36 Burst results for "Fiona"

Fresh update on "fiona" discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "fiona" discussed on Mark Levin

"Families of politicians There's some but very few Who don't leave Washington wealthier than when they came here And some of them never leave of course One of the few would be Donald Trump Who probably lost billions of dollars as a result of running for president And now faces endless investigations all by Democrats Democrats You just wonder how this man can tolerate this How he can withstand these endless onslaughts Now Congress and these others have had his tax returns now for a long long time have they not mister producer Then you have people who are elected On a platform of getting Donald Trump and people take their politics and try and criminalize it against Donald Trump and his family Now we have this absolute clown meritless Garland Getting information from a committee of Congress that was really a front group to begin with It's really quite shocking and then you have this guy senator blunt's son who's making a fortune lobbying against voter ID expansion in states particularly Michigan sets up a group and they set up a group and another group is set up all for the purpose of laundering legally under our current rules The source of the money Soros and others This is why the Republican leadership hates Trump Mitch McConnell his family his in laws have made a fortune of the communist Chinese and their front group this freight company as Peter Schweitzer has pointed out here Fiona home or property we need to have a chat here As a lawyer I'll give you two reasons you never want to be the victim of home title theft Reason one when a cybercriminal worms his way onto your home's title he'll take out a loan not just one loan after loan Using your home's equity Then he'll vanish leaving you to prove you didn't commit fraud While that becomes impossible got two reason two You could be a victim of home title fraud and not even know it for months No agency notifies your asks.

Donald Trump Senator Blunt Congress Trump Mitch Mcconnell Washington Garland Peter Schweitzer Soros Michigan Fiona
"fiona" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

06:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"fiona" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"Upsetting her. Now, she's good at words this young girl. So noisome. He smells bad. I love offering a little bit of word play and vocab extension in books, but in order to do that so that it feels integrated. You do need something like the idea of someone being involved in spelling bee and looking at vocab lists and having an interest in words and etymology. And so that's how I can bring words like mellowed or some noise I mean as part of Nell's arsenal in objecting to Ted. At school, you know, she's in, as we said, the top upper area. And they have to give us good talk about what is important to me. This is where the book takes on a very different track. And this is sort of something I think you've given a lot of thought to. So what's the subject that Nell chooses to speak on? So she becomes a very engaged in the idea of climate action. And I didn't want to start the book with a character who was already an engaged climate activist. I wanted us to see progression of that interest in Nell. So infected at the beginning of the book, despite her very clear eyed interest in catastrophes of all sorts. She's decided that climate change is just too big and too scary. She can't take that on. So she sort of looked away. And that avoidance of it initially was partly to do with the fact that she and her mother were in mela cruiser. You know, like only a week before the catastrophic bushfires went through that region and that really traumatized the idea of that traumatized. So she has been sort of looking away from it really, trying not to worry too much about it. And that's despite the fact that her grandmother's a member of extinction rebellion. So she's a very strong activist. But it's not until now drops out of spelling bee and her grade 6 teacher Alex says, okay, now because you're in the leadership group, you need to propose another extracurricular activity, and she starts looking into this idea of climate change, climate action, being now dives into the research head first and she has this moment where she thinks far from this being too big and scary. You know, to look at, it is way too big and scary in such an emergency. And I have to look at it. So she does, she does undergo that sort of flipped from avoiding it to facing it and uses it as you say as the subject for her class talk. And then through that campaigns for her whole year level to go to school strike for climate. You put in a reading list in this book, Nell has a comment about school librarians. And of course, this was my past career. So I felt this strongly. What was nels come in? She's talking about her mother. Objecting to the fact that not every primary school has a school librarian and her mother's appalled at that and in fact, nils school has a library function. So there are books that go, you know, that gets sent around to various classrooms and get distributed. But there isn't that special person who we know is a crucial person in every primary school and every secondary school who will say to every reader, what are you enjoying, what sort of book are you looking for if you liked that, you'll love this. Let me show you this graphic novel because I know you're not enjoying reading big slabs of text at the moment or the school librarian will give a thousand enticing invitations to every reader. And of course, just an essential part of education. So yes, I think her mother's her mother's appalled stance that the school doesn't have a dedicated librarian. Fiona would, you previous books have been aimed at young adult readers. It's a distinctly different readership with distinctly different requirements. It took me ages. I mean, I'm a slow writer anyway, but it did take me a long time to hear and Nell's voice properly. The main thing I had to do with that was just to really be able to sink into my self at that age at the age of about 11. And I was strange there. I was really helped by finding a photograph of myself at that age looking really miserable. And that just gave me a little portal into getting the level of anxiety right for the character. But then there are other things too more craft based things that I was conscious of. So this book has got, as you would have seen, a lot of very, very short chapters. And it was something that I was talking about with my lovely editor Emily Gale, who's also one of my favorite writers. She was reminding me a lot to give the younger end of the readership lots of little assistances to get through. So that somebody who might be reading a chapter a night will feel very encouraged if there are lots of short chapters and they can move through the material will. With that in mind to there are different sections to break the text up. So there are the catastrophe notebook pages which are graphically designed to provide a visual break. The Friday Friday notes from under the door also look different and when text messages are sent they set out so that they look graphically like text messages. So if we read it with a flick through the book, you know, I hope that they would see short chapters a visual variety in the text and lots of pages with plenty of white space. So they're not, you know, they're not too overwhelmed by dense dense prose. But at the same time, remembering what it was like to be that age. I think it's a really fascinating age. Just that sort of liminal age where, you know, yes, your child, but you're also pretty much a teenager. So you're on the cusp of a lot of things. And people have this age as smart and they're well read and they're exposed to the whole world greater rate than certainly I was as a child or even, you know, then my children were in that age. So it's a really interesting age group. And it was a big shift. Great 6 is a year of growth and change with puberty happening to climate awareness. Fiona wood has also included blending families and humor in how to spell catastrophe. Thank you, Fiona. Thanks, Chen. And now, it's David's turn. It is in the ordinary everyday.

Nell nils school Ted nels Emily Gale Alex Fiona Fiona wood Chen David
"fiona" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

06:54 min | 3 weeks ago

"fiona" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"This is a three CR podcast. And this is published or not. We are told we should have household emergency plans. Perhaps in case the fire do you have one? Fiona wood has written about more lighthearted plans in how to spell catastrophe. Welcome back Fiona. Thank you, Jen. Lovely to be here. No macpherson is a catastrophe expert. My favorite just in case you are accidentally locked inside a lion's cage, it is most important to learn how to pick a lock from YouTube beforehand. Well, did you have a favorite capacity prevention? Look, there was such fun to write, Jen, but I must share with you that I had to learn from YouTube how to pick a lock myself when I looked my keys into my luggage when I was in Italy a couple of years ago. So I know that you can very successfully learn how to do that sort of look picking from YouTube. But when I was writing the catastrophes for Nell, who is a catastrophe expert and really feels, you know, she lives with her anxiety in a pretty accepting way. And she's and she's had therapy, but she feels that knowledge to be forewarned is to be forearmed. So she doesn't, she keeps her notebook of catastrophe facts and information and thinks that if she's thought of everything in advance and she probably can't be taken unaware and she should be okay. So one of my favorite catastrophe notebook entries to write was the fashion catastrophes, because when we think of that as a phrase, we think, oh, someone looked terrible or they turned up somewhere in the same garment, but from Nell's point of view of fashion catastrophe is a very literal thing. So it will be a huge flood of period blood on white trousers or electrocuted by the metal spoke on your umbrella or a penis zipped into a fly, something like that. So she's got a very clear eyed take on the world of catastrophes. And they were fun to write. And I have to also confess, I'm a catastrophe, too. I have spent a lot of my life reeling myself back in from worst case scenarios. So that was very accessible material for me to write and I enjoyed it. It sounds as if now has a lot of life experience. But she's not that old, is she? She's not, but she's like I think a lot of only children who spend a lot of time with adults. She's a clever girl and she spent a lot of time with her mother and with her grandmother. And a thoughtful girl who, when she was 7, I realized that because her father had died when Nell was a baby, that meant there's a lightbulb terrible lightbulb moment for her when she realized that meant anyone could die at any time. And that's when she started to think seriously about the whole realm of catastrophes and how they might impact her. She is a serious warrior. So much so that she did have meetings with grace Leon. And I think this is interesting for kids to read about this too. Yeah, so grace Leon is a therapist who saw when she first had that sort of big spike of anxiety about the idea of death and dying, which is quite a common thing at around the age of 7, which is when Nell had it, so it's a little bit of backstory because Nelson grade 6 in this narrative space. And so she went to study to see Grayson and grace helped her deal with look at her worries. Look at the source of the worries and give her some strategies to cope with her worry and anxiety. I think that idea of therapy and that sort of help for younger children is much more accessible now and sort of socially acceptable. We're much better about talking about mental health for children than we were certainly when I was a child. Well, she's one of the smarties in grade 6, along with her best friends. They're in the leadership group. The best successful spellers in the school spelling bee. They take things seriously and do them well. They're best Friends, but then along comes plum Clarkson. Yeah, so plum comes at that enticing time of year. Remember what it was like in primary school. If a new person came into a class group partway through the year and that's what fun does. And she's a disruptive element for sure. She's a cool new girl in term three and Nell is intrigued by her interested in her and really interested in seeing if she can be plums friend. And that causes friction with her old friends like Sicily and Gus her old spelling bee friends. And plum to Nell represents what the future might look like. What next year might look like, what high school might look like. She just has this sort of an aura of, I guess she's just a new girl. She's different. She comes to school without her uniform yet, so she's got her stylish clothes on. She's just ticking all the boxes for new, exciting friend. And she encourages no to do things that now knows she shouldn't, but is testing that boundary. Yes, so much so. And in fact, Nell, with her with her grandmother who lives in Glasgow, Nell reads books over Skype in the book they are reading in the narrative space is northern lights by Philip Pullman, which has a very adventurous protagonist lyra. And so Nell is, she's got both the real life presence of plum Clarkson and she's got the fictional influence of Lara, who's a very adventurous, you know, brave character. And those two things come together to prompt Nell to take a few risks to bend a few rules. It's quite uncharacteristic for her, but this is the time she's doing that. And things at home are a bit difficult for now because her mom has blindsided her with a decision. Oh. Yes. So absolutely ruins pizza Friday for now, which is a tradition that she and her mother have. Every Friday they have pizza in a movie together. And on one Friday, her mother announces that Yoshi's planning for her and Mel to combine households with Ted and his daughter Emilia, who is in Nell's eyes, a very annoying 7 year old. Now is very good at making lists and she is a plan to get rid of tid. She's thinking of finding another man for a mother, spying on him and proving he has another girlfriend, pretending she is allergic to him, and that he is noisome..

Nell grace Leon Fiona wood YouTube Jen plum Clarkson macpherson Fiona Italy Grayson Nelson grace Sicily Gus Philip Pullman Glasgow Skype Lara Yoshi Emilia
"fiona" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

Ask The Health Expert

03:44 min | Last month

"fiona" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

"Demand list so that they will be able to get as their gift from you. And I know that you're one of the pioneers in understanding insulin resistance and I remember following you like many years ago and watching what you were saying about this. So the food insulin demand is actually a metric kind of similar to the glycemic index, but it tells us how much our insulin goes up when we eat a food. For example, one food that's very spiking to our insulin is dairy protein, even though it's low in the glycemic index, it causes our bodies to make a lot of insulin. And so many people react badly to dairy either from sensitivities, but also because of the massive spike of insulin, it causes. So this list goes through all of the most common foods that we would eat and gives you their food insulin demand number so that you can learn which of the foods might be really triggering your insulin to go higher than your imagining. Yeah, so key critical. I think back to just the classic agave and crystalline fructose that they'll put on a label and they'll go low on the glycemic index and it's just why we have to look beyond that because you can still spike insulin and have something low on the glycemic index. So I think this is just brilliant. I'm excited everybody will grab this. I super appreciate it and I appreciate your time today, doctor Fiona, thank you so much for coming back on the show. Thank you, JJ. It's been amazing to be here again. So after the break, I'm.

