12 Burst results for "Finance Hedge Fund"

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:48 min | 8 months ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"How much interested do you have with the invest with investors that get that whole process is entire mystery to me. Is there some people that just have influence on the trajectory of your thinking Completely or just this collective energy that they behind the company. Yeah i mean. I i came here and i i. I was amazed how yeah people would only here for a few months and i met some incredible investors and almost run out of money and Once they invested. I was like i am not gonna let you down and i was like okay on them like an email update every like three minutes and then they don't care at all so he kind of want to. I don't know like for some. I like it when it's just like they're always available to talk but A lot of building a business especially a high tech business Very little for them to add right. There's little for them. To add on product is a lot for them to add on like this development. And if we are doing product research is for us research into the market research into how to make a great hedge fund. And we do that for years. There's not much to tell the investors so they're basically is like i believe in you. There's something i like the color. Your jeb something in your idea in your bitch ambition in your plans that i like. And it's almost like a pat on the back and like go get him kid. Yeah it is a bit like that. I'm that's cool That's a good way to do it. I'm glad they do it that way. Like the one in meeting. I had which was like really good with us. Was mating morgan. who's a actually a co founder of renaissance technologies in the nineteen eighties and worked with jim simon's and He he he was in the room. And i was meeting some other guy he was in the room and i explaining how quantitative finance works. So you know the you use mathematical models and then he was like yeah. I started renaissance. I could about this. And then i was like oh my god so yeah but then i think he kind of said well yeah. He said while he was working at first round capital as a partner and they said they didn't want to invest And then i wrote a blog post describing the idea and i was like i really think you guys should invest and they end up. Oh interesting you convinced that. We don't reinvest in hedge funds and also you don't see like what i'm doing. This is some company not a hedge fund right. Yeah numerous billion i. it's when it caught my eye. There's something special there. So i i really do hope you succeed in the obvious risky thing. You're taking on the ambition of it the size of it. But i do hope you succeed. You mentioned jim simon's he comes up in another world mine really often on the. He's just a brilliant guy a on the mathematics side there's a mathematician but he's also brilliant finance hedge fund manager guy Have you gotten a chance to interact with him at all. Have you learned anything from him. on the math on the finance on the philosophy life side things I've played poker with him. It was pretty cool. It was like Actually in the show billions. They kind of do a little thing about this poker tournament thing with all the hedge fund managers and that's real life thing And they had a lot of like world series of bracelet was bracelets holders. But it's kind of gyms thing and I met him there and Yeah it was kinda briefed..

nineteen eighties three minutes jim simon billions first round months years
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"Your need fancy algorithm to predict this person wants to go to Singapore. The person just told you I want to go to saint poor email me when it does at General Assembly. Our. Most effective personalization was when he's that, we did exactly that when we got a new email address and we ask them of the five topics, we cover which topics do you WanNa. Hear from us on people chose the topics wanted and we actually tested that we tried sending people what they ask for and we tried tests we tried sending them basic during their opinion and sending them what what are Algorithms said they're interested in and it turns out that people are pretty accurate when they tell you they want something yeah i. that was one of the things that I talked to the stitch fix while back and one of the interesting things that they saw. In their product development was like if you ask someone to fill out like all their. Essentially, measurements are the data points. There's a certain number of data points that they need in order for close to to fit better than like twelve or something like that, and if someone only chose five, the likelihood that they're going to be happy sticks customer was actually was actually worse. They want people to do that right they wanted people to fill out A. Minimum of I think it was ten because once you pass that threshold that means that that person's closer going to fit better and so it's a forcing function to get happy customers on the front end even though you're losing a bunch of revenue on the back end, but you're making dissatisfied customers. Yeah I'm not I'm not surprised what's the what's the anecdote to? To some of that stuff how does the C. Cmo? Obviously, we talked to a lot of CMO's of different types of companies. Some companies are shifting away from the role of CMO entirely what's the antidote to try to figure this out for today? With the acknowledgment that obviously there's a million different. Types of companies and you have to adjust to the one that you're doing. But you know is is the role of the CMO is it necessary is going to be around is IT GONNA change significantly? How does what's the? What's it look like historic if you go back will far enough like even like Thirty Years CMO's were basically brand managers right they. If they followed the model of proctor and gamble and Unilever and their job was to manage ad agencies, their job was to figure out positioning and placement. Price the traditional stuff you see in a business school course. It was very qualitative. It was very much a trying to figure things out and tell stories around them. It was. The equivalent finance wasn't hey in the nineteen seventies finance people were salespeople then came the early eighties and a bunch of these finance hedge funds figured out that they could hire people from Mit who really spartan math and do some arbitrage and all of a sudden. They could do all sorts of things that the the glad-handing sales guys couldn't do the same transition happened in marketing only took the Internet to make it happen in the last fifteen ish twenty years We've seen marketing shift from being this very qualitative storytelling madman type world into very much performance driven math type world and that that trend is only accelerating in some ways. That's great. But I think it was haggled talked about the the thesis antithesis, and Synthesis why I think we've just like finance had a problem where the all those math guys started believing the numbers a little too much and we ended up with crises like a long term capital management. Where they had all their numbers in there like the numbers all prove that everything's going to be great and turns out that they were wrong WE HAVEN'T WE'RE GONNA same problem in marketing where we've gone from these really qualitative brand manager type marketers who treat marketing as an expense line and wanted make their budgets as big as possible to these performance. Marketers were treat every it's all fast. Feedback and if you can't measure it, it's not true and both those types of market is wrong there. There is a synthesis synthesis where we take elements of both those marketers to build this new type of marketer and every time I talked to private equity firm or venture capital firm that they're looking to find a new. CMO The challenges they're looking for this third type of marketer who market. The Third Way who understands the math they can talk math and understands performance marketing but also understands the big picture and the long term effects and knows that just because you can't measure something doesn't mean it's not true and they can invest in that those long term impacts and that's sweats worthy seem roles going and that's kind of what my mission has been is to start that conversation. Around Hey, you don't need to be one of these types of marketers you probably started as one of these days marketers, but you need to build the muscles on the other type. If you WANNA really be truly successful in the world I. You know I think we talk about that produce amount on this show of like the the five to a marketer that just doesn't really exist in the wild. Of the person who has all of those attributes you just don't have enough time in your career to be able to to develop all those to be able to have have enough. You know skills to do that. So you have to have really strong VP's your directors that are that are subject matter experts in those things. I'm curious though about specifically with the the second group of people you're talking about the data driven people that if you can't measure it, it doesn't happen. I think what we've seen here is people who got really really really good at this that had big enough budgets especially if they're like dita or something where they control one hundred percent of the funnel. And they knew that if they spend a dollar, they get back dollar twenty and then they just like you know. Poor the pedal to the metal. What does that lack in opportunity? What are you missing if you're doing that if you can figure out how to make a buck twenty? Four for a dollar what's the? What's the arbitrage? That is there? Yes. I'm a big fan of money machines. You can put in a dollar and it spits out a dollar twenty for real. You should your your questions shouldn't be like, what else should I do? The question should be is how much money can I stick in this machine and performance markers tend to be pretty good at that sometimes although the even there you end with blinders where they start believing their own attribution models and you end up with things like retargeting where they're spending a dollar..

