thank you. That's the most important thing. People can look you up. Yes. Phil cook with any. You have a new book out called ideas on a deadline. How to be creative when the clock is ticking. So how do you inspire? How do you explain yourself? Because you really are very no, but I'm saying you're creative, you're a man of faith, and somebody says, what do you do? How do you describe her? I'm we've done everything from Super Bowl commercials to documentaries to films to all kinds of things, but I also consult with a lot of organizations, the museum of the Bible in Washington D.C. is a client. We've done all the media for the museum over the years. And we just really want to help people get their story out there. And we live in a media driven culture. And if you don't speak that language, you're not going to get hurt. Well,

Phil Cook Dennis Prager Museum Of The Bible Washington D.C. Super Bowl
Dr. Jim Petersen on the Importance of Communication

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:51 min | Last month

Dr. Jim Petersen on the Importance of Communication

"Gym. I want to switch back to you for just saying, and looking at these life lessons, what he just talked about about communication. And I've looked at over some of the ways you've titled these chapters. And that is finally what you're thankful for, adopting by, you standing shoulder to throw to those who came before you. You know, hoping for the best preparing for the worst. Patience. Those were all communication skills that when you met Barry, when he came back and you were teaching. His communication actually connects us to each other, isn't it? Yeah, sure, it does. The way that we become friends, the way we become lifelong friends is Barry and I have. Become we both were in financial services together, and Barry developed a way of communicating the clients better ways as to. Better ways to communicate why people needed financial plans. And I was director of training at that time. So we worked together to provide these to the other financial advisers that we work with. Very actually was our top producer for four years. While he was financial adviser, one of the reasons was because of the experiences that he had. Those experiences cost him to think about why financial independence was important and he could communicate it in a way and protection what's important. He could communicate in a way that none of the rest of us could communicate

Barry
Ep 155: A Once-In-A-Generation Opportunity to Shape the Future of Nonprofit Work (with Allison Fine and Beth Kanter) - burst 01

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:41 min | Last month

Ep 155: A Once-In-A-Generation Opportunity to Shape the Future of Nonprofit Work (with Allison Fine and Beth Kanter) - burst 01

"So if we think about digital transformation about leveraging new technologies like smart tech and organizational change, whether that's the way we work or whether it's being more innovative with our program models in a way that adds value for our mission and our stakeholders. So smart tech is really good at doing these rote tasks like intake forms or expense reports. But it's more than just liberating us from this busy work. It can really profoundly change us. Because of that gift of time that you mentioned. And here's the intersection with well-being. Will nonprofits use that dividend of time to try to get more and more done, like those workers underneath the city, or can we repurpose that time to improve our relationships with donors with our other external clients and stakeholders, as well as give staff that space to plan, even to dream to innovate. So I think this is the intersection of digital transformation and well-being. And another way to put it is with the tagline from the movie, which is really about putting humans at the center, not the machines or the tools, and that tagline of metropolis is the intermediary between the hand and the brain is the heart. So what we're talking about is approaching this technology that can be highly efficient to be very human centered and really not to invest it back into busyness, but to really invest it with that spaciousness of that leads to innovation and doing work differently. And I just want to say something about spaciousness versus busyness. And I think that's really important. I'm learning a lot about the notion that there's work that fuels you and there's work that depletes you. Right? And I feel like the kind of work you're talking about that lives in this place called spaciousness is the work that fuels you, that right, it is the staring at your computer and doing that busywork you describe that depletes you. That's what puts people on the fastpass to burn out. It's not how much work you do, although there's some of that. It's about the kind and quality of the work that you do. And that's really I think what you're speaking to here, right Beth? Absolutely. And I think also the amount of work is also important too when it leads to burnout. So if this is liberating us, to do more quality work, it's also liberating us to take that time off and refuel and have the confidence really to make that change. And that it's going to be better. So I was never in a classroom without a crucifix on the wall. And Catholic school, the nuns would always say that learning

Beth Catholic School
 Trial opens for ex-USC coach in college bribery scandal

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Trial opens for ex-USC coach in college bribery scandal

"A former coach at USC is going on trial for his role in the college admissions bribery scandal you'll Vonda of H. was a celebrated water polo coach at the university of southern California with a string of national championships now he's on trial for his alleged role in the college admissions bribery case known as operation varsity blues he's the only coach of the many implicated to challenge his charges in court in opening statements in federal court in Boston prosecutors say Bob H. baked outlet credentials for at least two college applicants designated them as water polo recruits in exchange for two hundred fifty thousand dollars from college admissions consultant Rick singer he's also accused of recruiting other coaches into the scheme his defense attorneys say their client didn't intend to accept any bribes and that USC coaches render pressure to fundraise I'm

Vonda USC Bob H. Baked H. Federal Court Rick Singer Boston
"first client" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"first client" Discussed on 600 WREC

"On specimen superhighway in the five points West area plans to replace that with a new professional building with room for 4 to 5 businesses, including his law firm. Master says he's already has one client lined up. You anticipate growth happening there and buildings like the one that we're redeveloping now and others that we may redeveloped later on will be that catalyst and I enjoy being That shot in the arm to make things happen, and I'm looking forward to doing that in the insulin. That is where he's from. Guster says he is waiting for the city to rezone the property. He expects. Construction should only take about six months happening in Tuscaloosa, the University of Alabama now offering support to families. Of young Children with disabilities or developmental delays ago. Cello could joining us now live to tell us more about this Negotiate. This can be a huge help. Of course of these families, especially right now. Yeah, Jenna's absolutely now for families. Child is approved to be a part of the universe of Alabama's early intervention program. The best part about all of this is it won't cost them a dime. That's right services are free. And this program with the early intervention throughout Alabama's early intervention system provides special education and related services to infants and toddlers under the age of three, and their families of the child can be tested to see if they qualify for services that includes speech therapy. Learning how And more usually intervention. Interventionists will come to the child's home or even daycare to work with here, she, but due to the pandemic sessions are being offered virtually During this pandemic. You know, young Children are still developing every day, and they're still engaging in their daily routines. And so we want to make sure that we're giving them that support within what they're typically doing with their natural caregivers Day today, and that might look a little different right now. And we'll have contact information available in our W B or C needs that shortly if you're a parent watching at home, interested in seeing if your child can take part in the U. S early intervention program reporting live in tests, Lusa go Jae Loca, Debbie or C. Fox. Six news on your side. Thank you very much. You go two more on the new restrictions involving New York City, including the drastic, drastic measures being taken with their schools. And getting deja vu all over again about shopping for what's called pandemic Panic buying. We'll take a look at that when we return. I'm a big fan of third shift time and a half a little extra cash. But it doesn't matter when all that money goes straight to banking fees. That's why I got smart and got current. No overdraft fees up to $100 no minimum balance fees and no hidden fees. I work hard for my money and current gets that.