Fiona
"fiona" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

Ask The Health Expert

08:00 min | Last month

"fiona" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

"Hey, super excited to have you on the show, doctor Fiona McCullough. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for having me, JJ. Well, it's been a while. I read this article and then I bombarded you because it was so fascinating. So, I mean, I am really thrilled to be diving into this whole idea about circadian rhythm and that fat cells have a circadian rhythm. Oh my gosh. So awesome. So let's kind of take it back from the beginning and talk about what the heck is circadian rhythm anyway and why is it matter? Absolutely. Yeah, when I found this study, I was just like mind blown, I was just amazed with it. So, you know, the circadian rhythm is really a rhythm of time. You know, with the body and typically it's thought of as a 24 hour period. And so it's the way that things happen at certain times in the body. So for example, we all know that cortisol was stress hormone has a circadian rhythm where it's released primarily in the morning and then the levels decline throughout the rest of the day. And many other things in our bodies run on a circadian rhythm too. So first of all, this I'd never thought I've always thought about circadian rhythm and how it impacted health and weight in terms of like, I remember the first time I looked at it, it was I had a client early on. This was probably 30 years ago, so 25 years ago. And she was a nurse who did the graveyard shift. And she said to me, she goes, you know, my Friends have told me that I can't lose weight because I do the graveyard shift. Well, I didn't know anything about this Fiona. So I said, oh, that's ridiculous. Of course you can. That wouldn't impact it. Now, she lost a hundred pounds. And I kind of at the time thought, well, maybe it was better I didn't know what I didn't know. But I now know that that could have a huge impact on it. So let's talk about, you know, how does circadian rhythm affect weight loss and why? What's going on? Yeah, absolutely. So there's been a lot of research into this in the past maybe ten years and what we've been finding time and time again in different studies is that really if you're asleep is disrupted or if you happen to work shift work like this nurse who was your client, there is definitely weight gain associated with that. There's more insulin resistance, which causes us to gain weight and it's been sort of known that when people start shifting their hours when they start traveling to different time zones, they actually can easily gain weight and in particular more around the midsection because it does influence our levels of insulin in the body, which causes to gain weight around that area. So you talked about that in gaining weight, but we're really talking about gaining fat. So let's kind of dig into fat and what it really is because it's not I remember like years ago it was like fats just like this bad backpack you're carrying around. It's like, well, no, not really. Yeah, yeah, you sort of remember that wheelbarrow from Oprah where she brought that out. Just like a big mound of fat. It's just a blob of stuff. Yeah. And what they've been finding is that's not true at all. So fat is actually an endocrine organ, so it actually makes hormones. It does lots of things. It tells our brain how much energy we have stored. So it's a very active hormonal system, our fat. It's not just, you know, a storage unit that's just pumped with energy, and we just burn it. It actually does a lot of communicating with our body. And it's actually really important for our metabolic health, you know, how our fat cells are actually functioning. So then how does this relate to fat cells circadian rhythm? How does this all play together? Yeah, so this study was really interesting and what they did was they actually took some people who had a fairly normal circadian rhythm to start with. And then they actually started to put them into a routine where they were eating at the same time. They were sleeping at the same time, and they did that for ten days to kind of get them all matched up and on the same kind of clock. Then what they did was they took away that routine. They took away daylight temperature and they put food into a very standardized window, which was evenly distributed throughout the day. And then they just looked at the actual time and they looked at what the people's fat cells were doing. They started measuring the fat cells every 6 hours, so they actually biopsied the fat cells and measured what their genes were doing inside. And what they found was that the fat cells just based on time. So not based on how long ago you've eaten, not based on when you've been sleeping, but just simply based on the time your fat cells do profoundly different things. So there was a huge difference between what the fat cells were doing, for example, in the morning, and at nighttime. So what were they doing? Or are they doing in the morning versus nighttime? So it's so interesting because in the morning, the fat cells actually did a lot of different things that were sort of similar to manufacturing. So they were involved in making hormones making cytokines that send signals to the rest of the body. Making, you know, a variety of different kinds, which are different little hormones that are fat cells signal to tell our body to do different things. And then at nighttime, what they found was that the fat cells were in a completely different state. So what they were doing was performing antioxidant actions and breaking things down. So they were breaking down fat itself. So that's called lipolysis, so they do that more at nighttime. And they were breaking down organic acids, which are byproducts of different metabolic processes in the body. So they were in completely different states in the day. And in the nighttime. Well, so knowing that then, because something I've been so fascinated with is, and I've watched this whole progression Fiona from, you know, 2020, 25 years ago where you were supposed to have breakfast a snack lunches snack dinner. And then, oh my gosh, you better have a snack after dinner too. Really? From that to going, all right, well, let's not snack to going, let's eat within a 12 hour period to let's eat within an 8 hour period to the latest I just saw was a four to 6 hour period. And from that first shift of intermittent fasting saying, hey, skip breakfast and have a later have lunch and dinner and I kept thinking, well, everything I've ever looked at says do this earlier. So I'm really fascinated by, you know, of course we want to look at food quality and we need to look at what we're eating, but I think what this is really showing is when you eat matters. And I wonder if some of this is, you know, how does this tie into all of this intermittent fasting time restricted eating stuff and what are the lessons that we can take? I know I'm throwing all this stuff at you. What are the lessons that we can take from the fact that these fat cells do different things at different times with.

Fiona McCullough Fiona Oprah
Rep. Fiona McFarland on a Proposal to Rein in Big Tech in Florida

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

Rep. Fiona McFarland on a Proposal to Rein in Big Tech in Florida

"With us is Fiona McFarland from the great state of Florida. I'm actually in Florida right now in Sarasota, so I don't know what part of Florida you represent, but we're both in the same state here. And Fiona is the sponsor of a very important bill that I want everyone across the country to keep their eyes on. We love Florida. We love governor desantis. And I love the fact that states are rising up to start to protect their voters and their citizens, especially when it comes to the issue of big tech. So Fiona, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show and walk us through your Bill. I represent Sarasota. So I love that you're caring about this bill. It's an awesome bill. Here's what the bill does. It creates some right to privacy for consumers when they interact with businesses online. So I'll list the list out the rights that we're creating with this bill. We create the right to request what information a company has about you. The right to ask them to delete it. And then the right to opt out of your data being sold or shared. Without your permission.

Florida Fiona Mcfarland Governor Desantis Sarasota Fiona Charlie Kirk Bill
Fiona Hill Tries Blaming the Current Russia Situation on Trump

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Fiona Hill Tries Blaming the Current Russia Situation on Trump

"But here's another one Remember Fiona hill Remember her from the impeachment hearings Fiona hills came off all professional Hitting Donald Trump during the impeachment hearings implying his administration didn't know what they were doing even though she was part of it Here's Fiona hill She was on with was it meet the press this weekend Here's Fiona hill part of the whole fiasco Still trying to blame the current Russia situation on Donald Trump Check this out Certainly there was an awful lot done by the administration also by Congress and by ambassador herself at the United Nations I think that just the one point that sums everything up that you yourself touched on is that president Trump at a pretty critical period withheld military assistance to Ukraine that was desperate for us at that particular juncture Basically to get volodymyr zelensky to do a personal further And what message does that send to Putin Well that sends a message to Putin that Ukraine is a plaything for him Have you himself as well under the United States And that nobody's really serious about turbo protecting Ukraine And that was ultimately a sign of weakness It's our political divisions our parties are in fighting which was on full display there But Putin I think is quite shock now that we've got some collective action together Ladies and gentlemen this is a total conspiracy theory Fiona hill is making that up The Trump withheld javelins so that he could get information from zelensky With regard to Biden is a conspiracy theory that's already been discredited The Biden Hunter Biden fiasco in Ukraine was a real was not a conspiracy It really happened It was a conspiracy but it wasn't a theory And Trump had every single right to ask for Ukrainians why prominent Americans kids and prominent Americans themselves were profiting off the chaos in Ukraine

Fiona Hill Ukraine Fiona Hills Donald Trump Putin President Trump Zelensky United Nations Congress Biden Hunter Biden United States Biden
What Can We Expect Next From the Durham Investigation?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:42 min | 6 months ago

What Can We Expect Next From the Durham Investigation?

"What can we expect from this point forward? So is Durham wrapping up his investigation? There's still some skeptics out there, cash. There's still some cynics. Hey look, there'll be a couple process crimes, but don't hold your breath. You're not going to get a Comey. You're not going to get a struck. You're not going to get a page. You're not going to get him a cave. You're not going to get anyone from the senior level of the Clinton campaign. What do you think? Look, I've run these massive conspiracy, massive national security cases, and they take two. I spent two three four years on some cases. John Barnes in his second year. And he's working against literally everyone in government because Merrick Garland's Department of Justice doesn't want to prosecute this. And the Chris ray and the FBI don't want to. So I don't think you issue 40 page indictments for process crimes and tell the world what you're working on if you're just going to stop. That's my opinion. And remember to your audience, an indictment is the only way a prosecutor can tell the world what they're doing because they're not allowed to disclose their evidence. So John Durham has taken the time to methodically issue indictments totaling over a 101 hundred pages now for three people. That's it. And he's identified 15 individuals like the Clinton operative in the matter like Fiona hill like Michael sussman and the like, and I think that's why he's building a larger conspiracy. Now, look, I'm not married to this pipe dream that we're going to get Comey. I wish we could, but I unfortunately just don't think we have the Jews to do it. I do think we have a shot at Andy mccabe and that's probably why the likes of Peter strzok are out in the media now, parading around. Just like Christopher Steele did, parading around his false credibility, now Peter strzok's turn. And that should tell you something that may be something else that's coming down the

Comey Merrick Garland John Barnes Durham Chris Ray John Durham Clinton Department Of Justice Fiona Hill Michael Sussman FBI Peter Strzok Andy Mccabe Christopher Steele
"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:01 min | 7 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Is it hard to come out the other side of something like that feeling roughly as sane as you did when you went into it? Well, that happens pretty early on, actually, the tinfoil hops, George Soros conspiracy. It become almost my first few weeks there. And I was like, wow, okay, what's all this? But fortunately, I was quite well prepared for this because I have been studying the Soviet Union. And Russian history and disinformation and conspiracy theories for quite a long time. There just wasn't expecting coming from in the U.S. context or from other governments. I got the ire of Victor royal Bond Hungarian government really early on as well. I grown up in the United Kingdom with all the conspiracy theories that are coming out of the soul of the 1970s and the 1980s. The Soviets, you know, kind of a spreading around. I just then realized, you know, you mentioned QAnon before that the United States was now generating an awful lot of this itself. And that was something that was deeply troubling because I went and worried about Russia and I came out worried about the United States. There's another aspect I think which we should discuss of that preparation for that appearance, which is the way that you are prepared to look on television. And the point you're making there or one of the points that you are making there is that this is a much different process at a much more intense and complicated process for a woman appearing at one of these things than it would be for a man for whom it is basically just a question of try and straighten your tie and put a cone through your hair. But even after you've gone through all that, how disheartening or I don't know if you're able to find it amusing or not, did it feel to pick up the Washington actual post, a newspaper, which you might hope of all journals would rise above this, goes and has a bit of a pop at what you're wearing..