C. Cmo Singapore General Assembly Unilever product development haggled brand manager dita VP Mit
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"Take time after the interview. Italia Montessori joined Amazon in March twenty thirteen in Sao Paulo Brazil where she was responsible for kindle direct publishing two years later she joined the K. d. p. team based in Seattle and focused on author acquisition in an engagement globally since July twenty seventeen. She has led kindle unlimited and prime reading before joining Amazon. Natalia worked in various as companies in China and for the Boston Consulting Group in Brazil she has a BA in East Asian studies from Yale and an MBA. From from work work. I spoke with her in Seattle by Skype and phone on Wednesday November twentieth and I began by asking her why she decided to go to work for Amazon. Six years ago. I was working for the Boston Consulting Group in Brazil at the time and I had read. That Amazon is coming to Brazil. I had been an Amazon customer during my MBA BA and like the company a lot but it wasn't necessarily in vogue as much as it is now for NBA Graduates and when I went when I reached out to the company as they were just getting their presence in Brazil. I met some of the people there I talked to some of my classmates who had joined Amazon in Seattle and I think it was just drawn at that point where true sort of startup environment they. They hadn't even launched in Brazil when I had my first conversation with them just to give you an idea that was in October of twenty twelve. They launched in December twenty twelve. I joined March first first twenty thirteen. It's interesting because when I graduated from Harvard Business School many years ago everybody's going to Wall Street and in a more. The recent period technology companies but at that time was Amazon perceived more as a retailer than a technology company. That might be a little more exciting for an MBA. For Yeah and I think in general When I graduated from Business School which was twenty? Eleven there weren't as many people people going into technology full stop. They were still doing some of finance hedge funds private equity a little bit less on the banking side a lot to consulting Also on the corporate side they would go more into brand management slash marketing for consumer companies. And we did have a recall recall. I think about five or six people who went from my class to Amazon in the OPS program or the as you mentioned like a retail leadership ship development program the interview process. I've heard some people say is pretty intensive. You talked to more than one person and you get asked a lot of questions What was the most probing and perhaps a skillful question? You got asked in that process. Good I'm trying to remember now. I remember member. It's so vividly that day there were a lot of questions in for one particular interview that centered around the customer and the customer turned away. Amazon treats the customer the end customer the customer clicking the buy button consuming Amazon retail products or in our case reading kindle. Books is it was just not not a stakeholder that I've had a lot of contact with in my career and so they gave me a few scenarios and I tried my best to work through those scenarios but up most of the customers that I had had to date had either been clients through like an agency relationship or consulting The clients or internal stakeholders so it was a little bit of a different way to think about You know the end customer but it's also super exciting. Which is something that people love about working at Amazon? That no matter what level you are what business you're in. You are asked to encouraged and inspired to be customer obsessed. That's interesting you can see that it starts even with conversations with people who haven't joined the company so that would make sense. I will now kill unlimited started in July of two thousand fourteen about five years ago. Six hundred thousand kindle titles thousands of audio books I I think I signed up as soon as it was available as very intrigued by the idea and I I use IT I. We might have a chance to talk about my experience of it I i. I'm glad I have it and I I probably buy or or borrow. Maybe five books month from my kindle unlimited subscription and. I'm always sort of kicking off One of the ten books that I have to make room for the new one and I very seldom actually read the books that are on my list of ten books but it still feels valuable to me because I get a chance to try a book without having to to pay for it. Because I've got the kindle on limited but I guess I'm just sharing that as the context for I've been although I've been a member of kindle and limited I I haven't been following it as intently as I'm sure you have in your role as general manager so it'd be good chance just to give an overview of it has the program evolved in the last five years what are the the highlights in terms of the scale and the and the offerings in now compared to then since the launch the kindle limited team has remained focused on delighting customers with books that they'll love. That's the premise of the program. Right and we can do that in lots of ways. So we do that in one way through the catalog itself. So the catalog has evolved from you. Know Six hundred thousand kindle titles to over a million titles the authors that are part of the kindle limited ranks have evolved as well we have Books from Dean Koontz. We have tolkien. I and e wear jody All sorts of you know new authors are coming onto The scene that weren't necessarily there as part of our launch. That's something that keeps the the program exciting In many cases we also have exclusive titles so titles that you can only find on kindle Those are available in kindle unlimited as well we have some celebrity authors coming onto the scene next year like Mindy Kaeling which are exciting for customers as well? We've signed on some new publishers. Which means new offers some of the popular ones over the last year have been Daniel Silva Neil gaiman? Joanna Gaines for example. That's on the E. Brookside Hedlund We continue to grow our audio book. Catalogue we continue to grow our comics offering which wasn't a big part of our launch but uh we had for example one of the favorites last year with last answer which was pretty fun to have a new movie tie? That's something that that's a that's a reader moment that We see as well folks who want to read the book or the commack related as it relates to the movie. The other the last point I'll call out. Land is around the magazines. We didn't have magazines when we launched. We launched in two thousand sixteen. We have a rotating eating catalogue of magazines. And it's really helps us be part of different reader moments whether you're sitting down to do a long binge read a series or you want something light for the airplane Wanna be able to offer readers a wide range of content and actually would led to my asking. If there be like you I could talk to his. I noticed on my iphone kindle APP Probably last month I got a notification Shen that was highlighting the magazines that were available that month and say that each month. The selection of magazines changes and I hadn't realized that I knew they were magazines. Aga's jeans but I thought it was maybe just a steady Selection of them and I frequently use the New Yorker when it showed up. But what can you say about how so much. That list changes each month. And how do you decide when to drop a magazine when data magazine to list their new magazines all the time I like each week. Their new magazines coming into the program. What we try to do is offer a wide selection? So we'd have something for home we'd have something for fashion. We'd have something for travel. And that's appeals to a wide range of interests You mentioned the New Yorker at that one in particular has been in twice this year for example We've had other ones that have come in an out and so again we're just trying to connect with leaders and a wide range of moments For when they might sit down. One open their kindle APP to read when I counted the magazines that are available this month November I count at Sixty one is does that number the total available change much each month. Love your about right. It's about sixty sixty five each month. Just add the magazine type type. Content is being added a new feature called articles where we've sorts Interesting timely articles From different magazines like things like you know Marie condo article a health and wellness article and we put those on what we call the kindle unlimited storefront so it's Amazon Dot com fats lashed kindle unlimited. And you'll see their row of articles at any given time. Okay so when I go Amazon. Dot Com slash kindle unlimited limited then is articles one of the categories that I can click connor. How would I find those single one of the rose? There that you that you would have included articles As well as magazine features in our weekly newsletter so kindle limited customers can sign up to receive a weekly personalized newsletter where we talk about some new content in the program we make some recommendations that relate to books that that you read in the past and we include new additions like well we now we have this magazine or now. We have these articles. And if folks want are in kindle limited hidden for some reason aren't signed up to that newsletter they can go to the same place that I just mentioned Amazon Dot com slash kindle unlimited and theories a little tab right under the big banner that says join the newsletter and you can click on that. And it'll take you to a page where you opt in to receive those canals. That's a good tip. I didn't know about that so now. I'm on that page. I see kindle unlimited and along the top I see can limited prime reading where. Where's The rain the banner? Did you see that banner. That's browse the catalogue. Manage your membership and then join the so so click on join the newsletter. And then I'm just going to can lend limited so okay so I just click that button and so so now it's part of and I do subscribe to some of the other newsletters from Amazon. And now that's activated as one that I receive but now does it turn orange if I've selected or if I haven't selected own Orange if you have I don't right now okay okay so I think I was actually subscribed so how did that's not weekly. It doesn't seem like shows. Does it show up just occasionally about once a week does okay. There's different versions of it. That go out depending on different customer groups right and so if I subscribed to it I'm going to see things in the newsletter glitter that take into account how actually using my kindle unlimited subscription but the other thing I'll say is we want to show you that right because we want it to be customized for you pull we also hear from customers is. She'll be something different. That's why apart it kindle limited not to just read one kind of book but to have a little bit of the freedom Without necessarily to spend more money but I can browse different categories. I personally have used the service that we hear that from customers as well. Yeah one thing. I like about the magazines that show up. You've got two different views. One as sort of the kindle view. It's just the text and and you can Read it like you would a kindle book and then the I don't know what you call the other view it looks more just like a pdf of the actual magazine page. What do you call those two views? Let's the global view. Yeah refillable is more like a reading kindle book it did doesn't have all the art in it and then the other one is like a page view that looks more like you're just looking at the print magazine replica. Yeah yeah and I find it. Nice to be able to switch between those two views because sometimes it's it's pleasing to see how magazine it's taking the time to lay out an article. But then other times I just want to read the words and I. It's my choice. I can just switch between the two. You said that the magazines start showing up at twenty sixteen so three years. Here's what kind of customer reaction have you had Two adding magazines too can limited. Customer.

kindle Amazon Brazil Seattle Boston Consulting Group Sao Paulo Brazil Harvard Business School NBA Yale Natalia Skype Dean Koontz Business School China K. d. Daniel Silva Neil gaiman
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

