35 Burst results for "Fifty Years"

Senate GOP plans vote on Trump's court pick before election

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 1 d ago

Senate GOP plans vote on Trump's court pick before election

"Before a cheering crowd of supporters in Pittsburgh president trump announced that he will name his Supreme Court nominee late Saturday afternoon at the White House president trump about to name his third judicial picks to the nation's highest court after the death of liberal justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says he's been reflecting on the importance of Supreme Court nominations for fifty years they also policy whether it's life whether it's a second amendment he says it will be a woman insiders call judge Amy Coney Barrett the apparent favorite and president trump defended the decision to seat a ninth justice before election day nine justices it is that with the unsolicited millions of ballots that they're sending it to scammers out critics say president Obama was blocked from filling the High Court vacancy with eight months before the election so president trump should also have to wait Jackie Quinn Washington

Pittsburgh Donald Trump Ruth Bader Ginsburg Amy Coney Barrett President Trump Barack Obama Jackie Quinn Washington Supreme Court High Court
Senate GOP plans vote on Trump's court pick before election

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 1 d ago

Senate GOP plans vote on Trump's court pick before election

"Before a cheering crowd of supporters in Pittsburgh president trump announced that he will name his Supreme Court nominee late Saturday afternoon at the White House president trump about to name his third judicial picks to the nation's highest court after the death of liberal justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says he's been reflecting on the importance of Supreme Court nominations for fifty years they also policy whether it's life whether it's a second amendment he says it will be a woman insiders call judge Amy Coney Barrett the apparent favorite and president trump defended the decision to seat a ninth justice before election day nine justices it is that with the unsolicited millions of ballots that they're sending it to scammers out critics say president Obama was blocked from filling the High Court vacancy with eight months before the election so president trump should also have to wait Jackie Quinn Washington

Pittsburgh Donald Trump Ruth Bader Ginsburg Amy Coney Barrett President Trump Barack Obama Jackie Quinn Washington Supreme Court High Court
Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

My Seven Chakras

04:53 min | 3 d ago

Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

"Our guest today is the one and only Dan Brulee Denver is a modern day teacher healer and world renowned pioneer in the art and science of breath work. He is one of the creators of breath therapy and he was among the original group of internationally certified rebours. He's a master of Yoga and she gone Janis, medical breathing exercises, and he leaves the worldwide spiritual breathing movement, the coaches trains, and certifies professional Brett workers, and since nineteen seventy, he has traveled to sixty seven countries and a strained more than two hundred and fifty thousand people to use the a bread and breathing for personal growth, professional development, peak performance, self healing, and spiritual awakening, and by the way. Tony Robbins wrote a forward for Danville is books. So you can imagine the die of content, the type of information and wisdom that we're going to get in today's episode, and by the way in case you didn't know this is the third appearance of Dan. Daniela on our forecast and the last time we connected was some wouldn't thousand and eighteen sedan super excited to have you on our show. How's it going? Wow. Wonderful. As I said, if things are going any better I'd have to be twins. Almost feel a little bit guilty during the shut down during this corona craziness Farrah's it's been just it's amazing unplanned unexpected opportunity to to really pause to really stop to dig in and it's resulted in a lot of creative juices flowing and guy been busier than ever. And meanwhile, so many people in the world are really suffering and really struggling and so my heart goes out to people So you know what we we do, what we can we make the best of every situation and sometimes something that we think is something really negative turns out to be a blessing, the gift, and this that that's what's happening for us loosen our corner of the world's around this whole crazy shutdown thing. Absolutely I think it's been hard time for a lot of people around the world especially in terms of divisiveness, your people, both sides, and there's a lot of. Anxiety stress as well. But I think your services and your support are even more needed right now as you very. Profoundly, teach people how to breathe correctly and properly and well. So I think it's a very opportune moment validity to. For this interview I was hoping to start from very beginning. Maybe tell us where did you grow up and what was life as a kid for? Well, you know I was the kid who in the school yard was organizing all the breath holding competitions. You know I can remember we we play with hyperventilating and then like squeezy. Almost pass out and you know just. Playing with the plane with the graph I since I was raised in new Bedford Massachusetts Which is where Moby Dick you know there's a whaling capital of the world. Catholic school who? factory Industry Town Garment Factory Textile Mills the cushion it river was right next to. US some very old American Indian tradition in that part of the world. And So the energy is really beautiful in the forest and long the ocean there. but yeah I. turned onto the breath as a little Catholic boy in kindergarten hearing about how God breathed into the nostrils of man the breath of life and man became a living soul and I don't know it just hearing that as a little Feiger kid. I Dunno lit something in me and And just been a missionary for the breath ever since and every job I've ever had and. has kept taking me back to the breath in one way or another until it's the only thing I've really done now for the last forty years is is been a missionary for the breath. So and it's you know forty fifty years ago I felt like a voice crying out in the desert. Breathing what's that breathing a? and. So now it's great that the science is caught up and can now we have understanding on my some of the ancient yoga practices and guys practices and why they work and and what's what's involved in them and So I love that science and spirit meet and the breath is is exactly a perfect place or science and spirituality could meet.

Dan Brulee Denver Janis Tony Robbins Industry Town Garment Factory Daniela Catholic School Danville Bedford Massachusetts Moby Dick
ON The Frontlines Of The Youth Climate Strikes

PODSHIP EARTH

05:53 min | 4 d ago

ON The Frontlines Of The Youth Climate Strikes

"This week we go to the frontlines of the youth climate strike movement. There are hundreds of protests going on all around the world today as young people, school children from Australia to Iceland come together to protest about what they're calling the crisis of their lifetime climate change. Of course, what they see is politicians inability or unwillingness to do anything about it to the global protests that is underway right now, students and workers all around the world of flooding the streets demanding action on climate change, Maggie, Rulli that a demonstration in London with the latest Michael with thousands of protesters, right underneath parliament, and what's so striking besides just the sheer size of protesters here are. The age of people who are demonstrating almost all of them are students that's hiding just nine years old. We spoke to a group of seventeen year olds who said they're here today to fight for their future. Now, the goal of this strike, really all these strikes around the world it's a send a clear message to world leaders ahead of the UN climate summit happening this week in New York climate change protests happening right now in lower Manhattan this is video from chopper four showing the massive crowd marching from Foley Square the courthouses down to the battery among the people flooding city streets were students who were allowed to skip class today to join this 'cause. I told with Jerome Foster. who had seven sounded watching documentaries about our planet go activated and started climate blogging creating virtual reality platforms social justice. He's now eighteen has been climate striking for eighty one weeks in front of the white. House. He founded one million of us to get youth to vote this November Jerome is one of eleven million people from over one hundred and forty countries the climate striking and skipping school to tell us we need to act now. I stopped by asking Jerome where he is now. I'm visiting New York City I just moved here for college, but I was born and raised in Washington DC. I'm going to college at Peace University and Columbia Columbia basically majoring in computer science specializing artificial intelligence. are distance-learning others are like mixed waken coming class in? Their dorm near the off his classes, some of them, most of my classes right now are digital. Have One. Now. So tell me about growing up in DC and kind of what led you to get into the place where you founded the organization one, million US. So where I grew up in Washington DC right around like places. And forests and those like a huge place for me to explore my neighborhood. So I kinda grew up getting in touch with nature and after years of like understanding what nature wasn't had really appreciate it. I started watching documented by astrophysics and learning about like what are world's about like what a black holes water were imposed all these cool late science things, and after that, I started watching documentaries about my own planet and how our planet fit into. Astrophysics. into the rest of the world that every time they talk about something else beautiful it's like but humans are burning it down and but. Are Continuing to extract coal and an oil and natural gas to power earth than is going to continue to see species go extinct and like that was kind of a wake up call for me understanding that our earth is actually has like trouble going on but still being like six or seven years old was like. This isn't that big of an issue. Adults are GonNa fix this adults definitely going to step up and take action but Learning later on like it didn't happen. That's that's not the story as the navy faded it. kind of grew into another understanding that like if the corruption is the unwillingness to have moral clarity won't stand up to corporations and that they don't have the political leadership to acting say, we need to hold you accountable and like as older I was like, how can I get into? Really. Getting their attention actually taking action when my friends kind of toby lunch table they're like, Hey, you should start into pitch. Okay. Cool. So like for sixth seventh and Eighth Grade I posted every single day. and. Like facts and got to like and I was like I got to convince that climate change because back then like global warming is a hoax and everyone believed that that was the big struggle and like today it's not that same conversation. It's about how do we take action but back then it was all about is it real? And I did that for six eighth grade in ninth grade I trying to transition. To. More technology and building I reality environments. So I mean when you say like it's ten years, it has been view like if he started when you seven that. Yeah. I started virtuality company called Vr, and basically it was the idea that like we can use virtuality. Gaming Place, but actually civic engagement accident building empathy only a few people will be able to see it because it's so expensive to create and it's so hard. Tribute it out. So I, kind of transition into. into journalism and it was because I started watching my documentaries again. It was Leonardo DiCaprio's before the flood and like in the last five minutes he said we need commentators then covered as if it's a lot we need young people we need people to come out here and start talking about time change in a new way. So I was like I can do that. There's like I'm I'm I'm with around blood so like two hours. Later I I email my English teacher in accurate a blog called the climb reporter and one hundred, sixty, five articles like eight months and determine about climate change from east perspective sounds like we need young people in this movement because our future is directly at stake people will say their children's children but we're the Stojan. At this point we waited fifty years to take action. Our Future. Now,