Alabama Guster University of Alabama Master New York City Cello Jenna Tuscaloosa Lusa U. S Debbie C. Fox
"first client" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"first client" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Not for rides roses I want you know you've been hurt you don't need to sit through a bunch of stuff before we get to the call so it's nonstop Ryan's roses nonstop nonstop in back to back I need to play a song but you're gonna me Brenda and we're gonna get to it faster getting to Ryan's roses fast to get to the call faster okay but I looked at the suggestion box it was Hey I want to sit through a bunch of stuff yes the range roses faster consider done so now let's get to Brenda's we can get to a faster how are you Brenda I've been better thanks for coming out for lines roses now I want understand your concern you've turned at your mom's house into an Airbnb after she passed away sorry for your loss thank you and your husband handles everything and the other day I logged on to the after noticed that one woman has been book in the place a few times over the last three months so do you think that this one client or this one customer is somebody that your husband knows and is going to see if the house yes that that what what I think where is yeah why would you think that I don't want to think that but if I've I looked her profile picture and asked him I asked him I said Hey Babe it looks like this I had this one I happen to log into the app and it looks like this one woman stay up on what's what's up what's her what's the story and he just blew it off like she's I think she's traveled for business or something she had this meeting she does not look like someone who's coming in for business meetings I know that so even saying it out loud I feel ridiculous but do you feel like you're raise your marriage broken do you feel like it's broken because to get to this conclusion you have to feel like it's broken well I mean you know it's harder because you know we had we had a baby and nobody gets a lot of sleep and there's our time for dates and what not I thought everything was fine but then I see this woman one thing to stay at my mom's house a whole bunch what's her name I don't Cynthia I hold on one of two point seven KIIS FM on air with.

Ryan Brenda Airbnb three months
"first client" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"first client" Discussed on KTRH

"You know I'll tell you one client I had taught is the editor Casey at a conference there and they came about four people wanted the other books on his talk to me and this man said okay read me until you're a police officer this is our career blah blah blah and he said wow okay. and contacted me and said you know you know you want to do more so one of them want to know because they know it works they know their hunches work but they don't want to get laughed out in there you know they're still a joke about that you called in if I could possibly so you know and that's why I'm so passionate about making it mainstream where it's just considered no I'm not a contractor you can pull in to help with things just like you know someone that does forensics or anything else and so that's what we're trying to get to is worth more mainstream in that way but yes I work with people in every field you can think of I get the voicemail so quite often from an individual who are claims to be a psychic and I mean. he calls and leaves messages that you know he predicted this and that and this and that most of those predictions have come after they've happened. not much of a psychic when you do that isn't. no that's why because they do like I said I do radio shows and I put it books like the one the learning annex for different radio interviews so people can go back and look at it as you want to go on record before it happens yes exactly let's go back to the phones Brenda's in West Virginia ease though she got ready let's yeah she is hi Brenda welcome to the show hi go ahead you're on the air thank you how you doing. we're good thanks. I really like to know a lot of psychic experiences of my life and I've tried took my. so you know on the back burner and try to help other people and when your your lady there was talking about that what what is the easiest way to help people. psychically yeah. what's going to help them with their lives what do you know their problems in their life what is it I mean you know it's so hard to get through to some people you know how do you become the good sidekick Kayla and give them the good advice. well that's what I was going to ask is what do you pick up psychically about them the best way to help them is if you have helpful information you know that that first off it's something if they're in danger or something that can help steer them away from that of the other things are really if you're clear on it you're sure that you're clear on it you know information that the value to them in their personal life but that's the thing is to work on it enough so that you know that you're being a clear channel and pick it up this information yeah to help them I choose to do it mostly for business and things for other people do it for love life for you know situations like that so we even with psychic ability you still kind of falling journey each of which one appeals to you in the one that you want to work with some people are medical intuitive enough what they do is you know reading help doctors and you know with with healing and medical thing so you find your you specialize just like in any other career it's so different to be an attorney or a doctor. let's go to sandy in my old hometown of Detroit first time caller sandy go ahead hi there all night. this is so important to me thank you guys I am I'm kind of envious of her lying I know she knows who she was from birth I think that must be wonderful. I want to know is she. tell me if there's something wrong with my brain or mind folders you could read my all along optional full Austin I don't know why I chose to come back here live the life. one not let me let me ask you when you say you came back to live the life you live is there something wrong with this life that you're living now. coast to coast what do you call that how. sorry I thought I was going to be sticking left her well you are but but I I need a little more information all I'm so sorry that's right now it is for that worked so hard and has lost everything a few years of calling on I don't even know how to start over and I'm wondering. I I really just I'm done all right kilo so what what do you do for are you are you I would teacher for. go ahead tell you what you asked you know why you came back here and I firmly believe that each of us made a conscious choice to come back in the five time knowing that it wasn't going to be the easiest life time for any of us and that time would be speeding up and we'd be going through so many different situations so quickly and I believe there were others on the other side that wanted to comment believe it or not that we were the ones that were that were lucky in a sense to come down we're ushering in a new evolution and new age and with that comes a lot of chaos and a lot of struggle and we're working through kind of breaking apart this old granted this consciousness grade to to bring into this device time and it can feel really overwhelming to all of us and I think part of it with you is that I think you're an impasse that you pick up on the energy of others and and feel that in it it it's really hard to work through that sometimes they become overwhelming and I dedicated a chapter in the book about that about what is an impasse and why so many things seem to happen it it just feels like everything collapses around and then when you can understand that you can build a stronger grade in your aura the kind of protect you from some of those things so that you don't get bombarded by all those types of energy so much and it's it's like a psychic shield in a way that will that will help them to kind of clear some of it out when you can clear that out of your aura you can come to reset it so that you know that you can bring out new things into your life but everyone's really feeling exhausted right now and going through I don't know anyone who's saying this is the time of my life for a great time we're all in this together in one way or another and we will get through it I really believe did you know I want to say seeing twenty twenty but I really I've written about this many times that twenty twenty is when things really ease up and get better for all of it so there is a little hope here yes yes okay we're gonna come back in just a moment here on coast to coast AM and take some final phone calls. rapid night and don't forget right at the end of the program a special tribute to the admin fitz Gerald we shall be right back. get daily show updates right to your inbox for free with the coastal zone newsletter sign up today coast to coast AM dot com. your. Houston's news weather or traffic.

Brenda West Virginia editor Kayla Casey officer sandy Houston Detroit attorney
"first client" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:14 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I was I was the first client to come into your amazing visionary space that's right you live on the flop push Avenue I was so proud of that what you've done I gotta tell folks out there if you are thinking of doing any marketing from a very small ads we major campaign there is no one better in the business then bottom line marquee review specs office I'm a huge fan of your work David thank you so much for joining me here in seventy seven of the BC pleasure thanks so much for coming to you live from the G. con real estate summit which took place on Tuesday July ninth at the Dyker cut Country Club and there were a number of partners behind it and one of them was eat P. I. and we have the great honor of having on Zetian over seller who is the executive director of the P. I thank you so much for joining me here my the business what a pleasure sold zetia what prompted you to get involved and to produce such an event hundreds of people receiving such focused indirect inspiration what is exploration real brass tacks on how to be successful in the real estate world what prompted you to get involved with this effort there are a few things here first of all anything that she a Rubenstein and your sure wordy are involved in I want to be involved in special because they are exceptional people and we do a lot of things together everything from events hosting seven hundred people straight through to webinars that we do monthly together but I have to tell you there's another maybe a more underlying concept why I like to be involved in this I believe with my whole heart that the river boat when the ribbon nationalism sees that we are going out of our way so far to take care of each other he gets the message and comes out and takes care of us all the more so so as long as he sees that I'm very happy to be part of that that effort we are here certainly in the same spirit of API to try to build people build the company's support their families and do whatever we can to bring upon also to our people in in the best way possible and to leverage everything that they have going for them perhaps you could even talk a little bit about the wonderful work that he does on a day in and day out basis so I'll tell you the P. I. does quite a few things but in regard to the P. I.'s relationship to a J. con type of event we are loaning free money already for ten years two people that are starting up businesses or in the early stages of businesses so they are coming to us with an idea or they're coming to us with a company that's a fledgling company and we are loaning between twenty five and fifty thousand dollars that is matching funds whatever they're bringing to the table we're bringing to the table and we are doing it without interest without taking a piece of the company and with giving them mentorship of free legal advice what ever it is that they need to help move the company forward in the biggest biggest way possible in addition to that we work and fond of partially the T. J. E. which is mentoring about three hundred and fifty businesses a year and it has been for free it has been unbelievable the mentorship is given by professionals by highly successful people and it's something everybody should be taking advantage of you do not have to take a loan from P. P. I. to get mentorship you can go to them directly you can come to us and we will do whatever we can to mentor or coach so special how could people get in touch with you find out more information so first of all they can call us they can look up the P. I or they can go to E. P. I. networking dot O. R. G. online and they'll be able to access the loan program the mentoring program the coaching program the educational courses were giving in in business and certainly if they need to hire an employee we've placed forty three hundred people in the last nine years forty three hundred people in the last nine years yes and it only counts when they're in a job for ninety days so we're not even counting people that go when you go out is he should did you get in touch with Guinness about this you should be okay if it would be funny Republic UP popular yeah I am a market I'm sorry your market so we're always looking for job openings to put our people in and we're always looking for job seekers to help them so a company should be in touch with you if they they're looking to scale the looking and people should be in touch a source of the looking to to get into the job market right so we are at their service that's what we do and we charge nothing so special visa thank you so much for joining us thank you for being here with us enjoy the rest of the evening thank you vision and now my against is none other than the C. E. O. of Mishawaka magazine in my correct on that you are correct the CEO of a small magazine I'll be Lazar an old friend he's not old but an old friend Kelly come on in the tens of thousands of listeners in on come on I mean well again there's gonna be people watching a video they see that beer but that bad so that he's a sage and also it's it's be advised let's put it this way okay it's a as.