15:54 min | 2 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"For the tech tip this week I want to do a comparison for you of the Echo buds which I think I got last last week. or so. And the Air POD Pro that's the apple version of the buds. So they both come kind of within a week of each other which gave me a chance to to try them out. The ECHO BUDS came I. I'll have to say I'm I'm disappointed with him. I had to call tech support three times to get help having it connect with blue too so that when I take him out of the case they actually work and I can see them in the Alexa App and see see what the battery life is. I think one one of the problems is that they come just with the budget goes on the ear. And then there's something called wings and these are kind of rubber things which you put around them and they create a little nub that helps Plant the the echo but in your ear a little more firmly so that if you're jogging it it wouldn't fall out. I thought this is a good idea because when I had a in without the wings did fall out of my ear but when I have these wings on the buds. They don't seem to connect with the charger adequately. So some of my problems have been that Even though I've got it plugged in for a long period of time they are. They just aren't getting charged. The other thing is they're really big. It just feels like you're putting a a whole big thing. I always put wax in my ear when I swim. And it feels like one of these. Big wads of wax. That I put on my year when I'm swamped the swimming up ocean park and so they feel. Ah a little bit more intrusive and I don't really like that when they were working. The audio quality seemed to be quite good you can double tap and get noise cancellation there's both technology. I think there's a lot of technology in here. But in sort of a consumer friendliness Dimension they really don't stand up Very well with the air pods pro now. The price of course Air Echo Buds. Let's one hundred thirty dollars. Air Pods pro or two hundred fifty dollars so hundred twenty for one hundred twenty dollars more. You get a white case. That's noticeably noticeably smaller than the echo boats charging case and when you take the airport out there's no wings or anything that you have to add. It's just a little rubber tip and if you wanted a smaller or bigger one. There's there's extras in case the box. So that you can use them but you just put him in. And if you've got iphone They just pair. I mean there's a couple of taps on the screen to set it up and then it's just totally paired rock-solid haven't had any trouble with on pairing or not working and they're very light in the ear. I mean you can almost forget that you have them in the ear. The quality seems really great. Great and They're really quite an elegant product. I read somewhere recently that oh I think it was. James mcreavy perhaps was saying that Amazon probably decided that it couldn't keep up with apple on something like an iphone because apple is just putting so much resources into new setting the standard for some of these hardware devices like a phone I think the same thing is pretty clearly Evident here on the battle title of the Arab Air Pods are here buds. Because the apple product is just so elegant. And so- rock solid. That the eco- bud looks like it's it's doesn't doesn't really measure up now. The one thing the the echo but has in really it's probably the genesis of it is that it has Alexa so that when it was working I could just say Alexa give a command and it would The other devices in my house would not respond. It would respond in my ear so there was fairly synchronized that way so if I was really looking for a convenient way to have Alexa in my ear. Oh that would be a reason to try to keep trying to figure out how to make this thing working and and do it because that's something that the air pods can't do but my situation is. I've got echo devices in just about every room in the house and then when when I'm out of the house the main place I go is my car and I've got ECHO auto and that has its own problems but it's fairly reliable and I can be driving along and asked to You know what's new here. My Morning Journal entry that I just created so I don't really need Alexa in my ears And therefore there's really no reason to use the echo buds compared to these really elegant apple The the airports pro. If you've tried either of these love to hear your experience you can send me an email at pod. Chronicles gmail.com take time after the interview. Italia Montessori joined Amazon in March twenty thirteen in Sao Paulo Brazil where she was responsible for kindle direct publishing two years later she joined the K. d. p. team based in Seattle and focused on author acquisition in an engagement globally since July twenty seventeen. She has led kindle unlimited and prime reading before joining Amazon. Natalia worked in various as companies in China and for the Boston Consulting Group in Brazil she has a BA in East Asian studies from Yale and an MBA. From from work work. I spoke with her in Seattle by Skype and phone on Wednesday November twentieth and I began by asking her why she decided to go to work for Amazon. Six years ago. I was working for the Boston Consulting Group in Brazil at the time and I had read. That Amazon is coming to Brazil. I had been an Amazon customer during my MBA BA and like the company a lot but it wasn't necessarily in vogue as much as it is now for NBA Graduates and when I went when I reached out to the company as they were just getting their presence in Brazil. I met some of the people there I talked to some of my classmates who had joined Amazon on Seattle and I think it was just drawn at that point where true sort of startup environment they. They hadn't even launched in Brazil when I had my first conversation with them just to give you an idea that was in October of twenty twelve. They launched in December twenty twelve. I joined March first first twenty thirteen. It's interesting because when I graduated from Harvard Business School many years ago everybody's going to Wall Street and in a more. The recent period technology companies but at that time was Amazon perceived more as a retailer than a technology company. That might be a little more exciting for an MBA to go to work for. Yeah and I think in general When I graduated from Business School which was twenty eleven There weren't as many people people going into technology full stop. They were still doing some of finance hedge funds private equity a little bit less on the banking side a lot to consulting Also on the corporate side they would go more into brand management slash marketing for consumer companies. And we did have a recall recall. I think about five or six people who went from my class to Amazon in the OPS program or the as you mentioned like a retail leadership ship development program the interview process. I've heard some people say is pretty intensive. You talked to more than one person and you get asked a lot of questions What was the most probing and perhaps a skillful question? You got asked in that process. Good I'm trying to remember now. I remember member. It's so vividly that day there were a lot of questions in for one particular interview that centered around the customer and the customer turned away. Amazon treats the customer the end customer the customer clicking the buy button consuming Amazon retail products or in our case reading kindle. Books as it was. Just a not a stakeholder that I've had a lot of contact with in my career and so they gave me a few scenarios and I tried my best to work through those scenarios but up most of the customers that I've had to date had either been clients through like an agency relationship or consulting The clients or internal stakeholders. So it was a little bit of a different way to think about You know the end customer but it's also super exciting. Which is something people love about working at Amazon? That no matter what level you are what business you're in. You are asked to encouraged and inspired to be customer obsessed. That's interesting you can see that it starts even with conversations with people who haven't joined the company so that would make sense well now kindle unlimited started in July of two thousand fourteen about five years ago six hundred thousand kindle titles thousands of audio books. I think I signed up as soon as it was available as very intrigued by the idea and I I I use it I we might have a chance to talk about my experience of it I i. I'm glad I have it and I I probably buy or or borrow. Maybe five books month from my kindle unlimited subscription and. I'm always sort of kicking off One of the ten books that I have to make room for the new one and I very seldom actually read the books that are on my list of ten books but it still feels valuable to me because I get a chance to try a book without having to to pay for it. Because I've got the kindle on limited but I guess I'm just sharing that as the context for I've been although I've been a member of kindle and limited I I haven't been following it as intently as I'm sure you have in your role as general manager so it'd be good chance just to give an overview of it has the program evolved in the last five years what are the the highlights in terms of the scale and the and the offerings in now compared to then since the launch the kindle limited team has remained focused on delighting customers with books that they'll love. That's the premise of the program. Right and we can do that in lots of ways. So we do that in one way through the catalog itself. So the catalog has evolved from you. Know Six hundred thousand kindle titles to over a million titles the authors that are part of the kindle limited ranks have evolved as well we have Books from Dean Koontz. We have tolkien. I and e wear jody All sorts of you know new authors are coming onto The scene that weren't necessarily there as part of our launch. That's something that keeps the the program exciting In many cases we also have exclusive titles so titles that you can only find on kindle Those are available in kindle limited as well we.

