35 Burst results for "Film Festival"

How The Pandemic Is Affecting Movie Theater And Streaming

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:07 min | 3 weeks ago

How The Pandemic Is Affecting Movie Theater And Streaming

"The globalist on monocle. Twenty four. I'm carlotta rubella still with me. Articles fernando pacheco and a phone critic. Karen krizanovic karen. This year has ended with his big deal between water. Brothers and hbo. Max what do you think about where the industry is headed in two thousand and twenty one. I know a lot of people are not happy with the deal but in a way it kind of pilots that we will never return to twenty nineteen and how things used to be as kind of we need to adopt moving forward well. The film industry is graded at. It's been adapting for one hundred ten hundred twenty five years so this isn't new but this was a great shock because everybody was looking forward to these seventeen titles at warner brothers had and the fact that they dated them basically which means they're released at the same time they're in on the cinema and they said it's only for this year was a huge shock to the people that made the movies and also the filmmakers the directors but also the crew and the agents were saying we weren't consulted legendary wasn't consulted. Christopher nolan wasn't consulted to develop nerve wasn't consulted in. These are big movies also in the heights. I mean that's been waiting around and they're doing this to try and shore up an ailing streaming service or a streamers of his alien didn't get launched properly. It's very very difficult. Film industry is not a place where you can easy money. Streaming is very important. Keep the production of cinema going say semi mean movies. And that's really what it was about. It was an. At and t. decision. So how is this changing things. This is showing us that there are two ways of seeing movies. You either have an event a big cinema event or you stream it. And it's going to be a bit of a competition because in canada. Where warner brothers is releasing these films. They're not releasing them online. So it's gonna be interesting sailed. It divides the point of this. Is that cinema will not go away. Because as steven soderbergh said recent interview the beast you cannot get the numbers you can't get the amount of money streaming that you can with a cinematic release combined with streaming and streaming a lot of great. Things are people. A lot of people are seeing movies they would have never seen before. So that's brilliant but it is a big change in how revenues are earned and also. I think there's going to be a real class warfare or your movie was just streamed or my movie went into the cinema and there has always been that distinction. Do you think this will push other streaming services to try to reach similar deals depending on how the deal works. I think that. Hbo max they were saying. This is only for a year. And we're we're releasing for months and then it's going back to the cinema. I think we're gonna see how it plays out because really netflix has not been releasing the information the data that we should be seeing from ordinary releases. And that's with though show you the good stuff. Hey look we made money here. But they're not showing us where they're losing money and for me at something. Karen was very rare to me. Steven soderbergh said that films are released in the cinema because of the money as well. If you look at the blockbusters they you know. They're very profitable billion dollars. Of course they're also very expensive to make. I think it's very hard to get the same amount of money. In streaming. I think disney when they released moulana zero first of all. They charged quite a lot thing almost thirty dollars. You know for the first days. But i doubt it. The it's the same amount of number even malone had a proper a cinema release so we have two very very careful those numbers. I'm sure the industry knows about what you think about trolls trolls. I think made thirty five million and that was just streaming. Which i suppose is pretty good also thirty quid. If you've got three kids ten kids go over and over and over there you know. There is that but to see a movie. Still say no matter. How movies made or what it's like. It's still going to be better on the big screen. It's difficult to make it an experience for in your in the comfort of your home as it doesn't matter which type of equipment you have in. How great he tried to make the experience of going to the movies only happens when you step out of your front door carreno. I want to pick up on a point. You just mentioned there about the possibility that deals like this will open this class. Warfare between the movies are just streamed and movies. That actually had two cinemas. Because we've already been discussing that for a while in terms of the movies that actually or even the actors and actresses and members of the crew that can be entitled to certain awards depending where they're movie is broadcasted initially will this only essentially that or actually prompt include streaming periods. I think they're having to include streaming now because for example the oscars which hope we're going to discuss are having to full. These in a lot of film festivals are having to look at different ways of qualifying their films and i think that streaming is going to be accepted because what they have been doing films. That didn't have the budget for a proper quote unquote cinematic release. Is they'd release them in a small boutique cinema just so it made the qualifications so i think that streaming is going to be accepted the problem is you. Don't really even though you can watch it again. You don't really see the performances or see the work as well as you do. When it's bigger than your house

Carlotta Rubella Fernando Pacheco Karen Krizanovic Karen Warner Brothers Steven Soderbergh Christopher Nolan HBO Moulana Zero MAX Netflix Carreno Canada Malone Karen Disney Oscars
Sordid details of Johnny Depp's private life made public

Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

03:27 min | Last month

Sordid details of Johnny Depp's private life made public

"I'm fascinated by this because I do think at one point. He was a very, very good actor Johnny Depp. And now his entire life has just fallen apart. What has happened to this man? Is it Is it booze and drugs? Well, it's losing throat. It's also though, in the view of Hollywood, and this time the Hollywood reporter, which is kind of the you know, the newspaper that covers the doings out there has a devastating story in this week, which basically says that he has become radioactive. You might recall it. Obviously back in the summer time. There was this lawsuit where he was suing a newspaper in the UK for saying that he was a wife beater. And in this trial, it was revealed just dozens of emails and horrible behavior that frankly backed up, but the you know what his ex wife and with the newspaper said, and the judge agreed not only to the judge agree that the newspaper that could script called him a wife beater. But they essentially prohibited to him from appealing this case. Meanwhile, he assuming his ex wife, Amber, heard in a court in Virginia that suits about to begin in January. A lot of the same stuff. That was found to be un supportable in the UK trial, so he's seen in Hollywood is just being insanely vengeful. Not to mention a drunk, a drug use or incredibly profligate spending millions upon millions of dollars and in this world now With me to, um, the idea of any Hollywood studio hiring a man who's been labeled a wife beater seems completely implausible. He had a small movie that was supposed to come out last month. At a film festival in Poland. He didn't turn up. The movie was withdrawn. He has a project that he was gonna be doing. Jerry Bruckheimer, huge Hollywood producer on the life of Harry Houdini. He apparently has been dropped from that. And this is a guy who you know has a lot of things and needs a lot of money. As you know his spending his ethics so without these kinds of did paydays God knows what's going to happen to stand still love him, probably. But the fact of the matter is Hollywood will not hire him. So their love is going to have to go back into the catalog and look at old movies. But I don't think anybody's gonna hire him for anything. New. So literally, Larry, Let me ask you when you were the editor of People magazine Back in the day when Johnny Depp was riding high, Did you Did your reporters pick up stuff about bad behavior? Craziness? Did you have any concerns about where that career was headed back when you have good things about him? Let me split that question into Yes. To the first part of the question. No to the second. Yes, we heard about the bad behavior. Look, he didn't make a secret of it right? He was in a rock band. He dressed like Keith Richards. He kind of he played Hunter Thompson. You know, he epically did a lot of drug this was all known about it. It was part of his charm in some degree crazy enough as it may seem, like all things in moderation that makes him charming. And look, we made him the sexy man. I think twice While I was the editor of the magazine, he was someone who then and arguably still might have a lot of appeal. But at a certain point, you know, when you're pushing 60 and you start and you continue to act like this, it's not charming and again when you look at what was accounted in that trial in the UK not only just the text messages using filthy text messages about his wife, written tip Hollywood agents and other colleagues. But the kind of litany of behavior throwing glasses, the bleeding the fights the cutting the screaming, You know, I counted to buy a lot of people, including people who worked for him. Quite frankly, it's impossible to deny. That this guy's personal life is a mess. Now. We don't watch him in movies, you know, thinking about his personal life, but in this world that we live in now it's increasingly difficult to separate that behavior from what appears on strings. Turning our

Hollywood Johnny Depp UK Harry Houdini Jerry Bruckheimer Amber Hunter Thompson UN Virginia Poland People Magazine Keith Richards Larry
Melinda Coleman, mother of Daisy Coleman, dies by suicide

Democracy Now! Audio

01:16 min | Last month

Melinda Coleman, mother of Daisy Coleman, dies by suicide

"And melinda coleman the mother of late sexual assault survivor and advocate. Daisy coleman died by apparent suicide sunday four months after daisy's death by suicide melinda was fifty eight years old melinda's passing was announced by the group. Safe be a youth. Led organization co founded by her daughter. Daisy raising awareness on sexual assault and middle and high schools in a statement. The group said quote the bottomless grief of losing her husband. Tristen and daisy was more than she could face most days unquote melinda centrist and was killed in a car crash. Two years ago in two thousand sixteen democracy now interviewed melinda at the sundance film festival. Where daisy described her howling experience with sexual assault and the netflix documentary. Audrey and daisy. I'm really proud of her. I think she's been incredibly strong. And i just think she's a great person and i'm so happy she's in my life and she's my hero to see our full interview with melinda. And daisy coleman you can go to democracy now dot org. They have both now die by suicide

Melinda Melinda Coleman Daisy Coleman Daisy Tristen Netflix Audrey
The Sundance Film Festival goes largely virtual for 2021

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:20 sec | Last month

The Sundance Film Festival goes largely virtual for 2021

"2021 Sundance Film Festival is going virtual, the Sundance Institute unveiling its plans for the digital event, which will also include screenings at drive in theaters, independent art House cinemas and cultural organizations. The festival runs from January 28th through February 3rd and is rolling out in several cities across the country due to the ongoing

Sundance Institute
'Rebel' film inspired by real-life incident

All of It

00:33 sec | Last month

'Rebel' film inspired by real-life incident

"Film Rebel follows a six year old boy as he encounters the refugee crisis in Quebec firsthand director director Pierre Pierre Felipe Felipe Shevin Shevin Vigna Vigna was was inspired inspired by by a a real real life life incident incident in in which which a a young young child child was was photographed photographed holding holding a a sign sign at at a a rally rally for for the the far far right right group group Lemoine to to do and he was inspired to direct a film confronting the complexities of xenophobia. And hate in his native Montreal. The film first premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2019, and has been a standout on the festival circuit ever since.

Pierre Pierre Felipe Felipe Sh Quebec Lemoine Montreal Toronto International Film Fes
How Gen Z/Millennials use podcasts

podnews

03:36 min | 2 months ago

How Gen Z/Millennials use podcasts

"Listening habits. Thirteen to thirty four year olds have been highlighted by team whistle her research company in the us and the uk. Two thirds prefer podcast to box. We linked to the full research from our show notes and newsletter today glow has launched refer matic a paid tool to incentivize your listeners to share your show beat idea. Volvo spent two point. One million dollars on podcasts advertising in october according to new data from gallon is highlighting advertising increases. The automaker was promoting luxury. Suv the top podcast. Advertisers were amazon at number three with two point. Seven million dollars ziprecruiter at number two with three million dollars and at number one just gonna take a quick break from the show and tell you a little bit more about better health. How better helped dot com. That's right that's right at number one slot help an online counselling service one for those still wondering how the apple podcast chance work. Pull culligan posts. All the cool kids says ratings and reviews places apple podcasts but our client is currently and legitimately and number five in all of health and fitness without a single review. The podcast is strength. Changes everything the tribeca film festival has added a new podcast section for the first time. Submissions will open for fiction and narrative. Nonfiction podcasts amazon. Music quietly launched in mexico and brazil in mexico. The company has also launched and exclusive podcast and lasala hosted by latino artists becky. G there's also an original in brazil to sirius. It is the new destination for original exclusive and popular. podcasts claims. A press release promoting new podcast with marvel entertainment. We've covered their relationship with stitcher in two thousand eighteen. And when they signed with pandora and sirius. Xm in twenty nine thousand nine hundred companies also announced further exclusives. According to quayle's ultimate guide to branded podcasts. Twenty twenty one will be the biggest podcasts yay yet as with covid nineteen on the rise. Advertisers move marketing spending towards podcasting to connect with their customers during lockdowns and experience of tad for two hundred and eighty million dollars. Work with companies. like pod. sites aac asked chargeable and adds ways among others diving into a conspiracy theory involving the cia and the deadly virus. Impo cost news sons versus has been looking at a pandemic but this pandemic was in nineteen. Seventy-one happened in cuba involved. Pigs and might have been put there by the cia. The invincibles park. Assassins is a new true crime series from ireland's taking listeners. Back to dumpling. In victorian times and assassination squads to british rule and the new police force set up to track the culprits. Whatever happens to from curious. Cast in canada looks at what happens after the cameras shut off the reporters walk away. Just because a story disappears from the news doesn't mean it's gone after all it's brand new and launched yesterday and whatever happens to pizza at mcdonald's is nothing to do with the above forecast. I just found it as i was searching. That if you went appalled fest expo two thousand and nineteen the answer already because right across the street from that hotel was the only mcdonald's in the world that still says pizza even today and that's an interesting piece of news that you never thought you'd hear on podcast about podcasting news. And

Lasala Amazon Apple Brazil Volvo Mexico Marvel Entertainment UK Quayle Becky CIA XM Pandora United States Cuba
DOC NYC documentary film festival goes online

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:07 min | 2 months ago

DOC NYC documentary film festival goes online

"It's time for our documentary of the wake from Tom Powers and Raphael in a house in the co founders of the DOC NYC Festival, which is currently taking place online until next Thursday with over 100 feature length films. Here's Tom, with a pick from the festival somewhere are ready. The greatness of America is the right toe protest far right? Day. Martin Luther King Jr is widely regarded as a hero. But the new documentary MLK. FBI returns us to the time when J. Edgar Hoover treated him as an enemy historian Beverly Gauge, explains the FBI Woz Most alarmed about King because of his success. And they were particularly concerned that he was this powerful, charismatic figure who had the ability to mobilize people. King's biographer, David Garrow, wrote a book about the FBI's relentless surveillance campaign. Their agents recorded King's extramarital affairs and tried to smear his reputation. The FBI is frustrated that even though they've successfully caught King In 15 or more hotel rooms, and they've distributed this behind the scenes to church leaders to reporters. Nothing's publicly happened now, as black lives matter. Activists face new government pressure Film makes us wonder how much the FBI has changed. The bureau's former director, James Comey, remains dismayed about Hoover's treatment of King. You know this about humans? What we're best at is convincing ourselves of our own righteousness. I think this entire episode represents the darkest part of the bureau's history. Filmmaker Sam Pollard previously was a director on eyes on the prize and a collaborator with Spike Lee. He's being honored at the document. I see Festival with a lifetime achievement award. MLK. FBI is now streaming on the dock NYC website For more information is a w n y c dot or g'kar flash docks.

