9 Burst results for "Fiona Robinson"

"fiona robinson" Discussed on active CEO Podcast

active CEO Podcast

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on active CEO Podcast

"I think it's a combination of having lived inside large corporates and. Experienced like to be in that position of being. What's the word smashed? Maybe smashed from Bobbins met from below every this. There's more people than you can possibly. Keep happy, and they all want everything from you yesterday, so having lived that. Gives me a unique opportunity to to have seen the world through the eyes of most of my clients. But also having worked on the consulting side of the table for much of my career as well I am able to look at this situation from the outside, so I get a kind of inside outside blamed. Which I find really useful in in most of the conversations I have with leaders. If you're speaking to a brand new executive or CEO coming into an organization. What key aspects would you get them to look for with regards the culture in deciding whether it needs to change or just evolve as a currently sits. Greg questions so You know the old adage. cultured strategy for breakfast on basically the the relationship between culture and strategies, the most critical thing of all a strategy that's written without the culture to execute it is nothing but a piece of paper. A culture exercise that isn't in service of the execution of strategy is just about making people feel good, so I would urge them to look at cal chat as a commercial. Proposition to look at the intersection between culture and strategy to understand very clearly what their existing culture is, so what are the prevalent existing rules of belonging in the organization that they have inherited? If the coming in as the most senior later, they have a unique opportunity to shift those rules of belonging in the right direction, but they need to know what that right direction is, so they need to think carefully and deeply about what culture they need to execute this strategy and only then take the steps to move themselves in that direction. Is a bitter to keep the current staff. On board when you're doing a culture shift change or to clean slight. The big question. Do you change the people or do you change the people? So look. I'm not sure there's a simple answer to that I. think if you are going to keep the same people you prefer to keep the skills of the people that you have and organizational knowledge and intellectual property the only way to do that is to make them feel safe throughout the change so simple techniques like every time you have to change something. Tell them the ten things that are not changing at the same time so that they can feel a sense. You know that they belonging is not threatened, and they can infect. Stay safe and thrive in the new world. If you can't be successful at that. Sometimes you do have to make the decision to bring in some new. People. So how can company Feature Pref- itself to ensure that culture supports the strategy. Pay, attention. A I mean culture must change constantly will it does anyway whether you like it or not? Should be continually nudged to support. So as Stra changes, culture should change and vice versa. They should be endlessly iterating around each other, so to the extent that any organization can be future proved. That is the key to doing it I believe. Keep an eye on how strategy needs to change and make sure that the to. Inextricably linked. Is there a need note, Neo we? We see a lot of companies who will do. Three five ten thirty strategies. Do. We need to see more of the three months or six months strategies. Because it's easy for people to comprehend the. The Reu big long detailed strategy for thirty years time. Yeah, it's a great question. It's one of those it depends situations Certainly there was a time when you could knock on the door of any strategy division in any lodge corporate and Oscar the ten year plan and get one today I think you might struggle you know you might get a five year plan these days. Possibly you will almost certainly get three year, and everybody seems to have a one year they time horizon for planning seems to be getting continually shorter. Unless you're a giant. Unless you, be HP or somebody in your your having to plan out decades in advance but. I think I think so long as it is clear to your people way, you're hitting and why the? Why is probably the most important thing the how can? But the why is this sort of Northstar that? People will keep their eye on. And and you know the the manner in which what's important as we move together the values that we espouse end, not just spouse obviously, but but leave in our everyday work. Those are those that absolutely crucial, so for people to where they're hitting and why? You talked about spending time now, working with executives as a coach. What you find coaching SAR rewarding. Do you know I honestly I'm finding it even more rewarding than I expected to I think. When you're enroll, and you're so frantically busy, and you have very little time to genuinely reflect if someone is able to give you a way of thinking about a problem, new mental model of framework, just just some hints and tips, and their practical enough that you can apply them. You can then go away from that Sison try them out, and then come back to the next one and reflect on what worked and what didn't it really can make a fundamental shift and I've now worked with enough executives and saying that happen over and over again and I just never cease to get a really genuine thrilling feels. I almost feel like they. Doing may a favor. By, letting may observe that process. I feel it makes me feel great to be genuinely in-service. So watching those transformations, it's what it's all about. So someone was looking for an executive coach. What key things should they be looking for? They need to feel comfortable, but not too comfortable with that person. They need to find someone that they feel a level of empathy from, but who will who will challenge them? is not a friend. A coach's a person who's there to challenge and support you in equal measure so I'd be looking for that blend not too comfortable. So what's next for Fiona Robinson? Well I am writing a book about orgnization culture, which is called the rules of belonging I have a newfound. Respect for people who write books as a result of that process. I'm also doing more keynote speaking on the subject of culture, which also enjoying thoroughly and alongside the work with individual executives during more work with teams around looking at the team culture particularly. If they're working inside, lodge, hold, how do you? Set a good couch of your team. When you're working inside alleged system so doing more of that kind of where it can very much enjoying that as well. So. How do you sit a good culture for yourself and ensure that you live in and healthy livestock? So am some years ago. I was blessed to be introduced to the notion of meditation, which at that time was? Still, pretty you know we're. We're when everyone thought it was weird Of course now we will know how incredibly valuable impactful it is in more recent years. I have embraced. exercise in a way that I never did in my early life. So take myself off to the gym and do yoga something that I thoroughly enjoyed doing with my young adult daughter so yes I'm on more and more mindful of how important it is to keep. Healthy and and in in mind and body. To be able to do the kind of work. Now I'm sure the word that you do now. You realize how important is to be in a peak performance night for your client on a regular basis versus when you were just in a routine job can. Go through the motions day to a certain extent, obviously doing citing stuff bit how what habits routines now allow you to ensure that when you turn, you actually really show up in that peak performance. Yeah! That's the thing about being a coach or an adviser of any kind. You've got to be on your a game. When you supporting client. Take sleep a lot more seriously than I used to. I absolutely religiously meditate on the morning of. A client engagement. I. Take Notice of what I eat. I'm not great with that, but I'm a Batia in the day before at client engagement than I am at a on other days. And Yeah just maintain the the exercise. She'll. We will know smart people have right answers by the best people ask great questions..