Amazon kindle apple Alexa Brazil Seattle Dean Koontz Boston Consulting Group Harvard Business School Sao Paulo Brazil Morning Journal James mcreavy Yale NBA Business School
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

10:54 min | 2 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"And on the outside window was a poster Mr and didn't say anything about the seals but the title was be someone special which caught my attention. I didn't feel special as a CPA. I mean God bless all you. CPA's out there our it's important work. It wasn't for me and and it was. It was a bunch of seals. Doing seal stuff you know jumping on airplanes locking out of submarines and hiding in the sniper ride and I was like Holy Shit. That's it that's it so then you know to cut the story short. I went through the whole process to be an officer and of course they were saying. Don't get your hopes up. You know I was going to go through. Kennedy's school most officers only twenty or a year or so come into the sales come come from the Naval Academy or ROTC Reserve Officer Training Corps. They take one maybe two through officer candidate which are like civilians like me and statistically like becoming an astronaut you know what I mean I said okay. Well I'm I'm applying. This is my path and so every day I visualized is it. I visualize myself as a seal. I visualize myself just crushing the training. And how long was I practice visualization as a year and a half. Oh Oh it was about what I described earlier where I sat down on a bench and I would do my breathing. Practice is part of the breathing about twenty minutes but the breathing was always part of it because it calmed me down Bruni inward breath takes you inward is like your bridge you want and then I'm GonNa dial this and you know it's it's a seems like it so it is what you're saying which I love is hey you're introducing something. That's another five minutes in your day. That's nothing but look at this massive impact on in your life right. I mean that's what people listening and it doesn't even have to be five minutes. It could be just the last five minutes to drop the mantra. And Click in the visualization instead. Yeah and I wonder actually if someone could actually see what my tm practice was in my brain how much you would look like because I realize I'm drifting being away from the mantra all the time in thinking about different things what I love so much about. Tm for those familiar. You're you're repeating a mantra over and over again and then thoughts that's come in and you can choose to pay attention to them or you can repeat the mantra and push them out. So you create this selection process in your brain of what you want to pay attention to which is your curing mcquarry filter through which then hopefully approach life. I find that actually a lot of the time. I am stopping to listen to the thoughts. The come through my brain Yeah it's a great way to. Yeah but I I realize now that I'm talking about this that the days where I feel more overwhelmed the more important. It is for me to go back to the mantra that prices something to where you WanNa fill to your brain more if you're feeling some kind of anxiety I don't know yeah but again I would. I would almost like to me. They're separate things like there is a very powerful and then there's a strong reason to contemplate. which is what you're doing? Yeah contemplating built from the practice of mantra or on top of the practice. Mantra is extraordinarily powerful. Because you use the mantra to get to that state where your mind is very receptive very open into what we call. The perceiving mind and out of the rational critical thinking mine and in that proceeding money's able to pick up more information right and is going to send you insights and you know signals and so at at that point you want to press pause the mantra allow you know just allow the contemplation and you may even also insert questions or imagery imagery in so. This is the time to do that so you can. You can combine imagery work and visualization with contemplation. But it would be separate Britt than your mantra training. The module training strictly is trying to train concentration. Yeah absolutely right. Yeah that makes sense. Yeah and then you could. You could stack them so you know you've trained ranger mantra for so long. Maybe as ten minutes mantra followed by ten minutes of what we'll call insight. You know where you're going to really try to learn something new about yourself or visualize visualize your future and do that. I just remembered I did do a vision. True visualization recently so. I got married about a year ago. Drugs and Thank you and so I had to give this Groom speech and Yeah. Yeah that's a stressful thing. Why Rhino writes and look spoken in front of people now enough times but but you know it's like three hundred people that are closest assist you? What are you saying that moment right and I didn't write anything down all I did in the day and this was probably four or five days leading up to it I just kept visualizing each person and who I wanted to say something to really cool and there were just probably a few key words that I had in mind for every person that I addressed and I kind of and then I got up there and gave the story and then I went down those bullets? I'll tell you what we went really. Well is one of the best. You just described how I go about giving my speeches. Oh really yeah. Someone asked me earlier. I starting to do more and I don't like using President I don't like using a it says unless they ask from like I had. I gave a speech yesterday too big finance Hedge Fund and they wanted slide and they wanted me to specifically talk about what we call. The big four skills deals in mental toughness. So I gave them what they wanted. But that I walk away thinking that was my best work carefully. You ask her. Yeah no because it was just to constrain me too much but typically okay. I'll do exactly what you do. Visualize who I'm speaking to visualize the key stories and outcomes and and what I want them to learn and that becomes the structure and I'll visualize it for a week or so before the event every day Let's cool and then when I go give the speech I'm very relaxed and ibox breathe before the speed always so relaxed as the speech too. I just felt like so in the zone for it. I just knew going into. It was gonNA crush predetermine the outcome. You one in your mind before the incident. Yeah and that's what visualization. Does you know so when you visualize your future. You're you're basically creating a new memory that will draw you toward got it and then practicing everyday makes it stronger and stronger just like practicing a memory of the past like if you if you had a major fuck up and you keep on rehashing it. You're just making it stronger now. How how important is the outcome in your visualization like? Do you picture people applauding. And she on your hand after sure. Okay Yeah. It's it's positive success success. It's bright. You're feeling elated. It's really important that you get the feelings into it. You don't have to have like every single detail or let me put it this way. You can visualize a lot of detail but don't be attached to it happening that way because what you're creating is a magnetic force as drawing when you toward that territory but don't expect the path to be straight and don't expect it to look exactly what like what you visualize like I visualize goes back to the store. I visualize myself getting through seal training as best I could. I didn't have all the movies that today. This is nineteen by. Now's nineteen eighty the eight eighty nine ish early eighty nine and went to seal training or went off Santa School November. Nine I was. I had one video. And it was the recruiting video from the navy for the seals and it's called the recruiting. It was also called V.. Be Someone special but it showed imagery of guys going through seal training and British cool stuff. I watched it maybe twenty times TMZ so that was part of my that was like the baseline like you said with the whip that was my baseline it planting some baseline imagery then with that. I added I inserted myself itself and expand upon. It added the emotion and also added myself at graduation day and I practice it every single day. Nine months of this or something magical about this timeframe of nine months to year Bob nine months into this. I had this overwhelming sense of certainty that I was going to be a seal. It wasn't there was no hope. Wish design was I am going to be. I've already done the most important part of the work and a week or so later. My recruiter cruder called me and said Mark. Congratulations Yeah Right now. You've got the ability to go to off screen at school and then the buds and when I went to Buds I had the sense that I had been there before and I graduated number one in my class out of one hundred eighty. Five hundred chargers nine thousand nine of US graduated. I was number one and my entire crew. was there with me. It was awesome and I attribute it to the Zen Training and the visualization and then this just the ability to drill into the present moment and stay focused on the right thing. While I went through buds I still found it challenging at times but not nearly as artists my peers. Dropping like flies. Yeah well like ask a million questions about about you and your life. But we'll save that for a podcast. Let's hear that'd be really fun. I'd love to discuss You know whether you'd be interested in talking talking about Me Trying the whip and maybe even promoting it on the podcast or some sort of sponsorship relationship but would love to have you try Ryan if you like it. I think that's the starting of course. Yeah I'm not like I told you at the beginning I would dumb. This sounds really interesting to me. Like it's a it's a breakthrough true that could get me. WHO's non-qualified guy to pay attention to it? Yeah I think you'll like but at the same time you're kind of level level past high performance in that you've already identified so many of these different things in your life that that make you more optimal. There's always one there's one percenters rose look down. There is no there there. There's no the more I learn the more I realize I don't have a fucking clue you know what I mean. It's like a lot from this conversation personally. So thank you for that You're welcome has been pleasure to have you thanks for Doing to do and good luck with the business. I look forward to following up and trying to whip. Yeah Soleil we'll get we'll get you on it all right and if there's anything that I can do for you send did you. Book tend to our training. You'd love to yeah. I'd love to participate in that sometime. Love cope with that information. All right thank you man. We are all right. Well all right so so check out the whip and you're going to hear more about that from me. I'm I'm going to try it out and I'm really looking forward to add an pretty intrigued actually and If you're into that type of stuff then I'm sure that The company's subscription plan might. It might have a program for you. Do you have like a friend family rate by any chance you can use my my code will Ahmed..