nine years fifty thousand dollars ninety days ten years
"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

"All right. Let's finish things off with the final five. What is your favorite sales or leadership book? Solution selling I don't know this necessarily the best. But that's what I grew up on a upon. I think a lot of the things are derivative. Also. Great. So who do you follow for sales or read leadership advice? I I don't mean I mostly I look at at our own data. There's no one that look for feels to. I'm not I'm not a sales leader a done seals, either sheep, but on, you know, a win about our leadership altogether. So I like recent book read his principles by revalue, which I think is a great manager. Chicago. Okay. Great. But a read a lot. Good. If you read enough, then you get kinda like an, you know, an animal GAM everything to get. Do you? Listen to it on paper, you read it. Iran's. I do I do half ass. All right. Are you vailable twenty four seven or do you have strict on time boundaries? Available twenty four seven for everything that's urgent. I do try so work a lot. I sleep four or five hours a day. I work round the clock. I don't need a lot of sleep. I'm an early riser. You just like made like five AM and go to sleep late. Weekends. I try to dictate to the family, but nothing urging people know they can always reach out. Okay. Besides your own was your favorite tool that used for sales? Lincoln acton. I use it like a day out or were almost everything the hiring selling informing intelligence everything great last question. What one piece of advice to have from the founders CEO's out there. Research before Utah are issued if you're no tackling a large large market than and do the market validation early on you'll save a lot of time. Great a ameet. Thanks again for joining us. Thank you much. My pleasure.

founders CEO Lincoln acton Iran Utah Chicago five hours
"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

"I I think I sent that clip over to you guys afterwards you'll say it's with. With a net. Promoter score of almost always between sixty five seventy five which is like it's ridiculous for enterprise software product, it's like the iphone in the good old days. We almost like consumer level enthusiasm about the product. That's terrific. You you guys are pulling a lot of data on from a lot of different companies. And what what are some insights that you've learned that our people would be surprised about not this beak less? Ask more questions than all this stuff. What's the stuff that the little things that make a big difference? Their taunts. I it's it's company specific. So the biggest thing that he changed his right? There's no, you know, my slogan that, you know, I don't put it on on on the blog post like burn your playbook because you don't know crap. Right. It just. People spend time discussing playbook without she. I mean based on semantic votes in some deals with well here in this that works everywhere, but they're different strokes for different folks, different people have like different skills that they have the best thing is the to create something that meshes the capabilities of the people. For example. At our company Burs, you know, sometimes you know, how we position this in. And I you know, I would recommend seniors Iowa would do it. But the city something that you can do your confidence in gravitas as the CEO is not something that I can say they'll built some well, gypped respect. So they're different capabilities of people. What works for one person doesn't necessarily work with the other. So it's it's really more complicated to pay attention in fine. Tune it is to specific people's capabilities. Yeah. I always always told people like, it's it's you can't just follow a script because different questions come up different people come up with different objections and just follow pattern down there. Right there guidelines, but not not straights ever. What's the most impactful and profound question that you've come across? And what was the answer? There isn't any. I mean, people are looking for the most refineries in any their loss or the silver goal to starting company. They're the the. So people ask what's the secret to success? And I wasn't wanting to make us as in one thing. And you can't teach it like it in in a in a conversation. The best thing you can do just higher break people that know provide them with the Russian and the means lip and do their job. And that's what we can do because you can't learn quickly enough in a startup. To be successful. So there's no one Tepe or or one, you know, sales technique or tactical to the fixer problems. Just you any like, really great people. That's the one the most important thing. Is more than one way to skin a cat. All right. Great. So meet I really appreciate your time today. Thank you for joining us. How can people reach out to you? Or learn more about gun. So I can find me personally could five which man linked in a meat bell. There's I think there's only one of us right now. And WWW dot gone. I oh just sign up for the blog. I mean to get those types like on a weekly basis. It's really good and people on the context. So and if you wanna see the product sign up for a demo, you'll see it over the website. So it's easy enough. Great. I'll I'll put the links in I in the. Description. Great ameet. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Great talking to the pursuit of time. And. Thanks for listening to startup sales with Adams Springer subscribe to the podcast. So you never miss an episode contact at him about speaking engagements or consulting services at atom at startup sales dot I IO..

Adams Springer CEO Iowa
"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

"And and. In additional texts of users within company. Very good. All right. And what was your go to market strategy? Or what what is it? Now. What is it? Currently. Well, it's it's a fairly complex corporation. I mean, I we with a great marketing team, and it's it's a multi pronged approach. There's obviously outbound and inbound second we were. We rely heavily on content marketing, we've content is widely successful. I mean, we share real data people appreciate, you know, doing some busting or confirmations on on some of the sales of concepts using wheel data versus opinions on nets create a lot of buzz around the company in other than we do. You know, the run of the mill things like online ads. Burglar out outbound reach trade shows from time to time. House how now you said you got some of your first or your first client from a from a trade show out of out of network client from a trade show, but Howard trade shows working for you and general overall. They're not the best source. So if you're to boost trapping, probably, you know, wouldn't be one of the first things that I would do is. Bang for the buck. But for us it was like get to know the market meet a few customers. So in terms of dollar for the ROI wasn't good. But I mean for the one thing he wanted to get traction, the market in and get people to know you. And that's that's that's why we're we're still doing it. I mean, we don't go every trade show we had bartered west events and. You know, obviously, it's financial investment. But more importantly, it's time in resources, y'all. But that's a we got a first time. It was like a big deal also worth eat in any facts, we've met of a much larger customer that remember that. But he told me later on the we met over there. And I told him the product is ready for them. And she appreciated is honesty that was scare. But they they bought a couple of years later. So things more than eight hundred sell. I think that's that's one of the biggest things. I I when I'm talking to different founders in there asking, well, how do I get this kind of stuff and tell him, you know, be honest, don't don't try to sell something. That's not ready 'cause you're gonna burn them. Okay. You get there you get their money now. But then they're going to be unhappy. They're gonna turn. And then you'll never get them again. Right. Right. I mean, it's called the the brutal honesty strategy end of like a previous company picks off were, you know, we have a large deal with the with Caterpillar. And you know, which would they appreciated the senate's warranted page are a fee, and we told them we're not gonna respond because we can't do like half of the things that they want an, but they're adamant that now we liked the product, and we had a very open discussion be appreciated versus on the larger companies who sold him the moon. And later on was a very large deal. But it works on a COO is works made it may take longer, but it will work. We'll be strong in you know, we're not we're not in. This sport win customers. We want raving fans, right? So closing the deal is is the park getting someone to rape about the product is hard. That's what would propel your company forward. Just people raving about the product that's our pride. And it's not definitely not about closing the deal. So we'd rather not take the customer that isn't going to be happy. Good. I I had Mark Roe Berge on the show. And he he really raved about you guys dur- during the show. I I think I sent that clip over to you guys afterwards you'll say it's with. With a net. Promoter score of.

