20 Burst results for "Fiona Wilson"

Japan 2021 Olympics in Doubt

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:13 min | 7 months ago

Japan 2021 Olympics in Doubt

"Now. Japan's government is holding firm at the moment in its view that this year's olympic games should go ahead. They've already been postponed once. But there's a growing number of cases of corona virus and also calls for tokyo twenty twenty one to be shelved while tokyo bureau. Chief fiona wilson joins me now. Welcome back thank you very much tokyo. Twenty twenty one is pretty ambitious. They want to call it to tokyo. Two thousand and twenty there is this insistence. Isn't there in the government to to stick with the plan for it to go ahead but the has been an enormous poll suggesting that lots of other people think otherwise. Yes you're absolutely right. In fact i was out in chablis very busy central tokyo that usually very busy and slightly sad looking tokyo. Twenty twenty flags still flowing. They're looking a bit faded and they're not changing the year. It's going to be tokyo. Twenty twenty even if it's held and twenty twenty one but things are not looking good for the olympics at the moment For many reasons. I think you know the surging Virus numbers obviously very difficult to contain at the moment. And you know they started a big public cole and eighty percent of people said they would like the games to be either postponed or cancelled outright. So there's not very Warm feeling for the olympics at the moment and it's it's really difficult moment to ask people to think about welcoming styles ends of people into the country. The moment and i think many people just think it's too much of a distraction at the moment. I mean from from the outside. This does look like somewhat of a mess. Doesn't it given the fact that like you say a sort of a cool clear head would suggest that Welcoming thousands of athletes and tens of thousands of visitors to tokyo when we are still in the teeth of a pandemic isn't necessarily the most sensible of ideas. Oh absolutely and i really have to wonder why the conversations behind closed doors. It's hard to believe. The prime minister soga is going over. All those options for cancellation really. My guess is that they probably don't want to announce today it's really definitely not possible to do it in. Of course everything's a bit delayed with the vaccination program here. It's not really going to happen until the talk about late february but the idea that everybody will be vaccinated in time for the olympics is extremely ambitious. And i think just that alone is making people pretty nervous. So i think it's. It's not looking very promising and more kind of message Does this convey from the government when they are still standing firm in. What does it say about the way that you're shahida seekers reputation as being saying well. I think when you look at that poll that was was negative about the olympics of the moment along with those those side eighty percent against the olympics. At the moment his own ratings have really dropped quite substantially. they were down nine percent in a month And over sixty eight percent of people said they were dissatisfied with his handling of the pandemic in japanese. Public is pretty critical. They're very of our overall. If you look at numbers they're really not as bad nowhere near as bad as as most country so in japan overall dump pretty well but the population is quite tough on elitist. Here there's a feeling that he's authored. Called a state of emergency for tokyo in the surrounding area and a lot of people have been saying for a couple of weeks. You know you. It has to be called now. They felt it was a little bit too late. So what we're expecting tonight. There's a press conference at seven o'clock tokyo time and it looks like seven. More prefectures will be added to the list. So that state of emergency will be spread across japan mostly to the west of japan and expecting you know all soccer yoga kyoto. An down to coca and even you know beyond also in kyushu. The governor of komo motto is said. We'll come we big did we. We want a kyushu state of emergency. So i think it looks like more and more people will be coming onto this State of emergency umbrella. Not as tough as the sort of lockdowns. We're seeing in the uk but it does Impinge on people's behavior. And i think that many people are saying you know we've got to do it now before numbers Get to more than can be contained

Tokyo Olympics Chief Fiona Wilson Soga Shahida Olympic Japan Cole Kyushu Coca Soccer UK
Japan pledges support for IOC's efforts to vaccinate Tokyo Olympic athletes

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:23 min | 7 months ago

Japan pledges support for IOC's efforts to vaccinate Tokyo Olympic athletes

"Now. Japan's government is holding firm at the moment in its view that this year's olympic games should go ahead. They've already been postponed once. But there's a growing number of cases of corona virus and also calls for tokyo twenty twenty one to be shelved while tokyo bureau. Chief fiona wilson joins me now. Welcome back thank you very much tokyo. Twenty twenty one is pretty ambitious. They want to call it to tokyo. Two thousand and twenty there is this insistence. Isn't there in the government to to stick with the plan for it to go ahead but the has been an enormous poll suggesting that lots of other people think otherwise. Yes you're absolutely right. In fact i was out in chablis very busy central tokyo that usually very busy and slightly sad looking tokyo. Twenty twenty flags still flowing. They're looking a bit faded and they're not changing the year. It's going to be tokyo. Twenty twenty even if it's held and twenty twenty one but things are not looking good for the olympics at the moment For many reasons. I think you know the surging Virus numbers obviously very difficult to contain at the moment. And you know they started a big public cole and eighty percent of people said they would like the games to be either postponed or cancelled outright. So there's not very Warm feeling for the olympics at the moment and it's it's really difficult moment to ask people to think about welcoming styles ends of people into the country. The moment and i think many people just think it's too much of a distraction at the moment. I mean from from the outside. This does look like somewhat of a mess. Doesn't it given the fact that like you say a sort of a cool clear head would suggest that Welcoming thousands of athletes and tens of thousands of visitors to tokyo when we are still in the teeth of a pandemic isn't necessarily the most sensible of ideas. Oh absolutely and i really have to wonder why the conversations behind closed doors. It's hard to believe. The prime minister soga is going over. All those options for cancellation really. My guess is that they probably don't want to announce today it's really definitely not possible to do it in. Of course everything's a bit delayed with the vaccination program here. It's not really going to happen until the talk about late february but the idea that everybody will be vaccinated in time for the olympics is extremely ambitious. And i think just that alone is making people pretty nervous. So i think it's. It's not looking very promising

Tokyo Chief Fiona Wilson Olympics Olympic Japan Cole Soga
What's next for the Asia-Pacific?

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:10 min | 7 months ago

What's next for the Asia-Pacific?