CPA ROTC Reserve Officer Training Kennedy Hedge Fund Bruni US Rhino Britt Bob Naval Academy Ahmed Santa navy Mark Ryan
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"Tb See who all right we're GONNA we. Oh Gosh I don't know well. I guess what was your your first impression of. This movie like versus is the TV show. Do you feel like it's a big departure from the TV show or like or how did you feel about it so I went into it and every the press had been like this movie is bad. expectations were low. The soundtrack is very good a grand the fashion is sort of the through line that they were able to bring Fra. It's Patricia field and it's like listen. She did the show. Everyone looked cool. In great she did the movie everyone cooling gray and then you're just kind of like plugging lugging them in different they give you these sort of like scratched the itch there is a montage of Kerry cleaning out her closet and you see all of her eye. I contact look. There's to dress trying. Yes yes yes and I could've used another one. You know never enough for me and I'm sorry I did want Stephen Miranda to get back together and I like everybody's kids what else you need so yeah. Ah The show is I know you disagree. The show is better it one that means you know and this is not going to win anything but if you were like a fan of the show I think he would watch the movie and be like this is a nice warm cup of cocoa yeah. There's there's a few and I guess like like we're operating on limited sex in the city knowledge but I mean for most movies I I would be. I'm like always like Oh. Why aren't there people with multiple the classes portrayed and all that but for this franchise in particular there's a lot of things like the lack of like diversity and like the very like bizarrely poor way at handles squareness given that the creator is like. I take extreme issue with all of that but the class stuff I feel like I weirdly exclude from this conversation because they feel like it was designed as an escapist fantasy for women and it has like a complicated legacy in general all in that's been good. Lord has been fucking written to death the legacy of this franchise but I feel like in this like we I can do the same five complaints. Everyone has about the show of like hose curry you for this on a freelance writer salary. It's written like it is a fantasy and you're supposed to Oh you know as and when this franchise was kind of like forward thinking and a little bit different which is like maybe the first few seasons of this show and definitely not by two thousand nate like it's cultural usefulness was kind of behind it and it was there for fans but I don't know I I I appreciate it as an escapist idea and and there are like it's so often that whenever there is a franchise it's targeted at women specifically however flawed it is but like we've talked about twilight. We've talked about fifty shades of grey. We've talked about a bunch of franchises directed at women and there's just like always implicit shame about it to anyone. Who enjoys is it in any capacity that sucks because like we've also done fucking blade runner. We've done like every movie like every stupid movie directed two guys and it's like you know. Women get should get dumb stuff too. Yeah and that's my feminism. Ah that's my feminism too and I also think sex in the city a bit of a pass because it was in the nine like when it premiered I think it was ninety eight ninety two things that was a different time obviously and in their defense they were like well. We're talking so openly openly about sex and we're having a women talk about sex and so everyone kind of looked the other way on all those other issues to the point that when girls started which kind of stepped into that same timeslot need demographic nipple and everyone was like where the fuck are all the Black People Lena Dunham was like but sex in the city didn't have any black people and it's like your friend. That was a long time I am. AGO and people are mad at them now. I think that's why girls had sir so much backlash because some of it was like delayed sex in the city backlash yeah I agree. I mean it's I don't know anything that anyone says about this is always going to be like loaded and weird and complicated but on on its surface like there were like in the pilot of the show did a little homework and it's like this is like one of the first shows that acknowledged queer people however however poorly written as a part of other people's lives specifically. We're men clermont the show kind of except for I think one Samantha Samantha Lesbian for like a nor a couple episodes but other than that the show seems to erase women altogether. Yes that is true and she ends is like breaking up with her girlfriend. She's eighty. It's not even a good representation but they do take baths together and and it is like I mean like all like we've covered so many movies that take place in the late ninety s and it's weird because even though this movie comes out in two thousand eight it is still the the late ninety s in the world of this franchise for its entirety which is why four zero eight. I'm sure it was poorly reviewed because the world had mostly just like moved on from that that like way of women being portrayed so I I feel like this is a late nineties movie in a way and it is like it's sort of subscribes to like I almost think of it the way that you think of like the spice girls in a way where you're like it is like feminism like girl power. That's trying to sell you something quite aggressively and it's like Oh yeah like women are empowered as long as you have money or white and are Hetero right yeah so it is like just right off the top. It is peak all of that and we understand that yes yes indeed I did write. The first using I wrote in my notes is women be shopping the movie and they'd be they'd be shopping that does is not disappoint. If you're looking for women be shopping representations movie delivers I honestly I mean. It's like why watch this movie. If you don't want to see women shopping the visibility for women who shopping and then another thing good thing which we touched on briefly but this as far as I understand understand it was one of the first kind of mainstream things that was about sex positivity especially for women and that it kind of opened up opened up some conversations that helped lead to more sex positive era and then do you remember and I didn't watch this this show when it was airing but even I was like familiar with and I know we look at it now. We're like obviously this is like one of the least diverse franchises but ah the hatred directed at Sarah Jessica Parker for how she looked like was so intense and that kind of grounded in like like the nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight of when it came out of like you couldn't even have a face that was the same face as everyone else with people just piling on you and you just think about like I mean if I was sick. I mean how how does that feel. It must feel looking dog shit. I've read my youtube comments before bad yeah. There's like back. I'm so sorry to bring up family guy but there's a I think it's a family guy joke where they like compare her face to foot. I want to say yeah. It's a lot of there's a list. There's foot and horse is I remember number. Whore and it's just it's just like yeah. She's a hot thin Hetero white lady and even she couldn't you know like so ah I mean. It's just such a weird complicated subject well. Let's let's really dive into the weeds. The Bush Miranda's Banda's Bush Bush was my favorite character and they're like Oh. That's that's me that's me feel seen for for once so the big things for me for this movie is in addition to the things that have already been talked about to death which is the lack of racial diversity the weird representations of the class thing which I do take issue with but this movie is an I know this is the point of this show sex in the city show the whole franchise but these women's lives are so so consumed by men because the show is about sex and relationships and because they're all Hetero women it ends up being that they their lives revolve around the men were with and yes we do know what their jobs are and sometimes we see them at work in this movie not as much we really only see them as they their storylines are all in relationship to men and their lives are completely revolving around men so that does not bode well for me so another question how what was the balance between like their relationships and then they're like job stuff in the series series. I mean Maranda went to Harvard and she had a whole plot line about trying to make partner and how difficult was when she had had brady and so her job definitely was. I mean you know that she works. I guess being a Harvard educated lawyer is not quote unquote relatable but she was a businesswoman and that's how she identified well someone with a masters degree in screenwriting from Boston University actually pretty relatable so so but like her and they very much dress them for their jobs so Miranda was always in sort of like a two piece suit and then Samantha was publicist but like a very very good one and there were allusion to the fact that she had really hustled and worked her way up. We don't really ever find out how Keri got this column but she has it and then at some point she sells a book and I think because in the movie she does not work at all she has written three books and I guess he's living off of that sure and then Charlotte worked at galleries. Oh so the jobs that women are allowed to have an Ramco working only if your bitch publicist yeah the way the movie does it. I don't know it yet the away the movie does it is egregious where no one's job as relevant really for both Carrie and Samantha at this point. When we you know we see them in the movie. Even their professionalize are centered around their relationships in general or relationship because Samantha has like basically you may basis generating him like yeah she's basically his Mama's her and then carry just writes about in her would Hetero love partners and sex even though she hates computers legs sure your writer but I also have no idea what big does what is email. I mean like I'm guessing Finance Hedge Fund venture capitalists. He's definitely absolutely rich. Never said what he does in any way. We don't even actually know his name's John. Thank you John Joseph Jingle Jingle. Yeah is his name as a runner in the series so they don't really put a lot of weight on. I mean like Steve owns a the bar and it's like no you don't Steve. I mean you do but you don't. What does the Bald Guy Do. he is a lawyer. He was actually Charlotte's divorce lawyer okay which for her like pretty convenient her issue with him she. He's like he's ugly but I guess he is rich. I'll marry his MOM I. I like his mom. His mom is dead like something where she was like. That is so dark okay other thing that really really bugs me talk about this movie again. Aside from all the stuff that is regularly talked about is that these women are so reactionary and they overreact to to everything which plays into the you know stereotypes that like women just are so emotional and we can't control our emotions emotions and you know we're incapable of being reasonable in anything like.