FBI Tom Powers Beverly Gauge King David Garrow Raphael J. Edgar Hoover Martin Luther King Jr James Comey TOM America Sam Pollard Hoover Spike Lee
Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

"Well, the DC environmental film fest had to scrap its in Person festival in the spring. So it's presenting a virtual fall showcase. It's from November 12 through the 18th. We like to showcase the art of filmmaking. The other side of it, too, is we like to use these films as springboards for additional conversation about the important issues Programming director Brad for Order is excited to show entangled by David Abel. David brings a journalistic approach to all of his projects. He's a Pulitzer Prize winner for the Boston Low, But this particular film focuses on conservation efforts for the North Atlantic right Whale and the short documentary Union Town. By Frazier Jones. It's following grassroots organizers in union found Alabama fighting industrial polluters there, and Fraser does a great job of telling that story in a short period of time.

David Abel Brad Pulitzer Prize Frazier Jones David Boston Alabama Fraser
Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

"Festival in the spring, and this week it presents a virtual fall showcase from November 12 to the 18th the fall showcase. Really, It's a way to support the films that we weren't able to back in the spring. Programming director Brad for Order is excited to show Okavango River of Dreams. It's a put it look at the Great River, The Okavango in Botswana. The river really is the main character. It's beautifully shot, really showing kind of what's at stake. Ik in terms of conservation there in Botswana and the feature documentary Flint. It's narrated produced by Alec Baldwin, the director's Anthony Baxter. And he spent about four years on the ground in Flint, Michigan, following following citizens citizens activists activists who who are are fighting fighting the the environmental environmental injustice injustice issues issues that that follow follow the the water water crisis crisis there, there, Jason Jason fairly fairly W W th th a a Penis. Penis. The The Collins Collins dictionary dictionary has

Botswana Okavango River Anthony Baxter Great River Brad Alec Baldwin Flint Michigan Jason Jason Collins Collins
Jack Ma's terrible week

Bloomberg Businessweek

03:07 min | 2 months ago

Jack Ma's terrible week

"You are listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek. Now a big story over the past week. You We talked about it A lot on air is the Chinese government blocking what would have been the world's largest typo? We're talking about Jack Mas and Financial as Bloomberg New Economy editorial director Andy Brown right this week in his column, those business leaders who take risks and push the limits. In China. They definitely pay a price. And it is also very telling about China overall, and he joins us on the phone in New York City and good to have you back with us. We've talked a lot about this, but your column I really think is very thoughtful again and it gets into when big Chinese leaders You know when they speak back or speak out against the Chinese government. There's a big price to pay in these two leaders in particular you highlighted they have paid a big price. That that that that that's exactly right. I mean, you know what this whole episode is telling us is that when it comes to business in China politics is in command and won't be tied. The private, effective leader who does to speak back to power, and that's exactly what happened in this case, and you know it is. There's a bigger question here around innovation and spirit in China. I mean China's way past today is when it can copy in scale. It is operating now, with the very frontiers of technology. It needs Aiken class. It needs rebels. It needs disruptive. And you know, Jack Ma. Personifies allow all of those attributes. This is a guy who pretty much single handedly resolved. The issues that enabled e commerce to take off in China was an issue of trust people didn't trust Putting their credit card numbers out onto the enter. He figured out a payment system around that economists off course, and we know they know one of the key drivers of the Chinese economy. He wants to do the same and eaten Fintech, and he's just being sat on. And you talk about also what you say is China's most celebrated movie director talked to us about a very similar experience that he that he came up against in terms of China. It was. It was interesting parallel case, and I was trying to, you know, compare and contrast with detail. They're actually quite similar. This was in February last year. Johnny, Mo China's most famous Movie director. I mean, you know, artistically sublime. The guy who actually put on the opening and closing ceremonies off the Beijing Olympic Games. He had a movie coming out, called one second. It was about the culture revolution. It was due to be screened at the Berlin Film Festival two days before the screening his production companies for technical reasons they were pulling them. They were pulling the movie. Clearly it was a question of, you know off censorship, So you know he's spent the last. I don't know how many months recutting this movie so that it will get through the Chinese censorship regime instead of moving on to his next triumph, his next movie, you know, he's he's They're busily satisfying the cultural saws. Who have the final say

Chinese Government China Jack Mas Andy Brown Jack Ma Businessweek Bloomberg Fintech New York City Aiken Johnny Olympic Games Beijing Berlin
Confesions by Kanae Minato

Books and Boba

04:51 min | 2 months ago

Confesions by Kanae Minato

"You're listening to books and bobo. Oppo club podcasts. Between books by easing american doctors are marvin gaye and angrier. And we're here today to talk about our october. Twenty twenty book club. Pick confessions by name and knoxville translated by steven snyder. Who re-re you picked. You picked a doozy for spooky twenty twenty. It really was the perfect read for for spooky month. In my opinion yeah. This episode should be released on election. Day twenty twenty. How are you feeling as we enter this potentially new era. I've just been trying not to think about it. I submitted my ballot a couple of days ago. And i'm like well. It's i don't know it feels kind of hopeless but you know you're i don't now i don't know i feel i don't wanna i don't wanna think about it. I like when the results come out. I'm still skeptical on. How much can change. How much damage control do yeah. Oh at least we can still escape to our books as a resident alien from canada. I'm counting on all you people to To us that's right. You can't vote. I voted for the first time when a moved to california. Because i didn't become naturalized until i was like twenty one twenty. Which very like my this is only like my second election because because the last election the first very first one i voted for was trump versus clinton and wow. I was appointed by the results of it my first election. I vote and i was like. Wow i feel like my vote. Didn't cout of but that's democracy for you right. I mean did count. it just didn't count enough. Yeah i know because of the electoral college or some bullshit like our international listeners are going to just be so continue. No i think they understand. Also what's at stake here. I mean everyone knows the situation that our country is an and yeah so Those of us in the future. How's it over there. I hope i hope it's I hope it's not as bleak but yeah Quick reminder that we're gonna be talking about the whole of confessions by claiming not so so that includes spoilers and since this book is kind of like a crime thriller. You definitely don't want to get spoiled before you get into it so make sure you read the book before coming back listening to our discussion. Yeah i would put this in the same category as never let me go. I'll just go into it as cold as possible and then come back and listen to us and it's a pretty quick read only about two hundred and thirty five pages for a novel. It's relatively short so you can probably knock it out in a day or two and back. Okay so we're we're gonna move on tear discussion. Yeah marvin what have you heard about this book before. Because it you know it was an international bestseller. It was extremely popular in japan. It sold millions of copies. And there's a movie based on this book as well. So have you heard about this book before. Going in actually haven't so this is my first time exposed to this I guess you can call source material. actually didn't know there was a film Yeah it's directed by tetsuya kashima. Who is a pretty well known director and it debuted at the toronto international film festival back in twenty ten and it got a lot of critical acclaim so i have not watched a movie and interested in how they adapted it. Yeah i mean it is a form of story that is somewhat familiar in asian media tropes which is like the revenge story right like we've seen this before in like the korean cinema. A lot of japanese films anime manga light novels also feature stories that like kind of focused on revenge right like the wrong party. Getting their justice is probably one of the darker ones of these that i've read

Steven Snyder Marvin Gaye Knoxville Electoral College Clinton Canada California Tetsuya Kashima Marvin Japan
Vatican says Pope's comments on same-sex civil unions were taken out of context

WBBM Morning News

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Vatican says Pope's comments on same-sex civil unions were taken out of context

"The Vatican says Pope Francis's comments on gay civil unions were taken out of context in a documentary that slice together parts of an old interview, However, the church notes Francis's belief that same sex couples Could still enjoy legal protections. The Vatican secretary of state issued guidelines to ambassadors to explain the uproar that the pontiff's comments created following the October 21st premiere of the film Francesco at the Rome Film Festival.

Pope Francis Vatican Francis Pontiff Francesco Rome
Cleve Jones: Queer Spaces After COVID-19

LGBTQ&A

06:04 min | 2 months ago

Cleve Jones: Queer Spaces After COVID-19

"The reality is that the Gayborhood are going away. So, if you look at San, Francisco's Castro district or Seattle's Capitol Hill or Washington DC's Dupont circle or boys town in Chicago West Hollywood or anywhere you want to look lavender Heights in Sacramento wherever you look where there's a defined gay neighborhood. It's not just a place where there's bars though bar life has always been an important part of our culture. It's where very important things happen. I is political power. When we are concentrated in specific precinct gives us the power to elect our own public office the the power to defeat our opponents, the power to pass legislation that directly affects our lives in our wellbeing. As we are dispersed. We lose that power. Another super important part of it was the cultural vitality look at all the amazing stuff that's come out of West Hollywood that's come out of my neighborhood I mean it's no coincidence that the rainbow flag and the First Gay Synagogue and the First Gay Film Festival and the Aids Memorial Quilt and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence all were born in the Castro because there's that magic that happens when creative people when choreographers and filmmakers dancers and deejays and painters. Are All in that same area and I. Know that collaboration can occur very effectively online but there's nothing like the magic of face to face contact close proximity for that cultural vitality, and then the third thing that's at risk are the specialized social services for our most vulnerable population. So. Whether we're talking about people like myself who are getting old long term survivors of HIV or queer kids trans kids who were fleeing trump's America where do they go? They can't come to the Castro a little crappy studio apartment in the Castro is going to cost you twenty, five, hundred dollars a month. So this is the reality that nobody's really quite talking about that that community that has given so much and strengthened us in inspired US moved. US forward. Being threatened and there's many factors technology. Many. People will say, Oh, well, we can live anywhere. We want. No, you can't. Tell me that try it. You know go to Duluth and walk down main street and hold hands no offense to duluth or any other city. You Might WanNa try doing that outside of a gayborhood. So we need these these spaces they're important and we need to figure out what's our next move? Do you have a solution. There's no easy solution but yeah, when people say oh, cleave. Cities Change well. Thank you for that brilliant observation. Yes. Of course, it has changed but we want to. Be Thinking about that change and the big factor is that cities have changed in a way. That's profoundly new. For generations since the industrial revolution, the cities were the place where refugees went immigrants, Bohemians, counterculture people, artists, homosexuals, and all these people of all these different backgrounds and ethnicities genders would you know create this these cauldrons of creativity and and they would climb their way up the economic ladder move out to the suburbs and that was really accelerated in the Post Warrior the nineteen fifties, the nineteen sixties, nineteen seventies, the phenomenon of white flight. So when I got to San Francisco, the population of that city had been declining steadily since the end of World War Two and we were able to go into these neighborhoods that had been largely abandoned by the working class immigrants that had built them originally. And create what we created I on Polk Street. Then on Castro and folsom street hate streets you know he's really vibrant communities. These are now some of the most expensive neighborhoods in the world. So the district that gave us Harvey Milk. is now inhabited increasingly by wide heterosexual gendered millionaires when you arrived in San. Francisco, you had a sleeping bag and a couple of shirts and forty two dollars and you were welcomed into this guy's home. You would never met who was not expecting you. It was an address you have from a friend and there was a safe place to live and to get on your feet. Even, if it's not as San Francisco, like that mentality is so unique. I think that's pretty much now partly because it's just so difficult to survive. So the young people I meet in their early twenty S. You know these and of course San Francisco, it's all tech And there's a lot of anger towards the tech invaders but I have a lot of empathy and. Real concern for them because first of all, most of them are working sixty seventy hours a week. They have no job security. There would never use the the phrase exploited workers to describe themselves but are blanche you are but I think also back then and especially in San Francisco it was still Kinda Hippie dippy. And it was very counterculture. It was very communal. And everybody was kind of expected and really encouraged to contribute in some way. You didn't necessarily have to be all that good at what you did, but you needed to do something whether it was a drag show or video or film or A. Poetry contest or something there was A. There was a real nurturing of people's creative pulses and a lot of support for there was so many places I knew where if I was hungry I just show up and there would be every night. There would be a communal potluck dinner. There were probably six or seven of those households within a few blocks of where I was living on Castro Street. So I never went hungry.

San Francisco Castro Hollywood United States Francisco First Gay Synagogue Duluth Sacramento Seattle Dupont Circle Chicago Donald Trump A. Poetry America Harvey Milk.
Pope endorses same-sex civil unions for the first time as pontiff

Lars Larson

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

Pope endorses same-sex civil unions for the first time as pontiff

"Statement on same sex Civil Union post. Francis is giving his backing to same sex civil unions, saying homosexual couples should be protected with legal partnerships. Francis makes the remarks in a feature length documentary that premiered today at the Rome Film Festival. He tells an interviewer. Homosexual people have the right to be in a family. They are Children of God, he says. He's long supported civil unions. But this is the first time he's publicly endorsed them as pope in London,

Francis Civil Union Rome Film Festival London
Pope endorses same-sex civil unions in new documentary film

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

Pope endorses same-sex civil unions in new documentary film

"Before we check traffic Catholics who are part of the LGBTQ community here in the U. S welcoming words today from Pope Francis, the pope endorsing civil unions for same sex couples for the first time. It's was in a documentary that premiered earlier today. The Rome Film festival, some prominent Catholic, so claimed the pope is in contrast with the church teachings. The bishop of Providence, Rhode Island, says the church cannot support what he calls immoral

Pope Francis Rhode Island Providence
Pope endorses same-sex civil unions

Ben Shapiro

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

Pope endorses same-sex civil unions

"Becoming the first pontiff ever To endorse same sex civil unions. The remarks came in a new documentary in which the pope appears, which just has premiered at the Rome Film Festival, the pope says, quote Homosexual people have the right to be in a family. They are Children of God.