executive Fiona Robinson Greg Oscar Sison CEO Northstar HP
"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to episode Twenty Six popper PhD being the last episode of Twenty Nine Thousand Nine hundred instead of an interview and this week. I'm bringing your collection of inspiring full of wisdom the guests of shared so far. I hope you enjoyed them. Having sneak a happy sharing welcome to papa. PhD With David Mendez. The podcast where we explore careers in life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of Papa PhD. I'd really love you the audience to play an active role in the show. So if there's a theme you'd like to see covered on the show or if there's a guest did you like me to interview head over to anchor dot. FM FOR SLASH CAPUCCI and drop us a voice message to be featured on a future episode on the PG see website you can also subscribe to our newsletter and get our resource sheet at the bottom of every page and you can also leave us a written message contacts page. Welcome to the show on episode one. The new Murchison shared about the importance of allowing self to think big when thinking of career opportunities. I think the the first biggest thing would be To to think big about what the possibilities are you know Well I think you know things like like this project. You're working on you know things it's like this podcast really help people to to realize there are a lot of opportunities to raise the go in addition to just you know continuing on academia right. So you know. Don't be scared to kind of be a little bit audacious about what what kind of direction you might be able to go into And to really think about what. What's what's GonNa work for you when it's going to resonate for you And then you know to you know work figuring out how you're gonNA spend yourself how you're going to and how you're GonNa get all personal brand how you're GonNa you know how you're GonNa spin it so that you're the right person to do that. Ah On episode. Two Joel. mccower talked about the importance of staying curious. I you still learning stuff. Yeah I thought I've got a PhD. I'm an intelligent person But when I was doing my MBA. I realized that If you're not not studying something quite rigorously you know. You don't feel union in especially of course I was in my late forties doing my mba as well but You don't Your mind does begin to stagnate so keep leading cause after a year of my MBA. I felt I was twenty years younger mentally again. My agility amd back and that was great you know is a great feeling To I would say just keep letting no matter what it it is do Of course you know Learn about extraterrestrial life. You know If physicals search for extraterrestrial life or learn about anything I think that's really important again. Every opportunity increases you'll network on episode three Mark Roberts shares. Why should never feel like you're stuck professionally? The key mindset is just to keep reminding yourself that if what you're doing say that new job outside Academian started if it doesn't live up to your expectations that doesn't mean that you made the wrong and that somehow failed so you really should have just stayed in academia. Now that's not that you can always leave. That new job can find another the job either in the same field perhaps discovered that field just isn't for you so if something brand new again you're really never stuck in this. You convince yourself you're stuck and so What what I would really recommend is that everybody is their own pep squad? So when things aren't aren't working out just keep telling yourself that things will turn around you one way or another on episode four Rob Hutchison talks about why it's important to identify your strong suits. I I would say to identify what you are good at and what you enjoy doing so they may not not necessarily be the same thing but hopefully future job would contain elements of both and next. I would say start working on your brand early so so this would mean developing your CV and your Lincoln page but also putting together your elevator pitch to summarize your profile. This is something that you should have prepared to recite someone on its opportunities arises and then third I would say. Don't be afraid to take a leap to try new things and do things that scare you like. I mentioned before some people might like the idea of just doing the same old repetitive tasks and over and over again. But if you want to progress in your career keep things interesting and do more meaningful work and makes a real difference whether it be for your clients or for anyone else that I think they need to take risks and put yourself out there. On episode six Fiona Robinson Talks about the importance of finding your passion. If you're doing research I think that the two top things you're at are transferable from that are your critical critical thinking skills and your ability to take a big project rated into pieces analyze those. Get those done tied back together and bring her back to the whole. I think you can do that pretty much. Anyone doing research is being back. Then you can do anything you can. You can take on any kind of challenge. So then it's finding where do you want to put your allergies. What are you passionate about? I know they say you know do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life. Whatever you still have to work? It's not always fun and not everybody gets to work doing what they. But there's gotta be something but you're doing or that you wish you in that that draws on episode seven Philippa Kereta Bauza talks about. Why you deserve to be where your today? Life is really really stressful nowadays in every field so you really stressful but if you are doing winging it is because it deserves and love your child as it's been hard in win nowadays the working. Where'd you live science will? Is Everything Itar and so rest. This will take all these days on episode eight. Emily Blue Roberts tells us what's important to have a side hustle during your PhD. Start doing actual work outside of your role role as a graduate student OR POST DOC By work I don't necessarily mean paid work. Although that is preferable it could be volunteer work but anything just just to gain any kind of experiences outside of your primary one as a researcher As a student as a trainee because working saying if it's a side hustle or a volunteer position or an internship or whatever it is gives you again those additional perspectives That you might be seeking at this this time and you know usually something you can put on your CV. Because a lot of the the fear I think at this stage is around I don't have any work experience. I don't have any reason working experience. All employers are looking for the PhD plus two years. He's Mary's as an entry level position. Well of course we know. That's negotiable right But something you can do while at the same time you're finishing her PhD. You can start that work experience clock even on a part time basis just by reaching out and having some of these other Arab experiences in episode nine killer look shows advice on finding a fulfilling career. Yeah so that is A. It's obviously a huge task to that transition and to even begin to understand what you want to do and I think one of the main things is needs to do. Your research find vocation that is profitable fulfilling but also can provide value to your audience and make you feel like you're making a valuable contribution And that's not always the easiest thing to do but if you do that research in you you have a decent idea that something's actually going to earn your money and filling. That's ninety.