Jerome Foster. Washington Dc Manhattan UN United States Leonardo Dicaprio Australia Michael London Reporter Foley Square Maggie Iceland Rulli Toby Columbia Columbia Peace University
Episode 53: mediUSA Reduction Kits with Christopher Miles

Lymphedema Podcast

02:50 min | 5 d ago

Episode 53: mediUSA Reduction Kits with Christopher Miles

"I'm so excited to introduce today's guest. Christopher Miles is the senior manager for clinical services at many USA he's trained as an occupational therapist and a certified in both limping Dima and wound-care. He has been working with patients to assist in managing chronic Dima for over eighteen years and currently his role as managing a team of clinical educators for many USA and also completing clinical education to direct hospital systems national and International Conferences Hi Christopher. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much, Betty I'm excited club join your pot cow. I am so excited to talk to you about the reduction kit. So many of my patients in the clinic won a single garment that can do it. All is the reduction kit, their answer. You know I wish that there was a magic pill for lengthy Dima. I've been working Olympia for a long time and I think everyone spent hunting for that I. Wish I could say the reduction kit will do everything I'm not gonna I'm not GonNa say that it can but it certainly can do lot. It's a phenomenal bandaged replacement system. So. Can you tell us how the product came to be and what inspired it? Absolutely. I would love to and it's always a great story share. So the reduction Kit is part of the circuit product line The cirque aid product line has been around for over fifty years in a way it was inspired. It was actually invented by a individual who was trying to find a solution to help his wife who suffered from chronic limping Dima. Anti came up with this idea when he was at the San Diego Zoo he noticed that drafts are very tall yet for some reason, they never have swelling in they're very skinny legs. In the reason they don't have swelling in their legs is because their skin is inelastic it won't stretch. It doesn't have the ability to give to excess pressure or fluid. So there's no swelling or. So we've that. Concept he wanted to create a garment that didn't stretch because up to that point all compression garments had been made out of elastic that we're very stretchy. So key. The first inelastic product actually a very crude on product that he designed was actually out of leather belts. But over time he designed and created the circuit blind, which is the combination of an inelastic product with inner juxtapose spans to allow patients to automatically adjust and apply their compression.

Dima Christopher Miles USA San Diego Zoo Senior Manager Betty
Secular Strategies for Politics

Dogma Debate

06:10 min | Last week

Secular Strategies for Politics

"Welcome to the show. So good to be back with you. I'm doing a couple of shows this week. and. They're kind of across the spectrum. The last show I did. I ever with the Mormon So exciting Mormons tinted stay far away from me. But it was fun actually having a Mormon willing to engage in an actual live debate and we went for like almost three hours and so if you haven't heard the full unedited. Commercialized version of that. The full extended version it's at Patriotair Dot com slash David C smalley. But right now. I'm joined in studio, the One and only Sarah Eleven. God I haven't heard that name in a long time. It's so great to be back. Gosh and it's weird. It's our first time in studio. Yes. You've done a actually come a little closer. You've done a lot of stuff with me, but it's always been over the phone would call in like every week back in the day and the old the old dogma debate days don't even call the show that anymore. but it's like. You've been so active in the political scene and it's funny that there's there are a lot of new people listen to the show now, who have no idea who you are, and then are some of the old school people who were like Sarah. Seeing a long lost cousin. Great. So have you been first and foremost good really well, I just moved to Los. Angeles. So. Thank you. Welcome to the fires and small quakes. It's so disappointing. The first week it was clear skies as beautiful and we were like Oh man we're going to go get our beach tent and and all this stuff, and then it's like now now it's. Hazy skies and it's really depressing and you know I sound like a very privilege right now. Go to the beach. The opposite effect for me the first six weeks I lived here it was rainy and cold, and it was like. I know it was six weeks straight in everybody everywhere I would go they would always go. It's never been like this. We don't know what's happening like it's never been like this I'm going. Yeah. Right and then sure enough it went seven months without raining or something it was gorgeous seventy five degrees every day for nine months out of the year or something, and then it rains again and I'm like, what's this falling on my car? This is bizarre. It is really is really rare that something like this happens, but it's that's what they said about. The last weekend were like this is the hottest weekend and all of all of the year and my place doesn't have air conditioning because it usually doesn't need it most people here that and they're like, why do you not have air conditioning? There are a lot of people go out here a little bit north of Hollywood. So where I am it's common to have AC but down actually on the beach, most people don't because it's like. Seventy S. Literally. Just crack window open your door in. It's fine. but last weekend. Right here where I am I say you a screen shot at one hundred seventeen degrees right here at this spot for you. It was one twenty-one. Few miles away. I can't even imagine one, hundred seventeen. I actually walked outside just to see what it was like literally like an oven it is. You just don't want to do anything used. and. I'll say it's still not as bad as like ninety six degrees in Texas. Because of the humidity humidity, you could take a shower and get out of the TUB and you're sweating and you feel disgusting. It is actually a swamp people forget. Reason more than one reason why it's So let's get into that. They remember you from a different organization. We don't have to dive into all of that, but you are now Founder and principal founder. If you wanted to say with or what, but you're now the founder of secular strategies. So let's get into a little bit of what that means because. I think more than ever. We need that right now just the name it says so much talk about what you do, what you were going to Asians. Sure. So you know I'm I'm really kind of like a meat and potatoes doer and always have been I'm I'm really most interested in just getting things done and getting them done as effectively in strategically as possible and I one of the inspirations for me to start my own company to work with. Clients focused on religious freedom separation of church and state was and you were part of this right in Texas in two thousand sixteen. When we got the secular caucus running that is now totally a pre- pretty much self reliant fundraising for themselves. I would say we spent maybe. A total of like five thousand dollars investing in that in that whole event and that that startup period and. Now, four years later that organization has you know a chair Vice Chair secretary treasurer is raising money got a resolution pass in two local counties van in conversion therapy in Texas. That is and more endorsing candidates. Remember correctly was was that the first ever secular caucus for advancement convention I gave a talk at that. I spoke. I Yeah I remember I remember being able to like I was just I got to say that I got to give a talk at the first ever everyone that's huge. Yeah and now they're like fully functioning. Yeah and now there's one in Nebraska just got one stood up in Florida. So they're they're secular Democrats of Florida and I'm working on. Virginia Colorado And Kentucky now, and we'll get into that in a second but I go back to twenty sixteen when I talk about what I'm doing today because from my perspective. That is one of the highest return on investment projects I have ever done. In terms of how much investment of time and money and the long term offensive because you know, you can do a lot of work but you want your. For me I want to institutionalize things that are going to be self sustaining so that we can I mean from my perspective, we are basically forty fifty years behind the Evangelical, right?