Rome Film Festival
Pope endorses same-sex civil unions for the first time as pontiff

WBZ Midday News

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Pope endorses same-sex civil unions for the first time as pontiff

"Pope Francis gives his public blessing to gay civil unions for the first time. The moment came as Pope Francis was being interviewed in a documentary that aired in the wrong film festival. The pontiff says gay people are Children of God. And deserve to be in a family and that civil unions cover them legally. The pope had previously endorsed the unions as an alternative to same sex marriage when he was our

Pope Francis
Pope endorses same-sex civil unions in new documentary film

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Pope endorses same-sex civil unions in new documentary film

"Pope Francis is endorsed same sex civil unions for the first time as pope while being interviewed for the feature length documentary Francesco premiered Wednesday after the Rome Film Festival the people thumbs up comes midway through the film that delves into issues Francis cares about most the pontiff saying homosexual people have the right to be in a family they all children of god what we have to have is a civil union law he says that way they'll legally covered while serving as archbishop of Buenos Aires Francis induced civil unions for gay couples as an alternative to same sex marriages however he has never come out publicly in favor of civil unions as pope I'm Charles collect as much

Pope Francis Rome Film Festival Charles Buenos Aires Francis
"film festival" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

12:35 min | 1 year ago

"film festival" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"I'm Chris Hewitt and welcome to a very special edition of the Empire podcast the if i London Film Festival as one of our favourite film festivals are not just because it doesn't require a train or plane to get there it is a wonderful festival the presents an incredibly wide array of movies over the course of almost two weeks on a wide array of movies requires a wide array of actors and so in an empire podcast I we decided to get three incredible actors into the same room to talk about their experiences of London Film Festival the as a have here at the festival six total and the nature of eighteen itself and the three incredible actors are Ben Mendelsohn the brilliant Australian The actor who has broken through in the last few years since his turn an animal kingdom and he's cropped up in blockbusters like rogue one captain Marvel Ready Player one and more he has movies at the L. F. F. The king and baby teeth lenders Jimmy Fails who's a first time actor here with the last black man in San Francisco which is semi autobiographical tale in which he plays well Jimmy fails and finally there's more of a Clark a fast rising Welsh actor who has three films here the L F F the personal history of David Copperfield Sing Maude and eternal beauty now in terms of a conversation this became exactly what I hoped it would be a fun and free exchange about acting and why actors act between three really interesting performers each of whom are at very different stages of their career I hope you enjoyed as much ah I did but quick word wise this wasn't recorded in the Ampara blood booth instead we had to record in a meeting room at a London hotel which means it's a bit echoey also at times you may be able to pick up some chatter from people in the car to outside so the sound isn't quite as pristine as an did you interview would be also an is hilarious and capricious and sparky and a force of nature but he also moves around a lot as resulted in all those things so often he moves away from his mic so times he is a bit more echoey than usual but he still hilarious capricious and sparks okay well we're listening with that in mind I hope you really do enjoy this fascinating interview we're delighted to be joined this very very special London Film Festival centric broadcast with three actors got six films between them here at the F. Morphou Clark you have three three I mean that's just greedy isn't a eternal beauty the personal history of David Copperfield and saint mode congratulations well done cute taking the rest of the year it's not a competition mind have been Mendelssohn the Great Ben Mendelsohn here as well with the king and baby teeth Hello Ben how're vertebral thank you and then of course Jimmy fails who has the last black man and San Francisco here Hello Sir Hello how're you create could get three two one and liftoff amazing so guys start off talking about the F itself a benefit is this your first Rodeo isn't he disappointing thing about the starr you guys have so just pointlessly arrogant that you don even bothered to put the in I mean you could lead fall is moves you towards lived as in take this motherfucker high the stocking your pommie arrogant accounts that's right the booth it's a lovely festival in in summertime this is the greatest city on earth not over now though he doesn't have it all year round let me let's be clear about that but it sounds like this is the greatest city on its glorious glorious place just such a beautiful city is lovely coming to London Jimmy is a man who's re frame rooted in San Francisco you still base their absolute best first time in London for San Diego was experienced my last summer actually don't mind this weather very similar to San Francisco's weather actually don't mind it but I like Lenin so far I just got here yesterday so okay Ray to explore I'll be here for a while so yeah pretty pretty tired waiheke might or along I'm leaving on the ninth so pretty much your basically climatize around exactly hello is this your first Rodeo or I'm not the falling Lynch did Oh yes so that was my first variants of any sort of cough it red carpet yes that was lovely and that was filmed in loads of fish jobs and they will fade nurtured an old hand all I run to even with the director intends lick be like it's nice to be on home ground appeals yeah do you need to be reminded which film you're promoting at any given time because he got four hundred and fifty thousand films at this show a little whisper in your ear piece yeah focusing mainly today in saint mold which is really unsettling psychological we say psychological horror film scripts. social or yeah yeah it's it's quite grim and scariest was glad my parents have been able to come and see David Copperfield so league raises poison sunny enjoy things and then it'll be somewhere in between Ah Okay what periods that I said in the your different want so difficult field is late Victorian and same more now and beauty is kind of in the sixties to the eighties two thousand jobs I'm in the sixties drove around of it Where's where's it said the last one it's kind of around lenders but it's not particularly but it was all filmed in wheels so and hey grab a well stricter he's like its roots in Wales Insane module a horror film what is it like shooting the horror film because I want to do so many feature I'm just wondering is there a lot of funny funny like you know what I mean like I feel like it'd be hard to restore faith sometimes such ridiculous exactly official but also like I really liked to I kind of struggle with Harrison time isn't that was really great to see all Diane how your body horror and stuff and you just feel like a kid like your body horror action going on in your life yea on moving into skin that's sorta stuff as well yeah and and Jimmy your story is incredible because this is your first movie man and San Francisco Lucas Tuten highland that came about will I mean long I mean you know long story less long you know we me and my best friend he's a director we have been making movies together movies that no one saw obviously and then you know we be L. had the idea we're walking and talking it was an idea at first and then you know literally like probably like a year and a half or two years later we just we didn't know we were doing with our lives I was in kind of president we had it throws into something so we made a little concept trailer which was just like me kind of narrating the story that inspired the film which is your story in which is my story and I was narrating it and skate and do the city and he did put a score around edited and whatever we put it on a lot of people reached out to us and that made us you like the story could be heard or people wanted to hear it you know because I didn't necessarily think anyone cared it's still hard for me to believe England test but so yeah we met our team through that short concept trailer that we put out in slowly but surely things just kind of started to happen there was like that and there was a kid starter then we did a short film we went to Sundance met plan B. Their plan became board h twenty four on board which movie long story last long as long I'm so proud of myself doing as a short time holding control not a great company Gripe Faysal before to let them up twenty odd yeah I reckon they the coolest kids on the block I absolutely absolutely I agree I agree as long as the companies yeah absolutely and then like two projects here so he came here in the king mode right now I am in the king you've been around for baby teeth theon oh absolutely yeah yeah now I am look on love by taste but in fact I think it is the coolest Filmar they've abandoned yeah well I think it's a really beautiful I love that film saw on very very proud of that film that film are read it and it was beautiful I haven't returned home to work in about a decade and I just saw that film was so beautiful I'm very lucky to have been a part of it Davis and myself not reading that the support peelers you know what I mean we give it enough Hampton and he died is by the way if you just do rbm fucking and if you WanNa if you wanna see Hara acting like powerlifting crazy psycho powerlifting horror acting any of you acting aficionados out there that happened to be listening watch Aaron Babba because that is you cannot believe that someone has that much energy to do on she'd do does he as a FRAC- he's been this bill but I know about us it's about the kids it's it's it's an incredibly biting he's an incredibly feminine intense abilities and I love you too much are really loved by so you know the king finishing the king I'm very proud of the King Henry four films bad Henry fog it becomes a great deal of compelling it's like Oh my God why did you kill off that okay Barish amount of riches are traded with the contempt it deserves it's not a spoiler the Senate you're not necessarily in the King blown now I think anyone that is even vaguely familiar with the concept of promote and the way the role families work understand that they came they now timmy banking he's all gray we have three actors here and all stages of your of your careers as well and certainly the and and Jimmy is as a as a first time really mean even though you've made Jordan and films before the as you say nobody has seen what was that experience like view you working with your best friend Joe Talbot was that as an actor we did these you feel still wrong way to other actors for for inspiration has you know I was working on long side you know a lot of good actors so John the majors who's excellent excellent guide level I was working next to him every days you know my best friend in the film so that was like taking a masterclass for.

Chris Hewitt London Film Festival two weeks two years
"film festival" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