Mark Roe Berge COO Howard senate Caterpillar rape mill
"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

"We just wanted to be we'll one of the few that could be real, and that's a real test. If you have a product. Yeah. And. Eleven out of the twelve said. Yes, says okay now, we're onto something. So that's were be say, okay. We're onto something we find at least twelve companies that'll pay something substantial for the products is they see the value. And. Dan, detests, the, you know, it's always like are there. How many companies in you know, by the time you'd have a hundreds? I mean, there's no doubt which took about a year. What happened to the twelfth company? There are all they bought actually it. So I mean that was like one company says, yeah, we kind of like it. But we're not sure. And then I I met the the CEO now United like nine five five way to San Francisco or sitting next to each other. You know, we search chatting hop laptop. And I showed him with Dallas has all my God, we need this and the. They. Twelve the PLO one is a little bit later, but they're all still using the product my fantastic. That's that's even more important is how long are they staying clients in what's the churn here? We have close to zero churn and Linus hundred percent negative metre. So most people expanded in double dollar investment wanted to start using the products of this and other.

PLO Dan Linus CEO San Francisco United Dallas hundred percent
"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

"But if they want to put it in the library people come prepare it, they go on breakdown calls word by word and and debate. What's the best approach what we could do better? So there's a lot of learning. It's great for the person who sent me to call. The Rick back and everybody else can see a wide range of opinions in and. In advice from from the team as a whole. So it's very powerful. I think that's great. It's really making a culture a good culture, not the fancy buzz, keyword culture, where hey, we have free beer by unlike you guys actually help each other out you right? I think that's a amazing team to be part of especially for sales. Because when if you're not team, and you're not there to help each other out a sales at Kristen horrible environment. Absolutely. So. You know, we wouldn't be gone without gong ashore. Good. I want to take a step back. And you spoke about product market fit before how did you decide that when you were first up and running? Well, when you so we know that we have a great feat. So we I had this idea. So this YouTube blind spot in Sierra, it's based on what people put in which is very little and obviously subjective. And they didn't give us any information. What do we need to do to get better? And how can we help our teams to be more successful? So you know, let's create these products that can give us total Bs ability to what's going on give us some facts versus opinions about what's happening within customers in in facing people with the constraints of nobody's going to do anything right is supposed to be like fully automated, people aren't gonna do anything. It's you know, we have a really tough audience are decant esque sales people to do anything. So wanted to do a complete reversal of Sierra model way of putting data. In a London. I along as Mike von partner. We obviously thought it's an amazing idea. But we did evaluation before against started the company and raise money, I cold, some fifty sales leaders that I know some people that I don't know to someone a total strangers until you here's what we're looking to do something that will China line on this usually leads. You know, if we built something that would you by how much the ability to pay and the feedback was very good. So that was in origin with that we raise money in and start developing the product and still doesn't mean a whole lot because people will say yes, but real test is when they buy and at the first year that was thousand sixteen we weren't planning on selling anything. We just kind of like convinced twelve companies that we know to favor start recording call so we can start training the models in the speech recognition, and in in, you know, within a few weeks, we noticed that they're actually pretty engaged with the product and sell like surprise us. And then around may engagement was getting better in this. You know, that was the five months, or they all fall in said, you know, what the heck let's do a trial close. Let's see. Let's ask. For money. As happens, we weren't prepared. What you buy the product. So we reach out with buddy. Hey, we're sorry betas is over time to buy in zero like substantial prices again, it wasn't the money..

YouTube Rick Sierra China partner Mike London five months
"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

05:08 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

"Did you take on your first real salesperson, not the not the consultant pet you had her advisor? As as soon as God. I think. At dozen or so out of network customers date. I knew that. We can sell to people that aren't to me without so which adds another level difficulty in its seems to be more of a repeatable process this weekend. Sell in the next challenge would be to train people who aren't me. Not that I'm older great of a sales price, aren't founders. It can we bring them in hire them and provide them with the environment and sports the be successful. So that was about dozen Anatoly like early on you can like an a first day took one of the be only sales developed in person that we had in Susie. No, stop stopping the sale development start selling because we were bombarded with leads. It was hard for you to to let go of that kind of that control. No, no, it's not these are like really good day. So I enjoy selling enjoy stigma of customers on a bone. But there's also joy of seeing someone else succeeds. I mean, not my my role is like the number one salesperson, it's it's founder and CEO company. And then my job is to make people succeed. So to see when other people are successful. It's actually. Even more rewarding than doing, you know closing a deal personally. Yeah. All right. So what tips would you have to twelve the founders that are listening to help that transition? There. There's a lot. Hey, but I make sure that you have nailed these out here, you can't expect, you know, a good salesperson to figure out things at the that. You haven't. So the most critical thing is the product market fit. They'll do you have a product that people are willing to pay reasonable amounts for and the market for it is is large enough. There are enough. You wanna world who would pay what you need to get paid for this product. That's the most important thing. No salesperson can fix it matter. How good they are. I mean, they might help you if there's a problem, but usually. Especially near early bays. A there's a problem in sales. I would definitely look deeper than sales on my my goal is always to create a product that is so good that I can that. I need superstars and sales. I'll still try to hire a superstar. But even just just okay people just to make their job easier. Almost try to create a product it sales itself. If you can't it's not always possible. Some products are just completed. So that's number one. Just look inside like the products in the market versus. The salesperson. It's usually not them. It's it's it or the product or how you train them second. If you do higher higher like the best don't don't try to go cheat or fines, you know, some people. Call me. Hey, you know, someone junior can start to saline you want someone junior like. So start up is is is risky enough. There are a lot of risk factors and you want to minimize the amount of waste, not add you hire someone who's not very experienced or very good. And let's say, you know, six months ago by still there are no sales. Now, you're asking yourself in my hard wrong person. Or is there a deeper problem? Whether if you hired someone who's really goods than the problem is more likely within your product than than with them. How do you find that? It's the right person. You know, besides just looking at Pepsi v. It's tough because the really good people may not want to work for you is a small startup, right? So find the, you know, try to recruit the recordable. That's that's that's selling. Right. That's the toughest sale. Trying to find somebody who's like really good now figuring out in early stages hard. So someone who is being like. Killing their quotas at work or Salesforce may not necessarily be good for you. Get you need someone with was experienced with early stage companies in the perfect profile someone who's being successful in a number of companies in different fields in an have been successful in all of them..

founder and CEO Salesforce consultant advisor Anatoly Susie Pepsi six months
"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