Texas Sarah Eleven Founder Florida Chair Vice Chair Secretary Tre Founder And Principal Patriotair Dot David C Smalley TUB LOS Virginia Hollywood Nebraska Kentucky Colorado
Lange Twins Old Vine Zinfandel 2017

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:01 min | Last week

Lange Twins Old Vine Zinfandel 2017

"Cheap. Wine. Dot Com. Review we put on the. CHEAP WINE FINDER DOT com website Levin years, and going strong. And today we have. Wine. Let me grab the bottle of lane twins. State. Older, by Zinfandel. Lodi. LISTSERV fifteen dollars and I found for twelve ninety nine for this is not an expensive why? And the stateline they own. Several vineyards. ONUM. It's all bears and the Lodi Appalachian, which is the Central Valley. Most. Most wind come from the coast central coast to coast. Lodi Clarksburg are a little bit of different they're. there. They're in the river valleys to the San Pablo Bay, which is the northern part of. This is a fairly well, I wanted to state wine. Not, single vineyard state by. The Lang twins are actually identify wins the. Fourth Generation. Family started. Farming in Lodi in the eighteen seventies in their first vineyard and the ninth eighteen sixteen. which is not that unusual. If you look you look into some of these big name Lodi. wineries they go back a hundred hundred and fifty years. Fairly regular basis and while there are wineries, other Appalachians have. Long Histories. Load is everywhere. and. Why is old vines? And there's a wine axioms. Wine Grapes half the struggle. To become. Complex. And best vineyards in the world are some of the worst land. Almost. No nutrients wraps through. No moisture. Justice not. Survive and thrive. Old Vines since they're old and. On their own without having any additions around them. So you KINDA GET A. Rape fine that is doing what you wanted to do. Donna dependent. From where what? Agriculture land is around. Old Lines are. kind of like highly sought after. These low dial binds are from. Before prohibition and they made communion wines. Church. Oceans communion wine. During prohibition. Kept him going and then the white Zimba trades the sixties planted. Zinfandel everywhere I just keep up the craze in those vineyards which are so so back mid day are sixty seven year old vineyards that are kind of. Little, jewel? How is the? State. Just. Kind of. Like about Lodi. There's a dealt with the same. There tends to be a bit of. A BIT OF A. Local resemblance or they're kind of. The kind of the middle I really liked that. Really High in Norman's infant infantile snappers those fast robles. Tend to, be more classic. Like it when you get this rougher edge to not a lottery rough that just just a little bit. That's my favorite. They tend to be less expensive on top of and there's a lot of great simple producers in California. Really great producers in California. Lodi does a for me may not prices usually right I'm gonNA, take a SIP. Tend to be less expensive clean here you get a single vineyard away a state multiyear Weinberg Thirteen. Don't really find that with some of the bigger producers, their winds there. Are More expensive to not only is it a style that I liked? Cheaper and we actually won DOT com. Also. There you go.

Lodi Old Vines Lodi Clarksburg Lodi Appalachian California San Pablo Bay Levin Norman Lang Rape Central Valley Donna Lodi.
Moo-Dunnit: How Beef Replaced Bison on the American Plainsand Plate

Gastropod

04:48 min | Last week

Moo-Dunnit: How Beef Replaced Bison on the American Plainsand Plate

"Nearly, all the hamburgers in America today come from cows that spend at least part of their lives on the Great Plains that famous open range in the. American. West. So that is where we will go to start our story today to the American West before it was American before Europeans and their horses started showing up there in the late sixteen hundreds. So before there were cattle and before kind of United States had control of the planes in the. West you had a variety of American Indian policies, groups like the Comanche themselves essentially a very powerful empire across the West and they were hunting bison numbers for that time are kind of hard to come by. But it's estimated that there were about thirty to sixty million bison roaming through the middle of north. America. These are big grazing animals and what they can do is they can turn the abundant grasses of the West into animal flesh which then hunter's. Can Eat and so they become the foundation of the economy whenever I'm in the same spot as a cow I'm always kind of amazed at how big they are. But Bison is a heck of a lot bigger and faster. They can run about thirty five miles an hour faster than most horses, and they can pivot on both front and back hooves and literally turn on a dime. These are terrifying and dangerous creatures. It's not the kind of animal you'd. WanNa meet on foot and other key thing about them is that they're herd animals. So they gather at times massive herds, massive herds that would have represented a very appetizing dinner plus some warm and sturdy buffalo-hide imagine writing towards a herd of kind of terrifyingly huge bison if you're safely on horseback but how did native communities had them before horses very carefully so you could really only do it in the spring or summer when Bison gathered together to mate. You would do it on foot and you could work as a group, but it was difficult. You couldn't really do it fulltime. You could hunt by some kind of part time before the Horse, the planes really belong to the. Bison. But we now think of as plains tribes actually lived on the edges of the planes combining a little small-scale hunting with some farming. But once you had horses than well-coordinated hunters could hunt the animals very efficiently. The horses came with the Spanish. The native communities got a hold of some of those horses and horses quickly caught on they even changed the politics of the region, the communities that had more horsepower like the comanche kind of took over and they. Would kind of dominate everybody else and basically built these very successful empires empires that were built on Bison, hunting them and trading them with European settlers on the east coast. So people like the Comanche Kiowa were very successful from horseback and they may have actually been causing slow population declines in Bison. The story I heard him school is that white people killed off all the Bison and the truth is they did but the bison were already under a little bit of extra pressure. Thanks to the horses that white people brought. But waited until the spread of ranching and Commercial Bison hunting from Euro Americans to really collapse and by one thousand, nine, hundred, there's only maybe three hundred bison left. The West from at least thirty, million bison to just three hundred and about fifty years that by some more systematically wiped out in only a few decades thirty million bison were eventually replaced by thirty million cows de Bison izing roses really got started in the mid eighteen hundreds when people of European descent or beginning to move out west of the plains and start settling there. It was all sorts of people particularly I when it was scale so When what is Texas belong to Mexico you had lots of Mexicans who are setting up ranch's then you've got kind of poor white settlers anglos coming into the region setting things up as the American civil war approaches you got people who are kind of second and third sons of wealthy southern plantation families who can't inherit the family plantation and so they kind of go west to a place like Texas to set up kind of these small scale ranch's. Looked out at the planes and they thought, okay there are huge rangy creatures that live there why not replace them with other huge rangy creatures but why didn't they just stick with the bison that were already living there bison meat is freaking delicious and there is more of it per animal because Beissner. Bigger and bonus bison more already perfectly ecologically suited to the native. Grasslands and climate conditions. That's a really interesting question. I've I've thought about it a lot because in some ways, bison would be a very natural animal to raise. But then when I was reading diaries and things, I found that these people they were kind of disgusted bison they didn't view that as an animal that could be farmed. They saw it as a wild animal. and. So what's interesting about that is on one level people go with what they knew. Euro. Americans know about raising cattle, but another thing gets into their ideas of what is civilized and Dave you. The Bison is not the kind of animal that a civil in their minds a civilized people would raise and so cattle is the way to do it. So

America Texas Great Plains United States Hunter Dave Mexico
5 tropical cyclones are in the Atlantic at the same time for only the second time in history

Nightline

02:07 min | Last week

5 tropical cyclones are in the Atlantic at the same time for only the second time in history

"Tonight for the first time in nearly fifty years. They've ocean is home to five rapidly growing named tropical cyclones with one hurricane sally set to slam into the southern coast tomorrow for the very latest I'm joined by ABC News. Chief meteorologist Ginger Zee now Ginger Hurricane Sally is clearly strengthening as it approaches your location in Alabama? Where do you see the storm heading? Juju I'm in the heart of mobile and you've got things like that building with sandbags in front of it, and that is for good reason from here back through coastal Mississippi that's where the brunt of the storm is going to impact. So let's look at on the satellite got lot better organized as we went through today, and that's going to keep going as it moves really painfully slow to the West northwest it will finally start to make that northern tick tomorrow afternoon and evening, and we expect landfall sometime around midnight or thereafter early Wednesday morning. So this is a slow. Storm that means that rain is going to be a big time issue and part of the slowdown is that stationary front making it almost defense you see we stopped the clock at about midnight. It looks like it should make landfall somewhere close to Pascagoula Mississippi if it does by the way, make landfall in Mississippi as a cat to that's the strongest we've seen in. Mississippi. Since Katrina in two thousand five that looks like wrong place wrong time. Now, there are always multiple threats as a storm approaches. There are already dire storm surge projections. What worries you the most about Sally. Storm surges what loses most life and property and storms. So six to nine feet in some places others up to eleven. Let me break it all down for you get warnings all the way from eastern Louisiana through the Florida panhandle. Now, it breaks down and closer to the center of the storm. In the northeast quadrant, we call it the dirty side of the storm. That's where you'll pick up some of the hefty so. From Mobile Bay. Back through deloise pass Christiane that's where we're most concerned. Now we also have rainfall and I don't want anyone if they're inland to say, Oh, this is just a coastal storm. By no means, you get fifteen to twenty inches on top of that storm surge right at the coast. That's not good especially here in mobile but go up to Gumri or even Atlanta and you could see a half a foot arrange.