"Today's special edition of the globalist we are going to focus on asia and what two thousand and twenty one might hold for the region. The obvious answer might seem and will hopefully be almost by definition what with one thing and another a vast improvement but even when asia does not find itself at the epicenter of a global health crisis it remains a complicated part of the world bringing their hostages to fortune to this look ahead to ages. Next twelve months are monocle. Hong kong bureau chief. James chambers monica's. Tokyo bureau chief. Fiona wilson a little later on monaco's bangkok correspondent gwen. Robinson will join us. But first to james and fiona fiona. Let's start with you. In japan as we mentioned in that introduction a new prime minister in office seeking to fill the big shoes and follow the tough act of shinzo are has yet figured out. What kind of prime minister he's going to be is a very good question. I mean i think he's been quite difficult for serger. Falling shinzo obey. Shinzo abe's for all his faults. You know longest serving prime minister in japanese history. So you go quiet trot record. He knows how to win elections. And you know. He survived an awful lot of ups and downs. Scandals also had to deal with the pandemic and ultimately how to deal with illness as well so yeah so quite challenging to come into that role. He started off pretty well. I think his ratings quite good. But i think as people have seen ways handled the pandemic Impressed is ratings have dropped. There's also the issue about the olympics. Will it happen waiting to happen. And i think so. Go really backing this. Huge domestic tourism tourism campaign encouraging. People around the country has gone down pretty badly although it has to be said Tens of millions of people have been guy around the country so they liked that bit of it. But so i think it's quite a tough time for him and interesting. He has to have an election by next autumn. And i think he's in for a pretty rough ride few under just to follow that up. You did the mention the oh word. If there is one thing that japan hopes it can look forward to in two thousand and twenty one it is the two thousand twenty Tokyo postponed because of the obvious right now on new year's day. How likely do they look. It really depends on you. Talk to to be honest. The government would love it to happen. They really wanted to happen dog to the saying we absolutely have to vaccinate everyone. And that's not guaranteed yet. Japan's rollout of vaccinations will be in the spring. And they say you know. We'll have everyone backs in asia by the summer. And if not. I think they are going to have a problem on their hands. There are so many vested interest in the olympics in definitely. The government is under pressure from tv companies. Advertises they want it to happen. Population is still quite lukewarm. I think many people feel it puts this unnecessary pressure on the country. At a time. When is trying to deal with the pandemic. we're still dealing with that joins in hong kong or bring you in now. It being new year's day let's at least out Attempting optimism As we were just discussing. Japan has one great big blue ribbon event to look forward to hopefully in two thousand and twenty one. Two thousand and twenty was a tough year for hong kong for the same reasons. It was a tough year for everybody but for other reasons. Besides is there anything in particular vet. People in hong kong are looking forward to this year. Yes well we've had a rough couple of years here in hong kong so You know when you've hit rock awesome. Which i think that's not hong kong. Has i mean the only way to go his up. So i guess people are looking at s- an economic recovery an a return to business as usual in terms of an making money and getting on that side of things but In looking ahead the the rest of the year. I mean there are few big dates to To look forward to the the first one would be at the end of this month on the polls in january when the the uk's visa essentially for the hong kong people comes into play and up to three million on congas could suddenly decamp to britain. So if that happens if the floodgates opened not lovely be a huge event we've oils essentially being stuck in vung most of twenty twenty so It's been difficult to town at the moments How big that exodus will be. And there's no no re- odds on dejean that which you know. Every time i do meet with hong kong peasant they do generate trying to ask me once. Lights live in the uk Just like an schooling an election. Step in where they should live. What's baath liken. Is it better than oxford as there is. There is a genuine interest. But i guess we're waiting to see how many people actually all through with all of the with these These moves

Hong Kong James Chambers Monica Fiona Wilson Fiona Fiona Shinzo Asia Shinzo Obey Tokyo Shinzo Abe Japan Olympics Monaco Gwen Bangkok Robinson James Dejean UK Britain
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:14 min | 10 months ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Public but also make Belarus more dependent on Russia and just before we go, you're finishing up a paper on the Belarus topic right now as well. will it be available for listeners to consume when it to hit screens? It will certainly be published anytime soon we haven't. Put pitcher with a specific institution it but it will be on Belarussian civil society, which indeed is very tricky because we've seen in a way the remake awakening of civil society these days but this decentralized nature is grassroots movement that we see is so strong. It's so convincing box decentralized nature lack of organization lack of centralized leadership is actually part of their weakness as well. So. We're looking at that how does protest move and translate into political force? Begnaud, Zog for you Bennasar, our security correspondent here in Europe now over to London join. Office with headlines Thanks Tyler Donald, trump's pick for the Supreme Court Vacancy Amy Coney Barrett will begin her confirmation hearing in the Senate. Later today Barrett is expected to tell senators that she will judge legal cases impartially. The Chinese city of Dow is testing its entire population of nine million people for Corona virus over the next few days, the virus which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan, has largely been brought under control in the country. Austria's Democrats have comfortably won Vienna's municipal. Elections Mongols News editor. Chris Turmeric will be joining us for the very latest a little bit later on today's program and the monocle minute reports on Hungary's attempts to house foreign stakeholders from important domestic companies with Budapest airport the latest business in the CROSSHAIRS FOR MORE HEAD TO MONACO COM slash minute those today's headlines back to you tyler. Thanks very much earlier in London we're going to head to Japan. Now, to get an update from our Tokyo, Bureau chief and Asia Editor Fiona Wilson is there good evening Fiona. Good evening. Good. Often named fee. Sorry. Not. To. Talk. A number of things to go through. Maybe let's just take take the temperature of the truly in in Japan at the moment. Autumn is, of course upon us a at this level of of the hemisphere I and I'm wondering, are we seeing an uptick on the street where people out out shopping What's what's the economic? Because we've seen a couple of indicators depending on on where we look that may be consumer sentiment out will and also some elements of, of course, industrial output is on a bit of an uptick. Yeah I mean I think this weekend we had a typhoon pulsing. So being out on the street on Saturday was quite difficult torrential rains that weren't of being good for retail figures but generally, there's a feeling. This is optimum song some quarters and obviously if there's optimism in China about the economy, that's good news for Japan, the recovery of Japan very much tied to to China so. Some good news there I mean, the the bad news I think these figures that came out about the tourism industry this four trillion yen hit that the tourism industry is. No surprise visits down ninety nine percent. What did anyone expect I think what was interesting was break breakdown if those figures and what people saw was that It was actually shops retail. That was has been hit the hardest and that's something you do not so. I I noticed more people are out, but it's a very different Tokyo this autumn to what people would have seen last year and you know at the moment not much sign of tourist reappearing a moment they're saying maybe next spring so we'll see about that. Let's just talk about travel right now we've seen of course, there's there's discussion If we look further south in Asia now opening up potentially between Indonesia and Singapore of course, you've got Japan and Singapore with this travel corridor and then also we've had discussion now about about Korea and Japan opening specifically for for for business and necessary at travel. What what other murmurs other that area I mean that's definitely such a move to get business travel opening up again certainly feel in this part of the world, you know where people feel sutton bars is not under control, but it's being managed in this part of the world. So all the negotiations happening in the countries around this region. So it's you know Singapore Australia New Zealand. It's it's it's around as well and what Japan? It's always the rumors are coming out the came through the Shinbone the big big newspaper was reporting at the weekend. The travel warnings on eleven twelve countries including China will be dropped from November Two that's people going to those countries from here and also the business. Absolutely as you mentioned South Korea Singapore already in place and Vietnam is now on that list and there's even talk that Prime Minister Sogo might be visiting Vietnam soon. So I, think that's a very positive sign. So you can see that they're trying to open up and also to lessen the restrictions to you know this distinct about quarantining is obviously you're going to put people off they're trying to make it easier very restricted countries, but they all trying to open up. Just mentioned new newly appointed PM. suge now. I guess. Things getting not spicy but but certainly as as ever. There's always interesting. maneuvres in and around the the South China Sea and Japan currently playing a role or at least a more active role in the region. Yeah I mean you know that's always that's just an ongoing discussion is now we saw last week we had Mike Pompeo in Japan should have been a longer trip to Asia but for obvious reasons trouble at home, he just came to Japan for the day but he had this quote meeting is very symbolic really group of Japan India US Australia and it's really seen as certainly seen by China anti-china coalition. It's a SORTA trying to contain China, that's how they're framing it and Chaigneau the. Cold War point of view Japan as always walking this tightrope trying to keep China happy..