Victor royal Bond Hungarian go George Soros United States Soviet Union United Kingdom Russia Washington actual post
"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:45 min | 7 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"He's trying to primary as he puts it. People from the Republican Party who seizes disloyal to in local and state elections get them pushed out. So there can be other officials put in who can then affect some of this state and local politics even at the election level. And also to suppress the boat, make it much more difficult in Republican health stats for people who would vote against Donald Trump to get out there and vote in the first instance. And then there's all this pressure on the judiciary that we saw. I mean, we now are seeing revealed around the investigations into what happened in 2020 in the January 6th storming of the U.S. capitol building, all the pressure that was put on people in the Department of Justice. As well as some of the other institutions and pressure to kind of push those people out of there. Then there is the investigation into the events of January 6 on the mob that stormed the capital. And Trump tried to stonewall that. But that again lays the groundwork for future incidents of mob violence and obviously more organized violence in the event of another set of election disputes. So everything at the local and state level now has become some kind of referendum on Trump. You've had the nationalization of politics across the board where previously there was much more focus on local and state politics. That was really the stuff of American democracy, not just everything was happening at the federal level. And he's using, of course, members of Congress to try to block legislation that might otherwise open up the system voting rights legislation that's trying to be pushed through, for example. There's one other character in Trump's orbit that I did want to ask about in detail, which is general Michael Flynn, whose trajectory I think seems to say quite a lot about the way that American politics has walked over the last 5 or 6 years or so. He was somebody who worked with at the national intelligence council between 2006 and 2009. He had a hand in helping recruit you to the National Security Council. He was a widely respected figure generally taken seriously former general and so forth..

Republican Party Donald Trump Department of Justice Trump U.S. Michael Flynn Congress national intelligence council National Security Council
"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:21 min | 7 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"He could just flutter him. Before we get on to Russia now, I want to ask where your own story intersects with Russia. What was the beginning of your fascination with Russia of all the things you could have chosen to be fascinated by? Well, it comes out of arms control growing up in the UK when I did. The whole period from 1977, which is essentially when I go onto my secondary school all the way through to 1987, is dominated by the Euro missile crisis. This is the standoff between the United States and the USSR over the stationing of missiles SS 20 and Pershing missiles in Europe on both sides of the iron curtain and the UK of course was kind of ground zero for many of these weapons being stationed. I was Germany. You know, we having that tall standoff there. And so my whole period at school is shaped by fears of impending nuclear Armageddon. And they're not just fears. They're actually realities. You have warnings all the time for what you would do in the event of a missile strike. You get told if you're outdoors hide in a ditch if you're in the house, you know, how long can you stay inside with all the fallout? It's not what we were thinking about. And so against that kind of backdrop when I'm trying to figure out if I go to college, what will I study? Russia, Soviet Union comes the forefront. And I start to think on maybe I could be an interpreter for translator. Maybe I could, you know, end up in some of these arms control negotiations with clearly have to do something. And so that's the direction that I found myself going in. And that's weirdly, where I kind of intersect with Trump as well because Trump in the 1980s decides to basically offer himself up to Ronald Reagan as one of the arms control negotiators, the stock's garbage off around New York, trying to meet with the Russian leader. And I decided to go off in a different path because I don't have that wherewithal. I decided to go and study Russian and I end up in Moscow in 1987. When the INF treaties signed, ending all of the horrible fears that I had, all the way through my teenage years and into my early adulthood about having to hide in a ditch or hide the cupboard at home during nuclear Armageddon. This fascination with Russia, of course, ends up becoming your career in the United States. And I'm somebody who's only lived in the United Kingdom for about three decades and therefore can not possibly hope to understand the intricacies of its class system, but do you think you could have had the career coming from where you came from in the UK that you have managed to have in America or would there have been a ceiling on it? It's possible, but I think there would have been a ceiling and probably what I would have done is gone down a different path. Because United States is more of a sort of porous membrane between academia and politics as well that you don't really have the UK. I actually did apply to the foreign office or the foreign service in the UK. And their lost my application documents. It's just one of those incredibly bizarre quirk of fits. It literally fell down the back of a radiator in the foreign office building..

Russia UK USSR Trump United States Germany Europe Ronald Reagan Moscow New York foreign office foreign service
"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:15 min | 7 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Reason that I went to work in the administration was not because of Trump or any particular affinity, even to some of the things that he was rightly calling out. He put a very hard spotlight on all kinds of problems in the United States that needed to be addressed. She's obviously the whole way that he then went about addressing them in many respects was extraordinary problematic. And it was a very clear early on from his personality misogynistic. All these kind of dog whistle signals on race and breastfeeding and divisiveness, certainly not any kind of unifier in the political sphere. And that was deeply problematic. But there was that large extent of something had to be done in the national security realm about the influence operation of the Russians had launched in 2016 into the election. And that was where I felt I could do something. And when I was asked to step forward, you know, I felt that I really had to honestly is not a duty because I'd previously been the national intelligence officer for Russia. Working under the bush and the bomber administrations, I knew what was going on. And I knew that there were an awful lot of people around in the U.S. government that we could work together to try to mitigate what had happened and tried to prevent it from happening again. And I did think for a little while that there might be somewhere of putting that to Trump so he could see the national security imperative. Because of other things that he said on the foreign policy front, let me just suggest he really did want to do something with Russia. Not for the things that everybody else thought in terms of colluding with Putin and beaten Putin's Moscow, candidate and Putin's puppet. But he wanted to have an arms control deal. And he seemed genuinely serious about it, just he wasn't really serious in terms of putting in the work that was necessary for this. He just thought he could shot circuit everything and he sat down with Putin and charmed Putin. It would all be great. He was the special sauce that had been missing since Ronald Reagan and garbage off of that. He could turn things around. So that was problematic. But I really did think that somewhere along that, especially kept talking about America first and American interests. They would actually have the national security interests of the country somewhere on the upper levels of his thinking. And he did not. You write in your book that you got to appoint yourself by 2018 and that bizarre and calamitous press conference in Helsinki, where you considered faking a seizure in the auditorium to try and stop what was happening on the stage. By the time you've reached that point, where is the balance you're making between just chucking it all in announcing to anybody who will listen that this man you have elected his manifestly unqualified to do the job or trying to work with what you have and trying to limit the damage. I think the Helsinki press conference Stephanie fell into the latter that you're suggesting there about how to limit the damage. Because behind the scenes to tell sinky, they don't actually be in some pretty modest breakthroughs with Putin and the Russians behind the scenes. On the arms control agenda, of course, he wasn't raising the whole issues of election interference. Because he honestly, I don't think wanted to hear an answer. What if Putin had actually said to mess with him, I did actually. I like to do. It would have blown Trump's mind. And also, because the fidelity of his ego, I don't think he could have humbled that..

Putin Trump Russia United States U.S. government bush Moscow Ronald Reagan Helsinki press Helsinki Stephanie
"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

02:57 min | 7 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"There were still the kind of Midwest and the American heartland and the center of manufacturing, but over time, those great big auto plants the big steel works all start to close down and then people start to feel disaffected nearly there to cause nothing new comes in. And I guess I've always been quite attuned to this because of where I came from. My vantage point on all of these processes is very different because I've personally experienced them. We will come later in the show to your experiences of working for and with president Donald Trump. But on that thought, I did want to ask when he began running for president. Did any part of what he was saying resonate with you personally? Because a lot of his pitch was towards those kind of people you're talking about and indeed people like the people you grew up among. Absolutely. And I recognize right away what he was doing. And he obviously had a feel for it coming from essentially the construction business. He'd certainly employed plenty of workers, plenty of people without any kind of advanced qualifications right after school and jobs in the construction industry. He'd grown up in Queens in New York, a pretty hard scrubber, blue collar neighborhood, although his family obviously had done pretty well for themselves, building up their own business. He got what was going on in terms of people feeling alienated in their grievances. I think some of the peculiarities of his own personality fed into that as well. He felt that he wasn't really given his due for being from a successful business family coming from someone like queens. He wasn't quite welcomed into polite society in a way that he describes this, although from my vantage point, he is somebody who had an awful lot of opportunity in life and a lot of advantages. But he always felt somehow that he wasn't respected and given full credit. He understood that many blue collar working classes in the United States context middle class workers felt exactly the same way. And he knew how to talk to them because he'd spent a lot of time with his father, going to the family construction sites. Hearing how people spoke, basically pitching everything that he was saying towards them. He actually is a very clever, what we call a retail politician. He's selling them a lifestyle, he's setting them a quick fix. He's selling them kind of basically a vision of what they're themselves could be sort of standing in for them. He's almost like another video game reading. The person that other people would like to be. Donald Trump, I think it's fair to say will not be parting with a blurb for the paperback edition of your book. He appears not to like it. He has issued a statement in which he described you as among other things a deep state stiff with a nice accent, though, actually, he has said worse about a lot of other people. You've gotten off reasonably lightly there. Given what you understood of his personality before you went to work for him. And what you learned of his character as you worked for him, did you do the job you were doing with any optimism? Did you think I'm getting anything done here? I'm able to make a case. Well, in terms of making a case to him, no, because he didn't really care very much about what I actually quite a lot of people might have to say..

president Donald Trump Midwest Queens queens New York Donald Trump United States
"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:49 min | 7 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Most of us spent the four years of Donald Trump's presidency, feeling like we were confined in a dishearteningly small space with a disconcertingly strange character. For some of that period this week's special guest on the foreign desk actually was. From 2017 to 2019 Fiona hill was senior director for Europe and Russia at the National Security Council, and therefore, at least in theory, a key adviser on Russia to the U.S. president. As hill details in her tremendous new memoir, there is nothing for you here, it didn't quite work out like that. Hill was among the exclusive coterie of Trump advisers hired for their actual expertise rather than their relationship to the president. She had served on the national intelligence council analyzing Russia and Eurasia. This made hill inevitably if depressingly, exactly the kind of adviser whose advice Trump was least interested in hearing. And makes her book a valuable insider report of the circus in Donald Trump's White House. There is nothing for you here is also a chronicle of hill's own remarkable life story. Hill was born and raised in a small town in northern England, the daughter of a coal miner and a midwife, aside from the location exactly the kind of people to whom Trump made his bogus pitch as a man of the people populist. There is nothing for you here, has further resonance as a warning of where such demagogues can lead a country and of the dangers of ignoring the anxieties on which they pray. What was it like watching Donald Trump attempting to govern? How do you get from childhood in a mining village in county Durham to testifying at the impeachment hearing of a U.S. president? And how does it feel to become the focus of the paranoid rage of Donald Trump's legions? This.