Mississippi Sally Chief Meteorologist Ginger Zee Abc News West Northwest Christiane Katrina Alabama Gumri Florida Atlanta Louisiana
UnifyID: Biometric Authentication with John Whaley

Software Engineering Daily

04:22 min | Last week

UnifyID: Biometric Authentication with John Whaley

"John Welcome to show. Hey, great to be here. You work at unify ID a company CO founded and you do biometric authentication is that mean? So, there's all these things that are very unique about each Each of us the most common type of biometric authentication. You know about these things like like fingerprints you know everybody essentially everyone's fingerprint is unique and then record that and then know that that is that whether Jew or not I mean. So what we do something called behavioral biometric, which basically incentive looking at something static like your fingerprint will look at your behavior like this dynamic behavior, you do things like. The way that you walk or the way that you hold your phone or you know there's this millions of other little Ideo little habits and idiosyncrasies that you have, and then use that for authentication and by doing that, we are able to get something that's very seamless that just doesn't require you to require any conscious user action. You can just be yourself and there's enough that's unique about you. We can actually indicate you based on that and it's continuous so you don't need to. Get up. Walk away from a computer you put your phone down. You know somebody else picks it up things like that. We're able to detect that that change and then know whether it's you in a very seamless way. I feel like biometric authentication has been a thing for a while there have been a lot of companies that have tried to do this. Why is unify different? Yes. So the biggest differences is the type of factors of us. We've focused entirely on passive factors. So things that that don't require any conscious user action to do I. think that's always been the challenge with any form of authentication is the users as the the the human beings just human nature I mean people are naturally lazy and they like they don't want to go through these additional authentication steps because it adds friction to the user experience I mean if you look at the way that people choose passwords, I, mean there's been plenty of information about. You know with Patrick Breaches and how to choose a good password, etc. You know if you look at every year, the list of reach passwords, it's always the same traditional, one, two, three, four, five, six, or the word password these those type of things, and so you know get changing human behavior is really hard. Now I, mean if you look at just historically across technology like there's always been a shift where initially human beings have to adapt to the limitations of technology and eventually technology reaches a point where humans where it can adapt to humans and the way that they are and so authentication is not a new problem in it. I mean it goes back to. Prehistoric Times in any social creature needs the ability to then identify and authenticate like are you who you say you are is this. Are you part of group or not? You know that's the this goes back a longtime y'all before technology existed and the way the people had always did in the past was you know you'll get their face you hear their voice you see that you know the context under which you see them maybe possessions things like that. But it was always very natural thing and then passwords came along around four hundred and fifty years ago now, and so this was very much of adapting to the limitations of technology. Let me enter these know these sequence of of symbols and numbers and letters, and that's how you know whether it's going to be it. It'll be me right but that's not the way that that people had traditionally identified themselves in the past. and. I think it's about time that no. Now Technology has now reached the point where individuals can be themselves, and then there's enough sensors and people's lives as well as technology reached the point that you can identify people just for better natural behavior rather than having them do something explicit. So you know the difference is because we're doing this completely passively it opens up a lot more different use cases where you don't really have to change the user experience. You have a much more seamless user experience like opening a door, for example. You, know with our technology like you, we make Sdk you can link into any IOS or android APP. We also have components are Web Java script as well but you know you walk up to a door and you have the APP installed, and then the door already knows that it's you and then the you know the the the doors unlock-, you don't need to take out your phone and do something extra and so for use cases where you have security concerns but you also care about these or experience that's that's where. Our technology really comes to play.

Now Technology John CO Patrick Breaches Prehistoric Times
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | Last week

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

Planet Money

11:28 min | Last week

How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

"How did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true Laura Sullivan is GonNa take the story from here. Okay, it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry they make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really comes from the dupont chemical company and some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the Hagley Library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first dupont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when Dupont made gunpowder not plastic. There's an archivist with a bow tie a handlebar moustache named Lucas Clawson, and he looks like someone would make cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world, a product that looked like glass but break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff but keep things hot called Styrofoam and incredible new film that can preserve food for days called. Saran. Wrap there were a couple of clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time the Society of the plastics industry their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon Chevron Dow Dupont. And there's this one memo from one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three, the. Movement is just being born, and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high but it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing I find reference to a memo a report, but then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it Lucas. Can I ask you a question absolute. Okay. Why? In this section are all. These APPS. So many of these. Cross out because those records are no longer. Here anymore day or not where did they go the society of the Plastics Industry Astra them back think they really yes is an unusual. That doesn't happen often. Do you do know why they took them. Did they say? I, do not know. Okay Of course, there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want. It's records back I did call society the plastic folks and ask them if I could see the records they took they said No. So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University and they're buried in its tax, our boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. Actually the industry consultant died in the why found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. I found what I was looking for a report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in nineteen seventy three. It says, recycling plastic is nearly impossible. There is no recovery from obsolete products. It says recycling is costly sorting. It is infeasible plus it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. So the oil in plastic industry new, they've known for almost fifty years. and. Then I found more confidential memos in meetings echoed decades of this knowledge insight thousands of pages of courtroom discovery. There's a speech from an industry insider in nineteen seventy four when it comes to recycling large quantities plastic, it says there is quote serious doubt that it can ever be made viable on an economic basis. Now. Okay. Sure. Anyone can take something plastic melted down and make something else. But what these documents are saying is that it's expensive, it's time consuming it's chemically problematic and it's just cheaper and easier to make plastic out of new oil instead of plastic trash there are all kinds of names in these documents men who have never spoken publicly before and there was one name I kept seeing over and over he. was, giving speeches at fancy hotels, hosting conferences and Berlin. Phoenix, they called him a bigwig. He was the industry's top lobbyist. Larry Thomas this is the man I had to find but do you know how many Larry Thomas's there are in the United? States. Thousands I'd call say are you the Larry Thomas used to work in plastics? Are you leery Thomas who used to be president of the Society of the plastics industry? And then finally, I'll prompt Merrin the plastics industry no getting around it the BIGWIG himself I'll walk. Do that's for sure. Yeah. My personal views certainly didn't always job with. US I had the quake as part of my job. That's the way it was there. He's retired now on the coast of Florida but I told him I've been reading all about his exploits in the world of plastic. Where would the offices the officers were? What would you think they would be K. Street yes. Twenty Five K. Street Casey was the heart of lobbying in Washington and it was in those offices at top executives in the world's most powerful oil and plastic companies met they had meeting after meeting about a little problem they were having there was just too much plastic trash consumers didn't like it. In one of the documents I found from nineteen nine, hundred nine Larry wrote the top oil executives at Exxon Chevron, Amoco Dow Dupont proctor, and gamble in a bunch of others he wrote the image of plastics is deteriorating at an alarming rate. We are approaching a point of no return. The classic. I was under fire. We gotta do. What it takes to take the heat off. Because we want to continue to make classic equality, they wanted to keep making plastic but the more you make the more plastic trash you get and the obvious solution to this is to recycle it but they knew they couldn't remember it's expensive. It's a great. Discussion about how difficult it was to recycle. They knew that the infrastructure wasn't there. So really have recycling amount to a whole lot. So they needed a different plan. Larry Decides to call a bunch of meetings at fancy hotels. He summons the Society of the plastics people executives Larry doesn't remember the specifics of each particular meeting but one of his deputies at the time Lou Freeman he remembers you could. Get. Back all the layers of my brain. Lou, remembers a bunch of meetings the basic question on the table was. You guys you're our trade association in the plastics industry aren't doing enough. We need to do more. This one dupont executive was telling Lou. It's your job to fix plastics imaging problem. So what do you need? You said, I think if we had five million dollars. which seemed like a lot of money. If we had five million dollars we could. We could. We could solve this problem. And My boss said in response. If you add five million dollars, you would know how to spend it effectively. Well, they came up with a way to spend five million dollars that and a lot more I. Remember this. This is one of these exchanges that sticks with me thirty five years later however long it's been. Anna was You know what we need to do is advertise our way out of it. That was the idea thrown out. The industry decided to advertise its way out of a can't recycle it problem. The possibilities off plastics plastics. From dense. Touted the benefits of a product that after it was used for the most part was headed to a landfill incinerator or even ocean. Look empty yet it's anything but trash it's full of potential. These commercials carried an environmentalist message, but they were paid for by the oil and plastic companies eventually leading to fifteen million dollars a year industrywide ad campaign promoting plastic. So I asked Larry why why spend tens of millions of dollars telling people to recycle plastic when the new recycling plastic wasn't going to work? and. That's when he said it. The point of the whole thing if the public thinks so recycling is working. Then they're not going to be concerned about the environment and if they're not concerned about the environment. Though keep buying plastic it wasn't just Larry in lieu who said this I spoke to half a dozen top guys involved in the industry at the time who all said plan was unfolding and it went beyond at the industry funded recycling projects and local neighborhoods expensive sorting machines that didn't make any economic sense school recycling contests. All of this was done with great fanfare. except I decided to go track down almost a dozen of the industry's biggest projects like the one where they were going to recycle plastic and national parks or the one that was going to recycle all the plastic and school lunches in New York they all failed and disappeared quietly but there was one more part of this campaign, the final piece that did stick around. That recycling symbol with the numbers in the middle this symbol has. So. Much confusion about what is and is not recyclable in the plan to stamp it on every plastic item popped up a lot in the documents I learned of a quiet campaign to lobby almost forty states to require that every single plastic item have this symbol stamped on it. Even if there was no way to economically recycle it, I should note that some. Environmental is also supported. The symbol thinking would help, separate and sort plastic but the industry knew the truth the symbols were causing problems. Warm report told executives in July nineteen ninety-three that the symbol is being misused. It's creating quote unrealistic expectations about what plastic people can recycle. It's being used as a green marketing tool, but the executives decided to keep the symbol anyway. I did reach out to plastic industry folks and they said that the symbols were only meant to help sort plastic and that they were not intended to confuse people but the symbol in the ads in the projects, all of this basically convince people Larry says the idea that the vast majority of plastic can be recycled was sinking in. Say that. After a while the atmosphere seems to change I. Don't know whether it was because people thought that recycling has solved the problem. was that they were just so in love with plastic products that they were willing to overlook the environmental concerns that were were mounting up. It's been thirty years now since most of those plans have been put into place and the public's feelings about plastic have started to shift again, people are reading stories about oceans choked with plastic trash and trace amounts of this stuff inside our bodies, and once again, people are wanting to ban plastic and the survival of the oil companies is at stake.