Japan China Singapore London South China Sea Asia Tokyo Belarus Amy Coney Barrett Belarussian Fiona Wilson Austria Wuhan Mike Pompeo Singapore Australia New Zealan Vienna News editor Vietnam
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:20 min | 10 months ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

". Riot police in Belarus have deployed water cannon and stun grenades to break mouse protests in the capital. . Minsk demonstrations gripped the country since Alexander Lukashenko's disputed election victory in August. . But critics say the authorities are now routinely using violence to suppress political dissent will join in studio here in Zurich by monocle twenty, , four security correspondent. . Ben. . Ben Who is also a researcher at the. . Center for Security. . Studies at eight here in Zurich and is an expert on Bellarusse good afternoon. . Welcome to the roofing. . Thanks can often and tyler. . Let's start as this is something that we've been living with <hes> since August and like many things with the news agenda other stories have overtaken Belarus in away but <hes> bring us up to date on really what is happening. . As we said, , we've seen obviously what is seen as as a spike in violence by the government but where where do we stand right now? ? Indeed. . This is the yesterday was the tenth Sunday of protests including election, , Sunday? ? Exactly ten weeks ago that we've seen massive protests in better than we talking hundred thousand people or more particularly in the capital means but in other cities across the country, , the thing is it's probably hasn't has hasn't been in the headlines as much as in previous weeks is that indeed, , there has sadly not been any political progress that these this protest movement has achieved, , the government keeps cracking down. . On protests and this Sunday was yet again, , more violent than previous Sundays. . So we've seen disturbing videos of people being beaten up in the streets in prisons and hundreds of arrests set again including lots of journalists you mentioned that this is it's it's nationwide <hes>, , and but of course, , obviously, the , focus is probably on the capital. . Are there other areas where you would say that also that there is more attention to you see greater agitation towards frontiers or anywhere else in the country? ? Sutton in the foreign policy realm, , we've seen an escalation as in the EU and contacting you for ministers are discussing sanctions against betters on this very day <hes> we've seen this realm escalating in a sentence number of countries have not only enacted sanctions against Belarus officials. . We've also seen <hes> nine countries currently <hes> pulling back staring Bassedas from as a signal of discontent. . So that's certainly an escalation and that includes all of Belarus neighbors apart from Russia including, , for example, , Ukraine with which relations have so far been actually quite quite quite cozy, , and this is certainly an escalation. . Domestically, , we actually shouldn't even talk about the tenth Sunday of protests which was yesterday, , but maybe about the sixty four, , th day of protests because we focus on these massive rallies in the capital as you said, , but as local activism across the country and particularly local neighborhoods where people probably feel more safe from government repression and there's been for anywhere from concerts, , small gatherings, , distributing leaflets, , hanging out flags, , these white red white flags of the opposition that we've seen everywhere and even honking by bus drivers honking bye-bye trains. . There's these many quiet signs of solidarity that Belarussians have. . Given each other over these weeks. . But indeed, , no political progress whatsoever as someone who's spent time in the country what do you think the the political divide looks like I say political divide. . I mean for the man and woman on the street are we talking about? ? Could you say there's a twenty thirty percent hard line know super pro <hes> Lukashenko backer of versus the rest of the country countrymen. . Do you see people buy into the vision and he'd it's obviously very hard to say because we lack reliable survey data this moment but there is room about exactly these twenty to thirty percent which are still staunch supporters of Lukashenka, , and that can. . Be for very material reasons because they owe their positions in government jobs or the social benefits. . This very government <hes>. . I would doubt though that these would be the people who would go out and rally in his favor because I think I've said it in the past as well about Belarussians that tend to be quite pragmatic because there is so little way to voice wants political opinion. . that. . They look they have the need to make ends meet and that certainly a factor. . But what we can tell the shore is that there's a majority that is unhappy with the way the country is ruled and with his person in particular maybe less. . So with the political system as such but certainly, , with Lukashenka, , he's lost all legitimacy in the eyes of majority of Belarussians. . How they behave in their everyday life is certainly a different story. . We we only see in the end, , a minority that goes out to protest and shows their faces. . Towards to authorities because obviously, , they will become a target of repression and we've seen so many instances of arrests. . Also of people being snatched from their own homes from the streets of from. . So people are hesitating but the certainly majority that wants to see taint change <hes> and won't have any to emphasize everyone so far is peaceful apart from state security forces and that's quite remarkable given. . It's been months since the protests that we haven't seen any escalation on that end if we turn to Brussels and e ministers, , the discussion that they will be having today the the probably having it right now. . Aside from recalling ambassadors, , which is, , of course, , is is wonderful symbolism <hes> but I guess when we talk about potential sanctions, , one would be thinking clearly economic <hes>, , where can the EU and well I, , mean I guess. . The. . The first point we have to recognize as well that there is an a manufacturing base there are a number of big companies are you based companies that manufactured Belarus the not probably slapping not <hes> right at the front of or at least that made in Belarus on the front of their labels but nevertheless, , you do have an economic base which is based on manufacturing what, , what can e you do and how hard will the EU push on sanctions Indeed so so far we've seen sanctions against the vigil individuals to say we've seen in the past as well. . So we talk ministers, , we tone security heads of security forces currently not look Shaneco himself, , but that may change, , for example, , German foreign minister, , high comas also for sanctions against Lukashenko. . Deed this very limited political signals that the US currently sending can send whereas economic sanctions as you indicate, , that could particularly be restrictions for access to capital same as a sanctions against Russia. . In certain areas those would certainly hurt the regime more <unk> particularly the. . Elite that is still dependent on Lukashenko as well and the state-owned enterprises that are important factor in Belarus the problem with that, , and that's really the pickle you for ministers are in first of all this hurts. . European. . Companies probably negligible but second, , it hurts workers in Belarus themselves. . People working in it in factories, , they will lose their jobs, , they will lose their income and the only access to capital to investment. . will be left for Belarussian authorities will be. . Russia. . So this dependence on Russia is already. So . high would only increase and that's part of the hesitation of EU officials indeed to enact such broad sanctions that will not hurt the public but also make Belarus more dependent on Russia and just before we go, , you're finishing up a paper <hes> on the Belarus topic <hes> right now <hes> as well. . <hes> will it be available for listeners to consume <hes> when it to hit screens? ? It will certainly be published anytime soon we haven't. . Put pitcher with a specific institution it but it will be on Belarussian civil society, , which indeed is very tricky because we've seen in a way the remake awakening of civil society these days but this decentralized nature is grassroots movement that we see is so strong. . It's so convincing box decentralized nature lack of organization lack of centralized leadership is actually part of their weakness as well. . So. We're . looking at that how does protest move and translate into political force? ? Begnaud, , Zog for you <hes> Bennasar, , our security correspondent here in Europe