Papa PhD David Mendez Grad school Rob Hutchison Fiona Robinson dot Philippa Kereta Bauza Murchison Mark Roberts Academian Joel. mccower Emily Blue Roberts Mary Lincoln graduate student researcher trainee
"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Thing about about the principal investigators to do administrative tasks does there's also I would awesome awesome challenge on their parts and not all of them have you know have all the skills or resources to then also play the mentor role to their to their underlings antibiotic era. I don't know how much help they get developing those skills exactly exactly so if you think about the skills that it takes to get those fantastic publications which are kind of the primary requirement to get a professional of professor the position. They're not the same skills that it takes to coach people. Who are you know maybe delete g motivated or lacking direction and in fact he might enrich the other way the guy who spending every Saturday night in the lab churning data may not actually the best social skills. You know it's true. It's it's it's a lot to ask professors as well to have all of those skills definitely definitely there there. There are depending on where people are studying their systems. There's like a committees that are part of of some peachy programs where the person gets in the in the province starts their their. Ph each the and they have a committee. That's always of different principal investigators from different labs and and I think that you know because the the a student is not faced only with their supervisor. They have other people with whom they meet regularly. That's already the type of the system. That must help a lot yeah. I think you're right. I think that more and more institutions are recognizing the need for that including those sorts of things into place and I think I think it's really positive and I think that it's the right direction to go. I hope that that really continues in the that. What I'm describing is not recognizable. King is about to some of the people here and that there's instead of less funding for science that there's more and more and that the pressure goes down a little a little bit so that people can more easily you know going to science and thriving signs and now we're talking about the academic setting what about it's in your current career or since you left academia. Did you have mentors that help to become who you are today. Professionally Louis Yeah for sure I think any time that you go into a new direction. You have to be you you benefit from from the attitude that you're GONNA learn from everybody around you. Though when I first went into I stepped out of academia into education communication I was I was learning. Everybody and I think it's still an and I think that's a good way to approach any kind of work I I I think he turns up like a a more philosophical mentor ago. I'm going to go back to the hockey world by assigns the medical education but I really inspired by the GM again agenda Hewing and why counted who is Jewish the captain of team team candidates so CIANCI sir over terrific person the two of them. They both have such vision and such dry for what they're doing. Bill writes boat heading setbacks and frustrations and they will take on any challenge to move their vision for they. They don't limit themselves in they don't they don't stop it an obstacle. They just find creative solutions shins and keep moving things forward. It's a little bit different too. It's not somebody who's necessarily showing you how to edit or showing how to develop e-learning modules but you can you can learn those things from from your colleagues various sources but that attitude in that approach things a believing in yourself and believing in what you're trying to do and then being prepared to do whatever whatever you need to find whatever creative solution you can and you know to to take setbacks because like women's hockey is an area where where there is a lot of challenge and there are setbacks. We've just seen GINA retire. League does appear and to taper setbacks are not let them get you down you. You live them. You mourn them but you move on on and you know you're confident that you believe in is bigger and keep going and you believe that you've got something substantial to contribute and who share that enthusiasm with others move forward with them and I think that was to really inspired me to do that in all the areas of my life excellent and so I was going to ask you what the most important lesson was that you learned from your mentors from from all so you said I feel that it's this this power this attitude of of resilience another lesson that you can share the that has really Let's say changed you and made you who you are today from from your mentors. I think it's like you said Zillions and it's also that personal responsibility that it's it's my life. I'm the one living I'm responsible for making it something worth living and of course we all have dense but you can't those dance prevent you from doing something worthwhile and going. I mean the worst that'll happen is that it doesn't work out but if you don't try it you let yourself down so. I think it's that feeling because I think I did feel for a while. During my academic experience like or meaning you know I'm not happy well. No one else is going to do anything about that and should it's up to you. It's it's up to me and that's both heading liberating and you can feel it as a as a liberation okay. I can bump to me then it's Kinda powering well and that gives you a chance to to take the direction that's going to maybe it's going to be the right one. I think yeah I think it's it's that feeling you gotta be responsible for yourself. Means you hold yourself to account to yourself but it also any different to go in direction. That makes sense to you. Yep I totally agree with you. you can kind of get lost in this habit of a self pity but it's just it's just a break. That's that's a preventing you from going forward higher yeah and the only person who's going to you lose out from that is you. You know you can say oh but I this this stacked up against me. It's true and you know I'm not. I'm not saying that he will don't have people don't have difficult circumstances pressure and there are things that you can't get over yet but you can. He can look at your own situation in your own strengths and your own averaging moves and and find a way to go for something. That's your that you believe is worthwhile and while I guess that's the other thing that that's just always been super important to me is that I feel like what I'm doing is worth a lot and I think that's probably with the case for a lot of people who are starting research into it because they wanted they want to contribute. They want to go there with their during his worthwhile differently and the but there are lots of ways to do that research is not the only way to do that and that is very freeing as well. There's lots of opportunities to take your abilities contribute br to positively to society and it's just a question of opening up to all the possibilities in and going looking for them and not being afraid to look in unexpected directions. You just take the leap of faith are even you know sometimes before. I believe we have to just look up. We've got is so close to the ground or so close and we don't know what else is out. There and there's all kinds of things out there in It was very much the case that I had no idea what I was looking for. I could not an years ago has and named the position. I have now I what I wanted to do. I had no idea what that was and it took years for it to appear work but just having become aware of that ride in the interest then I started looking for it and I stood and I kind of research different things and you know across across different ideas and started going in different directions but I I think you have to be patient with yourself can't expect to be something like you're. GonNa wake up tomorrow go. That's it better shock decided he kind of you know. There's a chance give yourself some time. It is an opportunity to look at different things I may be different things and also to enjoy yourself along the way I think I am very much ado very much believe in that we worked very hard to make some sacrifices and sometimes you tough things for a long term goal that is worth it but we have to be careful not to get so caught caught up in that that we don't enjoy now because now really all we've got and you know it's we were during your undergraduate so that that we could get a good graduate position regarding graduate studies to get a post doc in but somewhere along the way you gotta start enjoying yourself and you know when you realize nice that everybody else gets to join the south. Why shouldn't you gotTA. Find Your own opportunity to do that. Each time we a milestone we just take the goalposts input ten yards farther and that will go on forever and you're GonNa try and get a junior position and then you're going to try to work towards tenure and nobody gets and your these days anyway if you're acting assistant contingent on keeping something far away and everything you're doing to try to get. I can't really not a good data. Those are very very wise words and it's perfect because we're reaching the end of the of the interview and and I feel this setting very good tone and and and I feel that it's you know very valuable and very wise advice to to our listeners I am today is all you have. No you live today and you do leave for tomorrow but again like you're saying if you're putting the objective always farther for the further away you know you may find it difficult to enjoy today into thrive in your daily life yeah and and you have you have the right to enjoy every day and I think we can get so caught up in that allegra sacrifice now for later that we kind of miss that injured you can enjoy every day or you have a right to be happy in. I think during my post doc at some at that time is really tough and I started it with just taking bill moments in Saint Myself. Okay in this moment I am happy and I'm walking in the sunshine and it was beautiful and not wrong but by identifying those moments in saying right now I'm happy I can't have had little micro moments.

principal TA professor Bill GM King GINA supervisor ten yards
"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