Larry Thomas Lucas Clawson Society Of Dupont Chemical Company Lou Freeman Dupont Laura Sullivan Sodium Nitrate Delaware Hagley Library Chevron Dow Dupont Exxon Syracuse University Phoenix Syracuse Consultant Berlin
At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:49 min | Last week

At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

"We start the program tracking one of the most potentially SA- serious spot points globally the ongoing hostilities between the nuclear-armed countries, India and China earlier this week they discharged weapons that each other for the first time in forty five years as a four month standoff between their armed forces escalated into warning shots in the western Himalayas. The skirmishes worryingly reminiscent of the circumstances surrounding the beginning of a war between the two in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two. Yesterday. The foreign ministers of the two countries met in Russia in a bid to defuse the military standoff Jonah Slater New Delhi Bureau chief for The Washington Post and Isabel Hilton China dialogue join me on the line now. Thanks both for for joining us is about what was behind this most recent exchange of shots. That rather depends who you believe I mean one. Of the meeting that has taken place in Moscow, which has been some extent. Calming is that neither side will acknowledge any wrongdoing and indeed continue to blame the other. There is a very in general terms there isn't defined line of actual, control? The seem to be signs that the past three or four months across quite a a a length of it. So not just in one sector, China has been a pushing the actual you know situation on the ground by crossing the line of Control China, accuse his India doing the same thing in this most recent incidents and says that it had to fire shots in the ad to deter what was Indian aggression India has said over the repeated incidents over the past few months that China has advanced and then has not on a promises to retreat. So we now have quite an extended standoff which began in the in the West and sector. But has now extended to the eastern sector to what in your Natural Pradesh which to southern. Tibet. So it's a sustained standoff still during the what more do we know about the outcome of the meeting between the two men yesterday Well we know that they met for two and a half hours a lengthy meeting their first in person meetings since the crisis began Jason Curve India's foreign minister is a is a former ambassador to China. He has deep experience there. But in terms of outcomes, what we basically have is an agreement to continue talking it's not nothing but it's definitely not a breakthrough I mean Isabel do you think there's any real appetite for compromise and given China's current aggressive stance globally will one be trying to dial it down I think that I don't see very much appetite for compromise on either side we all you have is highly nationals governments which both. Set great store on territorial integrity and and then of course, you come to the sensitive point where the territories real defined and then you have a you know constant potential for confrontation. But if you add to that I mean what one thing that is very different from in in this border confrontation with other areas of conflict China like the South China Sea for example, where were you have because it's accessible and and territory marine territory that's used by lots of different kinds of people in people from from different countries, you can enact a conflict at a lower level if you like using fishing boats or or customs boats, and you don't actually have to use your main forces. But this is highly inaccessible territory. The only people who are out there really are our armed forces and they have increased. Both sides have increased the presence of their forces really dramatically in the last few months, and in the last few years, they have increased access to the border by building infrastructure building roads and railway building roads rather So you have the potential to mobilize both heavy weaponry and larger numbers of troops When you have a moment like this, do strategically, I would say that China is trying to discourage India from. Joining in a mall full blooded way any anti-chinese coalition organized by the United States so the has been quite a warm relationship between Modiin trump as we know, and and the question is how far India will take this because that could be a Catholic. And during this meeting, come about because the to happened to be in Moscow anyway or is Russia playing the piece Burqa. Well. Both of them would have been at this meeting, but it does seem that Russia is playing a little bit of a role of convener here as a country that. Ostensibly would like to see tensions reduce. It has constructive relationships with both countries there have been reports in the Indian media suggesting that I'm sorry that Russia was doing some quiet diplomacy behind the scenes earlier in this crisis but I think the these these two men obviously would have been there anyway just comes at a very. Sensitive, sensitive, and important time. It's about what's in it for? Would I guess it's less less difficulty in the neighborhood they do as we've heard have rush the Russians do have constructive relations Russia likes to be seen as a broker these days I mean the whole trajectory of Putin's kind of outward posture has been to assert Russia's important so to be able to mediate between a traditional friend India and. country. Rival with whom relations little complicate it China would greatly enhanced prestige. One of the difficulties is that what we know from the reorganization, for example, the Chinese military which is put sheeting. Very firmly, inconspicuously in command, we need to assume I think that decision is made about deployment of troops and our posture go very much to the top So you know without a signal from the tall, the foreign ministers of my decide couldn't actually resolve this. Yeah. How do you think this fits in with the the general foreign policy aims of India. I don't think expected crisis with China I. think that was not part of its. Foreign Policy Goals as Isabelle was speaking about no, India is. Wary of China's rise, it has been drawing closer to the United States and also to this grouping called the Quad, which includes the United States Japan and Australia this one of the interesting aspects about this crisis with China along the line of actual control is that India says at least that it's at a loss to understand why China is doing this it repeated that again today that. Shot, the tiny side has not provided a credible explanation for this deployment. Jay Shankar, the foreign minister a few days ago said repeated that India's is a little bit flummoxed here, and so if China is sending a message that it doesn't want India to draw closer to the United States, India's not really getting the message quite clearly So I think that's one of the strange parts about this entire episode, which is we don't India claims at least not really understand what China's motivations are for this. Quite significant deployment along the line of actual control which began in April and then Burst into actual skirmishes, skirmishes in May, and then the deadliest violence between the two countries and more than fifty years in June. I mean Isabel attorneys right WH- one can't really see what's in it for China I. Mean as you say, this is an area where there's really not very much. It's inaccessible the only people there are the soldiers. What's the point? I think the point is is partly to shore up she gene pins reputation at home is a vigorous defender of China's global position and Chinese sovereignty, and you might well argue that that sovereignty over a few miles of inaccessible mountain compass matter but they matter symbolically domestically in China. It also might be I mean, we've seen a passion of a very assertive behavior. Put it no more strongly from China pretty much since the coronavirus outbreak and a lot of you know if you look across the piece it what's been going on there had been provocations in around Taiwan with you with Chinese. Military flights crossing into Taiwanese airspace very recently and and we have you know I, think for the first time that I can recall in. Since the sixties we have on this board, we have confrontations in both the important western sector and the equally important eastern sector. Now, that's that's kind of unusual that does signal a much more firm intent to send a message even if it's not a message that India understand. So it may be a message that's being directed to the Chinese public that you know we can do this because we are bigger and stronger than India and we will continue to defend. China's position in the world.