Japan China Singapore London South China Sea Asia Tokyo Belarus Amy Coney Barrett Belarussian Fiona Wilson Austria Wuhan Mike Pompeo Singapore Australia New Zealan Vienna News editor Vietnam
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"The COVID. Nineteen pandemic has been bad news for almost every body and almost everything there are a few industries which have been suddenly presented with the prospect of a golden age. One is robotics, a field concerned to a considerable extent with reducing the necessity of human contact in variety of fields, and for that reason, a new range of autonomous robots unveiled this week by the East. Japan Railway. Company have attracted Kina than usual interest will joining me to welcome. Our new robot overlords is monitoring Tokyo Bureau. Chief and Asia editor Fiona Wilson Fiona, what marvels have the Pan Railway Company presented us with? Es Well, it would be quite site yesterday if you'd been it Technolo- Gateway Station in Tokyo, they had a whole lineup of robots doing different things. One was disinfecting handrails. Another one was delivering coffee. Another one was bringing food to people's tables, and another one was transporting luggage, and the last one was one. You could actually get on and go around the station. And you could. Transport yourself from one end of the station to the other, so these are all robots are being trialed <hes> they did say that they may come into service hopefully by twenty twenty-five, but this particular station Techno Gateway is a new station, and it's being used by JR East to showcase high new technology and sort of high tech strategies for increasing autonomous robots in real life. I mean these are obviously things that were in development long before covid nineteen struck, and as you say, they may not yet be introduced into service for another few years, but nevertheless. Robot is the robotic sector in Japan generally sensing that it might be on the cusp of a bit of a moment here. Well I. Mean it was anyway. This is the sort of interesting thing. Japan's population predictions are pretty dire looking at half in probably half the population that it is currently by by the end of the century, so it's a very very severe drop in population, so the government's pumping money into robotics and in trying to encourage people to use robotics. These kind of three Po. Robots that look like humans, these robots that can really. Do Very mechanical roles maybe. There's a labor shortage they could in for an already, I've been to a sober restaurant where a robot was cooking the Sopa, a person delivered it, but the mechanical parts of the cooking was done by a robot and I think we're going to see more of that. They've also been trialing robots for delivery, and you know I think what we saw. Jerry's yesterday was just a sign of things to come so yeah and throw in the corona virus situation and it's it's even better for the robotics people because. This is about contactless. Communication where you can literally order something on a tablet, and a robot will bring some food or drink to your table. You don't have to see a human a tool now. That might be a terrifying prospect, but. At a time when people don't want to have so much, contact I, it's looking quite good for the robotics industry.

Japan Fiona Wilson Fiona Technolo- Gateway Station Tokyo Fiona Wilson editor Pan Railway Company Evans Jerry Rees James Research Andrew Miller Charlie Phil Chris mccord Judea
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Twenty minutes date here in London finally on today's show Tokyo Governor Yukio said that the Olympics must happen next year as a symbol of world unity in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. Well, let's get the latest with our Asia. Editor and Tokyo Bureau Chief Fiona Wilson joins us on the line right now. Good evening to you. Great speak with you. This Monday tell us exactly what? To, say! Well quickey said in an interview today that. She's hopeful that the Olympics will go out effects that they must go ahead. As you said as a symbol of world unity and I think you know honestly many people here are feeling. She has to say that she can't cancel unilaterally, although all the signs of pointing to being a very difficult event to pull off next summer, but she said I think the feeling. Is She just been reelected as governor? People are looking to say right. You said you're going to have the Olympics. What are you going to do about it and I'll have still though she said the Olympics must happen. She was very scant on detail at the moment. So at the moment it's just it's. It's an idea. For a reality I think which is something that's understandable, but perhaps not super helpful as we're trying to plan our calendars for the next twelve months I'm just reminded US though a little bit on the white backdrop hair, because obviously we've spoken she frequently about the well, pretty dexterous work from central government in regions to contain massive outbreak, but there are concerning spikes in Tokyo of course a elsewhere. I give a bit of a sense about how what's the mood about how well the the pandemic broadly is being dealt with within the borders of Japan at the moment. I think the feeling. Is You know the numbers are quite good, but a lot of medical experts been speaking out about the Olympics and saying well look to be honest. We've got nobody coming in at the moment. Japan's borders are pretty much closed and we're. We're keeping the situation under control. They did a survey last month, nor point one percent of Tokyo residents have antibodies for the forest so. Trying to pretty vulnerable. To another wave and ready Tokyo at the moment is undergoing. It's not being called a second wave exactly, but there is a spike in cases quite specific target testing the going in for very specific areas of Tokyo areas where balls small theaters, but there's a feeling that the public is very very nervous about the Olympics and quake-hit. She said in the interview. She said I'm. I'm going to get public support and I think that will be a big challenge because every poll shows that more than half people in Japan think the Olympics should be canceled altogether, or at least postponed further, which is really not a likelihood and the only sort of positive we want. The Olympics was was I think about fifteen percent, so it's pretty low public support. So with the pandemic in the background, it's really really difficult now. The with the experts coming out and saying what exactly are you going to do? You know even if Tokyo takes all the measures, the people here you've got people coming in from all over the world. How will that work and I? Think that's that's to be a problem. One of the many I have to say well. This sounds like an intriguing. Nobody wants to that point. No, now. We spoke a few weeks ago about the challenge for well one of varied challenges facing Shinzo obey, but this idea that you know the legacy, this face to the world Japan wanted to present by hosting the Olympics. How Dare Jing is in. You know in soft power terms. Really if the Olympics is either delayed again for frankly, we must talk about the symmetrical if it doesn't happen at all in this in this cycle. Is it possible the country can can recover from a blown like that? Well I think you know people have had time to adjust you know looking back in March and people were still saying maybe the Olympics will happen. This July now seems on thinkable. Doesn't it I? Think honestly we're hearing a lot more from Koi K. at the moment, the governor of Tokyo The mail from Shinzo Abe I. Slightly get the feeling that Shinzo obeys thinking I don't like the look of this I think I'm going to hand over to the governor of Tokyo. She can deal with it. You know you've got Tokyo twenty percent of the Japanese economy, really under pressure from the pandemic, and now we're talking about finding. Up to six billion more on top of the. Any any guesses is likely, but they're talking about an overall cost of twenty five billion dollars for this Olympics. It's just huge, and it's not going to be popular so I think at the moment is thinking. This is not the legacy. I'd like to have a hugely expensive and unwanted Olympic, so I think at the moment he's. He's letting governor cordray take the lead, and and she is. She's she's. She made a platform when she was in this rob strange election campaign to the governor. She. She said I will have the Olympics whereas her two key opponents, both said once said he just outright canceled, and the other said he would counsel if experts advised that it should be council, so she's really got her work. Cut Out to say nothing of you know she's got to persuade. Will these companies to four count more money and we're already seeing that the the Japanese Olympic? Committee is having to reduce funding to the sporting federations around Japan I mean the pressure is intense, and then you don't have the public support either I I think you're absolutely right I think anybody wants to deal with this right now. We'll just to that point then. What does what about coach as long term, political career and all sort of aspirations mean it would be an unlikely triumph to somehow turn this around. Maybe you know in the summer of where we get twenty twenty two. Even potentially I is there an unlikely sort of Hail, Mary? Pass available where she can sort of emerged somehow from the wreckage, and say look, look what I've achieved, or is that frankly rather unlikely? While I, mean who knows in Japanese politics Anything is possible. This long missions that Shinzo Abe. This is really against the norm. It's usually you know people in and out quite quickly, but I think you have to look at her political. Christie's had a very long career already. She was already in the die in the early ninety s I think she was elected eight times. She's she's first female defense minister very briefly, but still she's had a law success in in national politics. She fell out with her own party. Party, Shinzo Abbas party the LDP. So I really think it's difficult for her. She doesn't have the sort of machinery to get back into that sort of mainstream politics and is at the moment. She's running as an independent as governor. So what what would she do? She tried to set up a party in two thousand seventeen. It was called the Party of hope turned out. There wasn't much hope and it really fizzled out. are just pulled the rug from trip by just having a general election and that sort that. That party out but I think she's in a difficult position very successful as a governor at the moment, but you know it can turn very quickly. Either way if the Olympics doesn't happen that that's going to be a very very bad sort of black mark for her, so I think it's difficult. It's difficult to predict. She was saying today I was very flattering that people are are are speaking of me as a prime minister which I'm sure she's enjoying but I'm not saying thing and I think she knows it's. It's too early to be making any kind of noises about about being prime minister and you know. She has some popular support. Certainly but I think the party machinery. The LDP wouldn't be behind her. Unless that was a big transformation, so be an uphill struggle. She she's made a few enemies along the way, and she's been very outspoken during the pandemic critical of the government and I think that you know she. She marked herself as an independent, so it's where she would go at the moment within national politics. Just very very briefly, if no Olympic Games then is there a singular event that can galvanize I dunno slightly fragment tree, Japanese coacher in society at the moment. Is that something that everyone can get on board with doesn't involve people coming from without the borders of big event, or is there something that people are looking towards the that can we get back to normal by DOT DOT DOT or? Is that is that too much to to wish for? I think it's a bit too much. Wish for I think partly because the Olympics have been such a focus for Japan for so long and this raw the agonize the extension, so at the moment it's. It's the Olympics and frankly people would be happy to see some some fireworks at this point, which is the usual event we should be looking forward to in August. August summer festival. Some fireworks looks like they're not happening. So at the moment it would be small gains just to see those happening all right well. We'll watch this space with interest. fairly always great to speak with you. That's all for this edition of the prefiguring was produced by reese. James and Yolene at Goffin and Charlie Foam Court. Was Our researcher Studio Manager was Christie Evans. I'm Tom Edwards thanks for listening..