Fiona hill Donald Trump Russia National Security Council national intelligence council hill Trump Hill Eurasia Europe U.S. White House England Durham
"fiona" Discussed on Plant Strong

Plant Strong

03:14 min | 9 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Plant Strong

"Say but then after doing that. I so well at behind on how. It's not that bad. How do i improve. And that was the challenge working out. Something that suited me regime roosting sources could speed up basically capture. The pacey could release races. Yeah kind of went from there in clear would literally lining the so next to polo radcliffe. And that's why assaulted the vegan running back in the uk because the l. home light day was going round in address x. Amount to pay and say hello. My name's fiona anansie and have you ever thought about income-based yourself onto that. So the declined idea behind. It was as they see. The vegan would would attached to a runoff on levesque. That's going into the elites thoughts the equation issa vegan equals. Excellence that that was it. I'm yet started thinking back in two thousand fool my yearning. I tried to get uncomfortable that way. Tell my but they were saying look. You've obviously got some ability boats We're not gonna help because it's going to be investing an awful lot time and diet is going to really improving to the next level and you're gonna find that when you do start doing the hot sessions you're not gonna be able to cope. You not gonna be able to sustain it. They said the wrong thing. Yeah i'm a yeah a diet in essence the veganism. It's the real reason. I'm out there in the first place. That's not negotiable. So it was the my running has been basically trial and error is an awful of trials. Knows laura's to get me where am i did humaira. Sins year no will the race. I just didn't. I don't have a coach. Don't come ccoo. i don't have never had in the lives ruined. No i don't have anything you're have you don't ask like one of the the pigs or goats to give you a little like the prego down. The cows like basic math on the plane. I missing the point. Try to make people it. Can you can be done. I don't have any i don't take any supplements. i go especially dire You do have a special. Yeah the whole diet special. You know. I don't have anything fancy you know what. I mean I'm it can be done very basically finances a wizard full-frontal mind because obviously my money is needed for the animals that sanctuaries so i'm very very careful and With five hundred miles to see mine is the one that i'm thinking about last So i am used to do to race..

fiona anansie pacey levesque humaira uk laura
"fiona" Discussed on Plant Strong

Plant Strong

04:08 min | 9 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Plant Strong

"Will make you and all of us more compassionate and better humans. So thank you fiona oaks. I loved this conversation. And i so admire the fantastic work that you're doing. Thanks fiona oaks. I want to welcome you to the plant strong podcast. It's an absolute pleasure to have you on season. Three of the show. And let me start by asking you fiona. I don't think i know anyone else. That's fiona in my in my life Is that is that kind of common over in the uk. No common tells the name. It was unusual when she tells him but she slips and we've got scottish background in. it's a scottish name. So yeah it system yet mega common. It's not unique Usual right right. I think the only other time. I've heard fiona is in the shrek movies. I think the princess fiona right. Well yeah. I'm not quiet princess but yeah i am skin well. Your story is so remarkable. I know that you are so kind of modest and humble and unassuming that you don't i think maybe see what would other people see in the amazing work that you do and you're running for the advocacy of the animals But you literally. You're like running for the lives of of animals and the farm sanctuary that you started in the late nineteen nineties. I have no idea in two thousand twenty one. How many animals do you have on the tower hill farm sanctuary about five from the altogether. We've got tackled shea. Hades hostess goats of We've got the flu Of the menagerie to It's hard work it you know. It's it's always been my passion. I don't i don't even see it. It's todd work country. I a famous to get at three thirteen morning and a half the decades and go out there and every day it flat lives. That's why a brief about. That's all i do. Think though. Yeah so three thirty a m. What if you if. You're getting up at three thirty. What time do you go to sleep at night. But i usually say go to sleep when i finish my would probably on average about ten pm. I don't need to know philosophy. I i really again about five. Probably five hours five and a hours of quality rest in the day. Either by days is really is philemon. Indeed when taking to make the film winning goods a i think. He's kind of skeptical. He's really you know. Is this really what happens. Attica is. It's you know the so much to do but i kinda thrive on work on a very disciplined person. I think that the discipline. The is i get through. My ronin helps mid with today life as well but some i see every every every task is an opportunity to leave a little bit more and do more for the animals and i also feel very very blessed that i'm able to continue doing it. I don't see a kind of you know the kind of hall full. Yes sometimes when the hub section to do a lot of what to do out there. I kind of thing. I'm privileged to be able to go out there and do it because so many arms so many pinot health is wealth. Especially now this and you know okay. fly out to bed three thirty every morning and saying in a way the day but You know i just feel that. I'm very lucky to live the life i do. Yeah yeah..

fiona oaks fiona shea uk flu philemon Attica
"fiona" Discussed on Plant Strong

Plant Strong

02:08 min | 9 months ago

"fiona" Discussed on Plant Strong

"Ninety minutes. I think you'll understand exactly what i'm talking about here. Fiona gives absolutely everything she has to the advocacy work that she's doing for the animals at the farm sanctuary. She runs in the uk called tower hill stables animal sanctuary across the globe including satellite sanctuaries in afghanistan and russia. And she. she's one of the premier runners on the planet. She is now in her mid fifties. She has four guinness book of world. Records She is the fastest woman to run a marathon. All seven continents. She has a pr in the marathon of two hours and thirty eight minutes She's run marathons In both the north pole. And i had artika. She has done the marathon assab which is a hundred and fifty six mile run through the sahara desert. It's completely self supported. She's done that three times. There's.

Fiona afghanistan russia uk sahara desert
Willow Smith Goes in a New Musical Direction

All Songs Considered

02:00 min | 10 months ago

Willow Smith Goes in a New Musical Direction

"Never thought i'd come out of a willow song same rock and roll here. We are willow. Is the artist. The record is called lately. I feel everything song hearing this. The closing cut called breakout willow. Also known as willow smith daughter will smith and jada pinkett smith and christina for people who remember her when she was just nine years old and released her debut song. Whip my hair. She's twenty now and this is not that right. Well oh and i have a lot in common and that we've had our beef as you know. We've had our nineties singer songwriter. Phase where we're into tracy chapman and maybe a little bit of Fiona apple here and there but now she's into what i was in sioux coming out of high school which was paramore and my chemical romance and it really really shows so ninety s. I read that she was inspired to go in this direction in part because of her mom right so in two thousand sue jada pinkett fronted. A new metal ban call wisdom so music runs in the family But also in particular what was brilliant sparring willow was that at that time as. She's watching her mom literally rock out she would also see. Your mom received death threats literally just for fronting abandoned genre considered quote unquote white and so this music is definitely. It's artistry but it's also activism for her because she wants to show like other black women. Hey we need to reclaim the genre that began as ours. And i even hear that like from fuck you. Which is i believe. The second track where i was like. Oh man this is her channeling x ray specs and this is even before i realized that polystyrene was half somalian. So some notable features on the record to cherry glazer this travis barker and tara appears on a song called extra. Want to play just a little bit of that. My i was ready. I wasn't prepared to go to scare you still right

Jada Pinkett Willow Smith Tracy Chapman Fiona Apple Christina Sioux Smith Cherry Glazer Travis Barker Tara
Biden Nominates Cindy McCain to UN Food and Agriculture Post

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 11 months ago

Biden Nominates Cindy McCain to UN Food and Agriculture Post

"The widow of senator John McCain has been nominated to a diplomatic post by the bite in administration Cindy McCain is been tapped by the president to be the U. S. representative to the United Nations agencies for food and agriculture McCain had endorsed by dean for president in twenty twenty after incumbent Donald Trump and spent years criticizing her late husband the Republican Arizona senator Cindy McCain currently chairs the Hensley beverage company in Phoenix the president also named former Delaware governor Jack Martel to represent the US at the organization for economic cooperation and development another of the seventeen nominees Fiona Whelan Prine the widow of John Prine to serve on the National Council on the arts Jackie Quinn Washington

Cindy Mccain Senator John Mccain Hensley Beverage Company U. Jack Martel Donald Trump United Nations Mccain Dean Organization For Economic Coop Arizona Phoenix Fiona Whelan Prine Delaware John Prine United States National Council On The Arts J
Women steal the show at Grammys

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Women steal the show at Grammys

"I believe it's my job. All of our jobs to reflect the times. It has been such a difficult time. Both Beyonce and Taylor. Swift broke records last night. Beyonce for most Grammys, one by female artists, She now has 28 Swift for being the first woman to win album of the year three times. Also meeting last night, Meghan the Stallion, her Fiona Apple. Well here to share

Beyonce Grammys Taylor Swift Meghan Apple
Protests Erupt Over Paraguay’s Handling of COVID-19

BBC Newshour

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Protests Erupt Over Paraguay’s Handling of COVID-19

"Clashes between police and protesters in the capital as soon theon on Friday. I wanna go well. President Mario Abdo is now our school ministers to stand down. He says he would appoint a new Cabinet to deal with the demands of protesters who are angry at the government's handling of the Corona virus pandemic. Fiona Aquino is a report of the ABC TV channel in Paraguay. She described the scene in the capital last night. We can't say yesterday was a total disaster here Innocence soon because everyone is fed up with the government's corruption. That's why 4000 people were out in the streets protesting everything WASP very peacefully at first. But then we have like some incidents. We even have hot, someone who died in the protests yesterday. Now the protesters are angry over the government's handling off the corona virus pandemic. What are they worried about? In particular, people are out protesting because we don't have medicines like attract audio and meanness alarm in the hospitals. And people have to spend like two million won years or four million war nears that are like $600 per day to be able to buy this medicines. We don't have diverse sins here in para white. We are like six million people, and we got 4000 for since last month. Right now, The hospitals are collapsing. We have like 1000 in 200 cases per day. And like 300, people are in the intensive care unit. We came get any more people sick because we can And give them that attention they need. Why hasn't Parag wide got enough vaccines, the government said. At first we got like an agreement with the callbacks facility. We were supposed to receive four million vaccines for two million people. Because the calf like two shots, we were waiting for those persons, but we never got them. We are still waiting for the Provokes facility to give us those vaccines. Then we are actually waiting for the Russians were scenes to the government did not made all the deals. To buy those vaccines for the Para William people. That's the main problem. I see that there are accusations that the government has been stealing millions of dollars that could have been used to deal with the Corona virus pandemic. Could you tell me more about that? We got $500 million for the health Ministry. We don't have the medicines when it in the hospitals, So we even know that some people from poor families had to buy. Medicines that were or generally from the health Ministry. But if you go to the drugstore you can buy that attack Korea or bad mean a solemn that wasps from the health Ministry. So that's why people are talking about corruption. We even talked to some families day show US photos off the medicines. And it has imprinted in them. This is from the Health Ministry, and you cannot sell this, but people were buying those medicines. The president says that he's going to appoint a new Cabinet to deal with the demands off the Protesters. Is that going to keep people off the streets? Do you think I don't think so. Actually, people are right now. Going to the downtown wasn't young once again because people are fed up. Everyone wants the president and the vice president to go and this is not going at all. To apply Kate these protests in any way. I was feeling Aquino a report over the ABC TV channel in Paraguay.