China India Isabel Hilton China South China Sea United States Russia Jason Curve India Moscow Isabel Delhi Bureau Jonah Slater Natural Pradesh The Washington Post Tibet Taiwan
What Is The Pe Diet

20 Minute Fitness

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

What Is The Pe Diet

"Everyone is Martin from twenty minute fitness I'm here today connected with Dr Ted Niemann Dominate, and why don't you tell liberal listeners about your work and book? The P. Will Hi Martin Nice to meet you just call me Ted first of all. So I, I'm Ted name I'm a primary care doctor and I've been in practice for about twenty years up here in the Seattle area and I have a mechanical engineering background, and so I'm kind of like a just a huge Geek. A nerd kind of a Geek mechanical engineering background went to medical school and. I ended up just being obsessed with optimum health and I realized that the difference between the healthiest people I saw and the least healthy people I saw really just came down to diet and exercise. So all day long in these patient visits icy this huge spectrum of health You know one minute I might be seeing someone who has just amazing body composition and their incredible health, and they might even be an elite athlete and then the next minute I see someone who's just frail and decrepit and falling apart and has millions of problems and it eventually occurred to me. That the only difference between these people was really just diet and exercise over time, and if your diet and exercise is optimal, you just slowly get better and better over time and if it's not, you just slowly get worse and worse over time and then you know fifty years down the road you see this massive spectrum of health from incredibly healthy to incredibly unhealthy and I've just been obsessed for twenty years with exactly what is the mechanism between Diet and exercise driving health outcomes in exactly what you have to do to get the positive adaptations instead of the negative ones and I've you know I've just been all over the Diet spectrum I was raised vegetarian I went to Loma Linda University in Southern California, which is this famous blues Mecca were everyone's plant based So I've I've experimented with Air Free Diet from Vegan and plant based to, of course, oil spectrum of Paleo. Kito. Carnivora. You name it and everything in between, and then I eventually realized that all of these diets right about something and the answer is in between and the secret is finding out what's powering each and every one of these diets and making them more successful than. The Standard. American. Diet and that's really how I came up with this book. The P.. E. Diet, which is sort of the unified theory of macronutrients You know that's at least it has been described right so so how does like the P. E. Diet look in a nutshell what makes it different from say pay euro at the Ketogenic diets or you know all vegetarian diet for example. So what I did is just zoom way way way way way way out to the fifty thousand foot view and just looked at what is eating and I realized that plants are. Auto troops and they make all their own food and then animals are Hetero trips and we only exist because we constantly injust other living organisms. So plants are at the base of the food chain for all animals they're making all the food for animals and then animals are just either eating plants or animals that have themselves eating plants. What plants her doing is two very specific things. Number one, they're sucking minerals out of the soil, which is nitrogen for protein and and about a dozen other minerals that are crucial for plant and animal life, and then they're using solar. Energy and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to create these high energy chains of carbons with high energy bonds, carbon hydrogen bonds, and that's all of your dietary energy either carbs, fats. This is all solar energy stored is chemical energy. So I realized that you could divide your entire diet up into protein and minerals which getting room soil and energy, which is these high energy, carbon chains, carbs, or fats that plants creating from solar energy, and then I, sort of looked at all of human history in this evolutionary Lens. I realized that if you look at hunter gatherers, they have this. Incredibly. High Protein Diet. It's thirty three percent on average protein. If you look at worldwide hundred gatherer macronutrients and hunter-gatherers, they have an easy time getting protein they just go out and kill an animal and eat the whole thing you get plenty of protein and minerals but you're always a little bit starving for energy right? Every animal you know trying to get enough energy to be successful, and so you're always looking for extra energy to add to your diet. You can get the protein and minerals, but just killing an animal and eating the whole thing but you're looking for. Extra Energy and what humans have done is we have always used technology to feed ourselves. We don't have teeth and claws were not particularly fast or strong on. But what we have is brains, and so we built tools, we use tools to feed ourselves. We use technology to feed ourselves. We had stone tools with break-up in skulls for branch and long runs for married at fat energy to our diet. We dug up tubers, add more carbohydrate energy tour Diet. We figured out how to throw weapons and create traps in hunting in groups, and we all of this technology to add. More, energy to our diet

Dr Ted Niemann Seattle Loma Linda University Martin Ketogenic Southern California
What was Before the Beginning?

Knowing Faith

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

What was Before the Beginning?

"Most people start reading genesis they, they don't stop to go what was happening before the beginning right in saying and she's ready. The. Question to the book, start the Genesis starts realtime action with the beginning I mean. So you're already in the flow of it. So this is kind of stepping back and saying, okay well, what was happening before that actually started? So who was there? I mean They're a bunch of stuff going on. There are a bunch of people there. was there a big you know meeting talk about it with turtles way down who was there? Yes. So The way I understand it I think the way the Bible describes it is there was nothing everything is dark for was void try to. If you can nothingness like nothing nothing nothing nothing other than got. Got The. Only thing that there is got is the only thing that is a being that is in existence in he is entirely created actually had somebody asking me question the other day here at the church. I pastor now and they said jt glad you're here I've wrestled. This is a this is a kind of an older saints who've been walking the Lord for forty fifty years. And he said to me, he said agent at this intellectual question for the entirety of my walk with the Lord. Laird, God come from. In ease asking the question like who made godwit gut come into being, and that's a very common question in the Christian response to this is God didn't come from anything didn't start anywhere. He is the thing that is probably most distinct about God in this is what we learned last year in the apostles creed is that he is the maker he is the he is the one who has unmade. His created exists entirely distinctly enough himself in Trinidadian relationship father son and Holy Spirit. So the first thing we want to say before we even get into Tyrian ISM if you want to go down that path is before anything. got. Yup. Yeah. That's and it's pivotal because specifically when we're talking about who got is reference to these first chapters of Genesis, we often use the language of creator creature distinction right exactly, and that might be one of the most important distinctions. Bible makes in that we have in theology is that God is entirely. In of himself yeah. Absolutely. that. He is qualitatively different. Than anything else he is utterly unique. As. One of the ways when I teach this that I get people to sort of have this hit home as I say, right you gonNa make a chart and on one side you're gonNA. Label call them things that are created and then on the other side you're GonNa label it things that are created and then on the left hand side things that are created for you right? Right God. And then on the right hand side where you're going to write. Everything else like there's there's nothing that was not the did not That does not have got us its origin. Yeah. Yeah. So We. Start there with talking about God is Creator in Genesis clearly displaying this, that God is creator everything else is created but who is this guy jt? You mentioned it kind of when you were talking about that. This is trinity right God his father son and Holy Spirit, and so are we talking about three different gods up they're all discussing with one another are we in collaborating with one another are we talking about one God who has three different roles? Who are we talking about when we're talking about this God who is Father Son and Holy Spirit? Yes. I think there's just clues that are given to us in genesis some people like to go to genesis worn twenty six or the texts says, let us which shows some kind of divine plurality. There's lots of ways to to interpret probably better for us on suggest to go to the New Testament Charles spurgeon has analogy where he talks about God has always been trinity, but it's kind of like walking into a room where there's furniture everywhere in the old. Testament, the lights are off in a new testament. You're turning the lights on none of the furniture was placed there during the New Testament it was there the whole time, but you can now see it better. So canonical, it's actually probably better for us to to move our way backwards if God is if there's only one God. In he is trinity and that's what we see clearly in the New Testament in the churches confessions than that must be the same God who existed before creation, and so the way that we understand Trinitaria relations in the New Testament is that there are three persons in one God. Our definition for Trinidadian is is that God eternally exists as one essence in three distinct persons, each of whom are fully God yet, there's only one God so. Policy for a second. Could you could you go back and say our definition of the trinity is just kind of repeat that real slowly? Yes. So our definition of the Trinity is God. Eternally exists supposing there that he that's what we've just been talking about. He is eternal. He has not come into being he is the Creator and maker of all things. So so always been always will be it's right. Okay and and never will never came into existence never has ceased existing never will cease to exist