"That's what we have to on the sale development. And actually, let them sell the product. Can I was open larger deals, but it's terrific. I I heard another interview with you. Where were you spoke about that you refuse to to give discounts at the beginning for for even trying to launch your product. You didn't wanna give discounts. Right. It's not the discount. I don't know if that's accurate or not. But we definitely wanted to sell it for something substantial. And again, it wasn't the money. It was the learning experience. We wanted to know pretty early. If people are going to be not willing to pay we wanted to know why? And what do we need to do? Do you have to change the product or the peach or the people were selling to? So kinda wanted to strive for for contract early on as a learning experience. Fortunately, almost everybody said, yes. So they always a good learning. But it's not we we assume. Yeah. All right. And what's in the earlier days? How long they take a average time to from sign up to or initial outreach to close. Some of it were like pretty fast. I'd say I mean, I it vary because we were dealing with companies different sizes. So a small companies could be almost as fast as one co close. And the larger it could be like six to nine months. So. We have a mixture of customers, but most most deals I would say at the early days close within thirty days is pretty pretty easy. And so. How how did the were you going outbound? At the beginning. Or did you? Yes. Yes. So so we're doing both. There is some inbound some networking still waiting small enough so through connections and quite a bit of outbound which was less efficient, but but living results so that the first phase you, sell, you know, the first dozen lure so customers were friends and families of people that knew us. So I mean, it's not easy to sell them. But that's one level of difficulty in once we pass out. So we want to sell to people that don't know us and went to a trade show in Chicago in we got our first out of network customer, which is like a big deal. It wasn't like a large deal financially by this is okay. There are people that don't know us actually buy from us, and it we started out bounding who to total strangers and in that that started opening opening up the funnel. Okay. Now, your background is is more in sales, and then and then growing into leadership and then eventually found her. So what what approaches, you know? Most of the founders said here in Israel. Anyways are more technical. What approaches are are you taking that are different than most people that helped you succeed. I I I wanna protests of a computer science degree. I wrote code. Asked. I was in marketing I was in sales almost product. So I I did quite a few quite a few things. But I mean, not not dodged a question. You know, what people want to know? Should I you know, who should be should be doing the first sales in buying large? It's probably best on by the founder of the company of founders eight of the not great salespeople there. Okay. A mediocre founder can probably be more successful than a great salesperson just because there is the level of commitment. The knowledge the passion cannot make up for things that they lack of deaths it if if they really they're not goods than they should hire. Phenomenal salesperson not someone is like junior cheap. But some really great because he's it's hard to do the initial sale is really hard. Yeah. You were you were kind of defining a new market. For young. Yeah. Absolutely gong is a new category that doesn't exist. Most of the world doesn't even know about yet. But it's it's it's it's totally new. Okay. So. When did you take on your first real salesperson, not the not the consultant pet you had her advisor?.

founder Chicago consultant Israel advisor nine months thirty days
"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on Startup Sales

"Product. But also gives management incredible ability insights on what they can do as a company to get better. And and how they can help people succeed. I know I've had a lot of guests on this show that have all said that they that gong is one of their favorite tools for sales. So I know I know you have a good name out there in that. It's very helpful for nothing, but good things. So when did you start this company? So we started about three years ago when the market about a couple of years ago, so it's still fairly fairly new. Okay. And when you when you launched the product officially how long they take you to get to your first ten clients. Well, we so it's complicated. But I'd say about five months. And it wouldn't even launched a product. It was relaunched. So we had we launch kind of like an alpha who for concept that we weren't even planning on selling that was on January two thousand sixteen and in may or June. We already had him Bank customers. Critic. And then you're and then you're next fifty and one hundred clients. So I think we got we got a few more because we had the companies at bought issue were kind of friends and family doing favorite trialing the product. And then we didn't have a lot of pipelines. So we took few months where we had no sales because we have to set, you know, we went from oath really we have a product. Let's go into simply gin and. I think to get to fifty a hundred two Kabbadi year. Not swear that it's accurate by demoss. But that's just the ballpark to get together. Honey fast from that point on. Yeah. So we had like a few months of Costa nothing because we didn't have anything in a pipeline. But one miss started. Getting that arrived January started selling in January two thousand seventeen in all seriousness in on it was very fast. Okay. So we now have close to foreign customers terrific Arcadia to two years on the market in about four hundred customers. And how long did it take you to get to one hundred K A R, and a millionaire hundred K was the first, you know, ten customers. So so five months, we got two weeks on him k. Okay. From in all those even prelaunch Ma. That's terrific and a million. I think about a year, maybe less terrific. So I don't want to dive into who this for salesperson is and stuff like that yet. But I wanna know when did you hire your first salesperson, and when and when did you grow that team to the size of ten? So I mean there is so I you know, I was doing the selling. Plus, we had we had Brennan Cassidy is a good friend and work with us as the consultant pleaded some of the initial deals on his own the I will personally matchy higher. We're getting like Eugene of demanding 'bout leads. So I hard the an SE are to help me kinda like all by and and and stream them or for body and. And we're bartered by. My leads. I was getting so many calls. I was doing everything on my own. And like calendar was full. So. I told him. Hey, Eric want to do anything that less than ten seats? You start selling right now in in the closed who deals within two weeks as okay now, it's like anything less than twenty. You're gonna handle so kind of shifting..

Eugene Arcadia Brennan Cassidy prelaunch Ma Eric consultant five months two weeks one hundred K three years hundred K two years
"first client" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:22 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Well, let's first of all start off with a lesson that we can learn from a financial fail. Tell us about it. Well, right now, it's probably about not selling that company stock, and it's always a tough one. Because if you're at some of these high flying, apple Google, LA these stocks have been shooting up forever and ever Invidia. I've got a lot of every clients that all these companies it's really really hard for them to sell that stock often after this Trump at the end of two thousand eighteen. Yeah. That can be a lot of money gone, really fast. And I've had more than one client that lost multiple millions in terms of their stock value. You know, why is that well because it had shot up a bunch and they still sell. So then you look okay now what happened now maybe come back up. But yeah, that's one of the things that you have to do is anytime you buy any stock, even if it's a great stock at a company has been doing really well things always change. So you always have to have three answers to answer. One. Is why am I buying that particular stock or that particular investment? What exactly is it probably should be actually the first one? And then why that specific one? And then lastly, how am I going to get out of it? Right. So not just the in the good times. But also in the bad times, they must people are saying. Oh, yeah. I have no problem selling my stock once it doubles in value or something. But what if it drops down by? Twenty percent. Thirty percent forty. What Wendy when did you get out? So. And that's the hard part is because then human nature kicks in and we cannot ignore it. Or we try to act like it's happening. And that all said you like, oh my gosh. It's down so far. Now, I guess I'll finally sell now and get almost nothing out of it. Well, that's obviously not the great way to go either. So having some sort of rules, if you're in the vestment worldly recall that investment policy statement, having some sort of actual written things saying she goes up this much. I'll sell it goes down this much. I'm going to sell and get out. And when it goes up, you don't have to sell all of it either. I mean, you'll be just selling off chunks of it. One of the newer people. I'm working with at least smart enough flashier to sell off a bunch of his apple and he was kind of jokingly saying they didn't help anything because his stock shot up more than he sold. So he saw the same amount. Well, now, the market fix that issue. Because now he's got a lot less than he did. Then so yeah. So getting hindsight that he did did sell off some of that those higher numbers. So that's one of the things you won't be really paying attention to is having a plan anytime, you're invested anything have a plan and actually today we're gonna be talking about three stages in retirement, and how you really have to have a plan for each stage. Because a lot of us could have that thirty year retirement. It is a possibility the fastest growing population. Percentage. Wise are centenarians that's people turning one hundred years old, so Eric how you help plans envision their years in retirement, where do you start with them? Well, one of the things is they'll Ray Kellogg at it. And like you're saying it could be very likely thirty years could be forty which is crazy, right? 'cause you probably worked forty years, maybe or maybe not even quite that. You know? So really big part is first of all it's those gogo years. Now, this is the time when you're doing all that bucket list stuff. Right. So there's all the fun stuff that you've been planning on doing. You may have been wanting to do much or African safari all types of stuff. Yeah. Doing those road trips. Yeah. Then you have the slow go years, which are ones where you're going to be maybe taking a cruise instead of doing a hiker, you know, other things like that. And then you have the won't go years now that you can't go, but you pray just won't go away. To go out and do much. And so really if you start thinking about that way. What happens is you're going to spend a lot more money early on. I mean, I hate really hate those things and say you need seventy percent of your pretexts income from went before you worked in all the silly stuff. Like, no if you got seven days to play and have fun. You get a lot more money early on and then slow down. So. Yeah. Really? That's what you wanna do is start looking at how that money's laid out in how your timing's get a flow and really looking at those different segments of time. They may may or may not necessarily be a decade. Hopefully, the go go years are more like fifteen years. But but if you look at them in decades, it's probably fairly close to accurate. All right. So Eric Tillis what you're seeing in the go go years because those sound like a lot of fun years for people in retirement. Yeah. I mean, these are the ones where. Yeah, you should hopefully be in pretty good health and the higher energy level. So this is the stuff where you're doing all that. Like, I said that expensive things like those trips that you always wanted to do. Yeah. I just had a client for New Zealand for two months and the fun stuff. Right. And then this this stage can be kind of dangerous in the sense that you know, if he end up having a little too, much fun. Spend in too much. Then you may end up in the next two stages. Not be so great. So you do have to be careful on your spending level because I find most people in those first five to ten years they can spend one hundred one hundred and fifty percent of what they used to make. Yeah. A lot more than you used to spend. Because you got all this time to do it and you're doing more expensive stuff. And so may not seem like much because they're spending X dollars per month. But then also throw in a twenty thousand dollar vacation here and there and Bouma's than you're spending way more. So yeah, that's where coming into a plan really helps out and Heckman financial what we do here is we create that blueprint to worry, less wealth. This blueprint is just a short document that's customized to everybody we meet with and really do first and foremost over that income plan. How's that money gets spent for the rest of your life is going to last you for the rest of your life? What types of investments should you have to get that income, then what types of tax ramifications are there along the way healthcare issues and legacy issues, and that's a five areas of the blueprints, worry, less wealth. It's that we do.