President Mario Abdo Government Abc Tv Channel Fiona Aquino Health Ministry Paraguay Cabinet Korea United States Kate Aquino
How the pandemic is affecting states unequally

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:21 min | 1 year ago

How the pandemic is affecting states unequally

"Of the characteristics of this virus economy as we have said on this program. I cannot tell you how many times is how uneven its effects have been on people black and brown and low income. Americans do in way worse in health and jobs and just getting by than whiter and wealthier populations are uncomfortable. As to how they're doing depends on what industry they're in and on states some of which have been really hit by this pandemic less revenue from income and sales taxes and higher virus expenses and some of which states that is doing all right so as the senate takes up. President biden's relief bill this week. And it's three hundred and fifty billion dollars in aid to state and local governments marketplace's mitchell hartman starts us off with a tale of several states. The pandemic recession has delta significant blow to tax collections. State revenues were down by nearly two percent from december. Last year overall. All but according to the urban brookings tax policy center tax revenues actually increased in twenty two states. This disparity has a lot to do with the mix of jobs in layoffs in a state. Says carl davis at the institute on taxation and economic policy so many lower income people have been laid off higher income. People have been much more likely to keep their jobs so tax. Revenues are down by double digits in states with lots of low-wage tourism jobs in hotels bars and restaurants florida and but states with more jobs that can be done from home at higher wages. Like in high tech and professional services are faring better. Washington's one example thinks in part to folks like darby megan of spokane he's a manager for tech startup. his wife's an accountant for an architecture firm. They're both working from home. We've maintained our salaries and that's been huge blessing. Haven't had to take a step back hours or anything. Like that with the stimulus checks. That was a nice little bonus. The couple owns a home. That's gone up in value. So they're paying more property tax but they've improved their overall balance sheet. We've been able to save significantly more right. We're not eating out as much and they made one really big purchase. A new van built into an rv. So we've sort of taken some of our vacation money that you budget and instead may domestic vacation mobile now not every high earner has come through the pandemic recession unscathed. Fiona greek at the g. P. morgan chase institute has been tracking household checking balances. There are some high income families that have seen cuts in their income cuts in their salaries but most of seeing their bank balances and assets grow and she says one reason is the booming stock market the broader trend. There's the growth and wealth. We see a lot of families transferring money into brokerage accounts to take advantage of those games but some states are missing out on taxing. Those income gains at the top. Says carl davis at the institute on taxation and economic policy. He points to nevada heavily dependent on tourism dollars revenue down about twelve percent where there is no broad based income tax. You're leaning a lot on sales taxes. Regressive taxes in general. Your revenues aren't going to do quite as well as progressive taxes at a time. Like this of just soaring income inequality contrast that with california that's opted for a more progressive mix leaning a bit more on the income tax most states do with higher top income tax rates on top earners. Especially that's staring a whole lot. Better with revenues up around two percent since the pandemic started. That's helped a good bit by silicon valley which attracted v and his family from texas. So i'm a software engineer. I was in iran for about four and a half years. And then during the pandemic My wife connor fulltime opportunity and bay area so we moved. He says silicon valley employers are hiring. Like there's no tomorrow. There were plenty of opportunities in the to offers in my hand. Some states are now considering hiking taxes on top earners to boost revenues and fund recovery from the pandemic including new york. Minnesota connecticut rhode island and

Institute On Taxation And Econ President Biden Mitchell Hartman Urban Brookings Tax Policy Cen Carl Davis Darby Megan Fiona Greek P. Morgan Chase Institute Senate Spokane Florida Washington Nevada California Connor Iran Texas
Explaining Threshold Concepts in Physical Education

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Explaining Threshold Concepts in Physical Education

"Spoke. That's just come out chamber alderson bryant threshold concepts in physical education design thinking approach. Now it may be that people listening. Don't know what some of those things are yet and we will come to that but first of all. How was it that the three of you came to collaborate on this book was the story behind it. Okay tom so i guess if i take you back a couple of years prosise really started. When funeral was applauded does student examiner for sporting p. program in the poorest folks in health sciences on. I believe it was really the first time i visited as an external examiner. Three arrests went for the coffee down. Cardiff pay before her return. Flight home it was really that conversation. Not coffee was where the magic or the seed for this book was prompted. I vividly remember the discussion that we were in the world to right within our own discipline. I think in particular some of the key critical questions we were asking each other centered around as a discipline of physical education. We clear what we were trying to achieve where we try to overclaim what we trying to do achieve was really possible for children and young people to achieve before they left school. So i guess the the most important question pursue our skin to establish with our listeners now is is this idea of threshold concepts and what. That's all about what is a threshold concept and why they so valuable to physical education so any discipline that we think about there are disciplined because they have these things called thresholds concepts. That's the only reason they're ever called a discipline. And i know that annan. Her previous answer mentioned as we believe that he was a disciplined or actually redick wondering about that ourselves. Is that actually the case. So if i give you some examples of threshold concepts first of all tonight on package little bit for you if we look at particular disciplines so for example in maths at threshold current set is an complex numbers if we look at design. Ambiguity is a concept. You have to grasp if you're a designer if you don't grasp what you can't call yourself a designer in law its presence. It's opportunity cost in economics. It's entropy maybe in physics so every discipline you can caboche if you were to lead the miles on the table. Every discipline that we know of has these threshold concepts and weirdly. We couldn't actually claim that for physical education. We couldn't literally sit down and go boom. That's what he eagles and we found that often. That was a problem because we felt that the reason of our subject area is often not valued is because we don't have these we haven't called the mouse definitively physical education offers. These are these threshold concepts so threshold concepts when their masters. They enabled students to look at problems in completely new ways. Antitank practice and talk in a manner of scholars of that discipline and the reason called threshold. Concepts is because you literally cross thresholds when you learned and you can never unlearn them. An maybe from maybe the fact that we're involved in movement riding a bike you never forget how to ride a bike so once you've learned tisch. It's not something that you can ever unlearn it's there it's embodied etc so quadruple would be described as admire land. Who don an awful lot of work in this area. It's like a portal so opens up a new and previously inaccessible way of thinking about something and it represents a transformed way of understanding or interpreting our viewing something and without that the learner cannot progress in that particular discipline or ever call themselves a scholar at that discipline.

Alderson Bryant Cardiff Redick TOM Eagles Tisch
How Cameo Blew Up During Quarantine

Business Wars Daily

03:04 min | 1 year ago

How Cameo Blew Up During Quarantine

"Remember in the old days when getting attention from famous person having to wait in line for hours with pan and autograph book or stand outside a stage door in the cold hoping to steal a glance of star. Well that was then now if you wanna personalized shout out from a celebrity. There's an app for that. Actually multiple apps on cameo users can choose from around thirty thousand celebrities movie stars professional athletes even social media influencers and pay anywhere from five to a thousand dollars for short video. Shoutouts want melissa ethridge to wish your mama happy birthday. That'll be two hundred dollars. If you're looking for more affordable option. You can pay fifty dollars for an anniversary. Shoutout from bridgeton actress. Ruby barker cameo keeps twenty five percent of the cost as a commission and boy do those commissions add up the at twenty five million in revenue last year that means customers spent a hundred million dollars for celebrity shouts ceo. Stephen galanos said demand for the app increased in march after the us implemented corona virus lockdowns. Because nothing makes being stuck at home sweeter than a message from nba legend kareem abdul-jabbar four. Five hundred dollars gladys told refinery twenty nine that during the pandemic the app became the to for folks who usually get their celebrity fixes through in-person events like meet and greets and fan conventions which of course were cancelled due to covid. And if you couldn't to zoo nope problem cincinnati's famous baby. Hippo fiona could send you a video for one hundred bucks proceeds from his cameos. We should say go back to the zoo. Of course it was only a matter of time before cameo started getting the attention of a sector that relies a lot on putting content directly into the eyes and ears of consumers branding promotional cameos which rolled out last july allow companies to pay celebrities to hype up their products on film without the huge price. Tag that comes with traditional celebrity endorsements. And it's working want proof. Recently tiger king star carole baskin made three hundred dollars for filming a one minute. Cameo promoting animal pharmaceutical company zametica since the video surfaced online a few weeks ago zone has penny stocks jumped two hundred and thirty percent with more than a billion shares traded. That's a lot of medicine for a lot of cats and kittens. Another app is looking to take a swipe at cameos revenue. My fan park began as a south african start up his saturated markets in india and across africa in europe the company recently announced its fourth market expansion into the us like cameo. My fan park allows users to connect with around twenty five hundred celebrities with the added option of extended one to one virtual meetings. Yes if you've ever wanted thirty minutes of executive coaching from moreau for example you can make that happen for two hundred fifty bucks. The gap between celebrities and fans just keeps getting narrower. And that's good news for cameo in my fan par now. If only i could find a way for my teenager to want to wish me a happy birthday for free. Come on parents. You know how that is

Melissa Ethridge Ruby Barker Stephen Galanos Kareem Abdul Hippo Fiona Bridgeton Jabbar Carole Baskin Gladys Zametica NBA Cincinnati United States Africa
"fiona" Discussed on The Coaches Corner

The Coaches Corner

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"fiona" Discussed on The Coaches Corner

"And i was a hard s. And now i'm this and now you know what and then they go crazy. People think they go crazy but then they get even more enlightened and the always switching and changing in the world can't help but not watch and your business will evolve as you evolve through different layers and levels of consciousness. Your business will evolve but what true right now in go all in on that and don't worry about six months. Sounds like what you're saying because you can't. You can't fathom that you're not that that's not where you are where you are. It's not what you've got one hundred per cent field. If people want to find you. I will leave a link because your your last name is not spelt in the typical. Or maybe it is. Maybe maybe you actually. Your last name is the normal. Everyone else isn't but it's a mouthful. Yes fiona z. Spelled with two ends as well. As i don't think so so this is not actually any other justice this great so i will leave a link below but i know your instagram is fiona mcconaughey. Is that night. When we're aleve the spilling below and ask every single person this One one nugget. I add every episode. He has given like one nugget. What's one thing you you just you wish or you can leave behind and i actually make a list of them all. I just have a list of like hundred million dollar. Earners to to brand new coaches to people who've had twenty two companies and everything else or an. The nuggets have almost as i'm going through the mall. They're almost all the same just worded differently. So it's really actually interesting to me. And i think most of it is an act of surrender but for your little nugget that you love to leave the audience with with be. Stop filtering yourself. I don't mean like instagram. I mean like what are you saying how you showing up what you really want to say. Stop filtering that for other people to like you like. It's just not what it's about if you're going to show up every day for the next thirty years you better start fucking doing it now as you want to do it for people will like you either. Way is actually the maze. One like you on your terms. I guess claim one more question. You talked about it if you're okay with this. What's your vision. What's your vision. What's next for me. I would love to have a set of big digital causes the big vision and i want to live in a converted van drive around europe. That's cool that could. Actually i don't know how long the pandemic or whatever you wanna call. It will last. But as that lifting in six months one year five years whenever it's gonna be maybe it'll be fully aligned with gaining converted van. My mind was a sailboat. When i was twenty five and i was like. I was looking at stables every day. i'm sailboat. I'm going to have big digital antenna. So i can do my work and just sale Phased out of that. But maybe that's still somewhere within me and maybe that'll happen someday. I don't know but that sounds cool. Yeah i've like. I've traveled for like my whole adult life just with my other career and stuff and i. I don't want a sedentary lifestyle. How is how is crossing borders in the in house when when they are open..

six months europe one year instagram fiona mcconaughey five years one nugget twenty two companies one hundred per cent two ends fiona one thing next thirty years One twenty five One one nugget hundred million dollar about six months one more question single person
Japan 2021 Olympics in Doubt