Holy Spirit Charles Spurgeon Tyrian Ism Laird Trinitaria
The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

Mom Brain

08:37 min | 2 weeks ago

The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

"So My name is Dr Marie? Reproductive endocrinology further specialist. My is in Manhattan on Columbus Circle. The practice is called new hope for not center I. Am a father of two boys. Ryan is fifteen years old going through puberty and Adam is eleven years old and I love my boys and my dot com will be he's my favorite history years old any sleeps with me every night I literally feel like we're just gonNA continue a sentence from from before. So we were talking about all your. Treatments in all the different things that you can experience while you're having your IV thing that sounds like somewhat not want to call it a SPA treatment but there it just sounds. Nice. Amazing this it is treated. You know it's funny to warding job honestly, and I really love my job and a lot of time I get attached to my patients because you're helping them have a baby and you know I get Christmas cards every year and saying, Oh thank you give me a baby. What kind of you know it's it's really happiness I cannot explain and actually they send pictures of the kids and the children and I put them on the wall and my house. So I have a wall full of pictures of the baby, the baby's. Saying So let's go back because I. think part of this conversation was really like I the F. One. Oh one if you've ever been curious if you've ever thought about it if you've ever been, you know sort of confused about what it entailed. We really covered all the details. So those of you listening who are still curious about that providence to go listen to part one of this conversation part two is going to be more of like you. I mean, you're just so knowledge what everything. More of the cutting edge stuff because I think that that's really what your outfit specializes in and is so prized for is that you really are on this cutting edge of what does it mean to be able to bring Tila to a challenging situations and to do it in a really as noninvasive way as possible, which is actually fascinating Lee sometimes with better results. So I guess we got cut off at noninvasive chromosomal screening is that right? Am I like looking at this? Okay. Then noninvasive chromosomes screening our next is the following. Let's say Daphne has three boys and now she wants to have a car. And now she comes to my office and tell me Dr Marie I WanNa have a boy now are we gonNa do is we're going to do something called IVF. We suck the ads at your husband's sperm, and then we make embryos right sperm and egg may can embryo it takes down a week to make an embryo Now, a days in the last few years more and more centers are testing the embryos not just for the gender also chromosomal screening. You don't want to worry about having a down syndrome baby and then I'm Houston later on or have a miscarriage and then was centers. Do they take a piece of your embryo and then freeze the embryo and test this piece for the chromosome because it's coming from the embryo? We don't do that with the Knicks are noninvasive chromosome screening. We take the fluid at your embryo where it's growing. Just. A fluid water and with that fluid for the end without taking off your angrier. We're only has this technology and I can tell you a lot of people come to us because they were like you know I don't know if the biopsy off Ambrose rain debut and I don't want south sticking out of my my future baby you know they can out to be tested. So that's that's the knicks or none of his of chromosomes I can tell you I love it because it doesn't put on your embryo if you see how an embassy biopsies down the stretch like this and the Pum, a piece of snaps out. It's a little bit aggressive. So the next I think presents a lot of things and then you can also for tomorrow and you can have your boy if you want just journalists election. Yeah. Fascinating because the the a when it's growing remember we put it in a culture dish and over the week after we had the sperm and egg over the growth of. The DNA is thrown in that fluid. So that's how we do it. So that's I think is cutting edge technology reverted proud to have it at new hope fertility center. Why is it only you guys that have this technology you know other centers have done it for research and stuff, but I did not get a good result when we started this technology. I can tell you my secret sauce by the way to have fun. Waiting. But before we offered the to patients, you have to test it. Right. You have to do on the same embryo both technologies the old one and the fluid L. We got ninety nine point nine percent correlation other places they got sixty, eighty percent Max, and so it's the the lab hasn't really got the as good results if I wanNA, say that's Why it's not. So we have great technology. We have great lab, and that's why we have a thousand nine point nine percent correlation between both understood and has a nice. So we talked before about the Needle Free Ivf, we're you take pills instead of injections, correct pills and patches and everything. Correct. There's no patches. This fills by mouth by GINA NASAL spray. Spray interesting correct. Is it just as effective show? We have to be very careful because if someone is young and they have a lot of eggs, it's not it's less effective. Why because? The shots are more aggressive food for the eggs and younger patients have lot of eggs to feed. So they need more food. So the pills is not enough they need addition to shots but women thirty five years, and above it's as effective as the old conventional where patients plenty of shots That's so interesting and I told you I have a patient and Amazon me she wants to talk about experience about the. Home Ivf because she get, we sent to the house no shots just spilt and nasal spray and that we got a lot of eggs as she made four embryos and that's that's a lot I mean it's this is favor good. So yeah it's effective and then how long can you freeze embryos for twenty five years? So it's good and bad guy, and this is great question. Let me tell you why it's good and. It's bad. It's good because nowadays, some countries by some doctors are struggling with Beijing let's say you come to me ten years ago you've eggs and you at forty now you come to me after ten years. Now you're fifty years old and you. WanNa get pregnant with my own exodus froze ten years ago. Some doctors have issues with that because now they think well, what if something happens to you now you have diabetes and you know so we're GonNa be stuck in situations where actually have a patient I was doing a patient from Norway she froze her ex in Copenhagen ten fifteen years ago. Now she's fifty one and they said we cannot use your eggs because getting you're pregnant at this age is dangerous. But, that exactly so I mean I love the fact that twenty five years but also. Having Siblings Twenty five years apart. This we it. Let's say you do IV after they get pregnant and twenty five years. Oh, my my my brother is. So. There's a lot of things but last last part which is. The great thing about freezing for twenty five years is that there is a lot of abandoned embryos what am I gonNa do with them right. I mean some clinics in this country has adult fourteen percent of the embryos abandoned coupled who left Leftover Embryos And are gone and they're not being the freezing fees because they finish this they finished family. So that's why when you go back to the conventional idea when you tell me, I get tons of eggs but guess what kinds of embryos to that you're GonNa be stuck with for live. So I won't vicious the thing that, yes home ivf or gentle IVF or neither free IVF. It's good effective at your to be stuck situation where you're going to be freezing fees for twenty five years for embryos that you might not need. Right. A lot of my consultations are bishops will finish their family and they just WanNa talk to me about what to do that embryo and I don't know what to say, what are the different options, throw it out, give it to another couple or give it twenty such but

Knicks Needle Free Ivf Dr Marie Manhattan Columbus Circle Dr Marie I Wan Ryan Adam Gina Nasal Tila New Hope Fertility Center Daphne Beijing Diabetes Ambrose Houston Amazon
Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