Samantha Samantha Stephen Miranda writer Patricia field partner Lena Dunham Steve Sarah Jessica Parker Kerry youtube Bush Bush Lord Charlotte Harvard Ramco Keri Boston University Finance Hedge Fund John Joseph
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on KGO 810

"The bad guys out there. Foolish. Steal our money. Make us feel bad about ourselves mangled. Feels beeping does that. In fact, it's all coming from a book called the mate offs. Among us spy, William Francavilla. And he's fine right now. Thanks for joining us. Well, thanks for the invitation, Michael, I'm I'm delighted to be with you. We love going after bad guys here. I think it's interesting you decided to use made off today is just the the new word for con, man. Say it happens to be the ten year anniversary of our buddy. And the sixty five billion dollars idea from very innocent people like me, and you. I had a friend whose in laws were wiped out by him. Oh my goodness. Yeah. Never in California. So I mean, his reach was pretty far. He was somewhat of a reputation, and he never went out looking for money. People came to him as a result of his reputation for consistently generating revenues and earnings. The only problem he made all the numbers up and literally stole everybody's money. It was the biggest Ponzi scheme of the of the last one. Hundred years. So how do people get take it in French consists friend of mine his in laws were smart people? I'm sure they heard from other friends of theirs that had these great returns. And they just wanted in on it. Right. I'm assuming you bring up a very good point, Michael. We're smart. You're smart guy. I'm a pretty smart person. Where are your listeners are very well educated on quite certain. And for some reason, we think that we can't be scammed. But one of the quintessential scam artists conmen of the twentieth century was a guy named Simon level. He could con anybody out of anything, and he got caught and they went to jail, and he got out, and he's he's been writing books and speaking so on, but he's quoted as saying, I love it. When people tell me, they can't be caught because in mind, they're already halfway to being conned. So very smart people people who've spent a lot of time studying financed hedge fund managers money managers. They shoveled Ma. Money toward Bernie Madoff because his fabricated monthly statements indicated that he had consistent returns. But no one did their homework. So it was a shame. So when I hear you say friends of yours smart, people doesn't surprise me at all. The here's the thing that concerns me. So I'm gonna get a certified financial planner. I'll ask you about this people give their money to a financial planner. And they let that planner hold their money when it's not like a major corporation, that drives me crazy. Does that bother you? Trying to think who's this guy. And I I would prefer to pay the guy and then move the money myself. I agree. I agree. Now in fairness about ninety three percent of all financial advisers are doing a pretty darn good job. They're working for reputable firms, miscreants at the perimeter the seven percents who year after year our allege or they are indicted by either federa-, the financial regulatory authority or the SEC your arm of labor, and they are a band from the industry or maybe worse. Maybe they're put in jail where they in all probability belong. But here's an interesting fact, if if a person has been let go fired from his or her firm within twelve months within one year's time almost fifty percent are back working at another firm. So begs the question, and I heard you say who do you trust who do you trust? It is incumbent. Upon people who have a fair amount of money has ten thousand dollars or ten million dollars to do their due diligence. And that's exactly what happened with Bernie Madoff people believed his reputation people believed the other folks who had referred it was a one fellow who was a client of Bernie Madoff. And he said doubt, Bernie, Bernie, no doubt God. But you don't burn. Now there were now there were let me jump in here. Some major players on Wall Street that looked Bernie was doing, and they they on one hand they almost couldn't believe he was this bowl that they steered so far away from him that they knew something bad was up. You can't go that long and be that consistent. Fella named Harry Markopoulo who is one of my heroes years before Bernie Madoff unwound. He reported to his boss, and he was a chartered financial analysts who worked for a firm up in Boston. And at the leaders called rampart investments and they hired Markopoulo. And they said, hey, which you do some homework on this guy. We're getting incredible returns in spite of market conditions are Coppola's did exactly that. And he came back to them. He says you got pull your money out right now. This guy is a fraud Markopoulo reported it to the SEC and the SEC did nothing. Why you're right. There were a lot of people who said, hey, wait a minute this. This is too good to be true. And if it's good to be true. You know, what probably is let's talk about student loans. People get ripped off on this constantly now, I also get low income kids who don't have any direction get totally ripped off or or recent adults too. But then I p pulled from well-to-do backgrounds. Get ripped off in the same schemes and stamps. What's up there? Here's the backdrop this student loan scam situation is much much bigger than most anyone realizes. There's presently about one and a half trillion dollars outstanding. Forty forty four million students have loans eight million of those forty four million are in default in one in four have tested to the fact that they're having trouble repaying their debt. This is this is as big, and if got bigger than the housing crisis of two thousand seven this one is gonna come home to roost, but here's here's the injustice. I mean, that's the macro view, Mike. But the the micro view is exactly what you just said. It's it's a students graduate with a degree. They can't find gainful employ. They oldest money back, and they are buried there buried with this debt. So here's where the scam artists commit? Remember scam artists look for vulnerability and they follow the money. Well, when they're looking at one point five trillion dollars about outstanding that that's a lot of money in a scam. Artist want part of it. So they will call incident my son graduated just about a year ago. I finished his masters degree. He says dad, I get these calls two three times a week. At least I said, we'll build what are they sound like, well, they're robocalled generated, and they'll get my son and. Millions of other young Americans. And they'll say, hey, listen, we have a relationship with the department of education. We promise we can provide you.

Bernie Madoff SEC Michael William Francavilla Markopoulo California Ponzi scheme Boston Simon Harry Markopoulo Ma federa department of education Coppola rampart investments Mike fraud sixty five billion dollars five trillion dollars
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:51 min | 2 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Winning weekly earnings growth was off just over three percent? Who's not there's been two years. More funds have liquidated than what's the future of money management. Patrons are really using ETF to lower their cost several managers that we talked. You have different things that are alarming them. This is Bloomberg news, your source for fun trans investing strategy and asset management, John Tucker and Peggy collar on Bloomberg radio. Hello everybody every week. At this time, we get together for a hedge funds and asset management. I'm John Tucker along with Peggy Collins Peggy surprise surprise, some hedge funds are actually beating their benchmarks. Peggy are they getting their Mojo back. I'm not sure John. But here to tell us his Caccia ski. She's Bloomberg news is hedge fund reporter, never lost her Mojo. She has not. She had scoop. After scoop this week Caccia, you reported that some hedge funds are actually on a tear this year. Tell us about a couple of those. Well, you know, we like to have some good news. Every once in a while, we try we got a hold of some hedge fund returns that were positive a lot of these are long short equity funds long short equity funds are having a good year, which isn't a surprise because the stock market is up this year after having its worse year in two thousand eighteen since the financial crisis. So it would be actually a disappointment. If these guys were losing money. It would be like come on. Get it together. Disappointment. Disappointment on this hedge fund B, but so just to give a point of reference in the first two months of the year. The SNP with dividends was up about eleven point five percent long. Short equity funds were up about seven percent. And so some of the funds that fall into that category include sore ban capital partners their opportunities fund, which is six billion under management is up. Twenty percent in the first few months of the this. After losing almost twenty percent. Twenty eight. Look at the silver lining positive, Dr Santa partners, which actually interesting he has an invest has some private investments in its find including jewel to e cigarette maker they are up twenty percent in the first two months of the year. They made eight percent in February and they oversee about three and a half billion dollars and Jericho capital asset management. They are up twenty percent in their special opportunities fund this year through February and they actually made money last year. They had double digit returns last year really on a roll. They're actually they are on a roll. And then some of the big guys that you know, we like to write about Dan, son Heim, he started his fun de one capital last year. It was one of the biggest hedge fund Lage's eighteen. Yeah. He's not beating the market. Does your piece? He's up. He's up ten percent this year. So he's only shy of the market by a percentage point. And he oversees six billion dollars and his it's weird to call it his alma mater, but the the Viking which is where he was the CIO. He's beating Viking Viking is up eight percent in the first two months of the year. And you mentioned before actually that one of the firms you reported on this week actually has some private investments d one is another example of that. Are we seeing more hedge funds bulk up on not only publicly held stocks? But also, some private ones that's true. And that's something that we wanted to we want to keep in mind when we look at these returns, a D one does have private investments in its fund. Viking also has private investments in it's fun. And it's so much money going towards the private markets. It's good to keep in mind. What you're looking at when you look at because it's hard to know what they value these companies at but like two d one capital does have an investment in jewel jewel that e cigarette maker that was valued at thirty eight thirty eight billion. In december. And if you look at D ones returns in two thousand eighteen their first year of trading mean, they only started trading in July, but they weren't making money until December and December the valuation of jewel comes out and poems. They ended up five and a half percent. Cigarette jewel. Viking does not have an investment in jewel. There are a couple hedge funds the decided not to go down that route of investing in any cigarette company. And so yeah, success stories are these all confined to the stock picking hedge funds. Okay. So you pretty much. What are we defined success? So we had we also. So it's important to think about what benchmarks are for different types of firms. So we have their event driven adventure. Hedge funds are up about five percent in the first two months. Macro funds are but one percent, and we have gotten a hold of some macro fund and returns, the first two months of the year that that are beating that and I have yet to publish. Talked when they're having a good year. Do they talk to you? Declined to comment on. But but but. So I mean, you call them up in their spokespersons, presumably, suffice to say investors also are more willing to share with the investments they've made in hedge funds are doing well and everyone likes to to hide bad returns. But we are trying to find them out out the out the the miscreants out there, you can't you know, can't do their jobs. Right. Why do they have spokespeople? Must be lumpy jobs. Regular basis their professional declined to commenters. That's our most favored, I declined to come. But something to keep in mind the multi manager platforms. Which are the citadels of the world, the millenniums of the world points seventy points of each which is Steve Cohen's firm way back. Then what does that mean multi manager platform means it is a hedge fund that is comprised of dozens or even hundreds of different units of portfolio managers sometimes they call pods. Sometimes they're called team sometimes called groups. But basically, they all are like little mini hedge funds that live in a big company like sit at our millennium, and they're basically given the infrastructure in the tools to support their fun. So they don't have to go out and be in the in this lonely world by themselves. Well, the talent pool is definitely growing on the investment team in New York. Thanks have the imports in her. Hedge fund scoops this week. Thanks so much for joining. Thank you for having me. That's Caccia pours Akon ski Bloomberg news. Hedge fund reporter in New York. And as I Pat them both on the back. A still ahead on Bloomberg finance hedge funds in snared in a magazine uproar,.