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:13 min | 1 year ago

Japan 2021 Olympics in Doubt

"Now. Japan's government is holding firm at the moment in its view that this year's olympic games should go ahead. They've already been postponed once. But there's a growing number of cases of corona virus and also calls for tokyo twenty twenty one to be shelved while tokyo bureau. Chief fiona wilson joins me now. Welcome back thank you very much tokyo. Twenty twenty one is pretty ambitious. They want to call it to tokyo. Two thousand and twenty there is this insistence. Isn't there in the government to to stick with the plan for it to go ahead but the has been an enormous poll suggesting that lots of other people think otherwise. Yes you're absolutely right. In fact i was out in chablis very busy central tokyo that usually very busy and slightly sad looking tokyo. Twenty twenty flags still flowing. They're looking a bit faded and they're not changing the year. It's going to be tokyo. Twenty twenty even if it's held and twenty twenty one but things are not looking good for the olympics at the moment For many reasons. I think you know the surging Virus numbers obviously very difficult to contain at the moment. And you know they started a big public cole and eighty percent of people said they would like the games to be either postponed or cancelled outright. So there's not very Warm feeling for the olympics at the moment and it's it's really difficult moment to ask people to think about welcoming styles ends of people into the country. The moment and i think many people just think it's too much of a distraction at the moment. I mean from from the outside. This does look like somewhat of a mess. Doesn't it given the fact that like you say a sort of a cool clear head would suggest that Welcoming thousands of athletes and tens of thousands of visitors to tokyo when we are still in the teeth of a pandemic isn't necessarily the most sensible of ideas. Oh absolutely and i really have to wonder why the conversations behind closed doors. It's hard to believe. The prime minister soga is going over. All those options for cancellation really. My guess is that they probably don't want to announce today it's really definitely not possible to do it in. Of course everything's a bit delayed with the vaccination program here. It's not really going to happen until the talk about late february but the idea that everybody will be vaccinated in time for the olympics is extremely ambitious. And i think just that alone is making people pretty nervous. So i think it's. It's not looking very promising and more kind of message Does this convey from the government when they are still standing firm in. What does it say about the way that you're shahida seekers reputation as being saying well. I think when you look at that poll that was was negative about the olympics of the moment along with those those side eighty percent against the olympics. At the moment his own ratings have really dropped quite substantially. they were down nine percent in a month And over sixty eight percent of people said they were dissatisfied with his handling of the pandemic in japanese. Public is pretty critical. They're very of our overall. If you look at numbers they're really not as bad nowhere near as bad as as most country so in japan overall dump pretty well but the population is quite tough on elitist. Here there's a feeling that he's authored. Called a state of emergency for tokyo in the surrounding area and a lot of people have been saying for a couple of weeks. You know you. It has to be called now. They felt it was a little bit too late. So what we're expecting tonight. There's a press conference at seven o'clock tokyo time and it looks like seven. More prefectures will be added to the list. So that state of emergency will be spread across japan mostly to the west of japan and expecting you know all soccer yoga kyoto. An down to coca and even you know beyond also in kyushu. The governor of komo motto is said. We'll come we big did we. We want a kyushu state of emergency. So i think it looks like more and more people will be coming onto this State of emergency umbrella. Not as tough as the sort of lockdowns. We're seeing in the uk but it does Impinge on people's behavior. And i think that many people are saying you know we've got to do it now before numbers Get to more than can be contained

Tokyo Olympics Chief Fiona Wilson Soga Shahida Olympic Japan Cole Kyushu Coca Soccer UK
Japan pledges support for IOC's efforts to vaccinate Tokyo Olympic athletes

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Japan pledges support for IOC's efforts to vaccinate Tokyo Olympic athletes

"Now. Japan's government is holding firm at the moment in its view that this year's olympic games should go ahead. They've already been postponed once. But there's a growing number of cases of corona virus and also calls for tokyo twenty twenty one to be shelved while tokyo bureau. Chief fiona wilson joins me now. Welcome back thank you very much tokyo. Twenty twenty one is pretty ambitious. They want to call it to tokyo. Two thousand and twenty there is this insistence. Isn't there in the government to to stick with the plan for it to go ahead but the has been an enormous poll suggesting that lots of other people think otherwise. Yes you're absolutely right. In fact i was out in chablis very busy central tokyo that usually very busy and slightly sad looking tokyo. Twenty twenty flags still flowing. They're looking a bit faded and they're not changing the year. It's going to be tokyo. Twenty twenty even if it's held and twenty twenty one but things are not looking good for the olympics at the moment For many reasons. I think you know the surging Virus numbers obviously very difficult to contain at the moment. And you know they started a big public cole and eighty percent of people said they would like the games to be either postponed or cancelled outright. So there's not very Warm feeling for the olympics at the moment and it's it's really difficult moment to ask people to think about welcoming styles ends of people into the country. The moment and i think many people just think it's too much of a distraction at the moment. I mean from from the outside. This does look like somewhat of a mess. Doesn't it given the fact that like you say a sort of a cool clear head would suggest that Welcoming thousands of athletes and tens of thousands of visitors to tokyo when we are still in the teeth of a pandemic isn't necessarily the most sensible of ideas. Oh absolutely and i really have to wonder why the conversations behind closed doors. It's hard to believe. The prime minister soga is going over. All those options for cancellation really. My guess is that they probably don't want to announce today it's really definitely not possible to do it in. Of course everything's a bit delayed with the vaccination program here. It's not really going to happen until the talk about late february but the idea that everybody will be vaccinated in time for the olympics is extremely ambitious. And i think just that alone is making people pretty nervous. So i think it's. It's not looking very promising

Tokyo Chief Fiona Wilson Olympics Olympic Japan Cole Soga
What's next for the Asia-Pacific?

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:10 min | 1 year ago

What's next for the Asia-Pacific?

"Today's special edition of the globalist we are going to focus on asia and what two thousand and twenty one might hold for the region. The obvious answer might seem and will hopefully be almost by definition what with one thing and another a vast improvement but even when asia does not find itself at the epicenter of a global health crisis it remains a complicated part of the world bringing their hostages to fortune to this look ahead to ages. Next twelve months are monocle. Hong kong bureau chief. James chambers monica's. Tokyo bureau chief. Fiona wilson a little later on monaco's bangkok correspondent gwen. Robinson will join us. But first to james and fiona fiona. Let's start with you. In japan as we mentioned in that introduction a new prime minister in office seeking to fill the big shoes and follow the tough act of shinzo are has yet figured out. What kind of prime minister he's going to be is a very good question. I mean i think he's been quite difficult for serger. Falling shinzo obey. Shinzo abe's for all his faults. You know longest serving prime minister in japanese history. So you go quiet trot record. He knows how to win elections. And you know. He survived an awful lot of ups and downs. Scandals also had to deal with the pandemic and ultimately how to deal with illness as well so yeah so quite challenging to come into that role. He started off pretty well. I think his ratings quite good. But i think as people have seen ways handled the pandemic Impressed is ratings have dropped. There's also the issue about the olympics. Will it happen waiting to happen. And i think so. Go really backing this. Huge domestic tourism tourism campaign encouraging. People around the country has gone down pretty badly although it has to be said Tens of millions of people have been guy around the country so they liked that bit of it. But so i think it's quite a tough time for him and interesting. He has to have an election by next autumn. And i think he's in for a pretty rough ride few under just to follow that up. You did the mention the oh word. If there is one thing that japan hopes it can look forward to in two thousand and twenty one it is the two thousand twenty Tokyo postponed because of the obvious right now on new year's day. How likely do they look. It really depends on you. Talk to to be honest. The government would love it to happen. They really wanted to happen dog to the saying we absolutely have to vaccinate everyone. And that's not guaranteed yet. Japan's rollout of vaccinations will be in the spring. And they say you know. We'll have everyone backs in asia by the summer. And if not. I think they are going to have a problem on their hands. There are so many vested interest in the olympics in definitely. The government is under pressure from tv companies. Advertises they want it to happen. Population is still quite lukewarm. I think many people feel it puts this unnecessary pressure on the country. At a time. When is trying to deal with the pandemic. we're still dealing with that joins in hong kong or bring you in now. It being new year's day let's at least out Attempting optimism As we were just discussing. Japan has one great big blue ribbon event to look forward to hopefully in two thousand and twenty one. Two thousand and twenty was a tough year for hong kong for the same reasons. It was a tough year for everybody but for other reasons. Besides is there anything in particular vet. People in hong kong are looking forward to this year. Yes well we've had a rough couple of years here in hong kong so You know when you've hit rock awesome. Which i think that's not hong kong. Has i mean the only way to go his up. So i guess people are looking at s- an economic recovery an a return to business as usual in terms of an making money and getting on that side of things but In looking ahead the the rest of the year. I mean there are few big dates to To look forward to the the first one would be at the end of this month on the polls in january when the the uk's visa essentially for the hong kong people comes into play and up to three million on congas could suddenly decamp to britain. So if that happens if the floodgates opened not lovely be a huge event we've oils essentially being stuck in vung most of twenty twenty so It's been difficult to town at the moments How big that exodus will be. And there's no no re- odds on dejean that which you know. Every time i do meet with hong kong peasant they do generate trying to ask me once. Lights live in the uk Just like an schooling an election. Step in where they should live. What's baath liken. Is it better than oxford as there is. There is a genuine interest. But i guess we're waiting to see how many people actually all through with all of the with these These moves

Hong Kong James Chambers Monica Fiona Wilson Fiona Fiona Shinzo Asia Shinzo Obey Tokyo Shinzo Abe Japan Olympics Monaco Gwen Bangkok Robinson James Dejean UK Britain
XRP, The 3rd Biggest Cryptocurrency Might Be In Big Trouble

Techmeme Ride Home

02:58 min | 1 year ago

XRP, The 3rd Biggest Cryptocurrency Might Be In Big Trouble

"The sec has indeed gone ahead and sued ripple. Labs it's ceo. Brad garland house and chairman. Chris larson alleging that they violated federal securities laws by selling x. p. to retail customers. This is actually a bigger deal than i thought it might actually lead to the delisting of x. Rpg from major crypto currency exchanges the price of x. p. is down over thirty percent at the time of this writing quoting coin desk according to a lawsuit filed tuesday ripple raised one point three billion dollars over a seven-year period to retail investors through its sale of sarpi on an ongoing basis. Ripple ceo brad garland house announced monday. That the sec had told his company of the impending lawsuit and published the payment firms wells response a document that seeks to tell the sec wise. Certain activity did not violate us securities laws. The san francisco based fintech firm has long maintained that x. p. the cryptocurrency is separate from the company the cryptocurrency was often referred to as ripple through two thousand eighteen and shared logo with the company. Until later that year the impact could be wide ranging. Several exchanges list are in the us with only one deciding to delist the cryptocurrency ahead of the tuesday lawsuit. If the sec prevails platforms that continued to list. The crypto may have to register as securities exchanges according to the complaint which names ceo. Brad garland house and chairman. Chris larson in addition to ripple labs as defendants ripple violated sections. Five am five. C of the securities act of nineteen thirty three by failing to register x rpi as a security or seeking an exemption quote over a long unregistered offering securities. Ripple was able to raise at least one point three eight billion dollars by selling p. Without providing the type of financial and managerial information typically provided in registration statements and subsequent periodic and current filings the filing said quote ripple use this money to fund its operations without disclosing how it was doing so or the full extent of its payments to others to assist in its efforts to develop the use for x. Rpi and maintain excerpt secondary trading markets and quote. So it turns out that there actually is precedent for the sec sort of inflicting mortal investigations on a crypto currency. And not good precedent. If you're ripple remember excerpt was the third largest cryptocurrency by market cap quoting fiona kobayashi on twitter. Those of you saying the sec suit on ripple will not affect p have a. Look at the sec's twenty. Nine nine suit on kick and its effect on the qin token in the lead up to the filing and over the ensuing one and a half years as noted by catherine wu. It's the same play in terms of process and ugliness and quote

Brad Garland Chris Larson SEC Ripple San Francisco Fiona Kobayashi United States Twitter Catherine Wu
Fiona Hill Discusses Massive Cyberattack on Government Agencies