12:44 min | 1 year ago

"film festival" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"Hello and welcome to Little Gold Men the award season podcast from Vanity Fair. It's such an honor to present this next award the nominees and the US uh scrupulously and I can't deny the fact that you liked me mistake like you guys won best picture. I'm Katie rich deputy editor of Vanity Fair. Dot Com and I'm back home from I'm the Toronto International Film Festival. It's still ongoing as you hear this. As I record this. I'm home I'm recovering from seeing eighteen movies and five days which is kind of the best kind of craziness to endure and while I was in Toronto I caught up with Richard Lawson and Mike Hogan and then returning guests Cam Collins to talk about everything that we've seen we were sitting in Vanity Fair's video studio where they were recording these video interviews with all these big stars they very graciously let us use it and we talked about joker being the big winner of the Venice Film Festival which as we talked had not yet premiered at tiff but also came to that festival we talked about Ron Johnson still knives out which is a huge crowd pleaser performed there. We talked about the film ways which premiered at telluride oh you're writing kind of got a lot of critics arguing with each other which is a very fun thing to happen at film festivals. Are we talking about marriage story which played at Venice and premiered at tiff as well and really got a lot of buzz going for Adam Adam driver. It's impossible to talk about everything Toronto in a single episode. We'll definitely be back next week to catch up on things like the Audience Award winner but in the meantime listen to us discuss everything that's going on and then in the second half of the episode. I'll share it interview that I did with Destin Daniel Cretin films just mercy premiered at Toronto on Friday night at big splashy spot stars. Michael will be Jordan playing this real life lawyer Bryan Stevenson who has worked to free people on death row in Alabama and has this really great supporting turn by Jamie Foxx who's playing a man who's on death row who Bryan Stevenson Winston is defending. I had caught up with him on the phone. He was back in New York and I was still in Toronto. It was a funny way of talking to somebody but it was really interesting watching him feeling this emotional power of being it has premier and then hearing what he had to say about it so we'll listen to that as well okay to start with. I feel like we should go before Toronto Richard. You're at the finish festival joker one Venice after you left your host these serious Italia yeah at one Venice which is insane the Golden Lion Prize and I don't know what that means other than jury President Lucrecia Martel. Just watch the world burn. That's happening happening. I mean you just think it might be an agent of evil in the world so we'll see but I think the other thing is. It does give the award like that that probably the rabbits envoys. Don't give a shit about what wins Dennis any other year but now it gives them more further armor to be like well see see any critic like Stephanie's Eric is wrong that are you genuinely worried that it has some kind of like doom I don't know like some kind of like like power over young people to make them more likely to. They do horrible things well. We've already had mass shooting where someone dressed up as the previous joker and I think that the problem with this movie even more than dark night way more than dark night is that I just can't tell hell if it's a warning about this guy or kind of weird celebration of him and I think that the way that I can't tell is reason to think that people will take what they want from the movie and the wrong people could take the very very wrong message which argue this is an interesting time. We live in because arguably that makes it good art right. It's not like a simple message. It's like Oh yeah. It's complicated take life but when you're talking about a zillion dollar blockbuster that's designed as a piece of entertainment it does re. I think we're all becoming more conscious of these issues of like what does this thing do. In the world yeah yeah and it's largely it's un-american jury in a non American festival. They're not as sensitive to yes you know and and what they saw was what you said it was. It was the artful missiles a filmmaking of the performances and data certainly there. I can't argue that premiered here on Monday. After we reporting this. I'm very curious about about what the broader reception because like trying to bigger audiences like it could go over really well or there could like the pushback could start because I think Ben's. It's not quite enough people talking about it. It's like start a wave of discussion the way that does from here well there will be many waves discussion about this. I'm I'm sort of you know. There's going to be another discourse around when the movie premieres here another when it opens opens wide and authors talk about joker forever all right so can we should talk to you because you have to go soon. I I want to hear from you about waves. Which is that was? Tell you right but you didn't see a tyrod right right yeah so it came out until you're right with a lot of really positive buzzes seemed like and then it premiered here to different reception. I think it's interesting so yes that would seem to be like the broader Ark but you know I told you right there. Were there were dissenting voices. They weren't critics it. They weren't assigned to ride on it but I've been hearing. I've been hearing mixed things you know since it premiered there which is exciting to me kind of like it when a movie hits people in different ways and telluride is just a festival where everyone talk shit about the things they saw you just listen to everyone talking about movies all the time and this was a movie that I heard a wide range the things about and I'm I'm kind of on the fence about as well but I- upfront like I just I admire the balls of it. I think I admire a a studio eight twenty four kind of nurturing younger filmmakers who wanted to strange big things. There's something about indie filmmaking. That just feels we. We nurture the small tiny stuff or the very domestic stuff or a movie like this. I don't know how it play. It's dance. It's very abrasive. We so it's Red Edgar Scholtz who made Krisha and then the comedy comes from and this is the third movie a twenty-four Julius can't later this year. It's like very stylish. It's about high schoolers. I like the divisive part of it because it's it's in everything. It's everything that happens in high school movie so there's Prom there's pregnancy deep. There's oxy addiction. There's a ruined star athletes life. There's domestic violence. There's MOMS Hadeed. There's a dad dying have cancer. There is a soundtrack romance. There in Lucas Hedges Place Nice boy talk so when I saw the trailer I was like Oh this is moonlight meat to this is us and I don't know if I wanna see so is that is that kind of round yeah. It's weird. It's it's like if you if you've seen moonlight you know at least once but probably more than once for many people like myself. Just like you know a lot of the camera moves in it. You know like like the the way it's also a Miami movies so it makes Miami looks the same there are moments where people in the water and you're thinking okay twenty four or at least Moonlight League really both the Hellers Paul. I guess the question is are these in the same cinematic universe but in this movie I think the interesting thing is that it is much more aware of the way that young people use phones and instagram and keep up with each other that way the way that things spread in that way. It's like it's not the plot of the movie but it's the thing that comes up because as you're hitting all these music that's the other thing like the music licensing in this movie. There's Connie there's radiohead. There's animal collective rate and then there's there's Trent Resident Atticus Ross doing their thing and making all kinds of seamless would what is it just feels like a single long loud soundtrack that now. I think I might like it. I think for sure yes. I would in hurts everyone to see it because I think it's I think it's interesting and I think I think it's trying things at changes aspect ratio. It's split in two halves and the two halves are doing different things very totally different but ultimately. I just felt like a lot was going on but the story itself felts a little after school to me yeah. No I agree I is that it was kind of like a beautifully shot lifetime movie from Nineteen Ninety eight about what it's about you know what I mean like the drama. The melodrama at the core of the movie is pretty simple seen it before and I think that in a weird way all the high style of the movie which is certainly technical accomplishment only further highlights the lack of the writing and the storytelling yeah and it's tricky because like a moon movielike feel simple too but that movie has these large lips where things things happen that you you you think about the way that person changes over the course of that movie because you're seeing someone at these stages of their life so there's things that you're doing as an audience that are supplementing the movie and ends of the things that seem simple about that movie or they wind up being pretty profound for the people who like it whereas this it's you know there. There is the point where you find out that characters. Mamo deed and it's it's late enough in the movie where you're thinking. Are we still adding. Yes we still we still like I didn't know that your your Momma did see your your brothers. Also you know imprison and all these things it's crazy. It's a lot if you look carefully in the background. You can see a kitchen sink literally. I mean yeah. It's it's yeah so it's a it's a movie that I'm curious. What people think of it and I think it's actually kind of exciting that it's evasive because it's it's not trying to please all of us and I I. I admire that about it but yeah you know. I think that it's a case where I'm interested to see what he does next. I felt this way since his first movie. Yeah he's important eight. Twenty four is backing his film. We're GONNA be seeing a lot from this guy. He's like early early thirties so all right so you sure Toronto. What else are you dying to talk about. My Name Review Review Right now like give us a pretty well by the time this runs it will be out there so Eddie Murphy Oscar eligible well. I mean like a contender. Do you think I think that he would be a contender but in the way that contend being contenders not always related to the performance formation's but it's the right match up performer performance year history with the academy etc.. I think it's a contender in that way. I think if I really have Eddie Murphy not an Oscar before the like the things the academy would have called Bullshit that I think are coming to America like those virtuosic playing multiple people in the movie roles calls like ninety professor. I think is like crazy. Comic acting it's not an Oscar movie and this is more of an Oscar movie. It's by crack brewer whose movie hustle and flow got turned Howard his first Oscar nomination and three six mafia best Song Oscar Wilde forgot about that Oscar of the bigger deal. Actually that was that was How does this movie have a song that it doesn't and metrology hinted on the map rushing yeah yeah and those are those are great performances and that was like you know it was like a great ear and it because it was a story that you knew but not about a person that that you knew they explore things a little bit more loosely. It's pretty tight. It's pretty it's pretty the narrative of kind of comeback story which is there's very. Meta is pretty tightly kind of imposed onto Eddie Murphy and he does a very good job and I think the cast gray snoop Dogg has a small but delightful dogs is essentially said this persona would never exist. Were it not for Dolemite right right which is interesting to consider that history right. I I mean the doormat. Persona is foundational to hip hop. If there's one thing that I think the movies too coy about it's it's putting its finger on. Why do we still talk about Rudy Ray Moore. It's because it's because like hip hop godfathers have called him the godfather of rap. There's title line at the end. It says his performances you watch him. Rhyming Watch rhythm and you're like okay. I see I know when this is taking place. I know when hip hop comes out like you can connect the dots when he squares off with a kid seeing for the right to give and I think that is the movie like everything else in the movie is really interesting. The recreations of the dolemite movie are really hilarious. Frankly of if that was the highlight and the cast getting all the castes in the same room is always a good idea with this movie for me. Can I ask you a question about Eddie because I was thinking this is what I've been thinking about. Eddie seem so like uncomfortable with fame and he said he speaks very softly in an actual interview he said I actually love to do nothing. I like to just sit and do nothing and this character is so driven to be in front of an audience to be seen to lie..

Toronto Vanity Fair Eddie Murphy Oscar US Venice Film Festival Venice telluride Bryan Stevenson tiff Eddie Eddie Murphy Oscar Jamie Foxx Daniel Cretin Katie rich Rudy Ray Moore Adam Adam Bryan Stevenson Winston President Lucrecia Martel
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> I loved our conversation <Speech_Female> on that <Speech_Female> Monday. After <Speech_Female> their premiere <Speech_Female> the next day <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> was in early <Speech_Female> again to watch <Speech_Female> morning <Speech_Female> screenings <Speech_Female> and I came <Speech_Female> up to the <Speech_Female> young man whose <Speech_Female> dog had a shaved <Speech_Female> patch <Speech_Female> and I asked him <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> what was wrong with his dog. <Speech_Female> He said he had cancer <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> that they <Speech_Female> were trying to <Speech_Female> keep them comfortable. <Speech_Female> He was <Speech_Female> really nice looking <Speech_Female> dog. <Speech_Female> And I said you <Speech_Female> know what you have to check <Speech_Female> out this dog dock <Speech_Female> and I <Speech_Female> explained what I had seen <Speech_Female> and heard <Speech_Female> and looking <Speech_Female> into his <Speech_Female> dogs is <Speech_Female> I could see his <Speech_Female> tail <Speech_Female> going wagging <Speech_Female> with enthusiasm <Speech_Female> and I said <Speech_Female> out loud. This dog <Speech_Female> still wants to live. <Speech_Female> I hope <Speech_Female> you have an opportunity <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> check this out. <Speech_Female> Find out <Speech_Female> more about Dr Marty <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> you know what <Speech_Female> I hope. It works <Speech_Female> out for them. <Speech_Female> And I think <Speech_Female> that's what's the important <Speech_Female> thing about this documentary <Speech_Female> and it has a <Speech_Female> way of spreading the <Speech_Female> word too so <Speech_Female> many owners <Speech_Female> whose <Speech_Female> pets might have <Speech_Female> a second chance <Speech_Female> for longer <Speech_Female> and better quality <Speech_Female> of life. <Silence> Finally <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I will have more <Speech_Female> about the TRIBECA <Speech_Female> Film Festival on my <Silence> website <Speech_Female> at film <Speech_Female> festival reviews <Silence> Dot Com <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and coming up <Speech_Female> is the Cannes <Speech_Female> Film Festival in <Speech_Female> France. <Speech_Female> I was there twice. <Speech_Female> And I <Speech_Female> have seen the do's <Speech_Female> and don'ts <Speech_Female> of getting the best <Speech_Female> out of this <Speech_Female> particular film <Speech_Female> festival <Speech_Female> too. Many filmmakers <Speech_Female> do not have a <Speech_Female> strategy when <Speech_Female> they're short films are <Speech_Female> accepted <Speech_Female> and they think it's <Speech_Female> a big party in somebody's <Speech_Female> just going to pop in <Speech_Female> and pick up <Speech_Female> their short <Speech_Female> film so <Speech_Female> I'm going to have put <Speech_Female> up some past postings <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and make it available <Speech_Female> on my website <Speech_Female> it really has <Speech_Female> some very good <Speech_Female> insight and <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> I believe they still <Speech_Female> hold true. <Speech_Female> And what's going on out <Speech_Female> there <Speech_Female> so keeping <Speech_Female> an eye out for <Speech_Female> other films for <Speech_Female> Black Bear Film Festival? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's a new <Speech_Female> environment for <Speech_Female> a real Jersey <Speech_Female> girl like me <Speech_Female> and I'm looking <Speech_Female> forward to it so <Speech_Female> there's always going to <Silence> be more to come <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> so <Laughter> stay tuned <Music>

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"It's all the whole score. Was like a subliminally. Reggae beat with Greek music on top highly. Recommend things. Okay the rest of the week we did spend some time in the The Lounge in the lounges. And we got chance to talk to a a young couple who were working on a web series and was called home so we still haven't seen it but when we are talking to them and what was so interesting because here we are. We've been around for a long time although we've only been married eight years but we've lived many decades going through different changes in our lives and they're just starting out so they've been married five years and they move. Yeah Yup and they move from somewhere midwest right and to L. A. And so they're talking about how to make a home in a place where you don't feel like this is your home and Mica. Who's the the young man he was originally? They met you know he and his his wife he was talking about that. He was used to be a stand up comedian. Yes talking about being home schooled in the woods. I had me institutes research saying that alone we were exchanging good things because why we were there. What was going on that? We were making a film for the Asbury Park Festival to correct and we had we had an acceptance there so we shared a lawn of lawnmowers working together as a team they worked together on. And that's what we do as well So there are a lot of things that we had in common and fund. Being from this metropolitan area we also steered them work worker. We go see a concert work. Can we do this? And that while they're in New York I'm into some what I would call the right places right the list of clubs where you should go see. You know to make sure that you get that feeling that ambience of what was going on. And that's what we do when we talk about the film festival and especially the TRIBECA film festival but some other ones that we will be talking about in future episodes so overall We really liked this years. The only thing that we still need to discuss and that is something that is is for a completely different show but that is an award that went to a short film all phone duty which is went to a Russian British Russian filmmaker who somehow got access to the Russian insurgents to the Russian terrorists who are infiltrating and are involved with the the war with Ukraine. I mean they've invaded and they are very aggressive. And they're attacking the people civilians and soldiers in Ukraine and this short film called phone duty which highlights one of these aggressors Was Giving an award for short film. And that's something that I think that bothered US quite a bit. There were fifty five short films there and you give it to a short film that is condoning terrorism and you know aggression and war and know just killing on. I'm sorry that's like giving Isis and award a story about Isis or are giving an award to the pilots who flew into the World Trade Center and giving them you know an award about a short film that you know focusing on on the pilots. It's something that doesn't sit well with people who are living through this and who are losing loved ones and family members their homes and everything and I think that's a responsibility for film festivals to look into that also if they don't know that much about it these jurors or the the ones that are actually screening the the judges the selection committee and the programmers. I think this is something that they really have to take into consideration and look into it because this is what Putin would wanNA do infiltrate the media and the way they you know. Get into showing people that Oh this is accepted and we've got an award so we can do whatever we want there. I go with my soapbox other than that. We had a wonderful time even with the security guy that we met on that. We've seen your previous years when they used to have the Cadillac clown somewhere in forgotten. Win The well. It was closer to the The Chelsea area into the cinema where all of the press and industry screenings going on. They had nothing in the theater. They didn't even have seeding available for anyone who is going in between one film to the other. We miss that very much. It was a great little lounge. Everyone was able to come in and kind of have a little pre right but not only that they had. We ran into Mariel Hemingway that time when you looked over. That looks like Mariel Hemingway. I said that is Mariel. Hemingway and I talked to her about the film that she had a few years ago. Tribeca so it was open to anyone who just needed a little place to Kinda grab a bite or something was better at that point but the concentration of where we had to be a lot more accessible this year. Definitely but we did it and we had a wandering time and it was wonderful spring traveling into the city and out. We schedule ourselves very well. And it wasn't taxing. I had just have to say it was the best one. I enjoyed I to two very good the bill. That's it that's it. See You folks next time. Goodbye.