14:33 min | 2 years ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"I do believe though for example the job that I have now you don't need. Hd on paper you do not need a PhD are think even a Master's to get the job however I think I'd do. We're much better job of it because a higher studies that I've done and not just because of knowledge that I gained about biology but because of all those other skills all critical thinking and the project management all of those skills I think those are probably at least as important as a scientific knowledge picked up along the way so you know whether every employer is going to be delighted to see it or not on your cv you as an individual are better able to succeed at whatever you take on because of the skills that you pick up while you're doing your graduate study an if you're close to finishing. I really think to yourself to finish and you celebrate at and I guess like you were talking about your interview for your current position. I guess also if you manage to to get an interview or even an informal meeting with someone at a an employer that you really want to work for you're going GONNA. Be You know if you well prepared. You're going to be able to convince them and to show them that. You are not just your and and and I felt that that's something that happened in your interview process for sure for sure and I think even from the first interview that I got outside of academia. I think from that that I that I find find that I was able to present myself in person you could see the difference I I've been sending. CD's out by not interviews but when I managed to get integrated into do a straight trade into a job to so much of it is about showing who you are and what your which are personal motivation is your enthusiasm for what you what you want to do there and it should come through in your cdn in your letter so for example if I applied for position somewhere a little fake shake my CB and I will customize it to that position so it's got all the same basic content but I might change up the headings or am I changed the order I might be the objective and cover letter as well should be absolutely Taylor written to the position saying why why you are the one for that job why you want to do that job and it it should. I think Kinda think people read our CBS ceilings things that are so obvious relevant to their position. No people were doing the first screening against CD's. They have so little time perceiving. They see almost nothing human in that cover letter. I am good or this job because I done this bits and I want to do this the job because I personally voted by this the severe important point if you are going to discover the themselves in your CV. You're asking too much. You've got to really put it stuck there and the it doesn't take let's do that but it's worth it and then you get a chance to meet them in person and talk to them you bring all your enthusiasm and your person ability and you show it and it goes a long way that goes further than and undertake knowledge so we're talking about promoting yourself. Did you have access to services at university that helped you tailor your CV prepare for interviews or was it something that you had to do you go about on your own. I was actually really lucky in a way I did a call up undergraduate degree back when they were not actually that common common and went to the University of growth and I studied biochemistry in their coeducation program that meant that after the first years old studies every every second semester I worked fulltime somewhere and so we got coached preparing our CD's for that had so I had a job with mark frost he would tall. I had a job with Boehringer Ingelheim who were at the timer at Beulah and so that gave me also an exposure to breaking outside outside of academic environment but also I got a chance to work on a CD go through interviews. They had this horrible thing that they did. which was is a really good idea? It's just all mortifying where they videotape you doing mock interview and then you have to watch yourself all. I've been through something like that too and it's awkward but it's it is useful and it's really helpful yet. That's really helpful so I think that that helps in. That was a long time ago in my undergraduate. There wasn't so much of that an dragic agit school and I think that's I think I said it before. During your graduate studies you're not really encouraged to consider sitter things other than that academic route. I mean during my PhD. I was part of a smoker for students than organize seminars every Friday afternoon for her every couple of Friday afternoons. We'd have somebody speak unusually. It was a student speaking about their research better doing that but then every once in a while we'd bring in someone who had done a life scientists huge was doing something different bath and it was super interesting we had one lady who was an adviser to a law firm so if the locker room involved invitation around a drug she could advise them about the whole biochemistry side the drug work and we had all these different different people come in and speak like that and I got labeled in the department is not being very serious about my research because I'm sort of these things even though I was committed to going into the post doc at the time fine you know thought I wanted to professor just the fact that showed an interest and kind of help to provide opportunities for other people to explore those possibilities no no no that was frowned upon and I think that's his appearance of the academic system all of these people coming through as PhD's post Docs oxnard hulking compressors no and then he acts and many have got so many ills that would be so good and so many other things we should encourage at exploration and I think that for some reason that doesn't happen very much. You're like about the public beach the very cool the good news is that there are there are now a thinking of McGill example. There's careers and placements center where there are people that are dedicated to helping you find you. You'll way you have. CV tailoring doing workshops. There's career fairs that are now and then so I think you know maybe it depends on where you are but for sure these resources exists and people can at the university find help transitioning. That's fantastic I think I think it's great that that's happening and I hope that people you know comfortable to do so again. It's it's up to you got to go looking for yourself. Go to go see what they did. Littering make aged aged need and I do it every once in a while they start to feel restless as I look at job postings that are out there not applying for them but just Kinda to either physically or digitally scrapbooking up you know just cut it out within an envelope that looks interesting and then at some point pull them out and look at them and say what are they collected honestly a lot of the time you think well. Maybe I don't WanNa do research into what I WANNA do. A lot of pressure thing got pick now. I'm going to go this direction but if you just kind of every time you see something that looks kind of interesting just just snag it but it in an envelope somewhere and then pull them out but at some point and be like okay. Have I got a concentration of something at source kind of doing that and I think that also abolished cheering was my other way of doing that when realize that's what I doing and then you start to see you start to see the things that are drawing. You know I there was a colleague that I had removed. PhD who he was really involved in organizing the main ball okay. That's a Cambridge tradition because in in May everyone is so busy with exam. She basically miss the month of May which is beautiful in England. Which is you know? It's one of the really love be much so in June. You have a May ball which is kind kind of make up for having Disney Timer Ministry Sanson so you just party all night he started at seven pm and you party until Sorta breakfast and it's you know fuller in Cambridge so your your Tuxedos and gowns eight full thing despite works with acid event and so he was involved in organizing that was the people in his caller and I remember the supervisor saying something about him pursuing his alternate current event and it was Kinda said half as joke kind of not the youngest and lead even sure what he went on to do as a career he could've been any wanted epic and but that that kind of came back to me. I was thinking about this like the skills using the lab to do research there so transferable to things running events and anything where you go to organize. It's a lot of things a lot of components and if you get what you're doing in your spare time or what you wish you doing in your spare time you may very well find mind something that you could pursue a career and you could start to dabble in. Maybe the volunteer or getting involved societies organizations start context that way they can write reference letters for you when I want to the job that I have now where I'm working for the for profit when Mikey letters reference came from GM I can understand the morale talkie team part of the C. H. L. which is a not for profit relief and I spent nine years volunteering for them with increasing amounts of responsibility a big teen volunteers under me so I could go to this organization and say I've worked for ACAPA. I know what it is to follow the benign culture. I knew exactly to work with teams of volunteers. That's a particular set of skills I don't do. I have those skills. I have someone who will tell you someone who's in a position -sition recognized authority. We will tell you get this so you know it started out as something. I was doing just because I like hockey but it ended up being actually really important to career to where I am now and and if we go back to University Grad school and post do are are there also people from that's fear that still today have a you know are some how important in your network that the that that had an impact on the job now or is university in your current. Career are the two separate compartments. I don't think they have to be two separate compartments. I think in my case they mostly are unfortunately it really hard mentors within academia Denia and there was never released somebody but I felt really connected to and I felt really cared about outcome. I guess there was a fellow student. Post doc occur with someone who really really supportive helped me and that I felt very comfortable weapon who who helped me to value my own happiness I was actually going to ask about about that so you talked about this person who helped you kind of slacked and then stop having the tunnel vision that you know that's you may fall into when you're in the in the academic career track. Let's say but there was no one that was playing the role of of mentor or that you could go and like open your heart to about your doubts and your your questions at the time now unfortunately not. I have to say that merely through my academic career from undergraduate. All the recruiter was there wasn't really somebody. I had a guidance counselor as an undergraduate graduate who cared I think quite a bit on eventually retired but from graduate school on you know it will be really just left the event ourselves. I think think and it was sort of hoping that figure things out. I felt pretty pretty much on my own in that respect anything quite frustrated did it because sometimes I would go to these seminars about you know finding your way and at the time it was really hoping to make it in in academia wanting wanting to eat searching but they had somebody who got a nature paper in their masters or and then went on to star. Hd they got talk post doc and off. They went to a professor. That's not really helping he individuals who find themselves in that situation or work themselves into a situation however you WanNa look at it and think you're getting a lot of guidance and mentorship from their professors. Professors love these superstars and doors. There's are open for them and they're getting lots of encouragement. It's the people like me who didn't get the nature paper out of peach. You know didn't have that obvious seller the other copy. I think sometimes we just get to her own devices which is unfortunate but I mean you know. Gadgets studies are still in education. They're not just test data generation vehicle for your professor and sometimes I feel like that gets a bit neglected. Just I don't think the ability on the students to communicate indicate that science is adequate adequately taught. I have edited he leases for Governor. They're terribly written and nobody cares. Nobody has to write and if you think about it you spend however many years with your nose to the bench during research and then you're suddenly supposed to be able to write about coherently. It's not they're not saying skills and I don't know maybe things have changed because was a little while ago this but I didn't get any instruction that I happen to love writing and so I took it really well and and then I enjoy helping other people to improve their skills at it but nobody like I kind of stepped up to do that or the junior members of my lab but nobody had that responsibility and nobody was making sure that those students were getting that help yeah and and you know you and I know how that life is hard and and and I have some morice for people who are doing research every day and discovering things that help humanity. Let's say but all that pressure to publish.