All Things Considered

06:44 min | 1 year ago

Fiona Hill Discusses Massive Cyberattack on Government Agencies

"Those were the words of Thomas Bossert, who advised both President George W. Bush and President Donald Trump on Homeland Security. Utah Republican Senator Mitt Romney compared it to Russian bombers flying undetected over our entire country. Both men, Of course, we're talking about the massive cyber attack believed to have been perpetuated by Russia on scores of US government and private networks. The attack went undetected for months on let's bring in Fiona Hill. She has spent her career studying Russia. She served until last year as President Trump's most senior Russia advisor on the National Security Council field. Hell hey there! Welcome back. Thanks so much Mercury's thanks. Start with something you just heard me say that this breach is believed to have been perpetuated by Russia. Is there any reason to believe this was anyone other than Russia? No, I don't think so. I mean, given the number off private sector entities of other government entities who have attributed it to Russia. There's also you know, longstanding hallmarks of a Russian operation that many of them very familiar with me. People have bean on the lookout for these kinds of attacks, and obviously, you know they have discovered one and this is I've been able to do all the forensics, so I don't think there's any reason to question it. When you say there are hallmarks that seem familiar to the way Russian hackers do their work that's like that. Yes, suddenly having worked with Many of the people who've been looking at this a cybersecurity experts, you know they're very familiar with the telltale signs that Russians and other actors leave behind. You'll have seen President Trump's tweet raising the possibility that this was China. Is it possible this was China? Well, China's certainly done actions on this kind of scale. A few years ago, we had Chinese hack which, of course, export trade and all kinds of data out of U. S. Government systems, including the personal data of many of the people had filled out security clearances and full time. Part time employees of the government. But you're saying the signature on this one appears to be consistent with Russia. Exactly. So, I mean the fact that he's saying Well, China, you know, could have done this well. China could have done an operation on this scale, but I don't think there's any question that this is Russia. Someone who has advised President Trump. Why, In your view, is he so resistant to blaming Russia or confronting Russia? I'm afraid to say that there's a very personal element to this. President. Trump has been fixated on President Putin for some considerable period of time. It's President Putin style of governance, it says. Seemingly unchecked power. It's the word that he presents himself personally. Azad leader. I think that there's a lot that Trump admires in Putin style, and I think he finds it extraordinary hard because he was convinced that they had personal chemistry to think that Putin would do something like this on his watch. I mean, I think we've seen that President Trump is the same person private in public. Who takes everything very personally, who believes my mention his own personal question. His own personal role on he's become personally invested in Vladimir Putin as a result of thinking that they have a relationship and he's lost sight. Unfortunately, then of the national security perspective of all of us, I think that's one of the reasons why he's both in denial to himself has said very little about this. How did this happen? Understanding you're out of government now. But do you think the U. S was asleep at the wheel, distracted by the pandemic, the election? Other things? Look, I think all of these things and issues I think part of is also problem. When your team is getting undermined. Then we were also in the midst of an election. Of course. In which we were extraordinary worried about a repeat performance of 2016 a hack of the election, But I think as a result of that we put a lot of resource is onto this. I mean, I can't say for sure, because I mean, I know that we have a new awful lot of very technically capable, hard working people across the entire system. But it was certainly the case that we were being pushed to look in one particular area. On any other pointed as well that the president is actually undermined The intelligence community at every turn has bean you know, pitted against them, since you know very much the beginning of his presidency. On a date has bean you know, putting political loyalists in place essentially to investigate the intelligence community. He's also sacked s O money. Cabinet members and senior people in The key purses that one would want to see pulling together as a piece of team to tackle. This kind of issue on has been a odds with the branches of government. Congress haven't Bean pulling together without the executive branch of the Department of Agencies, either this it takes the whole of government effort on the whole of society effort. May I say I've interviewed you now. A number of times, Fiona Hill. I have never heard you speak so openly in such an openly critical way of the administration. You served has something changed. I think that really what we've heard is more of an accumulation of facts to basically point out to people. I know what I've been trying to do all along, including last year when I was testifying is trying not to politicize everything we talked about in the impeachment inquiry. This is actually part of our problem. When we politicize Russia on we get into parties and fights. This is exactly when we lay ourselves vulnerable on the whole message that I've been trying to get across is we need to pull together, you know, thinking a part of the problem for many of the people have been trying to speak out like myself in earlier times. Is gonna get painted His disgruntled employees as somebody with an agenda while speaking out is a political act doesn't have to be partisan. You have to speak out on behalf of the country on I think that this kind of stirred it should be inescapable to everyone about. You know our failure to tackle Cove in our failure to get ahead at this kind of hack. All failure, frankly, should be able to hand off the president. Seeing a smooth fashion President Trump is already talking about massive demonstrations on the streets of Washington, D. C on January 6th. I'm talking in the language of in another country. In another setting that people would say, Hey, he's trying to basically instigate a coup. So I mean, I think at this point if the larger population has not quite got the message that I feel like I've got to speak out a bit more strongly. It was Fiona Hill of the Brookings Institution. She served his director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council in the Trump Administration. Great to speak with you as always. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you.

President Trump Russia China Vladimir Putin Thomas Bossert President Donald Trump Senator Mitt Romney Fiona Hill Putin Donald Trump National Security Council President George W. Bush Utah Mercury Azad Department Of Agencies U. United States Cabinet
ESPN Esports Lays Off Nearly All of Its Staff

Esports Minute

02:11 min | 1 year ago

ESPN Esports Lays Off Nearly All of Its Staff

"Was a tough day in the espn headquarters a tough week. In fact this week the worldwide leader in sports has been laying off tons of people the pandemic combined with the loss of sports at caused and declining cable. Tv subscriptions over the last few years are all potential reasons. Why but it's a combination of all those factors. Unfortunately for e. sports those layoffs also included the majority of espn sports staff says being created five years ago espn. Sports has been a leader in the space. Jacob wolf known for his wolf bonds was go to when it came to breaking roster business moves at the top level of sports. He's also a really good feature writer in addition to wolf is ps. Let go of feeling on fire. Top minds in league of legends and phenomenal writer and emily ran one of the best feature writers in east sports bar. None you'll notice a trend here other layoffs included editors who are some of the best in the business fo- tugs again some of the best the business host and video producers. Who are really good. They're all really good in all. Almost the entire department is gone though. It's unclear whether or not espn plans to fill those positions back up in time but they've jettison a talented staff who simply won't be replaceable as eastwards pumps focus on a period of free agency across a lot of the major sports eastwards publications also have just received a free agency period of their own. Suddenly a lot of talent is now available. Be interesting to see who ends up where. Espn dropping eastwards entirely surprising. I think a lot of the people on that staff knew this was coming. Jacob announced that he was moving from. Espn awhile ago but it is still sad to see ultimately eastwards content. Just doesn't drive the same numbers that content in traditional sports does so when it comes to top level accountants slashing contracts east. Sports is probably one of the first places they looked that has nothing to do with the town of the staff producing that content. Hopefully they'll find opportunities quickly and continue delivering some of the best continuity sports. If you're a position where this is an option. You should hire. jacob wolf. Emily ran fiona fired. Darren kalinski sean. Morrison daniel colette. Brian been komo's jared hobbs or thomas tissue if i forgot anyone or mispronounced names. I'm sorry i tried to grab the names of everyone. Saw laid off today and michael dollas to you

Espn Jacob Wolf Emily Jacob Darren Kalinski Morrison Daniel Colette Jared Hobbs Fiona Komo Sean Brian Michael Dollas
Entrepreneurial Success with The Millennial Money Woman

Marketing Management and Money

06:59 min | 1 year ago

Entrepreneurial Success with The Millennial Money Woman

"Everybody Welcome again to marketing management money. And today we are with Ryan Ryan and Fiona. So this is actually going to be a pretty interesting episode. We have brought in the millennial money woman and she seemed to be talking. So honestly, we like to think that we have a lot of expertise in what we do one of the things that we lack in is ownership of a female business. I don't know off Ellen's of you know, I mean, I have my moments but most of the time not yeah, so neither of us have ever owned a female business but Fiona with the millennial money woman has so she actually she's come to us. She owns the millennial money woman. She's done quite a bit in financial planning and basically wage. As I understand if you want to your whole mission your whole goal is to work with people at that entrepreneurial level to help them understand how to make and keep the money. You've done a non-profit centered around this you've done a business around this. Why don't you tell us a little bit more specifically about what you do who you are and kind of some entrepreneurial things that you can home guess with. Yeah. Definitely. I mean, first of all, I want to say thank you so much for having me and obviously your audience having me so thank you for this opportunity. My name is Fiona like you both said and I just absolutely love anything that has to do with money or financial matters, right? So I started you know, I think as a preteen or early teenager boys fascinated with money and there were two things. I knew right I knew how to make money and I knew how to spend money but what happens in between right like actually throw your money off. So that kind of lack of knowledge actually made me much more curious as to what happens right in that investing stage or in that growth stage and that Cap City drove me to learn about money. So ultimately I earned my certified financial planner certificate my cfp which is kind of the equivalent to be a financial ninja and then I got the last years of Science and personal financial planning because I really wanted to peel back the layers of the onion if you will and peer behind, you know, like what actually happens to your money once you earn it and before you spend it sure so that was kind of like my intro to finance but then as I grew write down my career which was a financial planner I realized that there is probably a pretty big need in the community for having a financial Well planning or a financial literacy background, even if it's just the basics. So I ended up partnering with my local Community Foundation and co-founded this nonprofit that both you talked about and thus local non-profit that I started. It really just focuses on helping young professionals and Millennials statistically increase their financial literacy, their basic financial literacy skills, and you know, the people that I Mentor they are extremely intelligent and bright across many different Industries, but the one thing that I notice they all had in common was kind of, you know lacking that financial literacy skill. So that was kind of the start to the nonprofit which I started about three years ago. And then that kind of float float in to me starting the millennial money women and you know that has been such a fantastic Journey as it relates to wage. Entrepreneurial experience obviously and really just knowing that someone is reading, you know, my blog articles and the information I'm providing and hopefully I'm making a positive impact on their financial lives. And you know, that's what I'd love to share with your audience kind of, you know, the ups and downs of Entrepreneurship. Obviously also talking about the nonprofit and then, you know kind of diving into the depths of how the pandemic how covid-19 Things that you wish you could tell every entrepreneur who's getting ready to start a business like these are these are the words of wisdom that they just need to know right off the bat. Where would you start him? What would you tell them that they need to know when they need to understand? Definitely this top three things. I think that I wish I knew right when I started my business was one that it is not a smooth ride. Right like you want to think of success as linear, but the fact is as an entrepreneur there is no such thing as linear. It's going to go in upside down loops and really really deep drops. It's going to go up a toes and then you know, ultimately if you look at it from a longer-term perspective. Okay, you'll see that slight incline, but if you think you're going to get from point A to point B B B. Success point you are very very mistaken. And you know, I think that's part of the benefit though of being an entrepreneur because you kind of get to experience the ups and the downs and I think wage Downs really help you appreciate the UPS later in your life. So I wouldn't necessarily consider, you know, those major gaps in possibly profitability, for example Has a negative but it's just something that's part of the journey and as an entrepreneur, I think you really get to appreciate the journey itself and not so much the destination. Sure. This is the second thing. I I kind of wish. I realized this earlier quite frankly is that there are going to be so many naysayers out there. I mean, I think quite frankly the reason why there are so many people that say no to you or that say that you're not going to make it that your business is going to fail or your idea isn't going to be fruitful is because you know, a couple of factors one, they could possibly be jealous too. They wish they were you and had the ability and the risk to actually drop their salary jobs and start a business office

Fiona Ryan Ryan Community Foundation Cap City Ellen
UK plans to break Brexit law 'hugely problematic'