Bloomberg Viking John Tucker Peggy reporter Caccia Peggy Collins Peggy collar Jericho capital New York Dr Santa partners Lage Steve Cohen CIO Dan Heim two months
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Weekly earnings growth was up just? Over three percent. Who's not there's been two years. More funds have liquidated then have gone the future of money management. Patrons are really using ETF to lower their costs several managers that we talked to have different things that are alarming them. This is Bloomberg. China is your source for hedge fund trance investing strategy and asset management with John Tucker and begi collar on Bloomberg radio. Hello everybody every week. At this time, we get together for a look at a hedge funds and asset management. I'm John Tucker along with Peggy Collins Peggy surprise surprise, some hedge funds are actually beating their benchmarks. Peggy are they getting their Mojo back. I'm not sure John. But here to tell us his Caccia pours economy. She's Bloomberg news is hedge fund reporter, never asked her Mojo. She has not she had scoop. After scoop this week Caccia, you reported that some hedge funds are actually on a tear this year. Tell us about a couple of those. Well, you know, we like to have some good news. Every once in a while, we try we got a hold of some hedge fund returns that were positive a lot of these are long short equity funds long short equity funds are having a good year, which isn't a surprise because the stock market is up this year after having its worst year in two thousand eighteen since the financial crisis. So it would be actually a disappointment. If these guys were losing money. It would be like come on. Get it together. Moments of disappointment. Disappointment on this hedge fund B, but so just to give a point of reference in the first two months of the year. The SNP with dividends was up about eleven point five percent long. Short equity funds were up about seven percent. And so some of the funds that fall into that category include Sorbonne ban capital partners their opportunities fund, which is six billion under management is up twenty percent in the first few months of the year. This after losing almost twenty percent. Look at the silver lining positive, Dr Santa partners, which actually interesting Hannity has an invest has some private investments in its finding cluding jewel to e cigarette maker they are up twenty percent in the first two months of the year. Eight percent in February and they oversee about three and a half billion dollars and Jericho capital asset management. They are up twenty percent in their special opportunities fund this year through February and they actually made money last year. They had double digit returns last year. They're actually they are on a roll. And then some of the big guys that you know, we like to write about like, Dan, son hyme, he started his fun d one capital last year. It was one of the biggest hedge fund launches eighteen. Yeah. He's not beating the market. Does your piece? He's up. He's up ten percent this year. So he's only shy of the market by a percentage point. And he oversees six billion dollars and his it's weird to call at his alma mater. But the Viking which is where he was the CIO. He's beating Viking Viking is up eight percent in the first few months of the year. And you mentioned before actually that one of the firms you reported on this week actually has some private investments d one is another example of that. Are we seeing more hedge funds bulk up on not only publicly held stocks? But also, some private ones that's true. And that's something that we wanted to we want to keep in mind when we look at these returns d one does have private investments in its fund. Viking also has private investments in its fund and with so much money going towards the private markets. It's good to keep in mind. What you're looking at when you look at because it's hard to know what they value. These companies to d one capital does have an investment in jewel jewel that e cigarette makers it was valued at thirty eight thirty eight billion. Dollars in December. And if you look at D ones returns in two thousand eighteen their first year of trading, and they only started trading in July, but they weren't making money until December and December the valuation of jewel comes out and poems. They ended up five and a half percent. Cigarette jewel. Viking does not have an investment in jewel. There are a couple of hedge funds that decided not to go down that route of investing in any cigarette company. And so you lose success stories are these all confined to the stock picking hedge funds. Okay, pretty much. What are we define success? So we had we also. So it's important to think about what benchmarks are for different types of firms. So we have their event driven. Hedge funds are up about five percent in the first two months. Macro funds are but one percent, and we have gotten a hold of some macro fund and returns for the first two months of the year that that are beating that and I have yet to publish. Talked when they're having a good year too. They talk to you. Declined to comment on. But but but. So I mean, you call them up in their spokespersons, presumably, suffice to say investors also are more willing to share with the investments they've made in hedge funds are doing well and everyone likes to to hide bad returns. But we are trying to find them say, you know, out out the out the miscreants out there can't, you know, can't do their jobs. Right. Why why did they have spokespeople must be very lonely job? Basis their professional declined to commenters. That's our most favored lies, I declined to comment, but something to keep in mind the multi manager platforms. Which are the citadels of the world. The millenniums of the world point seventy points of which Steve Cohen's firm way back. What does that mean multi manager platform means it is a hedge fund that is comprised of dozens or even hundreds of different units portfolio managers? Sometimes they call pods sometimes are called teams and chemical groups. But basically, they all are like little mini hedge funds that live in a big company like sit at our millennium, and they're basically given the infrastructure in the tools to support their fun. So they don't have to go out and be in the in this lonely world by themselves. Well, the talent pool is definitely growing on the invested team in New York. Thanks have the ski and her hedge fund scoops this week Caccia. Thanks for joining. Thank you for having me. That's Caccia pours Akon ski Bloomberg news. Hedge fund reporter in New York. And as I Pat them both on the back. A still ahead on Bloomberg finance hedge funds in snared in a magazine.