apple Eric Tillis LA Ray Kellogg Google Wendy Bouma Heckman New Zealand twenty thousand dollar one hundred years seventy percent Thirty percent Twenty percent fifteen years fifty percent thirty years forty years thirty year
"first client" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on KTRH

"What is the easiest where talk me through a typical client of yours right on. When you walk in the door. And what is it? They're they don't understand about this. Great question. First of all when I'm called in they know, my reputation, so they would like to raise their prices and typically they're in a market or an industry where the competition is purely selling on price. They're dropping prices. There's a race to the bottom. Somebody gets within our termites eyelash of calls. The next person goes down to cost and somebody goes with a low cost they gonna go to make it up in volume. Well, if one company in an industry can start dragging an industry down could one company start bringing the industry back up. And that's typically when I'm called in. So a sit down first of all with the chief. What is their desired outcome? What do you want to do? I had one client who said I've always wanted to be a one hundred million dollar company. He was doing about thirty and couldn't get anywhere with my civil bring your executive team together. Tomorrow. I'll show you how to be one hundred million dollar company next year. They wore ties they had never heard such a thing. She said, well, you consultants or something. So I told them drop their price to a dollar from a dollar ninety seven and we would sell one hundred thousand one hundred million of them, and they would get their hundred. Because what he said he wanted wasn't really what he wanted revenue now, then we started talking about profit he was selling frozen pies. As it turns out he was selling. Here's for a dollar ninety seven and it cost him two dollars and ten cents to make it. I'm not a genius. But I can see a problem in that doesn't help them. They're not a lot. So nine months later they were selling Pyatt retail for sixteen dollars us me sixty four dollars. We would slice it sixteen times and sell it for. So there's a reason why people will pay more and sometimes we get so close to our business. We get locked in we become myopic. And we don't really see the opportunities that could be out there. So I start with who else. What else who else? Could you be selling to what else did you be selling? And then we go to the marketplace and talk to their customers, and we asked simple questions like what did my clients product do for you last year had a software. Company the C F O of a previous company became the CEO of this company. They have six sigma software, and they were selling to GE. So when he took over as CEO he called me and said come work, your magic, again, sure he said your first job is to figure out how we can unseal GE because before he got there someone sold. GE an unlimited lifetime license for fifty thousand dollars. You can see three problems there. Okay. I said you don't need a sales developer sales trainer you need. A good lawyer go unravel that go G GE what your software did for them last year, the fifty thousand dollar purchase in the last nine months of the previous year, save GE almost one billion with a B dollars. So we start with what are you worst to your customer? And it doesn't matter what your competitors are charging. It. Doesn't matter. What it costs you to make the product costs pluses fest fastest way to go broke in America. I think we'll tell you what the the cost plus is certainly a way to establish a floor right of you know, this is the minimum. I can charge for it. Right. Yeah. But but then you gotta take a hard look at what is it worth to? Right. We were talking during the break, very briefly about some quick repair work. I had done where the customers losing millions of dollars a day. We us being able to do it faster. You know, there's really not a number. We can tell them that's going to upset. That's it. That's it. I have a client that can do in three minutes what their competitors take three weeks to do. So when they go, they do disaster recovery stuff. You have two vendors come in one can have you back up and running in three minutes. Caviar up and running in three weeks, which one are you going to go with their cheaper rate? Yeah. And save that money, oh for Pete's sake. So I live with the number of Chuck 'isms. There's fifty some Chuck 'isms and one is the only difference in cost him prices the ratio, obviously. But the person who is buying on price is not buying on quality. They're not buying on long jeopardy. The only thing that hurts more than losing a sale to somebody with a lower price is losing it to somebody with a higher price because they could sell their value. Yeah. Now, I understand somebody wants.

GE Chuck CEO Pete Pyatt executive America C F O developer sales trainer one hundred million dollar three minutes nine months three weeks fifty thousand dollars fifty thousand dollar sixty four dollars sixteen dollars two dollars
"first client" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