professor Cambridge Boehringer Ingelheim dragic agit school Taylor CBS Disney academia Denia England McGill PhD hockey mark frost University of growth Mikey University Grad school supervisor
"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"You know whoever you are whatever you're doing control the things that are around us whether circumstances that were in but we also. I can't just sit back and say well. I'm happy with this. You know someone else should do something about it. No one will it's really us. We have the responsibility we also have the the opportunity the freedom to do something about it and I think it's not a bad combined like you say we we learn when we do research or maybe redrawn to me search because we naturally do work really hard things but sometimes only progress incrementally and we had that standard it to stick with it and I think that's that's really valuable on the one hand I'm saying I really see value in seeing if you're not acting or looking for ways to Vaughan but at the same the time that idea that you work hard at something and sometimes it isn't easy going but you know that it's going towards something that is going to be rewarding that you believe in I I think that's one of the driving forces that keeps us going the other thing that I very involved in here which y'all volunteering with women's hockey or organization and there have the opportunity to work with some of the best female hockey players in the world under the Olympic starts and I kind of I've always been a geek. I'd never never been a sporty person. I play hockey at the lowest level and I kind of assumed that these women were just naturally really good at hockey and they are but they worked so hard work working with them. I've had the opportunity to see that same commitment that we apply in research they're applying to improving their skills and hockey whether it's in or on the ice for an off ice training video review they are just working so hard and demanding so much of themselves and I think that really that really inspires spires me. I see them going excellence and questioning themselves in order to achieve excellence but still enjoying it. It's still it's the thing that they love. I mean they barely get paid anything so they really are doing the game and and that inspired me as well to seek opportunities delivered that myself work they do now. You know I could probably make a lot more money breaking in a pharmaceutical company but I would not get the same joy out of what I do as I do now and sometimes there are crustaceans at along with that. You don't have the same resources needed. There's politics. There's politics I get so much is joy out of seeing that the work I do is actually bettering the lives of some people with indicates bleeding disorders at meet them. Sometimes I see them using the resources created developed with the other volunteers the organization with the help of volunteers of the organization and and it's just so rewarding that it's worth the work that you put into it and it's worth olding himself a very high standard to make sure that that were producing really good materials and I think that that it's a combination of that dry for excellence patients and that maturity but know that after breaking down into smaller smaller components wants to work through them with resources you have available to do the best that you can and then the at something that you can apply to any any area insurance any kind correct and S- going back a little bit to to finishing you know some some of our listeners may be eh finishing or or may be tried to decide whether they'll right up there master seizes instead of going to the Beach D- and you know that that last stretch may be challenging and you told me off the mic about one of your latest assists sports exploits and I feel that it aligns pretty well with what our listeners can be experiencing right now. You know what I'm talking about. Area sure that's fine. I think it's an interesting parallel to draw so as I read it to my bargaining the I'm very recently a half ironman and that completed the half ironman Bama Combo Julia Fischer and for me that was a huge challenge college athletic person at done a couple of smaller triathlons but nothing like it and when I signed up for about a year ago I was physically incapable of one thousand nine hundred meters and then biking ninety kilometers in the hills of Makamba and then writing a half marathon but he wrinkles. It's less pretty impressive it. It was pretty daunting. I signed up for it again. Oh my God I'm going to do this but it was great to have the focus and the challenge and and you know to apply kind of that similar mindset of I really want to do this and I guess maybe that's the biggest parallel to getting that versus getting through completing degree. I want to do it for me. That was my big motivation. I wanted to do it for me. I knew I wasn't going to be much of anybody. I wasn't a podium finish it. I just wanted to do it for me sock. It doesn't get me anything right. Having having a half ironman is not a qualifying skill for over the I just wanted to that myself a goal that was outside of my current limits and do it and and it who is challenging and it was sometimes extremely you know it said thirty two below on you're going for a run me out Saturday. It wasn't the most tempting thing to do but it actually every little achievement along her way in her every little run done every swim done every biking done and it was just it was a little reward all along the way and the comradery of the group that I was training with fantastic fat on club here. Michelle called the chicken taken who are encouraging and an to do it on the day to seven hours quite a long time. Seven seven was better than I was expecting. I was worried I wouldn't be able to do it within eight and you know the last couple of kilometers. I felt like throwing up but at the same time it was just so l. exhilarating to like I can do this. I'm going to have done that and so at that point and I think that it's similar to when you're writing up the end you know you just gotTa get it. He just Kinda to yourself just to get through it. You work so hard you put in so many hours and you often given all kinds of things to get yourself there the no matter what anyone else thinks no matter what anyone else is encouraging to do or not to do for yourself. You need to finish that thing and then you've got it forever. You can always say I did that and I think a master's are. Hd It's GonNa make a difference. It's GonNa give you an opportunity. You didn't hear Stevie and your Easter opportunities that a half ironman won't it doesn't it doesn't magically opened doors but it thank you both cases. He kinda made a deal with yourself. You're kind of you're kind of also telling yourself that you know. This is all worth it. I've done something and I can be proud of it and I think that's also just an important personal recognition that an did it and it's done and then you decide to Kvant joppy things if you want to and that PhD or masters on your CV even if it doesn't if you you may not get a job in something that's directly but smart employers recognize the discipline and the effort that it took the intelligence check to get back degree regardless of the topic. That's always going to be a good set of qualifications and tell me if you agree I I have a feeling that even psychologically the fact of finishing initiative beat the PhD or the half Ironman the fact that you that you finished allows you to consider going further the next time uh-huh. It's kind of a boost to your ego. Almost I finished now now. This is behind me and I can move further and and go higher absolutely right. You're absolutely right prior to doing that. I didn't Arikan and your for that what I would have said. I could never been a marathon that I decided I wanted to do. It named Britain did it very slowly. They did it and then after that. I thought well what else could I do. I started thinking about you know the half Ironman and what I signed up pretty ethical if I could do that but it and so then you kind of get in the habit of break limits pushing pasture limits and that is incredibly empowered and it translates to ooh. I think your office work or whatever else you're doing. I don't think it's any coincidence okay. This may get coincidence but I think think it's related that you know when I started to push myself to really get more fit and to take on these sorts of challenges. That's also also when I started moving towards job that I have now that I really more than the other jobs I had a research. I think that when they came when this job came along I had the confidence in myself to go for partly because I had already taken on other things that I thought might get side of my abilities or outside of my limits. Let's and achieve them so I thought why not go for this as well and I think it really does. Impact your overall confidence and self esteem and those are also things that are really. They're really transferable. They make you much easier person to work with. If you can feel confident about yourself you're not constantly seeking validation or doubting yourself kind of you know putting it on some other people and I think you can. You're easier to work within your your. Maybe be better at your job when you can come more positively yeah that's a that's a very good point and what I'm taking from what you're saying. He is I even if you want to leave the the academic career path having a master's or a peach on your CV TV is is not going to be discounted by by whoever's going to be interviewing for jobs. It counts. It's not lost time second I'm getting also this. this feeling that you know if you're if you're at the end if you're one year to to your defense just take the energy that you have put it all into your resilience and finished because it's going to be hard but what you're going to take home from it is going to be exponentially more. I think so. I think that I think again I think he owes it to yourself and it's gotta be for yourself. You can't be anybody else. Could someone else's obliging you to do. You feel like you over to someone else. You owe it to yourself and I think that's kind of the biggest motivator to get through. Something like that is is that you're doing it for yourself. It's true I think. Some employers are intimidated by some higher study. I've known people to take the PhD because they improve their employability. I don't know that I don't know I. I have been in situations where I think that might be. Hd has made people uncomfortable.