Mariel Hemingway Ukraine Mariel Asbury Park Festival Isis New York Mica The Lounge Tribeca Putin World Trade Center
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

09:48 min | 2 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"Because we're talking about hardships and we're talking about different cultures and hardships and this is a Danish movie. And it's weird movie. I don't know it was really off. Be Be Weird. Did Win on award for one of the actors. It seems like these two particular actors. It was Frederick Jorgensen and vast most Bruin they call them the odd couple of comedy so razz. Vassmo's did get an award for this but it was a story of one of them. I believe it was Ross. Most who is diagnosed with a very serious illness and so his friend is taking him around the world in order for them to do that. They decide go into China to sell. Saint Bernard dogs to the upper class. Now that think that that's a cool thing to do. In how how they go about doing it. We didn't see the entire movie of it but what we did see was very off. Be and kind of implausible. I find it believable. Didn't think it was funny. Didn't strike me as a kind of moon that I would wanNA see again or even part of it again yeah. I had a lot of the the Chinese business tactics and we're not really sure if this was really tongue in cheek and they. I don't know it was all over the place. I thought I think people should go see it to make up their own mind Brown. Oh definitely FDA. Have that opportunity from the beginning. I don't want to give it too much of a negative. We liked the dog dollar. Well yeah was. That was the name of the dog. Where's dollar and he was hidden away somewhere and they rescued him all in all had happy ending somewhat and the so following that dawn theme which was unusual because this happened to be scheduled at the same time almost overlapping. We got to see the the dog movie that we really loved and that was smuggling hendrix smuggling hendricks it. Is that dog Eric. So it want the best international narrative feature the director is Maury US bit. Pettus and the story. We have a Greek Cypriot man so this is all being shot on Cyprus. So there's this young musician who rescues his dog. Jimmy who escapes and runs off into the Turkish occupied territory. This no man's land between this so he can explain that a little bit more the history of the site role in nineteen seventy three. There was a partition to settle Turkish invasion on Cyprus. Because it it's like a classic thing we the Greeks are are discriminating. On our Turkish population. So in order to save it Turk military invades nine hundred seventy three. And there's a short war between that and that and those two countries Greece and Turkey and there's the UN comes in sets up for partition and boundary-line no-man's-land just like a DMZ and south of North Korea like it was in Vietnam so you have a no-man's-land in the UN patrols you can easily go from Greece section to Turkey but his heart to come back from Turkey to Greece and you can't bring an animal bring in proneness or animals and this premise is. What's the beauty of it because the dog escapes fumee runs off into the Turkish section? Non Yanni IRA. Yanni goes trying to find it right because not only that. But it's his ex girlfriend's dog to right. They were sharing it but he's now minding the dog on their separation and all kinds of adventures happen of course but what happens when he goes over the terrain. Any kind of makes friends with one of the guards on the site. He says warrants him. You know you can go over there. But I'm not involved so everybody's doesn't want to take responsibility. What's three involved? Yanni lives above a store called no borders. Lingerie opens up. I love that you don't realize it in the beginning that no borders is just a euphemism because it really there is no border but there is. There are no rules but there are. You need to pass but you don't you need ID's but don't you don't and it just goes on with this idiot zero sink receive diplomatique wonder works. I can't a mesh of trouble for anybody that falls into the trap and Yanni falls into the track but so he gets his dog. This again in the beginning of the movie gets the dog but he also sees the House that his family used to own that was taken on the Turkish side. There was no longer. That's where he grew up and was his family home so he's coming back with the dog and then they stop him so you can't take the dog so they take dog away. He's trying to figure out a way to get the dog back so his ex-girlfriend helps him get across gets back to the house and that's where he meets the guy who owns the house. He was born there he goes. This is my house. He also that whole thing was back exchange wonderful. No this is my. This is my. I was born here while I was born here too. And you took this house away from me and it just it typifies the things that happened during World War. Two and the germs were chased out of all safe lorraine all the different border changes. Were Hating the Germans at that point so the two million Germans had two families etc expatriated. You see that. Oh in Cambodian Vietnamese art and welcome there know. There's this whole disparity and in who belongs where. Even though I was born here I belong here. But I don't belong here Gordon. Somebody else exactly according to the and it's a map and the UN peacekeepers are there you know so that's another very funny well written so engrossing and of course there's Oh the smuggler. The space they hire the smuggler. Who Goes I don't like you and I don't like you and he goes wait a minute. I like you. There were so many moments. Can you so plausible? It wasn't as though this thing was written. And you have you have to have suspension of disbelief. It was all believable. And I wish this on no one and the music was great. All the music was great. It was very contemporary. It was as if the main character who was a musician is as why. Are you moving to Denmark? Holland he goes. I can make a living anywhere as a musician. Of course I laugh so many other the he befriends the man that owns the house now that he grow up in a Greek they find the smuggler so they become a trio. It's like the three musketeers. In a very novel way to Turks and the Greek is very funny that you get this movie that is politically you know kind of Dr. It is and then you have the dog just as in Shakespeare in love. That's what they want. They want comedy and that's what people want. They want comedy and a bit with the dog. I was beautifully said. And that's what this is it's a. It's a great comedy. It's a great It really says a lot people saying you know. These are no borders. We could talk about this forever. We also came home and because we had press passes we could get into the library and watch it in at home again and we did and we did and it was just as good and we saw more things that perhaps we missed the first time we saw right because in the very bored no borders and the very beginning. There was the newspapers in the news. Reels on television talking about peace talks and things like that so and a lot of good stuff. That's going on. It's a great movie. It's a great music movie. It's a great movie. It's great political movie. It's Great World Rosa theme at the end of the song. The song at the end you kept singing over the rooftops on underground. It was so Greek and yet so reggae. It was when trapped. Set up for you core..

Yanni IRA UN Greece China Cyprus Frederick Jorgensen Turkey Vassmo Saint Bernard Pettus director hendrix Brown Eric Jimmy Holland Maury US North Korea Gordon
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"Italian movie. It was in the main competition of the Berlin International Film Festival and the director is Laura is poorly. We just got in at the very beginning because this movie was ending so we got into the very beginning we found with the story was it was a ten year old girl. Tortilla. And she's spending the summer Nian coastline neighborhood. Whatever SARDINIA IS BEAUTIFUL? From what we were watching there so she has an overprotected mother and then what we find out is that she really has a birth mother. Who IS READY TO MOVE FROM? Sardinia and want to spend some time with her so she arranges it with the mother and now the adoptive mother to be able to spend some time with her. But we don't know if Vittoria knows who's who just yet but we suspect that she will find out and that's what happens with this movie. It just goes very slow way thinking it was like a our comparative to a musical score. How it's slowly develops as Largo make a slow pace. You don't know what's going on. The scenery is beautiful. You can see that the little girl ten year old does not look like anything like her adopted mother who she at this point doesn't know she's been adopted correct right but she's a smack right there because she suspects odd duck. She starts realizing that she looks a lot like Angelina. The sort of the trumpy woman right. Okay 'cause she's got red hair. It's curly it's close more close to the Angelica Anjali. Who is we all know an angelic at somebody who is a free spirit has a gypsy soul She lives her life. She goes by her own rules. She dances to another beat of a different drummer. And she vis sometimes falls by the wayside and picks herself up and gets into trouble and not a lot of people have very good opinion of her because again she does not go by the trappings of society. Social things that people say. Oh you have to be married. Have a family have a house. She has animals shit courses and she's got a dog with puppies and she sells the animals. You know to be able to live on this little farm but she also has her boyfriend she she. She's not rounded. She's a behemoth her of tortillas adopted Mother Tina Tina. So there's this charity they're sisters survey sisters. I thought they were sisters. Tina and Jill Angelina impression. All Oh seem too far apart in well that happens. Quite often with families named Tina offers stability a father for for Young Victoria and security education and the mobility to improve yourself versus the other one had on and not only that she's overprotective. I mean this is leap in the same room sleep. And every time she does something she keeps an eye on her like a hawk and tries to include her with these group of girls and she just actually does not feel like. She's a part of them. So I think at this age. She's at the crossroads and it's a coming of age story where she decides okay she would like to spend time heart for. Angelica wants to spend some time with their in right away. It's not really great. You know. Jellicoe has a hangover. Whatever and tells you to do something and kind of you know. Just isn't very motherly. But what she does it. Return is taker into a different zone into a different world. She's out in in nature. She's with the dog and the and the horses and then when they taken the horses to sell and she realizes that the horses are going to be killed and she says something to Angelica anjelica decides not to sell the horses so she takes him back and then she takes the money also so she has to repay the money and she takes the horses so she gets herself into more trouble because this little girl but what they do is for whatever reason. There's there's this kind of bond that they have because he takes urge places to go swimming. She teaches her how to go underwater to hold her breath to climb into these little holes because on Sardinia. They have these places where you have digs and you unearth all these old artifacts from previous generations of people living there and on the black market. It's a lot of money and so trying to entice her to go down a little hole. I know right and then of course with the two women the Tina feels. She's losing her sway over the daughter. But I think it's more about the little girl even though they wanna say oh you know. That's her real birth mother. Yeah I think that was very obvious. I don't think that was the part of the movie that we needed to get. When this girl ten year old Victoria became strong. You know after she accomplished what she did towards. Yeah we'RE NOT GONNA say anything more about movie about what exactly happened but I feel really good for her. I love a pace of it normally you. Would you go to movies these days? It's all quick editing action plot Lewis at times etcetera etcetera. And here you have. You have to sit back and truly enjoy. Let's say Vittoria walking the paths and trying to find her where it was almost symbolic where she was trying to find her way moving slowly. You don't see that anymore. Very rarely see a movie where the pacing is slow on purpose out of it. Easy Great Edgy. At times when Angelica was in the scene otherwise it was really not them. There wasn't much of a score going on this was so sparse very very low key and the movie and the actors their expressions said a lot and the peripheral actors. They were rough-hewn. There were bar scenes. There was a lot of drinking. There was also the the fact. Sardinian peasantry was fishermen. And you saw the hardships of how how hard they worked so there. There's a rough edge to this and the music and the characters in the scenery because it wasn't friendly desert-like because all the trees were cut down long ago right so it's very very here that win at that point where they were filming that season aridity to the emotions to the scenery and to the act and the acting no But the music was sparse. If you WANNA call it arid with Oh we like that. Thank you ask will or so. Do we give this this one to keep an eye out for and and go see it when you get a chance to wherever it may play. I hope it does get distribution. Because it's very worthwhile all right now. I'M GONNA jump to the next one which is Saint Bernard Syndicate.

Tina Tina SARDINIA Angelica Jill Angelina Angelica Anjali Angelica anjelica Berlin Nian Vittoria director Sardinia Laura Saint Bernard Syndicate Jellicoe Young Victoria Victoria Lewis
"film festival" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on About to Review

"How do we find them allah will figure it out new i know too i know okri's well it's creating four all right we know rarely see how how will will and will bring them ovine them for a shack every on i come up here i mean like marino saying this is just a big networking opportunity but one of things that i love seeing is all the collaboration is i will meet somebody to different vancouver film festival or different film festival come here and recognize that everybody knows each other you know their work you know what they are doing lessons of community is always just inspiring and so last night at the gala opening and then i am sure tonight after everything before we get kicked out uh you know we'll have another chance for everybody just to really get together and meet each other listening to students last night on the director from violet in june listening to her after the screening talked people and be like oh cam i'm graduating i'm going to be done with school what should my next steps be and her getting legitimate advice from people in the industry was pretty amazing yeah that's such a beautiful failing the vancouver them community is is is has such as support system built into it and who i am we have like a programs like story a high of a through tell us we have crazy aides we have hotshots we have all these little unlike mp a award through with or film festival all of these little awards here in there that have i am really broader community i mean we're not that big of a community so it's it we are growing and naturally increasing our numbers but i'm the independent community really bans together and end its events like this where you really see it and you can answer feel the sense of community you can't i can't walk down that hall neither of us can without being like stop by five people horrible that we know and we've known for a year isn't as does they're they're still working there still creating in its is really inspiring to see that the city just doesn't stop against all adversity and they all come out to support each other's work so it's been it's been other really good year for that murtaza.

marino director okri vancouver
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

08:31 min | 3 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"That way. Well it becomes a a community of people that are supportive of one another and I don't think she was getting that support. She was kind of trying to break out of that family unit. And that's always hard when you have a family situation going on year after year and you are set in this family as a supporting role or lead character we see that at family reunions and and Family Christmases and holidays situations. Gatherings people are in their slot. Feels that that's where they should be. And there are certain people that WANNA break out of that. I'm one of them so I broke out of my supporting role and have become an independent person. I have a different way of celebrating holidays which I enjoy. I enjoy with you and with our friends. And this is one person who she kind of broke out of her mold. As this ice mold the spouse would have influence over the child of the mother who is in this role to be almost like a servant for them. She was helping them all right so in any case. I thought it was a great film. I don't know about the music. I don't remember all the music on it so I think Some of the music would really be supporting so then as we were going on over the summer we saw wonder woman which that just totally blew out the box office. And I don't think anyone really thought that it was going to do as well as it has an. I thought it was wonderful. I really enjoyed it and we saw in a movie theater. That was that caters to tentpole movies. It's one of those big cinemas it has how many seats five hundred or whatever with the seats that kind of move back and the screen was just huge and the sound system everything and so the actress. She did not get a lot of money for this movie however because it was so critically acclaimed and everything I hope. She does better for the sequel. I really that remind me of Queen Buddha. The stories there that we had A. That's based on a real person real historical queen but that was way back when an Amazon is legendary. Did they say they know exactly who they were? I don't know it was Herodotus. Who's talking about the Amazon's company but I really enjoyed them creating that situation. We're watching this legend. Come to life so that was and then it goes into world war and she went forward and just kind of brought it out the other thing that kind of goes along with the novitiate that we saw was a Docu series on. Netflix has called keepers. You found that one. And that gripped us. It was a seven part series. I couldn't stop watching. We binged on that one. So yeah that was a good binge year. We had no idea what to expect. It's a murder mystery. A fifty year old murder mystery of a young nun sister. Kathy CHESTNUT UNFOLDING. More people were coming forward. And that's what the Director Ryan White was saying. Couldn't believe how Hashtag me to really became evident here where people were coming forward when the series came out and more people were talking about it to the point where now that the Baltimore Archdiocese's really being pressured to release some of the documents that they still have about that because it was a just unbelievable story of things that were going on and they still have not found the murderer so in any case it was just a well structured written gripping series that was going on. I would like to see it again. Because you're watching. Sometimes you you you WANNA see a so much. You anticipate so much that you forget what you just saw. You're going Oh my God. I can't believe I heard that and went on so we like to do that. All the director's mother actually initiated his interest in the story G. INFLUENCED HIM INTO MAKING. This story was she involved where she remembered the story or something of that. We have to research that a little bit there. That was quite the show. We highly recommend that one the keepers. Now one last movie about nuns. Because of course this is Christmas time you hear the bells of Saint. Mary's you have bing crosby being father o'malley and singing all that and we saw white Christmas and so we have our traditional music musicals and and shows that we like to watch around this time but the trouble with angels was right because it's a comedy and it has a Hayley mills who starred in this film with Rosalind Russell who was a devout Catholic to be mother superior kind of frivolous and said it was formula snap but I think very differently about it. I thought IDA Lupino who directed this was her last film that she directed she started directing the nineteen fifties and then she directed television so she directed a series of the fugitives. She did bewitched she was the only woman that directed twilight zone episode so she took this on and worked really well with Rosalind Russell and I really feel that. She took every key scene and really made it important. Really had something to say about it that it wasn't just a prank that these girls made it was something that changed them. And of course you know. That's what happens in the end but that was a movie that the nuns and ours in our Catholic school liked for us to go see and recommended. There was some other ones that were on the list. Y You weren't allowed to watch but I really enjoyed that film and then when I found that IDA Lupino was directed it I thought wow that was A great way to kind of end the year with women who were very strong in film in the one thousand nine hundred forty s and nineteen thirties nineteen forties which we were doing. Just this past month. Becca Davis movies. We did Joan Crawford movies. We were watching everyone during that period of time and I loved it some of these movies that we just talked about the shows that we're just talking about now. Does influence may trigger someone to come forward to open up some of those memories because Alana them are put away their boxed up and put away and as we opened up. Some of the gift set have been coming around now this time of year. We're opening up a lot of situations that will perhaps help somebody and make their life more enjoyable seeing some of these films. Go onto these film festivals. Because you're going to see films that you may not get to see anywhere else ever and we have a whole list of those and so until next time happy new year. We're going to do a lot more of these because We enjoy just going out and seeing these movies and go into film festivals retrospectives other things that go on. Absolutely become a subscriber. Go to film festival. Reviews DOT COM. Subscribe to this podcast. It will just show up in your mailbox and you could hear our next one as we come up and film festival reviews Dot Com right and this show was recorded at we. Chief Studio Productions Audio Engineer Yuri Turgeon and produced by March hare media until next time..