Olympics Tokyo Japan Shinzo Abe Governor Yukio Tokyo Bureau Chief LDP governor cordray Christie Evans Asia quickey US Fiona Wilson London Editor prime minister Shinzo Abbas reese Tom Edwards
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"But. Contains g to make an appearance this afternoon. We'll see what the very important thing that he has to say as he tweeted today, we'll be then similar photograph. I noticed on the front of both less time, and La Republica. This is the, the prang between a huge cruise ship and a Venetian Warf. Yeah. This is a very sad image. And I say this because I was in Venice quite recently, and I've been following this issue for a long time. The, the issue is that humongous. Cruise ships are allowed onto I was in Venice for the first time last November, I didn't really have a sense before. It went of how tiny Venice is compared to especially to these mentioned which pull up alongside it. He just looks weird. It's, it's incredible. You can see them above the level of, of the buildings at times. And, and this cruise ship, particularly crashed on the side of the canal, that's not some somewhere far away. That's one of the two main, I guess, devise, did you deck island. Some of the main island of Venice as tourists will know it, if it had been five hundred meters kilometer away. It could have crushed into some of the most iconic sites of Venice. Luckily, very few people were injured, but the question about whether these cruise ships should be banned from the canals is, again on the table and is creating controversy as you would imagine. Kyar. Thanks for joining us. You're listening to the briefing. You're listening to the briefing on monocle twenty four. Let's continue now to Tokyo to hear what has got Japan, talking today and joining me from Tokyo is bureau chief in Tokyo, Fiona Wilson Fiona, welcome to the show as I understand it, you and everybody else in Tokyo.

Venice Tokyo Fiona Wilson Fiona La Republica Venetian Warf bureau chief Japan five hundred meters
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The Japan tourism agency is launching its first survey on over tourism, popular destinations of being overrun by visitors in peak seasons, which is having an impact on commuters and local residents. Fiona Wilson is Monaco's Tokyo bureau chief and joins me on the line. Now, how bad is this problem? Well, I mean, there's a lot of talk in Japan about they actually used the phrase tourism. Pollution can co guy, and you know, honestly, in certain places, it really is. It's it's jammed are just too many people. I, it depends what you go, but if you're going to some places, certain temples and kill to certain streets in Kyoto Cam occur, which is not that far from Tokyo full Mcapital you know the weekend, it's just bumper-to-bumper traffic bosses. 'cause people on the pavement it it is definitely overrun and it's not just a tourist that this is unpleasant. I mean, local life is being affected. Yeah, I think that's why the JTI Japan tourism agency has decided to do this that they sort of sending out surveys to all the municipalities where tourism is really, you know happening. And I think, you know, really Tokyo is another area, you know overseas very noticeable here. I mean, you just look at the numbers, obviously, that was going to be some impact. I mean, I was looking at it today two thousand nine that would just under seven million visitors by two thousand twenty. They're going to be forty million year. So I mean not increase in such a short time inevitably as had an amazing impact. And I think it affects both sides definitely a lot of complaints from people in Japan, it's affecting their life that commute. But also, you know, I think from a tourist point of view, there's a bit of disappointment. You go to some of these peaceful temples in Kyoto. You don't expect to be in really shuffling along with such a huge crowd of tourists as well. So I think all round that needs to be better management of the the tourism experience. And I mean, just need to be an overhaul of the tourism infrastructure, particularly in busy places. Yeah, I think so. I mean, everyone's well aware. I entered the mayor of Kyoto Elliot's yet very well aware of. They're trying to encourage people to maybe go to popular temples a different time of day. Everyone tends to go to a few temples particular times of the year at particular times a day. And he saying there thousands of temples in Kita spread out bit. It's difficult because people off on short trips that they want to go to the greatest hits. They said that's difficult. But from a local point of view, particularly the rise of private, lodging, min Packers. They call them here, which is, you know, Airbnb kind of commendation had a huge impact. And that's been very, very unpopular locally. People don't like the noise. You know, ink places like people living very close together. People coming in late at night, causing a problem, not putting out the rubbish properly, things like that. The really ball the people here so that that's being some some grumbling and the same time. People are very well aware that tourism is a massive contributed to the economy and potentially an even greater one. You know, I mean, it was four billion dollars forty billion dollar story. Last. Year, so you know, forty billion dollars and growing in. So it's a, it's a mixed blessing. And I think really every wants to ease the situation, all the visitors from any particular places. I mean, there have been criticisms that this is a slightly then Afo bec- survey that it's aimed at at Guishan. Yeah, I've had that said, I mean, you know, obviously the the, the increase in overseas tourists is what's really affecting the, you know, the local environment. So I don't think it's particularly meant to be fair because that's the intention and it's also it's meant to improve tourist experience as well. So I don't. I don't think it straight. I. It's really fed Senna phobic..