hockey Vaughan Julia Fischer Olympic Michelle Makamba Britain Kvant Stevie one thousand nine hundred mete ninety kilometers seven hours one hand one year
"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Out it hadn't volunteering and doing other things just became essential for me and like I said in a a number of cases that were more fulfilling than what was going on in the lab for me. Even though I liked the bench research and I like I like the research just it was very hard to see a long term future. You're in it became clear to reasonably early on that. It wasn't likely to become a professor and so run any kind of long term stability and it was hard to we'll see how that was going to happen excellent so so given that you had this you know that you felt felt that the academic path was not going to be fulfilling for you long-term how did that impact you know your your a graduate milestones like writing up your PhD or going through Your Post Doc. Did you did pose obstacles was it was it easy for you to finish each chapter. Let's say of of your graduate and Postgraduate Studies. How did this knowledge that you want to follow so something else. Impact you know the final stages of let's say you're PHD and and even your post to say that I was the final year of my PhD for at least eighteen months it's about. I think that might be experience. Other people have as well where I guess it takes a while to finish. It's not it's not the most fun time. It's stressful and you wonder how you're gonNA get through it. I was pretty motivated to finish because I did like a research. I love writing mm-hmm so actually in one of those. Weirdos enjoyed writing consists in uh there was a very high time pressure on so that was kind of less pleasant but I really act could actually she just sit right. I liked doing that and I was very motivated. I knew I wanted to post doc so I was very motivated to finish up and go on and post op okay during my post that I kind of lost steam because I just didn't see it going anywhere really promising and that was when I had to really think inquired about what to do and unfortunately I think also not getting yeah. There's not a lot of mentoring around that kind of reflection so I was very lucky to have a good friend. we actually did our needs both in Cambridge and then ended up both both post docking at sick kids in Toronto and and Mariana Vargas Cavallo and she would sit with me we would have these long chats over lunch and she knew she wanted to do she wanted. It's very search she. She is doing research now. She's very successful as really good research and she's managed to balance it out. She's got a beautiful family and but she really helped me to realize that we're responsible for our own happiness. No one has to come along and figure these things out for you and it's nobody's he's job to do so I think sometimes we feel like we just got a separate through things but we're not GonNa End Somehow American that and in fact there's not really you. You get one shot at life. If you're not enjoying it it's nobody's problem but your own and the opportunity and the responsibility to do anything about it is also sir uniquely your arm and she really helped me to reflect on that and I sort of funny because she did not encourage me to leave academia not at all but she helped me to see that's what I wanted to do and so you know she kind of really helped me to start looking for those other opportunities and it started instead of doing a second post. Doc is you can just go on forever post. Docs becoming a research associate instead and that gave me an opportunity to be in a slightly different inquisition in the lab. I really enjoyed that and I would have if when we came to Montreal if an opportunity like that would've worked out I would have taken it and gone in that direction I think but it happened that fundings AIDS changed right about the time Game Montreal and a couple of labs that wanted to hire me dude administrative rules couldn't because they couldn't in that kind of money to a research associate so I you know it kind of just circumstances conspired that the opportunity to Work Ama- first physician outside of academia was working to create public education posters that you'd see some times in pharmacies and doctors waiting areas at their sponsored guy farmer company but they're still educational. There's no promotion to them because they know that the more certain conditions are diagnosed more of their particular product we'll be prescribed but that was that was a great opportunity for me because it gave me a chance to change completely go into the office environment working team worker an non-academic employer with budgets timelines clients and they were interested in it because I had worked with science. It's education outside the LAD. All those things I had outside live just interested they got in the door for mutual well now. I also should mention and that it took about a year to get that so I started looking for work in January until we moved to Montreal in the summer and in the fall oh I was looking at one hundred percent I was all of my time was spent looking for a job and it was December before I got a job that was rush. That is really hard. Look at yourself often. You think you know I've got a pretty smart for all kinds of skills and I can get an intricate pretty immoral and better it was worth it because you know the first interview that I got I got the job and it runs a fantastic opportunity to learn all those thanks and proved that I could do all of those things I and I stayed there for less than a year within a year. I had kind of gotten what I could out of the job but I also so they had a CB that show that I could do this kind of work and so happened that my goalie in hockey team was working for a company that was is doing something similar but on a much more advanced level and so when I went to Denmark my cd fire her which really helps to have that connection. They looked at what I was. He's doing. They also look back at my parents. Were I remember sitting in the interview for that position and they said Oh wait. You've edited journal which was being done at the ball and Terr- well that's interesting. Maybe we should bring you on his junior editor and so that was what got me an opportunity to go again a little further dude things that were more challenging pick got more skills really developed rather than just making sort of short posters display was learning how to be learning modules and interactive media and on onsite in person training workshops and cool so that was fantastic that really expanded my repertoire a what what I could manage because a big part of that kind of work as well. He's actually project management and then officially. I was a medical editor but you're also managing a lot of the project and you're working with an entire team. The writers graphic artists who are donators and so that whole side of it. It's a whole lot of social skills and organizational skills and while lyle think you develop organizational skills in the lab again knowing that you've got those social skills they often come outside of a lab and that's something else that I think it's it's worth thinking about because when we're in the lab we tend to think that we we only know the kind of information that we know and we forget about all the other aren't. Aren't we develop as researchers. I it's it's true and I think I mean research. The with the thing I've seen that I think is the biggest transferable skill. The research is the ability to take a big problem from a big question ray get into smaller parts and evaluate those. What do I need to tackle each of those knows. How can it be who you are need. What's the timeline on that have to be done in a certain order execute them and then bring them back together into into one big thing that's just right. That's also event planning that's also if you want to take an idea and build it up to a publication developing a product of launching like anything like that those are skills you need and the the management consulting companies in the UK used to come remember recruit from the life science programs are Cambridge and lewd why we don't have any business knowledge and they said well your literate your numerous and you can do problem solving critical thinking. That's what we need. We can teach at rice and I think that's the case for so much research. We have all of those skills and it and it's not everybody who has really refined their skills so he finds something else. You're interested in and you start applying that kind of rigorous method to it. You probably find that you're pretty good yeah definitely an in long term projects that could take no years peachy sheet masters could be two years but a PhD can be six seven and and so th there's you you're not you're not going to be intimidated by regular six-month projects at tweets ever a whichever job that you're working so so fuel yeah. I I agree with everything you're saying. we you know you come out of of Grad School and even a post doc with with a huge amount of of stamina you know and resilience to to take on it's very very challenging projects and and this is often very interesting an interesting set of skills for employers the for employers that are looking for candidates with the the profile of of either masters. OPEC graduates now you seem to you know you you kind of told or or you've got you've kind of is gone over a whole arc of of of your story from from Undergrad to Grad School you've talked about the importance sports had specifically hockey had keeping you a sane and healthy throughout it's same thing with volunteering and finding ways to give back to the community and and I find it very very important giving back is to me one of the most effective ways to to get back to to due to recharge your almost your spiritual batteries ahead of no shoe shoe degree right and it seems to me that throughout all of this. You've always kept a positive attitudes and this links to my next next question. which is what made attitude of principal? Would you say has accompanied and guided you from from that turning point of that moment of of knowing what you wanted to do later on today and how has this attitude impacted your life up to today. It's it's a good question and I think I would not have been able to finger on it at the time but looking back I think I think it's a combination of two things one. Is that village ation. It's really up to you to be responsible for your own happiness. What's that that's something.