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:48 min | 1 year ago

UK plans to break Brexit law 'hugely problematic'

"A furious row has erupted between the UK and the European Union Prime Minister Boris Johnson is trying to change part of the brexit agreement after the much fought over deeply argued about seemingly interminable brexit debate billions of dollars worth of British, trade with the EU and potentially with the United States hangs in the balance here is Steven with the update Brexit is a two stage affair the first age last year was the exit deal on the which if no trade agreement was reached with the EU A Hog Boorda would be imposed between northern, Ireland and the rest of the UK. This was meant to avoid a hard border with the Irish Republic, which remains part of the e you many Brits were unhappy with it, but the deal was agreed and turned into a treaty under the second stage. Britain's had a transition period of the year in which to negotiate a new trade deal with the block that period is drawing to a close negotiations of gone well, and the British government. This week tried to change its commitment on Northern Ireland in parliament, the Northern Ireland, Secretary Brandon Lewis made a startling. Yes does break intellectual law in a very specific limited white. Yes. That was British cabinet minister admitting that his government's planning to break the law provoking outrage in both houses of parliament former Justice Secretary Lord Charlie. Folk ner didn't mince his words. This stinking hypocrisy chokes our country's reputation and destroys our government's ability to lead at home and make agreements abroad and with the E. U threatening to. Sue The agreement that now looks in deadly peril his that free trade deal the UK's negotiating with the EU its largest trading partner Fiona sing. Carter. Of Forex trading firm city index says it's not surprising. The pound has fallen sharply. What's he doing here is adding to this picture of uncertainty I think it's just adding to the sense of does anyone actually know what's going to be happening? In what's going to be happening in just a few months at the end of this year without a new deal forty-three percent of UK exports could face European tariffs and other barriers. Charles Grant of the Centre for European reform says, it's not a pretty picture. The huge prospect chaos at the borders lack of ability to travel easily from one part of Europe to another the impact on financial. Markets which react very nicely. The European Union is demanding. The Brits stopped trying to renege on the exit deal and it has a powerful ally Washington, which brokered the peace deal in Northern Ireland in the nineteen ninety s Nancy. Pelosi Speaker of the House of Representatives says, if the Brits continue on this course, they can kiss goodbye to any hope of a trade deal with the US as well.

Ireland Northern Ireland European Union Justice Secretary Lord Charlie United States European Union Prime Secretary Brandon Lewis Boris Johnson British Government Centre For European Reform Irish Republic UK Britain House Of Representatives Steven Europe Carter Pelosi
"fiona" Discussed on Taking Her Lead

Taking Her Lead

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"fiona" Discussed on Taking Her Lead

"At the end of the Hallway, why would I not tell the other author sitting next to me about that? In like what? Why would I not connect the to view like at some point that might help me it might not but it might help somebody else to me. That just makes sense and it surprises me when that doesn't make sense to other people. An abundance mindset rather than scarcity mindset. Yeah. What are you most hopeful about what he was hopeful about with regard to women and influence and women leadership moving forward what I'm most hoped for about is that women in my? Daughter's generation are going to think. Very differently Outta the gate they're going to I think if my daughter is any indication that they are going to just assume. Some things that I didn't. They're just going to assume that they should be paying same. They're just going to assume that they. Should see more women like themselves in leadership roles gas going to assume that they should be CEO's they're just going to assume that things will look equal because they should. You Know Fiona isn't over comer and she's a learner and she's giver. After the interview I, I really feel like I can take another look at things I've had to overcome and Ask myself my framing them in a way. That's helpful. To empower myself. I'm inspired by the things that she said, my favorite quote is Abe Babe. Hey, precious. Perfect. Perfect. I also like actual. The services she grew up as a mouse and she didn't want her daughter to be one. And she's not. And the.

Abe Babe CEO Fiona
"fiona" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

15:40 min | 2 years ago

"fiona" Discussed on Popcast

"She was very purposeful in for the most part in who she talked to Rachel Handler from vulture has become like a culture that Fiona whisperer has sought her out because she's liked her perspective on things. I think she did that. With the raiders from L. is while but Kristen Iversen. Yeah and I think that is a direct reaction against a lot of the press. She got earlier in her career a lot of which was written by older white men that were protected a lot of things onto her Were pretty demeaning and that has become part of the Fiona narrative that I think now were sort of course correcting a bit more than a bit. I think quite a bit really for the last two records but this one in particular and it's like so baked into her story at this point of even speaking out against some of those characterizations before there was social media the clapback or anything like that. The title of her second album was a poem that she wrote a vow. A journalist basically Geno that you can recite it by heart Jan. You want to bless us. Do you WANNA blast with this recitation. I would love to recite the POM POM which I've had memorized since I was a teenager on podcasts. On podcast highlight of of my career citing the when the pond foam on the podcast. Thank you for this opportunity you. When the on the conflicts he thinks like a king he knows that blows when he goes to the fight and he'll win the whole thing for he enters the ring. There's nobody to batter when your mind is your might so when you go solo you hold your own hand. I remember that the greatest of heights in if you know where you stand than you'll know where to land and if you fall it won't matter because you'll know that you're right. Oh now the xbox yeah. I don't. I feel really fortunate to have at least begun my Fiona fandom at age fifteen kind of attached from the really skewed media narrative around her and your personal connection to her music cruised Mateen free information Outage you memorize the title. I had a live recording of it that I downloaded on his. Aw when I was in high school and I think you know I would. Just listen to all of my Fiona Apple songs in the recording of when the pond was was in there which is listen loop and overtime. I just realized I had the Paul memorized fire energy. Another great way to spend your time in Quarantine. Maybe should we do when the on challenge when odd? Okay if you want to post. A recording of the Fiona apple fall album title either on twitter and at us or on the PODCAST facebook group. Maybe we'll thread going big energy straight into your Rita Yeah Right. Yeah wouldn't read it. Of course not no. No no if you if you really about it. If you really bad it post a video tag us would love to see it. I did this thing when I was in high school where I made a candle by melt. Taking the half melted candles in my bedroom and putting them in a glass jar and then a wrote the when the pawn foam around the jar. Sharpie marker so that the palm could create Light Mirror. Wow Wow here's the question is is at extent like does that exist somewhere that candle. Yeah still at my parents S. I save that for the museum. Like that's that's GonNa be when the when the Kellys exhibit is up at the Hall of fame. That's that's gotTA BE IN THERE. That's like let's save it now like put it in plastic put in bubble wrap like just make sure no one touches decides got up. Woo. I also made my own Fiona apple t shirt by taking all of my life. Mo and t shirts. I was done with Ema so I cut the letters up and made a shirt that said. Listen to Fiona Apple. I just feel like a lot of homework. After this episode of five Gazza phone fit sponsors. Can we talk a little bit about some songs? Because I feel like we talk a lot of Meta loves talking about songs and particularly. I love to talk about under the table. Can that be the first song we listen to please here a little bit of under the.

Fiona Apple Fiona whisperer Fiona Kristen Iversen raiders Rachel Handler twitter Geno Kellys Mateen Hall of fame Paul Ema
"fiona" Discussed on Circle Round

Circle Round

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"fiona" Discussed on Circle Round

"When we left off Fiona the baker had been whisked away by the fairies the ferries were ordering her to stay in fairyland and bake cakes for them for ever her but Fiona had a husband back home and a baby and a wonderful life? She didn't want to leave all that behind. And besides funeral was big on kindness generosity and good manners and the fairies didn't have any so she decided to teach them a lesson. Listen listen I'm tickled to hear how much you've been wanting to taste my cakes and I would make for you but I I'll need a few things like what well for starters. Only the mixing bowl and spoon please. One of the ferries zipped out of the room and returned with a Golden Bowl and spoon but the bowl was the size of a walnut and the spoon was no longer than a blade of grass. Thank you but I'm afraid I'll need something bigger. Could you go back to my house into my kitchen and fetch me the biggest mixing bowl and spoon you can find. And while you're there gather flour sugar butter eggs and every other other ingredient. You'd fancy in a cake please. So the ferries whizzed back to Fiona his house and returned with everything she'd requested. Thank you I have more than enough to bake the most scrumptious cake ever or do I. The ferries were puzzled. What what do you mean Fiona? Well now that I think of it I can't ever seem to measure my ingredients without my cat lying beside me. His purring hiring is so soothing. It helps me measure everything slowly and carefully. Could you go back to my house and bring me my cat please. So the fairies zoomed back to feel this house and turned with the cat who immediately curled up by Fiona his feet and began to her. Thank you now I can get to work or CAN I. The fairies were baffled. What do you mean Fiona Zona? Well now that I think of it. I can't ever seem to mix the ingredients without my dog sleeping beside me. I circle burkle my spoon. One time around the bowl every time he snores. Could you go back to my house and bring me my dog please. So the fairies darted back to the owner's house and returned with the dog who promptly dropped down beside the cat and began the two snore. Thank you now I can get started on this cake or can i. The the ferries were perplexed and growing impatient. What do you mean Fiona? Well now that I think of it my family has no. Oh I D- aware I am. I can't mix or measure my ingredients properly. If I think they're worried about me could you go back to my house and bring me my husband and baby please. So the fairies flit back to feel as house and returned with her husband baby who were very happy to see her. Thank you now. At last I can do some baking or cannot kanae by now the ferries were more mystified than ever and more impatient. What do you mean Fiona? Well now that I think of it it's passed dinner time. My baby must be hungry. I prepared a pot of stew earlier today. It sitting on on the stove. Could you go back to my house and bring me that pot and a spoon please. So the ferries flew back to Viola's House House and returned with the pot of stew and a spoon. Thank you now. I'll just hand these over to my baby and all get baking but you know how babies everything seems like a toy so no sooner had fiona handed her baby the pot and spoon than the child began banging them together like a drum now remember. These fairies detested loud noises immediately. They started flying round and round in frenzy the teeny hands clamps Titan over. There tiny ears had seen this coming and justice she had planned and Norway's got considerably worse. The baby's banging startled the cat and the animals jolted awake. Were soon racing around the room. The Cat Cowen how were yelling and the dog barking and growling. The fairies squeezed is shut and shook their heads. This this is intolerable. We stop this rocket. Uh You said the magic word. Quick as a wink Fiona scoop some stew into her baby's mouth. The child smiled with pleasure. He stopped his banging dipped his spoon into the pot and began gobbling down bite after bite of peace potatoes and carrots as soon as the baby settled down the cat and and dog did to. Suddenly the room was silent. The fairies stopped flying round and round and sink to the floor. You're exhausted. Who Thank you Fiona? Thank you so we are so. Oh so grateful. Truly Fiona smiled. You're very welcome fairies and thank thank you. The ferries cocked. They're tired heads. Thank you four. What Fiona laughed for finally showing some? I'm decent manners. Of course all this time I've been waiting for a little please and thank you and now that I've gotten both well now I will bake you your cake and she did after the cake had cooled the fairies gobbled doubled up with Glee. It was every bit as delectable as they thought it would be from then on Fiona baked the ferries a new cake each and every week. Mind mind you. She did it from her own home. She end the ferries agree. That would be easier that way. Every Sunday Fiona would load up platter with a fluffy frosted cake and leave it at the edge of the forest. And every Monday she'd come back and find her platter sprinkled with Gold Coins It was the various way of saying thank you because Fiona had given the fairies more than food she'd given them food for thought and top the important lesson that when you're kind to others you show your appreciation. Well it can be truly sweet. Indeed.

Fiona Zona House House Norway baker Cowen Viola