14:44 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on KGO 810

"Cagey. Oh, eight ten. And welcome back to coast to coast, George Noory with you. Louise back with us international speaker, visionary intuitive, presentations, entertained audiences all over the planet, and she has this gift of sight from early childhood with an ability to merge with another consciousness, and then kind of move pictures forwards and backwards in time Louise's learn to use this ability in very specific ways. And again, as I mentioned, she's a noted author couple other books include beyond boundaries. Fearless future streaming consciousness. Louise, welcome back. Were you you? It's great to be bad looking forward to this. This is a subject, I just really love me to get right into how about you. How did it start for you? Well, knowing that I had these gifts when I was four I said to my mother when you go to heaven will write letters, and that was just a pre cognitive knowing that I'd be able to stay in touch. But lately. In the past few years. My I'm just fascinated with expirations in consciousness with expanded on local higher consciousness. And really seeing how vast and multi layered this information is that goes beyond time. And it started with interpreting for souls. I don't call it the other side anymore. I call it the non-physical because it's not. But it's really the same. As when I I call it piggybacking on another frequency. When I do consultations with that first deep breath I merge, and I'm able to see sue my clients is beyond time also see through their eyes in their bedroom at four years old when there was something his it all a strategic scene, and we can reposition them in the past that will send out waves as changed through the president teacher. Not when you when you talk about non local consciousness, what does that mean? Well, it's consciousness existing beyond the physical body here. We are in our our carts or landrovers. We call our bodies tooling around on planet earth, but we are pure consciousness in or out of the body. And this this concept of the higher self is really a level of communication where I often play mediator in interpreting or seeking resolution with a client and their boss or an ex partner, but we have to go to the level of our higher selves to connect with the higher self of others. So that we're not imposing our will on another level of consciousness is above the fray above the echo, selves agenda. And it's the same lucid communication that. I get when I'm interpreting for those with dementia those in a coma strokes those on the other side clients in the past present or probable future. So I just go all over the place all over time. And it's really fascinating to see this lucid awareness, particularly in those with dementia. Really tell me about that. Oh, gosh. And it's really fun. You know, people say, well, how do you know that you're really communicating with him one thing that I do with souls when I'm interpreting for them those in the non-physical as well as those who are unable to communicate verbally when I'm wrapping up. I ask them to show me. A sneak preview of a cosmic, wink, they'll be sending my client. It can be. Well, here's an example one client having a hard time with her employer. So I go to my higher self picturing a ball of light. I put my energy up above to higher level of consciousness, and then I connect with the higher self of of the employer, and this is remotely it works best actually remotely, and I invite them onto invite him onto this higher frequency of of goodwill and authenticity higher mindedness off a one one for all resolution, and so on and sometimes they turn sideways that they're they're listening, and sometimes they're anxious to be able to be themselves to be a more truthful person. And then what? So I asked this the higher self. That's just employer. Okay. So show me a cosmic wink, a sneak preview of cosmic wync. You're going to send my clients to prove that we did indeed have this conversation. Well, he projected abundantly tree. So a few weeks later, the client emails me and said the other day my boss walked into my office. Put a bonsai tree on my desk. Said something kind to me and walked out scratching his head. Like, why did I do that? So I called that trickle down higher consciousness. Loved ones L. Here's another example, one of my favorites. I I don't know if it's an oxymoron to see a favorite dementia story, but it has some great stories, usually, I'm I'm really I'm good at turning off the switch when I'm off duty. But sometimes I'm getting a phone consultation is coming in. And it opens my heart. That's the frequency. That's the connective. So I was about to I give a free half hour consultation to caregivers bless their hearts family professionals. Golly. What patients and energy it takes? So this was two sisters in Alabama. And they had emailed me that their father was no longer eating was non verbal and was getting pretty agitated so I was thinking about and before our sessions and open, my heart. And there is so I- telepath ice to him. And I said it must be so hard with dementia. So frustrating. And I never say, what's keeping you here. And golly clients whose loved ones around life support or in a coma. They certainly do wanna know what's keeping them here. Sometimes it's the cat. Sometimes you never know. What's keep waiting for some some timing something to resolve in the family? But so instead of saying, what's keeping you here. I said, what are you attached to what are you still attached to and what I got from him was the stories. So then we began the sessions. Me on the speaker phone with his two daughters. I told them what just transpired, and they laughed and they said, well, they didn't laugh at that. When they said dad was on the USS intrepid and on Pearl Harbor. Wow. And Wisconsin Makasi three times we never knew he suffered from PTSD. Always like, this is a real story. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. This happened. Just last year. And and they said that it was only in the last year said he started telling the story about that wartime incident. I would take him so long to do that. Oh, I think I think some people with PTSD before before we really knew how to treat it start. The rub Manasseh hit away. Don't ask me. Don't make me go there. Thing. I they get better. They bring it back. Yeah. Yeah. And yeah. And I think I've seen that a new kind of therapy is to really have them. Go into details to really embrace it. And you know, anything we push away from we give power to post to embracing it making it real and so on. So they said it was only in recent years that he started telling the stories so I to left with ice to him. I said well when it's time when it's time to drop the body the way I purposely irreverently referred to the allusion of death because it is an illusion when it's your time. The story will reside in the hearts of all who love you. You'll take the stories Wiki what else. And then I got cold and the daughters laughed again, they said it's the gold Cadillac, and they said dad was jealous of his brother-in-law's gold Cadillac and was hoping he'd leave it to him. And our uncle live to be a hundred and. That happens. But then they get the gold Cadillac, and it's in the carport and the fans are sticking out and blocking traffic, so so then I just I said, you know, when it's your time. These things will go with you, you are loved, and then I asked I need preview of a cosmic wink, well, he transmitted something that looks like a sudden motion and then staring at one of the daughters. Just I just write tour. Well, a few hours later they called and they said when we hung up we went to sit with dad and all of a sudden he sat both upright and yelled out what the hell is. Everybody's been talking about. He hasn't been verbal and then stared at one of the daughters. So that was the cosmic Winky. He he had sent a preview. What what did that to get him back? It wasn't that more trickle down higher consciousness. I I was from you. Yeah. Yeah. And it was that level of lucid timeless communication. I have another great example and apprentice, STAN and his wife Denise the nieces in last stage is Alzheimer's. She's really hanging on. I think it's been four or five years maybe even longer now and Dan Google communication with the high yourself, and I thought yes, look at how we're spreading about the true nature of consciousness. And he wanted confirmation that he wasn't he'd telepath izing east. And so we he actually eventually came on as an apprentice and our sessions. Involved. Oh, gosh. I wanna say a three way. No, threesome. No. It was three of us communicating. And so we mostly I was interpreting for Denise, and she would say to Dan threw me. Yes. You did. Catch my thoughts. When I was was saying thinking that the cat needed a bath. I was fascinated with how lucid and timeless and the tach she was from that body. And so when Dan would ask about her care? She would she would say, oh what that body. What do you want to know? And here was this level of overseeing timeless consciousness that was fully aware. So she even at one point showed us the three facilities. Dan, had yet to go look at and which ones she would prefer where she's been residing for a few years now. So he's able to see beyond time. Would you say that you communicate telepathy wise with the most people who have afflictions? Well, when when it's a client. I mean, I don't go around. All right. So they have to ask for this or somebody has to ask. Yeah. Yeah. They yeah. And again, I I give a free half hour to caregivers, and I just go right to the one they're carrying for interpret just this week. A client her mother has dementia, and we ask a better care. I can feel because I'm urging I'm piggyback frequency I can feel what she feels what's agitating. What feels good? What felt good was something fuzzy coming towards us. And she said in the and my client said, oh, that's the puppies. They just let into the facility I said that feels really good. And then she is I emerged. She took me to my clients childhood where we're feeling tight elastic around our arms and the clients that. Oh, yeah. Mom used to. So for me. And I used to hate it. When this lease would be too tight. So then her mother transmits to me, tell her that's how it feels when they take my blood pressure in the cuff is too tight on my arm. So that's an example of how their consciousness extends beyond time. They can go anywhere in time. And is able to communicate with this clarity. She also didn't like the way the attendant would place. Her foot on her left foot on the pedal or the show, whatever you call it on a wheelchair. But she could do much about it at that. Exactly. So they come down there less agitated because they've been heard and everyone wants to be heard with somebody who has severe dementia. What did what do they do are they in a vegetative state? I mean, how do they react? Well, it doesn't matter because it's this level of times higher self non-local consciousness. It has nothing to do with the physical body. It's it extends beyond the buddy. That's who we really are pure consciousness. But do you teach them this or do you just ready to to to chat with me? You know, telepathically they can't wait. Well, yeah. Now, most of them they're quite eager. But I did have one situation the clients. The client had had to move her mother four hours away because she kept running away visibility. That was nearby and they weren't equipped to tend to her in that way. She's like walk away or something. She she kept trying to escape through windows. And I'm not sure exactly how. But. Excuse me. So my client had to put her in a facility for hours away, and she had seen her at Christmas and said, she just had rage is. She said she looked like he was gonna kill me. So I'm merged. And it was the first time I ever had one appliqued one say, what do you want? It was like she wanted to slam the door. And so I I kind of came through the door. And I said your your children love you. They want the best care for you. They wanna know how they can help. He she said kind of grudgingly. I got back from her higher self thanks for the fuzzy thing, and it was a stuffed animal that my client had broader over Christmas. And then I said your daughter your children need to know, if you would mind moving back to that other facility, they can take you now. And then I got I don't know if you know,.