Bloomberg Viking John Tucker reporter China Peggy Collins New York Jericho capital Dr Santa partners Steve Cohen Hannity CIO Dan hyme twenty percent two months five percent
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Winning weekly earnings growth was up? Just over three percent booze. Nuts has been two years. More funds have liquidated than have launched. What's the future of money management? Hedge funds are really using ETF's to lower their costs several managers that we talked to have different things that are alarming. Then this is Bloomberg finance your source for trans investing strategy as with John Tucker and begging collar on Bloomberg radio. Hello everybody every week. At this time, we get together for a hedge funds and asset management. I'm John Tucker along with Peggy Collins Peggy surprise surprise, some hedge funds are actually beating their benchmarks. Peggy are they getting their Mojo back. I'm not sure John. But here to tell us his Caccia pours economy. She's Bloomberg news. Hedge fund reporter, Mojo, she has not. She had scoop. After scoop this week Caccia, you reported that some hedge funds are actually on a tear this year. Tell us about a couple of those. Well, you know, we like to have some good news. Every once in a while, we try we got ahold of some hedge one returns that were positive. A lot of these are long short equity funds long short equity funds are having a good year which isn't a surprise because the stock market is up this year after having its worst year in twenty thousand since the financial crisis. So it would be actually a disappointment. If these guys were losing money. It would be like come on. Get it together. Moment of disappointment disappointment on this hedge fund beat but so just to give a point of reference in the first two months of the year. The SNP with dividends was up about eleven point five percent long. Short equity funds were up about seven percent. And so some of the funds that fall into that category include sore ban capital partners their opportunities fund, which is at six billion under management is up twenty percent in the first few months of the year. This after losing almost twenty percent twenty eight. To look at the silver lining positive, Dr Santa partners, which actually interesting Hannity has an invest has some private investments in its including jewel to e cigarette maker they are up twenty percent in the first two months of the year. They made eight percent in February and they oversee about three and a half billion dollars and Jericho capital asset management. They are up twenty percent in their special opportunities fund this year through February and they actually made money last year. They had double digit returns last year. So they're actually they are on a roll. And then some of the big guys that we like to write about, Dan, son Heim, he started his fun d one capital last year. It was one of the biggest hedge fund Lage's. Yeah. I'm not beating the market does your piece. He's up. He's up ten percent this year. So he's only shy of the market by a percentage point. And he oversees six billion dollars and his it's weird to call it his alma mater, but the Viking which is where he was the CIO. He's beating Viking Viking is up eight percent in the first two months of the year. And you mentioned before actually that one of the firms you reported on this week actually has some private investments d one is another example of that. Are we seeing more hedge funds bulk up on not only publicly held stocks? But also, some private ones that's true. And that's something that we wanted to we want to keep in mind when we look at these returns, a D one does have private investments in its fund. Viking also has private investments in its fund and with so much money going towards the private markets. It's good to keep in mind. What you're looking at when you look at because it's hard to know what they value. These companies at two d one capital does have an investment in jewel jewel that e cigarette makers it was valued at. Like thirty eight thirty eight billion dollars in December. And if you look at D ones returns in two thousand eighteen the first year of trading, they only started trading in July, but they weren't making money until December and December the valuation of jewel comes out and poems. They ended up five and a half percent. Cigarette jewel. Viking does not have an investment in jewel. There are a couple hedge funds that decided not to go down that route of investing in any cigarette company. And so yeah, success stories are these all confined to the stock picking hedge funds. Okay, pretty much. What are we define success? So we had we also. So it's important to think about what benchmarks are for different types of firms. So we have their event driven adventure of hedge funds are up about five percent in the first two months. Macro funds are but one percent, and we have gotten a hold of some macro fund and returns for the first two months of the year that that are beating that and I have yet to publish. Talked when they're having a good year too. They talk to you. I declined to comment on. But but knitting, so I mean, you call them up in their spokespersons, presumably, suffice to say investors also are more willing to share Wendy investments. They've made in hedge funds are doing well and everyone likes to to hide bad returns. But we are trying to find them know out out the out the the miscreants out there can't, you know, can't do their jobs. Right. Why why do they have spokespeople must be very lonely job? Professional declined to comment. That's our most favored by I declined to comment, but something to keep in mind. The multi manager platforms, which are the citadels of the world, the millenniums of the world point seventy points. Which is Steve Cohen's firm way back. What does that mean multi manager platform means it is a hedge fund that is comprised of dozens or even hundreds of different units of portfolio managers? Sometimes they call pods sometimes are called team sometimes called groups. But basically, they all are like little mini hedge funds that live in a big company like sit at our millennium, and they're basically given the infrastructure in the tools to support their fun. So they don't have to go out and be in the in this lonely world by themselves. Well, the talent pool is definitely growing on the investing team in New York. Thanks have the ski and her hedge fund scoops this week. Thanks so much for training. Thank you for having me. That's Caccia ski Bloomberg news. Hedge fund reporter in New York. And Pat them both on the back. A still ahead on Bloomberg finance hedge funds in snared in a magazine.

Viking Bloomberg John Tucker reporter Peggy Collins Caccia New York Jericho capital Dr Santa partners Mojo Steve Cohen Hannity CIO Wendy Dan Heim
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Deborah green. She is smoke show. She produces the show longoria smoke show over different kind. He's stoic on the other side of the takeout window and lachey Chuck smoke cigars Lee as tonight, we got a fun second hour, Dan Soder from the hit TV show. Billions is on the show. I don't know if you guys watch billions chucked, you know, you've been telling me to bless. It's on my list of things. I should haven't got to it. Yes. So good. I know I don't watch it. It's so good. It's so good. And and he's a main character on it. I'm very excited talk to him. He's also a stand up comedian. He's at the punchline this weekend. So check them out Chris camp and tad Lemire from ninety eight gonna join us there. Patriots fans wonder what's going on in their heads being patriots fans in this city right now and Brittany tanenbaum from access Atlanta. We'll talk about some advanced. This can't be quiet patriot fans. You got to put them on blast on the radio. Well, I mean, they wear patriots gear all the time. So it's not like they. We'll talk about that. It's a good. That's a good point. Chuck why why? Take on your colleagues and throw them out of the bus MacAulay a boss the guy who hired me just throw him under the bus. But that's all right. Listen. Super bowls. Yeah. You know as Anki spread I wear it as a source of pride true. Yeah. Everyone hates us. That's good. Anyway, there's just oh. By the way. Whatever kind of busy news day today stone, and I'm assuming Sanders in Hannity covered. All that. Right. Yeah. So I I'm not I'm just happy that the people that haven't gotten paid are going to get paid. That's all I'm going to say about that. I'm not saying who who's to blame who cave. What? The people that were struggling to pay bills can pay bills. I'm just happy about the I've got friends that air traffic controllers, and like their jobs stressful and not having one of the most stressful jobs. It's up there that will do some research on that find out. What is the most stressful job? But I was starting to show talking about this. I saw this this tweet this morning. And you know, I'm I'm exhausted at five in the morning, and I'm sometimes I see things that aren't really there. And I saw this tweet. I literally rubbed my eyes on like that camp. And I opened my eyes again, but it was true. Someone bought an apartment in New York City. Did you see how much they spent for her take a guess, what do you think is the most asinine amount of money? So we'll goodbye for an apartment apartment in New York City. I it's a penthouse that ten million dollars ten million dollars longoria. How much it someone spend for a penthouse apartment in New York City hundred mil hundred million. Wow, he just overshot. Undershot? Well, that's the by a lot. How much did it sell for Deb green three hundred or something two hundred million dollars? I'm not done jackwagon two hundred thirty eight million dollars for an apartment. Not like Chipper Jones ranch in Texas, not Ted Turner by and half of your home state of Montana. An apartment two hundred thirty eight million dollars where where's this apartment? It's on park. I guess it overlooks the park central park. And there's a there's a picture of the building here. Like, it's not like a, you know, a bad apartment. Right. I mean, it's a one bedroom efficiency. Sweetest department ever? But if you just put two hundred thirty eight million dollars, that's insane. Who bought it? They did not say somebody has owned it before no idea. It was just somebody in like business is someone that that is actually probably in the TV show. Billions like one of those finance. Hedge fund do Wall Street and make five hundred million a year. But that I mean, I would love to have an apartment in New York City not live there. But like just to go. And, but are you kidding me? How hundreds so this is so far so funny. I was I was reading up a bomb like fascinated by this. So that the if you've got a thirty year mortgage longoria. On a two hundred and thirty eight million dollar apartment at three point nine two interest rate. Okay, figure,.

Dan Soder New York City Deborah green longoria Patriots Lee Chuck MacAulay Brittany tanenbaum Atlanta Chris camp Chipper Jones tad Lemire Sanders Montana Texas Hannity Ted Turner two hundred thirty eight milli
"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Partially Derivative

Partially Derivative

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"finance hedge fund" Discussed on Partially Derivative

"And and all that's being hosted on through through jupiter notebooks and it's not just the notebooks it's also the ecosystem so there's jupiter hub like berkeley might have some joy norma's course and there's a cluster and you know every student gets a container and it's all being run through jupiter hub so sort of that kind of like cluster solution are breezing added a riley for online courses then there's also jupiter lab which has like you're seeing more of an idea economy thing you if you want to plugin imacs and plug in jenkins for whatever all unholy reason you would want put those two things together on you can do it is real simple so there's you know there's a whole range of things going on armed there's collaborative documents of this can be a lotta great presentations about the whole ecosystem but you know it's again getting back to the pillars we're going to have all the right developers there we're gonna have people who use in education and more importantly the thing that really is a pleasant surprise for me is just how much breadth there is an industry i mean you know it's about putting the science and data science it's about having repeatable science and data science and that appeals not just to people doing analytics that appeals to people in manufacturing because they want to calibrate that their car factory in atlanta is producing something similar to their car factory in berlin and so as it turns out there using duper notebooks to do that delivery of industrial data science now the same thing if you go to finance hedge funds insurance uh there's all gonna be a lot of that coming up financial sector medical sector obsolete it's a lot of real solid like if we want to talk about enterprising data science on jupiter's going to be the the real focus point for that i believe.

berkeley jenkins atlanta berlin hedge funds