Japan Tokyo Fiona Wilson Tokyo bureau chief JTI Japan Kyoto Kyoto Cam Kyoto Elliot Monaco Airbnb Guishan forty billion dollars forty billion dollar four billion dollars forty million year
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Has sent a ritual offering to the controversial Yasukuni shrine. It's seen by many of Japan's neighbours as a symbol of the country's wartime militarism joined on the line for more on this by Monaco's Tokyo bureau, chief Fiona Wilson, good afternoon, good evening to you. I should say Fiona reminders. First of all, why is this shrine so controversial? Yes, show. I mean this this shrine is right in the middle of Tokyo built in eighteen sixty nine. It's it owns the war dead. Basically there are two and a half million souls enshrined the the problem is among those two and a half million off fourteen close a war criminals from the second World War, and that has always made it a focus of, you know, every August the fifteenth, which is the anniversary of Japan's surrender into the Sacramento. It's a meeting point of left and right Japan basically and just attracts a lot of control Vanity. Fair enough. I wonder similarly controversial amongst the home. Relation. We know that the neighbors may be understandably reticent about what it's meaning is what about people who actually live in Tokyo and Moberly run Japan. Well, it's complicated. I'm not being to the shrine many, many times. It does have this overseas controversial reputation, but it is also a very, you know, it's an important shrine. There are many festivals that there's an antiques held there every month. It's part of the fabric of Tokyo. It's not only about the water. So you know, from one point of view, it's it's highly politicized is there's no question. There's a museum about the wool there. But on the other hand, you know, as well as the war criminals, many other people that onset is a enshrined there. So it's complicated. You know, there are many civilians there. It's really, really difficult to separate. And that's been a long argument saying what they need to do is maybe have a separate set killer memorial for the war dead that removes all this. You know this very controversial. There's tension that happens and it happens every year. I mean particular around August fifteenth. But any anytime a prime minister visits? Yes, a Kuni. It's going to cause a problem with the neighbors, which is why shouldn't, but it hasn't been there for a longtime. He hasn't been there since two thousand thirteen. So he does send offerings. He sends donations. He says, a Representative and all the members of the diet do go actually, but he doesn't go. He knows he can't go and he's going to China for a visit on the twenty fifth of this month and it would make rather uncomfortable meeting with Xi Jinping I should think given all of that and given the fact as you say, he stayed away in person since two thousand thirteen. Is it unwise for him than to send this sort of Richard offering? Or is it Broadview that's an acceptable level of commemoration? And he can sort of get away with it. It's no surprise that he did that. He always does that, you know, I mean, what would be surprising if turned up in person now he won't. I mean, everybody knows it's extremely controversial. Emperor Akihito, who's you know as you know, abdicate next year has never been. Now, this is a source of a, you know, a big controversy. Discussions here because only you know, last week the chief priest of Yesica has he's out to resign because comments were leaked that he made criticising the emperor for distancing distancing himself from yes, Acuna. So this is unheard of, you know, I, it's often been wanted, what does the right wing of Japan? Think about the emperor. The emperor has really been seen as sort of pacifist side of Japanese society, and he's expressed deep remorse about the war, very publicly statements. Those the words, he's used deep remorse, and it's often wondered how does the right wing of Japan feel about this? And I think what came out in these comments last week, they're not happy..

Japan Yasukuni shrine Tokyo Fiona Wilson Emperor Akihito Monaco Broadview Yesica Kuni prime minister Sacramento Representative China Richard Moberly twenty fifth
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Japan's biggest warship has been conducting maritime drills with the British navy in the Indian Ocean. Tokyo who said it represented an opportunity for the two navies to train more closely. Let's get the latest on this with Monaco's Tokyo bureau, chief Fiona Wilson. He joins us on the line now, welcome to the program fan and speak with you as ever. Let's kick off to a little bit about the drills, what exactly are these navies undertaking? Well. India nation. This is not contentious territory, but it's a sort of symbolic naval drill, really. So the real problem is the South China Sea, and they kept well away from that and is really just a chance to show some corporation to show that the UK is standing by Japan. China's got huge amount of influence in this area North Korea looming. So I think you k- stepping into say, you know, they're showing support, they're doing their own missions. The ship HMS Argyll was then heading off to the more contentious waters in the South China Sea very hotly contested. That's a freedom of navigation operation. Japan hasn't done one of those yet, but the Royal Navy is was doing that, and then they're coming back to Japan. So it simple. It really, you know, one ship is not going to turn the tide anywhere, but you know, it shows that the British navy is standing by Japan indeed. So perhaps no surprise therefore that these two are collaborating. And I guess if we look back by historic times as well, there's all the more reason why collaboration, here's sort of makes sense for both parties. Yeah. I mean, there's been, I mean, a very long before the first World War that the links between the imperial navy and the Royal Navy go back a long way..