Dan Google Louise coma George Noory PTSD L. Here Pearl Harbor president Alabama Cadillac Wisconsin Denise partner golly Alzheimer STAN
"first client" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

07:54 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"To coast to coast, George Noory with you Louise help back with us international speaker, visionary intuitive, presentations, entertained audiences all over the planet, and she has this gift of sight from early childhood with an ability to merge with another consciousness, and then kind of move pictures forwards and backwards in time Louise's learn to use this ability in very specific ways. And again, as I mentioned, she's a noted author a couple other books include beyond boundaries. Fearless future streaming consciousness. Louise, welcome back. How are you? It's great to be back to this. This is a subject, I just really love to get right into how about you. How did it start for you? Well. Knowing that I had these gifts when I was four I said to my mother when you go to heaven, write letters, and that was just a pre cognitive knowing that I'd be able to stay in touch. But lately. In the past few years. My I'm just fascinated with expirations in consciousness with expanded Don local higher consciousness. And really seeing how vast and multilayered this information is that goes beyond time. And it started with interpreting for souls. I don't call us the other side anymore. I call it the non-physical because it's not. But it's really the same as when I call it piggybacking on another frequency when I do consultations with that I eat breath I merge, and I'm able to see through my clients is beyond time also see through their eyes in their bedroom at four years old when there was something. A strategic scene, and we can reposition them in the past that will send out waves as changed through the president of future. Not when you when you talk about non local consciousness, what does that mean? Well, it's consciousness existing beyond the physical body here. We are in our our valve carts are landrovers. We call our bodies to me around on planet earth, but we are pure consciousness in or out of the body. And this this concept of the higher self is really a level of communication where I often play mediator in interpreting or seeking resolution with a client and their boss or an ex partner, but we have to go to the level of our higher selves to connect with a higher self of others. So that we're not imposing our will another. And it's this level of consciousness is above the fray above the ego self suggested, and it's the same lucid communication that. I get when I'm interpreting for those with dementia those in a coma strokes those on the other side clients in the past present or probable future. So I just go all over the place all over time. And it's really fascinating to see this lucid awareness, particularly in those with dementia. Really tell me about that. Oh, gosh. And it's really fun. You know, people say, well, how do you know that you're really communicating with him one thing that I do with souls when I'm interpreting for them those in the non-physical as well as those who are any Bill to communicate verbally when I'm wrapping up. I asked them to show me a sneak preview of a cosmic, wink, they'll be sending my client. It can be. Well, here's an example one client having a hard time with her employer. So I go to my higher self picturing a ball of light. I put my energy up above to higher level of consciousness, and then I connect with the higher self of of the employer, and this is remotely it works the best actually remotely, and I invite them onto invite him onto this higher frequency of of goodwill and authenticity higher mindedness off of one one for all resolution, and so on and sometimes they turn sideways that they're they're listening, and sometimes they're anxious to be able to be themselves to be a more truthful person. And then why? So I asked this the high yourself just employer. Okay. So show me a cosmic wink, a sneak preview of a cosmic wync. You're going to send my clients to prove that we did indeed have this telepathic conversation. Well, he projected a banzai tree. So a few weeks later, the client emails me and said the other day my boss walked into my office. Put a bonsai tree on my desk. Said something kind to me and walked out scratching his head. Like why you do that? So I called that trickle down higher consciousness. Loved ones. Oh, here's another example. One of my favorites. I I don't know if it's an oxymoron to see a favorite dementia story, but it has some great stories, usually, I'm I'm really I'm good at turning off the switch when I'm off duty. But sometimes I meant. Dissipating 'cause I'm consultation that's coming in. And it opens my heart. That's the frequency. That's the connective. So I was about to I give a free half hour consultation to caregivers bless their hearts family professionals. Golly. What patients and energy it takes? So this was two sisters in Alabama. And they had emailed me that their father was no longer eating was non verbal, and let's getting pretty edited. So I was thinking about and before our sessions, and it opened my heart, and there is so I to leper ties to him. And I said it must be so hard, but dementia so frustrating. And I never say, what's keeping you here. And golly clients whose loved ones around life support or in a coma. They certainly do wanna know what's keeping them here. Sometimes it's the cat. Sometimes you never know. What's keep waiting for some some timing something to resolve in the family? But so instead of saying, what's keeping you here. I said, what are you attached to what are you still attached to? And when I got from him was the stories. So then we began the session. She's on the speaker phone with his two daughters, and I told him what had just transpired. And they laughed and they said, well, they didn't laugh at that. When they said dad was on the USS intrepid and on Pearl Harbor. Wow. And Wisconsin Qazi three times we never knew he suffered from PTSD always life. This is a real story. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. This happened this last year. And and they said that it was only in the last year that he started telling the story about that wartime incident would take him so long to do that. Oh, I think he I think some people with PTSD before before we really knew how to treat it start the rubber away. Don't ask me. I don't make me go there. Thing. I wanted to get better. They bring it back. Yeah. Yeah. And yeah. And I think I've seen that a new kind of therapy is to really have them. Go into details to really embrace it. And you know, anything we push away from we give power to as opposed to embracing it making it real and so on. So they said it was only in recent years that he started telling the stories so I to Lepas ice to him. I said well when it's time Wayne, it's time to drop the body the way I purposely irreverently referred to the allusion of death because it is an illusion. When it's your time. The stories will.

Louise PTSD coma George Noory Pearl Harbor Lepas Alabama president golly partner Bill Wisconsin Wayne four years
"first client" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"first client" Discussed on KCRW

"But he was my first client ever is one of the funny stuff incomes. I put some everywhere against the calls. Africom extremes. Diet gave up show business for feet. Oh chevy. All right, Amy. What is the plot of this movie? Well, as you just heard Richard Dreyfuss was a comedian poised to break out huge in the fifties and sixties, and then he became a podiatrist. So. He has a good defensive becoming a podiatrist had a happy life. You had a good family bunch again kids. But now he is stuck in this retirement, home, whichever. Chase has also been forcibly escorted there by his granddaughter played placate makuuchi because he's basically spending his life showing up at coffee shops and annoying. Young women by telling them how he used to manage very famous people that they've never heard of. So the two of them are in this retirement home being very bored by all the payment on display, and they decide they're going to resurrect Richard Dreyfuss a stand up comedy career. And from then on you can probably predict every single beat of this the road trips the detour into Tijuana, the jokes you here when you detour into Tijuana, the lovely woman that they meet a played Miami. Mcdowell who just puts a full charm rusher on Chevy Chase and makes his life magically better because she's there to do is just wait and McDowell is ally younger, I think or maybe she just doesn't look it. Because rather Shing Lee beautiful. Well, and I think pudding. An actress like her up against Chevy Chase, especially when he's playing this broken down character who sort of had a spirit crushed you're like enemy Dell is way younger isn't she? All right. Let's move on. I think we've said quite enough about this movie. This next one is called a dog's way home. It's about a dog who get separated from his owner and the dogs four hundred mile journey back home..

Richard Dreyfuss chevy Tijuana Mcdowell Chase Africom Shing Lee Amy Dell Miami