Montreal hockey editor Cambridge research associate Grad School professor OPEC Mariana Vargas Cavallo AIDS Toronto principal UK Terr lyle ray Denmark
"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"I'll let you tell tell pillow listeners a little bit more about yourself. Thank you thank you very much. David the pleasure to speak with you when you contacted me and asked me to talk a little bit about in my career progression from graduate studies do what I do now. I was very enthusiastic to do so because I remember going to some phases where I really had no idea what direction to go in and didn't feel very confident and I have to stay kind of landed somewhere right actually very happy and like people to know that you know that's a very probable outcome was doing maybe searched working as a PhD student and as as a post doc and even as a research associate. I really did enjoy the bench work. I enjoyed writing. I really enjoyed the writing part of it. I found John Myself often helping other people with their communications in the lab editing disease and papers or helping students to prepare for their committee meetings but I didn't see a long term future for me in research and I was sort of disappointed because it's what I wanted to do for a long time and I did stick at it for quite a long time but I also found that I was finding a lot more fulfillment in some of the things that I was doing outside of the lap and just because I'm a naturally as somebody who looks to federal into community when I moved. I moved around quite a bit during the study. Every time I went to a new city would do two things I would find hockey team. I'm to play on and I would go to the volunteer center and find similar to volunteer and those two things ended up really being. I think he to the direction I ended up taking everything is a lot of the volunteer things that I did where around science communication in medical education and not even necessarily by design those were just the opportunities that lead to any when I would go to those volunteer centers. I joined a an HIV AIDS education group in Cambridge accent found myself giving classes in high school about viruses and I joined a group called Cy High in Toronto that did hands on demonstrations demonstration's our science to either schools or community groups. I started volunteering also as an editor on journal called hypothesis which was that an open access access online journal that had been started by a group of graduate students and so I just found myself often going in the same direction and really enjoying that work and and when I moved to Montreal and my partner and I knew to Montreal for personal reasons I decided to start as an experiment try continuing to look for research fission but also looking for opportunities in the Science Communication Medical Education Theo and just see which one opened up I and it was it was the direction that I that I ended up going in. It was a science communication side really built up a passion for wanting science and knowledge of a science to serve society and I think a lot of do research because we want to serve society. We want the research results to benefit the public we want. I want things to be better for people with certain illness or we want to improve outcomes in some area as a result of our research and I think there's a few ways that can happen and one by advancing the research but the other is by communicating it well to people and people understanding it and that's where I felt that there was a lot of opportunity and a lot of breakdown breakdown where the headland since you seen in the papers don't always reflect the research that's being done it ends up. I think with the society that maybe doesn't feel feel really confident or familiar with science and they don't always see it as a positive thing and so I always kind of interested in trying to impact that and empower people would sign so while I was doing my PhD with that was at Cambridge and I was on a pretty small personal stipend and so to make ends meet. I worked as a cleaning lady so I would go to this lady's House for a couple of hours per week in cleaner house and she was under a smart lady she had already a PhD in one field and getting a second degree in another but she hired me because she had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and she found that with all that cleaning houses ball was too much and I liked it because it was a chance to just switch my brain off and just do something manual and quite often while I was writing my thesis by ideas of how to bring the data together came while it wasn't thinking about it but so we're giving leaving I was literally scrubbing the toilet and she came to me with this package insert for her medication and she said He. Can You understand this because tomorrow tomorrow I have to decide if I'm going to continue taking this drug or not and I don't understand with this sets and it was you know the list of prescribing information and potential adverse presidents and that sort of thing and I thought ten things at that point. I thought one if her best resource at this point that information is her cleaning lady. There's a problem with the system spent are getting information. She needs and the second thing. I realized that that's what I WANNA. Do I want to use my ability to analyze analyze information light bat research. Maybe some background around it and use what's available to help. Patients make the right decisions for them. I didn't know anything thing about multiple sclerosis at that time particularly I was I was doing already sliced into my hd but I could find out what she needed to know to understand what she was trying to beat and to make a decision that was best for her and so it was sort of in that moment with the toilet brush in hand that I was like this is what I wanna do with that looked like at high. I had no idea that even existed existed as a is there such a job as an. It took me ten years to find that position. PhD and went onto did a faux stock because I did the research I went onto being research associate but it had federally spark than me something that I felt like there was something else that I could do but this with the abilities developed the researcher and in fact I came when we came to Montreal. I started working in medical education and and I worked in a couple of different positions and when I saw the description for the job that I do now I would lit up. This is my job. That's what they're looking for for the last ten years and at the end I applied for it and I went for the view and it was sort of funny interview. They were saying Japanese questions and I said really but it's not because I don't WanNa knowns votes because I do know I know is that I walk and they they said that it was quite convincing so good but it's it's. It's quite amazing because you know I think maybe that's an important takeaway. Is that You don't have to know exactly what her job looks like or what it is or what its title is you. You have to kind of know what you're passionate what you'd like to be able to do which you feel like you can do at then you start looking around for it and you you. You may not get to directly. I think in academia we kinda get used to a very linear progression to your graduate postgraduate and you know it's very kind of linear it's Uni Directional and it's pretty much predefined out of that. You have to embrace a certain amount of uncertainty. I don't know necessarily where you're going but in some ways that's liberating silly will for example your first job. Out of academia is very unlikely to be your lifetime. I am job is such a thing exists anymore in not outside of academia not that many people start a job when he finished education and Spain arrested a career. There's is a lot of changes in direction and focus and pleading complete change of career so when I came I in outside of academia it it. I knew when I took it that I didn't WanNa do that forever but it did give me some really good experience getting into kind of science communication area and also showing in place that could work in a non academic environment is that through the important not academic employers can be quite reluctant to hire the people have been in academia for a while they have some kind of impression that we're unsociable and layers and not necessarily manageable the cush bookish and kind of stuck in the ivory tower and it's important to have something to show something for them to take a look at and say okay. I think a person has some social skills percent. It'd be part of a team so that's where things like having played hockey in different places and being involved in various volunteer activities it also showed them that I had a life outside of a lab work and that I was capable of working with other people. That even had an inclination to do that but those are living together I did because I am joined. I think they ended up being a real positive in terms sir and showing a potential corporate employer or non-academic employer that I could be part of their team and that you were multifaceted. Person and potential employees are sure. I think that it's important it was also really important to meet in terms of just being healthy as a whole individual during my studies I tried going. Maybe one semester without playing hockey and I realized that I didn't feel well. It'll play hockey. I only played a very low level international league but it's it's really important. It's where I find other women who are like me play recreational hockey. We don't take ourselves too seriously. We have good laugh would do something already and that that proved to be essential for me. So what I'm understanding here is that you were you always gave importance and tell me if I'm interpreting right to having a balance between your work clive we in the in this case study beat Bishop O. Stock but also then extracurricular activities but what I find very interesting and is that I feel that you found this calling which was to to get scientific knowledge to everyone or as many people as it's possible but what you did was always find a way to nurture this this side of of your interests with the volunteering yeah absolutely I admit that I wasn't so good at the balancing earlier on I mean as an undergraduate anyone eamon who knew me as an undergraduate with that was far too far too often in the library and not often out in the bars and but that was something I had to kind of mature into I think and I got better at it. As I went further my studies and I think it also became more necessary for me man up to a certain important. I was prepared to keep my head down on my nose event. Just keep working for that academic career but also over time I realized that I didn't it wasn't doing it for me and though.