British navy Japan South China Sea Tokyo imperial navy China Indian Ocean HMS Argyll Fiona Wilson India North Korea Monaco UK
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And finally today, Bloomberg reports that Japan wants to use flying cars to solve traffic congestion and Tokyo is calling on companies like Uber and Boeing to help. Let's get the latest on this with Mongols Tokyo bureau, chief Yona Wilson. Fiona, does this mean Tokyo is going to look like that futuristic city in minority report or will it be more back to the future with highways in the sky? Can you imagine either scenario I've seen this story over the last few months is sort of popped up, and I thought really April. The first comes round again and again, I mean, it seems so unlikely, but the Japanese government wants to take the initiative. It wants to be the sort of the lead country in in flying 'cause hard to believe it. But basically tomorrow twenty nine th of bogus does a meeting of twenty one companies and these really big companies. Yeah. You mentioned Yuba Boeing Airbus but also Japan Airlines in a Yamato, which is Japan's biggest delivery company. They're all involved and you know the, they're going to set a plan apparently, and, and you know, it sounds unlikely, but you know, if you, if you see the Yuba press releases, you imagine that they may even be a tie an ETA taxi service. This is in Paris the hooping by twenty twenty three. But Japan is hoping that it will have more of a countrywide operation. You mentioned the number of big companies that are going to be involved in discussions and that Tokyo wants to sort of take a leading role in the world. But what does the government say about why it's taking the lead on this and right now? Well, I mean it says, you know that it's going to ease traffic congestion. I mean, if you just think about it logically and you see the proposed cross, they're very, very small. It's quite hard to understand how it would ease traffic congestion, not create a whole load of other problems in terms of air congestion. But that's the idea that there will so saying it would be great for disaster relief evacuation. If those, you know if there was an earthquake and. They also it'd be good for tourism. So that pretty much throwing every reason in the book to justify this. I think it's, it's an interesting idea. I don't think anyone actually thinks that Tokyo will be filled with flying cars in anytime soon, but they have sort of set a goal of having flying cars within ten years. That does seem very embellishes is seems very ambitious. I mean, I wonder that scenario is that going to be in the middle of nowhere. It's a bit like driverless taxis, you know you, we've heard about endlessly and they've actually got some that are a testing in Tokyo at the moment. But you know, it really hasn't moved very far, and I think that case of driverless taxis if that's anything to go by, I think you really looking a long time frame. Just imagine the regulation situation, a city like Tokyo up, see full of skyscrapers helicopters flying over. You've already got two international airports very close by throwing a load of flying cars into the mix. Haunt to see how that will really work out. Just lastly, if you own that you've been in Tokyo for quite some time, and it's a city that often rates very highly and Monaco's list of top cities for liveability. I is it really that big a problem that we need to turn to the skies to to tackle congestion and things like that. I mean, I think so. So interesting. I have lived here a long time nearly twenty years actually. And you know, I've never once had a car in Tokyo. So that's how I'm using traffic congestion. I never drive an, you know, an I. I use the subway. I do use taxis and I, you know, it's just not a problem. So I think this sort of these mythical traffic jams. They do happen from time to time, but I think actually Tokyo's pretty good on that front. Thank you. That was Monaco's Tokyo bureau, chief Fiona Wilson, and that's all for this edition of the briefing produced today by restraints research by Bill Ludi and Julia Webster are Stu studio manager. Was David Stevens the briefing back tomorrow at the same time noon in London. You can join Andrew Moore, former Dory house live at eighteen hundred here in London. Thirteen hundred in New York City. I'm Daniel h. Thank you so much for listening and goodbye..

Tokyo Japanese government Japan Fiona Wilson Yuba Boeing Airbus Monaco Yuba press Yona Wilson Mongols New York City Boeing Bloomberg Japan Airlines Paris London David Stevens Uber Daniel h Dory house Andrew Moore
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"In kobe vissel kobe and in yesterday's heading there so today we saw early on in the day photos on social media of in yester coming on mickey tani's private jet over to japan and then this press conference this afternoon absolutely hundreds of journalists are in news basically massive photo what he was asked a few questions he was quite diplomatic what specifically do you like about jeopardy's football and and he was very careful to say i respect japanese football but mickey tani's very interesting he said really yester obviously massively respected player and we want him to have an impact not just on this team in kobe it's on japanese football full stop so he's talking about the ripple effect and you know hoping in yester will will really change the culture the jleague japanese football league has been a bit stale recently no big names and i think mickey tony would like to see in yes to making a big impact and there's talks more big names could follow is that right there is i mean they're now took about fernando torres who's just left athletico madrid you know that there their stories he's been linked to a team in the states and other team in china he's now being linked to a team in japan and there is a story going around his preference is to come to japan i don't know encouraged by yester or not but you know that it's suddenly you sort of the whole thing gets more interesting and you know the world cup coming up you know it's really a good moment to get young japanese people really reignited interest in football again so hopefully i think that will be that will be their plan but you know the the national teams had its problems and it it's a good moment for a big name to arrive in river everyone up i think we shall see what happens in the j league moving forward fiona wilson our tokyo bureau chief thank you here are some of the other stories we're following today.

mickey tani mickey tony fernando torres football tokyo bureau chief japan fiona wilson
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Monocle has bureau around the world in tokyo hong kong singapore london toronto and new york city in tokyo bureau chief is fiona wilson bit such a big city but i think it's just one of these very layered cities most weeks there's something new to keep us interested you know other it's a new development or a new building a new fashion brand there's something about tokyo once you'll hear an you live here it gets more interesting if from monaco's editors and correspondents on the stories that matter on the places that everyday on monocle twenty four this is midori house live from london on monocle twenty four i'm daniel beach still with me kathleen burke and jonathan fenby when it comes to merchandizing and maps some places feel more pain than others just ask any new zealander or residents of the australian state of tasmania but in china maps carry extra political clout something the us clothing retailer gap now knows all too well gap apologizing today for what it referred to as an incorrect map of china which appears on t shirts omitting politically contentious territories such as taiwan well marietta and delta are among the corporations who have also apologized this year for how they've referred to taiwan macau and hong kong as has mercedesbenz for quoting tabet and spiritual leader the dalai lama is this just part of doing business in china jonathan following the official party lines yes i mean the the official poverty line has made it politic doing business in china.

new york official hong kong taiwan macau delta us jonathan fenby fiona wilson tokyo bureau chief Monocle taiwan china tasmania kathleen burke monaco tokyo toronto
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"No one was mall no one knows small they find out how we can help you contact us yesterday in the north monocle has bureau around the world in tokyo hong kong singapore london toronto and new york city in tokyo i'll bureau chief is fiona wilson such a big city but i think we'll say just one the fight led city's most week says something needed to keep us interested in no other others and you develop man or a know really into the building and he fashioned brand the something about tokyo wants you'll hear any live here he gets more more interesting pair for monaco's editors and correspondence on the stories the matter on the places that matter every day on one poll 24th the benefit now since his election last year emmanuel macron has sought to portray himself as the liberal face of europe an antidote the rise of the farright all the populist protectionism of donald trump's america but this week francis president is approved plans or crackdown on asylum seekers and economic migrants the new immigration bill which is due to be debated later this year would impose limits on the number of asylumseekers allowed to stay in france as well as making it easier to deport people seems like a fairly significant change in tone but why let's speak now to affiliate malia his professor french and european politics at university college london and is with me in the studio by any standards these are these are pretty tough measures that having this on application price as having the time for appeals doubling the detention appear it allow before deportation what are the reasons the french government's given for this yes these are very very severe measures and pretty unexpected if you like because my call as you put it through new seemed to have to be to kind of new president with liberal face knew that the kind of prison who wouldn't do what's a previous prison state in in in in terms of migration in terms of asylum and that's what he's doing now so what happen i think it seems to be to my call to imagine my corners the candidates over yearago which have promised humanism at home and an an and internationally and now this deep the president's one your own uh which clearly has seemed to have taken on board a number of policies while ideas which.