IDA Lupino Rosalind Russell director murder Amazon big cinemas Queen Buddha Netflix tentpole Baltimore Archdiocese Joan Crawford Ryan White DOT Kathy CHESTNUT Yuri Turgeon Becca Davis Hayley mills
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

11:14 min | 3 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"Hello everyone and welcome to another show of Film Festival reviews and this is Christina caught. I perching and we're doing an end of the year show. It is cold. Very cold year frigid blankets last year. Around this time it was about sixty degrees and we were practically sunning ourselves but we were preparing last year to go to Sundance Film Festival and slammed dance at the same time. Park City Utah. That was January. Two thousand seventeen and what? I really wanted to happen while we were. There was have a great festival experience for you you already because this was your first Sundance Synopsis Quickly. Beautiful Park City. It's not every day every day. The women's March what was happening there. The reason why I try to focus or prepare for Sundance as much as we can with the types of movies they're gonNA be out there and because we knew that the women's march was going to be happening while we were there. It was a protest for the inauguration of number forty five and especially because he was outed on national television on entertainment tonight and how he grabbed women by there and we seen the pussycat hats in any case we were there. We were supporting and we're looking for films strong women films for this entire year. And that's what we're going to be talking about today. We got to a park city by Wednesday evening so we had an opportunity to really kind of set ourselves up and give us the the plan of action because again you had no idea what to do where to go and what what to do next. But I knew great guide. You structured our time there. We had no downtimes or watching a movie or going to some kind film. Commission were panel discussions receptions networking parties. A lot of things. That was no down time. We were there for how many days or a week right seven full days. We got there Wednesday evening and returned Thursday morning and it was wonderful. And of course you you gave me the choice to whether to attend certain functions or not to attend or are worn out by this by now beautiful setting. It was just beautiful. I loved every second of my memories from that time. It's twelve months later and we're picking up our vibes from that time and sort of recapitulating everything that happened in between what we saw the year. F- were encapsulating the year with the theme that we are. We have chosen for this podcast so first one that we did go to see and again it was a world premier and that was the novitiate starring. Melissa Leo. And that was the novitiate for me right now. That was my break in movie or Sundance. I really want to see the novitiate because I had the opportunity to have a podcast with Melissa Leo. A few years back when she did frozen river and one of the things that I really was so impressed with her was the way she was able to just grabby by that first moment that you saw her whatever it was she has a way of bringing out that that strength that power whatever character it is and this was. She was mother superior in this setting and it was in the nineteen sixties and. That was a time where there were a lot of. Catholic schools and a lot of the nuns would kind of choose one of the the young girls at maybe was not really a popular girl was kind of quiet and bringing to unto their fault. And that's how this movie started with this one girl who was not brought up religiously but she was little lonely and she kind of fell into this romanticism and the mystery of being a nun. Because that's how it's all projected you have the silence time you have this spiritualism you have these candles. You didn't have a lot of stuff going on. You know his very simplified but rigid schedules. How did you see that film when you were watching it or do you up memories first of all? I my first impression of non-swiss as a four year old that Sarai going into schools. The dark moment of these dark people were. I went through Catholic school to a certain point fourth grade from kindergarten. Right well on the other hand. There are a lot of girls young girls who felt well. Maybe this is a way to go and here. They're giving you direction and structure when you're in grade school going into junior high. Whatever sometimes a little structure and regimen is good. Get all that discipline in different mediums but religion works in a different way. God and how do you perceive God and you're marrying God that decision and it's really convent. No you can leave but falling all the rules and regulations. I was wondering how Melissa Leo Prepared. For this role of mother superior and then questioning her own decision to be the mother superior into abide by the rules when the rules were changed because Vatican two came out and all the rules were changed. And that's what the story approach to Lynghjem which ended Melissa Leo's character the CPO mother superior. Who's been in a non? For forty years and everything about the Vatican two was upending her beliefs in that stricter and structure liberalizing the church to her was the biggest anathema that she had to deal with and it was very difficult for her well. We enjoyed the film tremendously. It was written and directed by Margaret. Betts who was there at Sundance. It was bought by Sony. Pictures and then it opened in the box office in October of two thousand seventeen and it got an R. Rating from the Motion Picture Association of America Breath from the Catholic News Service gave it a rating of Oh for morally offensive. -fensive okay. Well you know what I think. They should just watch it again. And we've you it and re were reevaluate. Its its raiding now back in the days in the old medieval times we saw lion in winter recently. That was a Christmas movie but we saw what happens to women who are controlled because they were property of their husbands so either they were imprisoned in castle. A lot of women who were independent in families and had money became nuns so that they would retain their independence and so that they wouldn't be held hostage as some you know on in the person's property so it's one of the greatest composers of choir music. Choral music was a nun. Who wanted to be a composer but in on the outside world. She wouldn't have had the opportunity so she became a non and allowed herself that freedom of creativity some of the most sonorous beautiful music dedicated to God and the church. So the the realities were often harsh and then all of a sudden you have this new reality of opening the windows and really changing the rules so in any case that had not only a profound effect on us during Sundance and slam dance. We saw some wonderful movies there too but during the year we were just kind of going towards the strong woman films and the the next film festivals your lead. Will you liked woman okay? Well as as we're going to another film talking about ice mother which we saw at the TRIBECA film festival it does have a religious signifying element to it being immersed in water and cold. Water is a right that we know as comes from baptism and it's very cleansing right for all cultures. This particular movie. Ice Mother is by Bohdan. Slama from the Czech Republic. It's called Baba's lead and it's a little different connotation when you translate it into English is mother. I don't see it that way. See Women coming from ice and coming from a rebirth. Because she is a woman sixty seven years old in a family situation. That's very regimented. Same thing she had the children and then was taken care of the grandchildren. She was cooking for them. She was taking care of them. She was a very regimented life situation. She lost her husband's she's living with with one of her sons and then the and she has a dinner Sunday dinner and she cooks Sunday dinner at that time. That one of her grandchildren was playing soccer and kick the ball in the water. And then she met this community of ice water swimmers. It was freezing cold. I felt cold swimming in the winter there and she joined the community. Well I don't know if I could ever do something like that. But so what did you think of the movie? I it was an incredibly wonderful depiction of older people who have lost love and regain love for different things for different reasons. Baba's ledoux or the ice. Mother met a polar bear that was swimming there and he introduced to that life. He lived in a squalor type situation but he wanted.

Melissa Leo Park City Sundance Film Festival Catholic school soccer Christina Czech Republic Sarai Sony Lynghjem Margaret Baba Betts Motion Picture Association of ledoux
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

06:15 min | 3 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"So whatever is forgetful or behind the scenes of should not be emphasizes. Mostly I think dramatic things that and how they're used for emphasis if a there's a scene music actually makes the scene and a lot of people don't realize it doesn't have to be memorable. It just has to have a dramatic or comedic effect as to its intent and purpose and I think a composer knows with the director what they want to emphasize in every movie that we enjoy. The music is incredible. That goes with it so there are very many tricks as to composition on how to deal with things violins for the blanche character. Rather than for the the baby. Jane Oh Yeah. They're very clever use of music and I think music is very relevant and necessary. I first of all the things that we've learned from making movies that the director knows that the music is going to either make or break a scene and so they work in tandem so the second most important job not only filming the move or the direction of the movie but the music of the Mooney but and I'm not downplaying the acting but to create what is not live because film is a medium that can be is frozen in time correct. Yes that's it you were as first of all what I wanted to mention. Too wonderful thing. The dichotomy between stage and and movies that stage. You got one shot with movies. You keep taking take after take after take till you get a right for instance in Juarez. Bette Davis has an entrance that William Wyler. The director made her do forty eight times and it was just a matter of her walking in and using our dress a certain way but you had to get it down to where the director said cut. That's the take number forty eight so imagine having to do the keeping that intensity up whether comedic or dramatic cost take after take after. Take one of the things that. Bette Davis in her later years in one of her interviews and people were asking her how much fun she had making her movies and she said this is not fine. This is work and this is something that they both had this high level of expertise and being able to have a definitive performance to show that it it's just are classed class. Act Interestingly enough or whatever happened to baby Jane Betty Davis was nominated for an Academy Award. And she really thought she was going to win it. Now Joan Crawford wasn't nominated. I think she should have been now. Joan Crawford was not nominated but he was asked to accept okay. She was asked to accept the award in case and Bancroft one for Miracle Whip worker so and Bancroft one for miracle worker. Betty Davis was supposedly. This is a story that they were both standing in the wings on stage and she did not win and Joan Crawford said excuse me I have to go get the Oscar so Hollywood Hollywood ending. It'll that they always try to create this the business. The business was trying to create a myth that they fabricated between Joan. This professional rivalry really existed it was just a fallacy. As far as I'm concerned because from all the back stories that we got with the movies we would go to special features and then we'd have these documentaries on the actresses that we've been interested lately which are Joan Crawford and Bette Davis and they didn't meet in life till when they never pads to cross that often not often you know but just work together so when whatever happened Jane exactly right that. An Act resurrected both their careers. It did right. It did but not always getting the roles again that they would have liked but what we would like to see Oh what would like to say? Is I think this is a wonderful experience that we're having and it really opened our eyes to a lot of the work that we would not have recognized recently of. Bette Davis Joan Crawford and the actors of either Lupino as a great director as well as Hetty. Lamar who is an inventor along with being a glamorous and very en- very accomplished actress so this comes from a lot of the work that the Fort Lee Film Commission has been doing and talking about and we are very grateful to Tom and Nelson for sharing all of their knowledge in history and for Jessica shares. Who has really delved into the Bette Davis Story? She has found a lot of archival materials. She was able to speak with an assistant of Bette Davis and received some very personal items that she uses her show. Her neck show is coming up on Tuesday December twelfth. And it's at the actors guild in New York City and she's has a residents there and I recommend this show. I highly recommend the show for people to see somebody with such energy as Betty Davis had in her years. I see that coming out of Jessica's interpretation of this really icon.