hockey research associate Montreal Science Communication Medical Cambridge David AIDS Spain John Cy High editor clive Toronto eamon Bishop O. Stock partner researcher ten years
"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Imagine swimming three point nine kilometers then biking one hundred and eighty kilometres and then running a marathon it me sounding possible or a task for superhumans but people like you and me set up to do it diligently trained for months and months and then do it they run the iron man and when they do they pushed through physical pain to mental blocks and through of giving up.

eighty kilometres nine kilometers
"fiona robinson" Discussed on A Cast of Kings - A Game of Thrones Podcast

A Cast of Kings - A Game of Thrones Podcast

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"fiona robinson" Discussed on A Cast of Kings - A Game of Thrones Podcast

"It's very likely we won't come back until 2019 but the longtime that's like a year and a half rides if you like hearing us talking about tv shows and you wanna get caught up on westworld and you can probably probably just talk about that not our podcast decoding was ruled that the building was ruled dot com there you go which which is probably coming back in 2017 although no date has been announced his rate uh each 2018 it oh yeah sorry uh w what years of rate out twenty surveys have little toy twenty team is when west worlds coming back uh but you know that show it's not unprecedented for that show to suffer from delays eta is what i hear so who knows when that's gonna come back but yet presumably so you're telling me we should do a young sheldon podcast veteran to through okay uh more like the do spaghetti anyway okay so w you know cast kings comes back probably 20 nineteen decoding was probably probably 2018 um but of course we will have a next week's season review round up as well so that's the future uh that is in store for this podcast and emma worker fiona robinson but before we get to this week's episode and recap it lot of let us talk about i do want to just acknowledge you know obviously last week's episode not only was a polarizing episode of game of thrones also polarizing episode if i guess i mean uh you you know how and use polarizing episode a game thursday is.

fiona robinson emma