toronto fiona wilson tokyo monaco emmanuel macron donald trump america president france university college london french government new york bureau chief europe francis professor
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"With french film and also the french arts from an outside his perspective it feels like perhaps the french government is much more proactive about wanting to spread french creativity around the world and maybe to assist with finance and things like that which i imagine is one of the incentives around this festival have you found that that's helpful in your own filmmaking journey amazing hehe'll may shengxing decimal it was created by any form she know who's dean is that totally french films uh around the world that was lucky enough to hug nine will the addition in worldwide's delivery helped us from meeting its allots and they are very very truck shit in its knowing or he commented judaea to kono that speaking to monocle tom whole and you can enjoy the full selection of filmmaking until the 19th all fed by heading over to might french film festival dot com we'll be talking cuffy off to this listener nautical has bureau around the world in tokyo hong kong singapore london toronto and new york city in tokyo i'll bureau chief is fiona wilson big city but i think we'll say just one defied led city's most week says something needed to keep us interested in no other it's in you develop man or a brilliant new building a new fashion brand pless something about tokyo wants your hair any live here he gets more more interesting here for monaco's editors and correspondence on the stories the matter on the places that matter every day on multiple 24th.

french government dean toronto tokyo monaco kono tom whole new york bureau chief fiona wilson
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"No wonder small no one knows small noon and find out how we can help you contact us yesterday under monocle has bureau around the world in tokyo hong kong singapore london toronto and new york city in tokyo i'll bureau chief is fiona wilson and it's such a big city but i think we'll say just when the fight led city's most weeks says something needed to keep us interested in no other it's you develop man or a you know really into the building and he fashioned brand play something about tokyo wants you'll hear any live here he gets more more interesting here for monaco's editors and correspondence on the stories that matter on the places that matter every day on one poll 24th two now it is no secret that china struggles with air pollution it has blamed for the deaths of around one point eight million people a year or two combat base what's being called the world's biggest air purifier has been built in one city in the early signs are that it's working what's tell us warm joined now by alija wolfson his science and health editor at quartz elijah this is a tower that is a hundred meters tall and apparently producing more than ten million cubic meters of katrina every day said the obvious question is how does it do it well i think even before we get into that i i'd like to kind of step back and ten million cubic meters of clean air sounds like a lot but uh i think it's important to recognize the actual uh scope of this thing right so it it has been shown uh according to uh chinese government data to have impacted aaron uh ten square kilometers uh around the tower uh just for comparison the city of uh she on is ten thousand square kilometers so we're talking about point one percent of the city um what it does with the the tower does is it uh sucks in air into these greenhouses where um they were solar power is used to heat that air and then uh filter through a number of uh filter lairs and then release cleaner air um but i would just point out.

monocle toronto fiona wilson tokyo monaco editor katrina aaron solar power new york bureau chief china ten thousand square kilometers ten square kilometers hundred meters one percent
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Boom you're listening to the monica weekly with me henry reshuffled in and tall met wits to kick things off we're joined by fiona wilson monaco's tokyo bureau chief and we also have charles my phone here from our new york outpost and tomas lewis from toronto more from the letter to in just a moment but fiona welcome happy new year to you thank you have been yeah very but it is a delight that you're one of the first faces i see in the new year 2018 annual neck of the woods and we can talk about this from a intensely personal viewpoint but also pic picture stuff i mean it's a region it very much been in the spotlight for good and bad what are some of the headlines to you think that will be ah unfolding what what are you gonna be watching from your your tokyo posting i mean you wouldn't really need to get crystal ball out know that north korea will mopeia featuring rather sara lee wrapping up again possibly yes i think probably imminently a it's just inevitable completely dominated last year's headlines for various reasons as to donald trump i have to say although he's not in the region he is always talking about the region i she he did visit the region loftier occasionally hilariously there was some quite spectacular gaffes of course but yeah you know what he says about asia has a huge impact and what he says about north korea and has been a roller coaster i mean he he via is between saying he'll talk to kim jongun to saying he's going to annihilate north korea so that really kind of controls the narrative we you know in fact from all points of view with thinking let's hope donald trump could manage his his tweets feed i'm interested to ease coverage of that type of thing in the region as kind of do me as is being in the west or has proximity to the actors involved the issues at stake rhythm all kind of pragmatic analysis i also interesting because i mean obviously you know there were various missiles being lobbed from north korea very close to japan i mean actually in japanese waters and people are calling me out from london say all you okay you know and oversee here we were talking about the uh the baseball result saw.

henry baseball london japan kim jongun sara lee toronto tomas lewis new york monica weekly donald trump asia north korea tokyo charles tokyo bureau chief fiona wilson monaco
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"I have to if you if you see a kfc in tokyo around christmas the colonel is outside in a in a santa hat so um they really go for christmas in a big way antics because as he say of course japan isn't a christian country now that's right i mean you know honesty most schools breakup on on what we would consider boxing day there are actually at school on christmas day and if it falls on a week day it's just a regular day like any other and thought one of the really strange things about being here in japan as a european is that christmas decorations come down on the 25th so just as you're feeling at your peak festive and they bring all the decorations done and they put the new year decorations so for japan the big part of this holiday is actually about new year's so really the funding games for japan begins off the christmas and the the decorations fanie a go up then so you know christmas is just a very different experience here satiny kfc is a different experience identing mennea europeans would be ah would be buying that for christmas day and will you be heading to your liquor kfc gene i wa i realized when i was thinking about the story i think have been once in all the years i'd been in japan and to kfc and you know it just it it is criminal in a country like japan with the best food in the world in a going trying to get a bucket of uh chicken really just is known as it uh although you know people hit you said it's not really about the chicken you know they no good food eight eight to just become this sort of tradition and it's about getting the family together that was fiona wilson in conversation with georgina godwin a little early on call twenty four.

kfc japan christmas day new year fiona wilson georgina godwin
"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"fiona wilson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"And then an a former yokozuna ashore you who'd i i actually interviewed myself who very interesting character early champion very popular champion real personality but he retired in similarly unfortunate circumstances he had an instant outside a nightclub and this is just not acceptable public behavior for grand champion so he retired in disgrace so that i needed talks about matchfixing there are lots of allegations about the sumo world and people find is just so intriguing at once you start following it you've got these big strong guys and very big egos and personalities at play an fireworks result motorcycle bureau chief fiona wilson in conversation with marcos talking sumo sense to have a bus marcus yup ucs offer their physique weiss moving on macos let's keep our eyes trained rather eastwards from japan we head to the korean peninsula and also sticking to the theme of sports that's what marcus south korea is unveiling its newest expressed train just in time for what the winter olympics home sijoong chang the lead up to the games in february has thus foregone pretty smoothly unless you count north korea's latest missile launches but there have been some concerns about how visitors will get to the venues and where they'll stay well our man in seoul jason strove us the new throwing line is supposed to take care of both of these worries we sent him out forward i've just climbed on board south korea's newest ktx express train it's the first line of its kind headed east into kangwon province from the capital and this is the line that will take spectators to the two thousand eighteen winter olympics income chung.

fiona wilson marcos weiss macos japan north korea south korea bureau chief olympics seoul kangwon