Bette Davis Jane Betty Davis Joan Crawford director Academy Award William Wyler Juarez New York City Bancroft Jessica Oscar Hollywood Fort Lee Film Commission Lamar Hetty Lupino Tom Nelson
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

07:36 min | 3 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"Welcome to another adventure. Episode of Film Festival reviews. This is Christina Kotler Pie and I'm Yuri touching and we've been doing this for a while now. What we wanted to get back into is some of the old films that we've been talking about with the Fort. Lee Film Commission members. Tom Myers Executive Director and Nelson Page Chairman of Fort Lee Film Commission. Who are doing a podcast called forty film town. Usa listening to them discuss. What the studio system. How the studio system began in Fort Lee and talking about all the different actors at the time so between that and recently seeing a one woman show by Jessica share called. Betty Davis in for sissies urine. I decided to watch a lot of Bette Davis movies and see for ourselves. What made hurt so powerful as an actor to this day that people just think what is Bette Davis all about. We saw quite a few films. How many did we watch? So let's go down the list. We watched now voyager the first time which I introduced to you because I thought it was one of the premier type Bette Davis showcases from nineteen forties. But then when we saw Jessica Sheriff Show in New York where she does a one woman show on. Bette Davis we decided. We're GONNA do a Bette Davis Binge of her movies from firm Jessica show. We understood that she that Betty won to Oscars right off the bat in the thirties. Number One dangerous number two Jessie Belle. And then the her show. Jessica show opens up with nineteen thirty. Nine Oscar show where dark victory was up. Bette Davis's lead role as an actress or she was nominated for the Oscar and her contender was Vivian. Lee Gone With the wind on with the win. And from there we get that position or that show from Jessica. Were begins at that point where she so disappointed that she didn't win that. Third Oscar. It's been elusive. It was elusive for the rest of her life. Because no actresses won three Oscars for lead actress but now voyager was where? We ruined Deuce than we saw Jessica show and then we went and binged. I went to the library and we got all these movies so we started with dangerous. We went into jazz bell little. Fox's talked a lot about that during one of the shows with Nelson and Tom and they again. We're talking about the studio system. Where Betty Davis came from theater She was a northerner she came from Lowell Massachusetts but because he was able to project herself on stage for voice everything is. She was very successful with this show. She was found by a talent scout and taken to la so she was under contract with the several of the studio's systems and eventually she wanted to get better roles. She was not the glamorous type. She was kind of odd looking her eyes. Were really big. And at the time all the actresses that were coming from the silent era were starting to create a look so that they could differentiate themselves from the other. There are lots of Glamour. Looks you know that. But she wasn't. She was the character actress so her first movie was dangerous. No of human human bonds and we just saw that because again we started in the middle so then we said okay what what was her start and why did she becomes such a provocative actor actress coming out from that Timeframe when Leslie Howard was this Glamour Guy and it was very romanticized and it was painful because that whole idea was you love somebody but that person doesn't love you and then another person could love you but you don't love them. I was just talking about how she presented this energy within this context of a very emotional story. And it's a WHO's the author of that Somerset Mom and we don't know if it was a Hollywood ending yet because I haven't read the read. The story have are like to go back to the studio system at the time. Were talking about Bette Davis's life and the studio system. You're a contract player. She was paid a salary had to do whatever movies that they were telling her to do. At one point they wanted her. Do a song and dance thing with busby Berkeley and she said no way my doing that. I am a serious act actor. I want provocative roles. I want challenges. I want my emotions out there. I love the audience. Some come from Broadway. I know how to connect. She encountered these different ways. First of all when you do movies you're doing take after take after take told the director says yes and yet that energy every time every time and she just amazing when you watch a anybody watches her movies and we have. I'll I'll the first to admit I cannot probably maybe take two at a time and then have to take a break. Because they're so powerful. Now coming off Broadway. She knew had a project chief motored with her is she took that into Hollywood and the day didn't know what to do with her. She tried to buck the system. She became the hottest ticket item highest probably paid at the time and got the best roles because she worked hard and she solicitors created image. One Movie Did she star in with Front Show. Tone should tone. She did several of them but the one dangerous was the one that she won an Oscar for well. One of the interesting things was her rival or at the time. The studio's always liked to show that there was a rivalry between Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. What was also interesting. Is this art imitation of life because she also married her co Star from all about eve. Yes he was bill in the movie. And she was Margo channing. And as we understood it we were watching some of the back story that he wanted a Margo channing to be married to outside of the movie realm and she wanted her bill and it didn't work out so there is a lot of this kind of art imitation life mixed with the Joan Crawford as well. That was very interesting. Listening to the way she was expressing. How disciplined you had to be maintained that energy for that emotion and the one movie that we really were impressed with was whatever happened to baby Jane..

Bette Davis Betty Davis Oscar Jessica Lee Film Commission Fort Lee Film Commission Jessica show Christina Kotler Pie Tom Myers Jessica Sheriff Margo channing Film Festival Nelson Fort Lee Jessica share Hollywood Joan Crawford Lee busby Berkeley Leslie Howard
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

07:36 min | 4 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"And the next one then. We weren't too sure we're going to go see it. Because of the reviews they got from the village voice by the way Danny King did not write a very good Review of ice mother as well as just missed the whole point of this movie but the other movie that we read about and we were having second. Thoughts was November. Is Estonian movie. So you see this picture in the book. And it's dark in its scraggly in its inner talking about werewolves in this and then in the description by village voice or saying don't go see it's all muck and dirt and we said okay. We're going to keep an open mind because we love these movies that come out of I don't know some pagan mindset recalls it a mash up of fairy tales but it's more than that it's legends. It's a way of life for people living in this part of the world and some very old and very dark superstitious magic against everything that you think of trying to understand your place in this universe and you're always fighting against the odds because these people look awful why we should set it up and say when did it take place in what part of the century which century in year. Eight nine years or something like that. Yes I think it was. It was very rustic people. Dress tattered clothes dirty placed to the great impact for me on this movie was that I could not for the for the life of me understand where it was going because of the way it started the there was very little exposition as to what he was really so I think it was very visual. And it had an impact on both of us it was the black and white but the richness of the black makes me feel the way they used to do in film they would like double it up. Really rich blacks. You just can't explain it. That's what this movie was all about. So it was very very visual and expressive. These images in these items would come alive like this thing called a crack. What was this? We weren't sure but it had some animals skull and some side Sir Blades and like things that could hurt people with in all of the sudden. You think it's gonNA come at everybody. And it turns out to be a family slave or the family servant but in a kind of a violent way part fantasy in it because of the crops were rice slaves and servants of their creators their masters. Where did it start? And why is it called November which I think is a misnomer as well may not be a good title but he was started on all souls day and as we know that is the very revered holiday time where the ancestors can come to closest to the earth to meet with their loved ones that were left behind or not so loved ones whatever so that was interesting we had ghosts because that's the night that started and it was really creepy in the woods with all these crosses and everything and and again we're starting to see a the seeds of a love story between Lena and Hans? Okay so that's where it all began in an all these other elements of wear wolves. She was turning into aware wolf. He was in love with another woman. She's trying to get a potion for him or how to break the spell and then you get all these people. These are the ones that were really not actors. They live in these woods and I would try to be very nice to them if I ever came across their way there were so many smaller stories that we were thinking that. Perhaps these stories may not have been necessary. But maybe that's because everybody. It's like the neighborhood. I think they were vignettes. Okay rather than one story. I think you're right okay and it would change. It would surprise you throw your left carve there were a lot of red herrings. As far as I was concerned there was obsession. Happened with an old man and a young woman. A woman with another young man who was in love with us all these emotional blackmail things going on through. Wolves represented wildness. And this is how these people were living. There was the baron with castle and then there were these people who were living rather close to the edge of life and barely hanging on their living all alone. It was terrible there sleeping cows. We have that yes husbandry and in the in close to nature. Yeah they would be always this evil spirits thing and then you would have charms and curses and blessings and everything. We're all mixed up together. So the religion was this. I think on the cost when the superstition was ninety percent of the religion. Still and then religion would kinda win over and force them to give up these These charms and superstitions and mysteries of thanks. And just to listen to this. I think the the greatest thing about our day was we saw three movies. Two of them were international. One was done in English language completely. So the other two were subtitled so that we had a taste of international all good taste to reach rational way. A lot of sexual and everything will go a lot of sex in this movie. To every time we go to Tribeca I think we spend more time on international entertainment. I'd like to go and explore every country that has movies made and see what their cinemas all about what their movies are great about film festivals. Right we'll get a chance to see a cross section in the time that we have and the resources we have. So go see bombshell. Go see ice mother. Go See November. That's a great one and have a good day. That'll be a few months from now. Get soulful ooh. That's good get soulful until next time. This was recorded at we. Chief productions and for MORE INFORMATION TO MARCH HARE MEDIA DOT COM film festival reviews DOT COM or torching tunes dot COM.

Danny King Sir Blades Lena Hans
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

10:06 min | 4 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"What do you think of when you say Hetty Lamar? Glamorous and actress didn't know her origin till I saw the movie. She has many many talents. Other than acting primarily she was studio actress for MGM a lustrous career but it was varied. She add many marriages. Did I know anything about her before? Not In depth. This would have heard of her. Because there's some great movies that I've Seen Sweden. We enjoy watching the black and white films while we go for the classics but there are a lot of people that probably don't know who heady Lamar is or was. I found it really fascinating to learn about her invention mouth. You look at the chronology of her career. It's started with her in a rather erotic movie in German ecstasy and then she got reputation as a an actress of dubious morality. She capitalized on her beauty. She wanted to be thought of as a thinker and intellectual. It was tough for women to be anything but glamorous when you say or something akin to femininity rather than brains. It's really if you are an attractive person. Attractive woman you're not thought of as right bright so she invested that that all misconception with her beauty to get ahead in other ways she was thwarted and right. It was saying no. Don't you worry about this? It's being taken care of you. Just go and sell war bonds. Well what happened was she had a patent that was called the frequency hopping the conception. Was this George. Until was her partner in this other than the fact that he was brilliant also as a musician she and actress as an inventor he devised or he wrote this piece for sixteen player. Pianos each player piano playing its parts. Correct so what they did was. They took two rolls and offset them. Because the punch outs are not even you can change frequencies to another punch shout and therefore they created what we know. Today is Wi Fi we know is bluetooth. It was a way of sending messages cryptically during World War. Two and a navy brass turned her down because Oh player piano rolls wanted to just go back and do what you do best. And they ignored it and stored it but she did get the patent yes then it was put away like in Raiders of the lost Ark. Somewhere top secret and put away somewhere and nobody knew out. Secret was just no she says. I think she said was top. Secret labelled top secret and then it's gone. It was really interesting hearing her voice because the crux of this documentary was her story. As they explained the beginning she did not leave. Anything behind there was a memoir but was by ghost rider. Not by her. She was very upset by the facts. Were changed all the time and just exploited made everything over the top just to sell. What happened was she was interviewed. He was central IMP-. Having about four tapes. Ninety minutes probably of a phone interview with her although because of the channel which I loved about this because it really made it feel so a fantastic so genuine that she's actually been recorded on this and so there were times when I had a little difficulty understanding what was said but for the most part. I got the gist in her voice. So a melodic to listen to her Austrian accent. She still had it but I think in acting. She was able to be coached dialogue coach. Now really have it as thick but those tapes. She went back to her Austrian background. Her accent there. The crux of the thing was her. Life was not easy. You have great parents. Her father taught her all about Maf- science from from childhood and that's where she got her interest. I think so. Many people were the shocked. Surprised or her can't believe that she actually thinking about these things in imagine it would just come to her her head. She would just see these. The ideas yes she saw in her head and that's where they come from but she had her all completed in her head to formulate something and say well. Here's a problem. I would like to improve upon it or who were invent something completely new. I love the fact that when she was five years old. She took up her music box and put it back together L. K. Now so that's a precocious child sense. Okay so that's what we call it. But it's just that she had a brain and she was beautiful and on top of that. She was beautiful absolutely and Pat of actresses. Try to copy her look her style with the hairstyle and the face and makeup use then then she said she said the home even when she started having plastic surgery that was later. Set The trend for that too she was. She was explaining what she wanted done. Very aerodynamically perhaps you. We're to hide them. But in my to have some structural right. She told the doctors what she wanted. And how it was to be done and where the scars were to be which astounded the doctors because they weren't using that technique. That was the whole thing now as not to jump ahead too far but it did not helper later in life having all that surgery by that time she was so naturally beautiful and she was naturally beautiful into her later years as well if she did not feel compelled to alter our look to maintain that what was perceived beauty because she was holy beautiful person from hearing those tapes really the stories and everything that she wanted and about her family and things. She didn't have to do that. She something that's over. What was it thirty billion dollars industry? That's worth three hundred billion ever got paid for her patent expired. She didn't know the legalities up. Your patent expires. Through certain time and she can reapply for extension and she didn't and expired so who takes over whoever discovered the use for the eventually adopted it the armed services and in today's technologies due to what she she came up with them. So this is all this information that we got from seeing this document. And I have to tell you that the director of this documentary Alexandra. Dean is an Emmy Award winning journalist and producer and she did news magazine. Docs for P. B. S. and series for Bloomberg Produced Series Innovators Adventures and pursuits. She writes about invention for Business Week. And she's a founding partner at reframed pictures. That's a journalist and producer. Who just created this story? That was so full of information but it was so wonderful to watch because we got so much archival and different elements of it. There was a lot of research done to this. So that's what moves the story instead of just having talking heads which happens quite a bit. If you're able to find all the images that completed this whole decade or decades of historic information about a movie person and a genius in inventing. And then you're getting all this technology. I think were director. Did very well was tell. A story of a woman who lived quite a long time had very career five husbands different children. How those children as they were interviewed in this movie knew her reminisced about her. There was so many nuances in this movie. That were really good. And the editing was good. Because it didn't well on what you said talking heads only our footage ours work absolutely yes but in essence she was constantly the sex bomb shell title and she never sounded bitter. She never an all the interviews. Even on that on those cassette tapes. She had a sense of humor. She was never bitter. Maybe privately off camera or something like that but whatever we got to see in. That movie was an incredible woman through thick and thin when when her husband left with nothing. The first one cheap bounced back. She just didn't have luck in love at the end. It was her individuality in spark in her zeal for things in life and she gave over software kids and show because they gave back. They were very positive about their mother. I think this was a great story and I think it's. She's a great role model rugby. And I hope this gets picked up. I'm sure we'll see.

Hetty Lamar founding partner director MGM producer Sweden Wi Raiders Emmy Award George Pat Bloomberg Dean Ark
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

08:48 min | 4 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"We had seen the American epic trilogy. A part of it at the Asbury Park Music and film festival so I was looking forward to seeing that but that was Thursday evening Friday and we weren't really coming around being set up just yet for this festival so we didn't get to see here but I really enjoyed this. Two trains running just the whole idea of the social upheaval. That was going on in the civil rights movement in one thousand nine hundred sixty four in Mississippi and then two groups of three white males were looking for Blues Music from the Thirties. And these people who were in Mississippi that they're still alive nine dl blues men that recorded on oak records or they had different other labels the were. Don By field recording in the field or they were brought to a studio or a cabin or something or house very little remuneration. They went back to their former lives. Either they kept performing or they dropped out. So in the sixties we have a juxtaposition of the civil rights movement with this to to crews of three looking for these particular blues men thirty years later thirty five years later Sun House was one skip. James was another and those were the intended targets to find because number one the particular styles these gentlemen was unique all the Blues Delta Blues cats that were playing Robert Johnson. Blind Lemon Jefferson mighty waters. You had who else Mississippi John Hurt. These people actually had a replenish career coming out of nowhere elderly age because these six aficionados of the was John Fahey from the from California. It was the bay area was separate system and the other were from New York. They got into Volkswagen and drove out with no plan. He said either. We were crazy or really just so innocent going to Mississippi at this time not knowing that it was such a powder keg they would drive by cottonfields asking for directions and the the black laborers which is look at them and saying they're not saying anything because they don't know what these white boys wanted from them until they found someone and I. I'm not sure who that person was. But someone who said he was going to help them and they did track down on house who was in Rochester. Some very funny point. There's they drove up to the house. These guys there's a man sitting on the porch. And they ask him they go the Eugene House and his wife live here. Sons real name was Eugene and he goes yes there on the fourth floor so they were about to go in and he goes but they're not there right now he said Yeah. He says the they're not there but I am here. I'm son House and that that's when they're Mecca their trip or their hodge. Their trip to Mexico was all of a sudden fulfilled. It's amazing it's an amazing story. But it was also when they found them that same day. They discovered the three civil rights. Workers were killed during her goodman. And Cheney going on at the same time. Here's music vision of music. And then there's the other end of the Jim Crow and segregation that was going on in. Mississippi was incredibly. Well like you said a powder keg and it was two trains running in and they just kind of criss cross each other back and forth. I loved how they did this. They used animation to fill in the gaps. Really great animation. I thought it was it transferred from the reality and it goes into the animation. Then it goes back Used a lot of archival material very well done and what I loved about the whole thing afterwards to Q. In a it was done by the composer the QNA and he was talking about because he said this sample art. Who's the director had to leave? They've been to a lot of film festivals already. So he's kind of heard many think going on especially with what's happening now in as things haven't changed but he got to talk about the music more so in this. Qna Any really enjoyed that and he did a wonderful job because everybody was asking him a lot of break questions for that. So I I love that fact that Woodstock we did when we were as Berry. Part Film Festival we did go to the house independence where they had. American epic which was a trilogy which was shown at this particular Woodstock Festival also which has music from that same era. They're trying to find the musicians from that era and they also reproduced exactly a duplicate of the machine that was recording them at time. That's does film this particular two trains running and the American epic. These are incredible troves of things that and sounding by the way owned a lot of the documentary or archival clips of that time in their safe in there Incubator Archives Their Archive. Which the two gentlemen now was a woman and a guy that did the American epic. They started that project correct. Yes and we're supposed to be great to see three movies a trilogy and Long Train Runnin. Again in conjunction and the full moon was a hunter moon last night okay and then after Beers Ville we stopped into. We went into one of those places where they had the fire pit and had a blue singer. So after two chains running We did get some live music which is always something that we love to support. We covered a lot of stop in a very short period of time. I I had a great time. Oh being there. Yeah Yeah and the moon came out last night when Friday. We just drove up. Friday saw the one film we hung around from wherever we got our tickets we planned. We got the maps and everything sorta settled on how things worked in the in the festival and made the decision to go to a Rosendahl for Saturday oath. Well we did because we went to Rhinebeck for for the women of my dawn's world premiere and made the decision to go back because we didn't have really a place to stay at the time and then we found a place to stay so that was wonderful. On Saturday night. We had a place to stay. It was incredible week and we locked out. Friend of ours helped us find a room at the Hudson Resorts. Hudson Valley Valley resort and SPA. A friend of ours. Who runs the place? It was just such a great sat. We drove up fall. Foliage is incredible the autumn at its peak. Beautiful weekend cloudless sky. We get there we get we check in and immediately split for wherever we as well we well yes. It was very very doable. And you know so. Many people were out there for a lot of different things and as was written in the catalog. There were art galleries art openings. There was Music going on there. There was a lot of Plea market the flea market. The big flea market was around. The farmers markets were around. It was a a wonderful time of year to experience all of this so I'm looking forward to next year. Okay UNTIL NEXT TIME. Get some music. Come in Love.

Mississippi Sun House Eugene House Asbury Park Volkswagen John Hurt John Fahey House Mexico New York Robert Johnson Hudson Valley Valley Eugene California Jim Crow Cheney director James
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

05:14 min | 4 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"And we went to see that. In Rosen. Dale get we love Rosen Dale. It's a maverick Kinda town. It so we really enjoy going there and talking to the people. I wish there was more activity there for the Film Festival because we saw a banner on the front but it was lower to the ground. And you couldn't really see as you're driving by people. Were able to stop and see recognize that that was part of the Woodstock Film Festival and it was not as well attended as it should have been. That's what I'm getting too because this movie was really well done. Well seemed to be put in the outer reaches of planet for screenings. Because it wasn't in woodstock didn't get the exposure should've had Rosenthal's a small community very small. Luckily Maria gone was at the we had a QNA with her great QNA. It was a great movie. Hope she gets more exposure. She has many words. You had other movies. I asked three questions I asked her. What was her inspiration? And then the second question I asked about was the carnival that whole kind of expression painting Dance Movement everything was very very powerful but it was only towards the end that that was going on so it wasn't really a major portion of the movie the cinematography was really beautiful. And the the actors which some were local others were The main character came from a United Kingdom. Uk and the actress grandmother was a theater actress. But what was your first impression when you started watching? It was going in had long exposition but as first of all photography was incredible everything was filmed beautifully. The my problem with was the dialogue was unintelligible. Trinidad and Tobago Right. And there are accents. First of all Maria von explained that she was supposed to have subtitles and they didn't put him in so therefore I had a hard time with some of the characters talking what they're talking but yet the just the flow. The movie was beautiful. The tension was was palpable as the movie went on and then the day new mall and the the two protagonists had their finale finale so to speak but the symbolism of of the moving was within y y the title play the devil within the context of the culture of Trinidad Tobago. They're very religious people but they use pagan symbolism and blended together. We do this in many other countries to not to be tangential here but it was beautifully. Done Carnival exists all over the Caribbean and it happens in Louisiana in happens in other countries within the Caribbean countries. And so she's exploring that theme but there was more to it than that it was the colors were just so pronounced with the blue colors especially because blue has been always used for cleansing going back to Greek. Times GOING BACK TO Many cultures and just keeps on going. Because it's it is. It's it's cleansing and it's casting out the devil and I liked the colors throughout in all the sets and in the clothing and in the the homes and the interiors and the exteriors and especially the waterfall which mentioned was very difficult to get to. Oh I know and she used some. Cgi because somebody asked about the car that was going over the cliff and You know how that was shot because there are some very steep cliffs and the roads. Don't give you a lot of room. And she was talking about Filming that way and trying to get around to these Very difficult to R- rugged areas that Filmmakers do that. I understand that point anyway. That was a great movie. We're very happy. Congratulations Maria for that. And we're looking forward to seeing more of her work and then we went into exploring the American roots music music and film and two trains running and that was at the bears. Ville Theater and that was Sunday evening officer.

Maria von Rosen Dale Uk Trinidad Tobago Caribbean woodstock Ville Theater United Kingdom Trinidad Rosenthal Tobago Right officer Louisiana
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

03:10 min | 4 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"And then the women are the ones that organized and held fast and supported. The men were altogether and and she was able to tell how she got to do this. You know she just went. Her mother was living in view. That's where she's from. She lives in but does the Maryland with her husband and two children but as soon as she heard what was happening attacks on a peaceful protests by students and they were vicious attacks by the. Swat like team of police were a police force. A called that court the order to shoot the civilians and there were over one hundred people killed by snipers in in other means by these coot police. This was ordered by the president at the time younger cartridge who ultimately fled Ukraine with this money which was in billions right seventy billion you. He emptied the cranes. Coffers is a Moscow now out with Putin of course you know in a planning out there. He secret war in Ukraine was the reason for the protest to begin with was finally that the premise was a unit cartridge. Promise to join Ukraine. Would join the European Union in in business and politic- politics and association rather than the Putin inspired a Commonwealth within the Russian sphere. Anyway that was the reason for the protests because Yama Cartridge reneged on the on the promise of Ukraine. Joining the euro was able to find in in many of her characters. I mean that's why these were all character stories. And what she was saying at the panel. She was trying to get as many women to talk about their experiences as possible Many times and documentary filmmaking. Which they explained is that you would find one character. Follow that character going through of the situation and what she wanted to show is as many people as possible men and women Jr showed young and old different a creed different cultures Don boss of big. We saw that in the film The behold banner saying that we support Ukraine in out so her story was really very powerful and fortunately because you had the panel on Sunday. Her film was still screening again. Sunday evening and we did get to see her after during the screening but we were on our way home and she said it was a full audience for Bears Ville Theater which we showed up in this up that afternoon because the Maverick Award for best feature narrative shepherds and butchers directed by Oliver. Schmitz.

Ukraine Putin Yama Cartridge Jr Maryland Bears Ville Theater euro Moscow European Union Schmitz president Oliver Don
"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

07:36 min | 4 years ago

"film festival" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"He was a cinematographer and director of photography for an credible amount of films. Such as WHO's afraid of Virginia Woolf directed by Mike Nichols he won the Oscar for that. He did in the heat of the night. Hard working on one flew over. The CUCKOO's nest was fired because he was involved with a person who was who's doing civil protests. Do you think his politics really infiltrated his work. Very interesting because I hearing about him and then having this incredible eye-opener what he did as he was speaking in this documentary being interviewed. He mentioned that he wasn't so much objective because he want he always in his documentaries he would inject himself as Alfred. Hitchcock would do cameos in his movie. Haskell would get in on the interview with whom he's doing an interview and actually trying to convince that person on his point of view so data work. I can't Talal because I haven't seen all the the documentary steady. Did but they were. They were incredible for instance medium cool occupy Los Angeles in the name of democracy. America's conscious associates con con sacrifice. Big Love who needs sleep passers of so rich to have. He did so many documentaries but they were all about some kind of social contract issues and they were neither leftist nor conservative nor Communist rain it just his belief he knew America. He knows America's great but there are ills in it and democracy does not always work as it should and he was trying to bring that out that capitalism and democracy are not synonymous. That's interesting because it's so appropriate for what's happening in the news. What we read about all the time These days especially and I think that is very a very interesting aspect of this programming. I think that was going on. Do you think that the documentary really gave his character and his vision? You know really brought it through throughout on the screen for somebody who didn't know who he was because as you said is people there. They knew him they loved him. They work there and he was always around. It was always involved with the Woodstock Film Festival. He was always showing up and he was always talking about some autocracy and things so and again his point of view right but being being introduced and course time eye-opener my mouth was agape. I'm listening I'm actually doing well. I didn't know that kind of reaction. He went to Vietnam North Vietnam with Jane Fonda. He felt her doing the interviews. And you know the North Vietnamese which caused fewer in America that she was actually supporting and he was descended. Muhtar WHO'S THE DP? Nobody bothered him because nobody knew he was doing it but he was there. He seemed to be everywhere he he did. Callers one nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight. That was real political. One with divall. And Sean Penn Probably Tens I. He did coming home with John and Jane that that why did bound for glory the Woody Guthrie about what he got threes life. Thomas Crown affair the original one and then in one thousand nine hundred sixty five. We're kind of jumping around. I know that because I'm I'm just getting to learn about the man and his life. He did the bus. Which is a documentary on the civil rights movement during in one thousand nine hundred sixty five when they were all going to Washington. Dc to protest the segregation and Jim Crow laws that were and it was right before. Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights. Act In one thousand nine sixty five so he's on the bus. I studied signed in sixty four when I saw you coming up from the because I was at the panel. Were telling your stories and I saw you coming up from that film and you were just bursting wanting to tell you know talk about it. And that's what I think is so wonderful about a film festival in the films is after you see one you want to be talking to somebody either. Sitting next to you as you're walking out there's conversations going on and we love doing that as well when we walk whether we're together seeing a film or not and I was a little bit jealous at first. I said I like to see the films that I don't get to see panels. Sometimes I don't get enough out of the panels you know when I go see them. Sometimes I don't think that the moderators are truly prepared. I mean they have the big name attached to them or for who they work for. Or some are radio announcers and some are Newscasters and some are journalists. But they're not necessarily moderators for a panel. So that's always kind of my thing. I said Oh you know. How's this going to run? But I was so pleasantly surprised because we had the telling your stories and on this panel was Roger. Ross Williams first African American to win an Academy Award for Documentary Short Music by prudence in twenty ten and his feature. Doc God loves. Uganda was shortlisted in twenty fourteen. He was talking about a lot of his work at that time and his recently life animated one the Twenty Sixteen Sundance Film Festival. Us Documentary Directing Award and then we had Ricki stern who's producing and directing partner. Anne Sundberg our emmy nominated They got a lifetime achievement award from full frame Documentary Film Festival. There film marathon Patriot's day bombings was screening at Woodstock this weekend. And then there was off out on Nishikawa. People don't know how to pronounce her name. But it's oil on niche calm and her feature documentary women of my Don Mehta's world premiere at Woodstock. We got to see it on Friday but when she started talking about it it she truly fits the life of a maverick and fiercely independent but it was really a powerful story of steadfast resilience and fortitude in the face of danger during all this that was happening in the twenty thirteen. Twenty fourteen revolution of dignity on the my Don's which is Independence Square in Kiev..

America Jane Fonda Woodstock Virginia Woolf Vietnam director Alfred Mike Nichols Oscar Lyndon Johnson lifetime achievement award Ricki stern Hitchcock Don Mehta Haskell Sean Penn Anne Sundberg Nishikawa Los Angeles