Squawk Pod

05:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

"Breaking news out of the former suitable sector. Let's get to make. Good Morning. Good Morning Joe Nine. CEO's of some of the largest drug companies in the world announcing they've signed onto what they're calling a historic pledge to uphold the scientific integrity and put safety first as they are developing covid nineteen vaccines. These are basically the front runners in the vaccine race for covid nineteen, all of the companies involved in operation warp speed in addition to Merck Pfizer and its partner biotech Astra Zeneca Madonna GlaxoSmithKline Sanofi Johnson and Johnson and Nova VACs all signing onto this pledge to do essentially four things. They say always make safety and wellbeing of vaccinated people a top priority continue to adhere to high scientific and Ethical Standards Regarding. The conduct of clinical trials and the rigor of their manufacturing process they pledged to submit for approval or emergency use authorization after demonstrating safety and efficacy through phase three clinical studies designed to design and conducted to meet regulatory guidelines through a regulatory authorities like the FDA, and they say to work to ensure sufficient supply and range of vaccine options including those suitable for global access. They say quote we believe this pledge will help ensure public confidence in the rigorous scientific and regulatory process by which covid nineteen vaccines are evaluated and may ultimately approved and guys. This comes as vaccine development is moving at unprecedented speeds and we are hearing about some hesitancy. From folks to believe in the process and to be comfortable taking these vaccines especially as the FDA's leadership has come under question about political influence regarding convalescent plasma and hydroxy chloroquine in a recent change research and CB poll about thirty percent of people said that they either definitely not or probably not take covid nineteen vaccine, and so guys the company is trying to step in here to tell the public, they will keep safety I. Yeah. It's in response to rumors that we'd get an emergency youth authorization for for one of these vaccines before completing. The process there's always pressure on the FDA. obviously in especially with you know we're talking about life and death situations with with some of these drugs to to cut corners and I think they're just you know they're just putting it out there that especially with so many people when. Vaccines are such A. Controversial even before this people, you know what? The Anti Vaccine and everything else and we do remember back with with polio before we knew everything luckily nothing happened but you need to be sure. His longtime ago we know so much more and we know what's in vaccines. We know the scientific basis for how they worked meg. So I, I would be comfortable with. with one of these, the ad no mediated. Vaccine or you know if there's a small stretch of Messenger Aurigny I'll give it a shot I. I'm not overly concerned with with like contamination by some horrific virus that we don't see or something like that. You know make so. A wary public needs to be. Absolutely certain that that. We've. Crossed all the cross the is and cross. The is in dotted the teeth I just wanted to know we are coming up on that and that final stretch and the vaccine development process sort of inconceivably because this only begin in January really. But when we get to the end of October that's when Pfizer is indicating that they may see results about whether they're vaccine works and the FDA has scheduled advisory committee meeting of outside advisers, October twenty second, and so a lot of people are gonNA be looking at that date and saying, are we going to see data and how transparent will this process be So these are nine major drugmakers saying that their first priority is safety and I think this is hugely important not only for building public confidence in. A covert vaccine, but for protecting the sanctity of vaccines in general broader, we've had discussions with Scott gottlieb about this. The reason you don't want to rush through and push something out there that hasn't been thoroughly vetted with a phase three trial is that if there were problems with it, not only would it convince people not to take a Kovin vaccine, but it could undo a lot of the work that's been done with other vaccination programs around the globe I mean Joe. Brought up polio. Well, Jonas salk actually. Vaccinated his children. As some of the very first people testing this out so you know that was something he felt one hundred percent confident with we don't do things that way anymore. But there has been so much that that we have done with vaccinations diseases that we don't even think about anymore because over the last fifty years or so you know they've they've they've kind of gone away up very common This is just important not only for covert vaccination, but for faith in the vaccination system at large. Yeah it's so fragile. Public Health experts are incredibly concerned that a misstep here when vaccines are so important could shake the the fragile confidence in the vaccine system in general, and as you pointed out, it's this terrible irony of vaccines that they have rendered all these terrible diseases sort of non existent, and so we don't appreciate that vaccines did that for us. So there's a lot on the line here.

FDA Polio Joe Nine Sanofi Johnson Merck Pfizer Pfizer Jonas Salk Astra Zeneca Madonna Scott Gottlieb CEO Chloroquine Partner
The Social Science on Women, Work, and Motherhood

The Double Shift

06:18 min | 2 weeks ago

The Social Science on Women, Work, and Motherhood

"Julie Kohler. Welcome. Thanks for joining us. Thanks so much for having me. Well, I'll just jump in and ask because obviously, this cove nineteen crisis feels totally impossible on so many different levels but this family crisis that you have written about, you argue that it didn't really have to be this way in America that this particular crisis of feeling the strain as profoundly as we have in our families that that's not actually a byproduct of the global health crisis can you explain? Yeah Yeah. But what I think is happening is that we are now experiencing a level of. Discount Verge and seeming impossibility with a situation that really had begun long before the current crisis and it is simply expanded to include more and more families. Those families especially middle class upper middle class families that maybe were getting buys sort of at the margins by our fingertips. I've really been thrown into a different milieu post Cova. So on its own terms, we are living under the economic system that has failed. There's been less growth less economic security in this country since nineteen eighty than in the forty years prior. But this economic approach has become really politically sticky. It's kind of existed or endured as Zombie ideology some have said, and that's because what they've been successful. An is expanding this notion of what constitutes private family responsibility and enshrining that is sort of a reasonable bipartisan consensus. So the article was really designed to kind of unpack the family norms that. At the root of this failed economic approach that's often called neoliberalism and one is sort of an economic assumption that families will provide for their own little public support and nested within that are interrelated with. That is a cultural assumption that the two parent nuclear family is the optimal structure to do. So and I really believe that at this moment were big changes are possible. What we need to do is not just. kind of raised the policy solutions but explicitly critique and dismantle those norms that lie at the heart of the dominant economic approach. Can you lay out some of those norms that we're talking about because the thing about norms is normalized we think that they're normal and that's the way things are supposed to be. So what are the expectations of this private family unit that you talk about that maybe shouldn't be expectations on us. Right. Well, I think what's kind of so ironic is there's been this kind of idealized family type right? Kind of a two parent traditional nuclear families still is kind of promoted as the best way of doing family even though many families no longer fit that structure in any way. But then itself was a social creation of a very specific time in history, it was really kind of the mid twentieth century postwar era and it was enabled by massive government spending. So it was only able though for a certain group of families largely white. Families especially and with husbands who had unionized jobs. So those benefits massive investment in housing massive investment in higher education for white men who were returning from the war and could benefit from the GI bill. All of these public supports enabled this kind of family ideal. Now, in the forty to fifty years, kind of sense that is beginning really in the one thousand, nine, hundred eighties we've dismantled all of those forms of public supports that made that kind of family possible and yet we still have the expectation that families are going to be providing for their own. So it's kind of a catch. Twenty two families they're forced to believe. It's their responsibility to provide for everything for their kids that can assure a middle class life for economic security in the future families have to pay for childcare to all the kind of enrichment activities that accompany middle-class life these days to higher education, which is increasingly financed by families or through massive debt that families have to incur either college students or their families on their behalf. So the economic burden for families has increased exponentially over the last forty to fifty years, and yet we remain locked in this family ideal. This notion of what families should look like. That simply is not possible with the economic burdens that we now have. I'm curious. Besides you know us feeling stressed and. And people having less and less money like what sort of the result for society of that. Yeah. Well, here's what I think is kind of interesting. So this economic approach was facilitated by two parts. A partnership you could say between Neil Liberal economists. So these kind of economists would a specific idea about what would lead to economic prosperity and social conservatives especially, Evangelical Christian Social Conservatives, and the case that Evangelical Christian Social Conservatives made about the innate superiority of the two parent nuclear family like that has not actually one out in the court of public opinion in this country like. People today are far more accepting of a wide variety of family forms and they were a generation ago. So we're at a very different place in kind of what we think can constitute a good family and yet at the same time because of all of these policies because of these economic shifts. Individuals are more heather to families through wealth in debt than they were a generation ago. So it's almost as though the economics has done the bidding of social conservatives for them. They haven't been able to succeed in winning the ideological war, but they've wanted on the economic

Julie Kohler America Cova
"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

06:14 min | Last month

"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"The transformers. David vs warriors. That's why this is deleted streaming, they used to Hasbro name but. That's probably it. Might. Be Right. Please robot toy please take. Robot card. Whatever he freaks out honor and she like he's I can't do all this by myself. You're pushing too hard. She loses it. She's a fucking. Anyway, there is some insane details in here though like she's rummaging through this box shit, and she's like Oh David Look at. That one fourth of July. You remember that oh? Of course, Scott loved all holidays and then she's like Oh and here you go. David Scott would've wanted you to have this? It's his Christmas stocking. Ladies fucking Jewish. What is he going to do with a Christmas stocking? Brought to this House David. I'll tell you what to do with that Christmas stocking. You put it on your door in college when you got away Oh. Yeah. There you go. All this is going into garbage. Meanwhile. Brandon has to get this interview with David. Silver. That's kind of the thrust of the second half of the episode. He's trying to he's trying to. Again like you don't need this, you really don't like just. Like Andrea again, always talking about it looks like it's the fucking post going out. It's a fucking. Brandon, I'm thinking about putting your article about Scott Right next to what we're going to get for lunch. The next week. Do you think the best place for it. Brandon of winning the story. Next to the fucking cafeteria menu scandal story we have going. So like there's a lot of David. Blows. Up On don at least twice. Treats her like shit in this episode, and she's just like she finally snaps back like Hey, I know you're going through some shit, but I'm the only one that is the cares about you and like really Blah Blah Blah I. got everyone of that party what the fuck is a yeah I. Guess you're right. And then he winds up watching a video of Scott that he took which is cut a devastating to look at. It's horrible I think. Like. There's a sequence where David is walking down the hallway. Any stopped like every second by somebody and one of them is this teacher vice principal whatever this fucking dude is. WHO's like? Hey, man. I got sort of volunteer to edit this footage. We need this shit from the fucking time capsule ceremony like cut and ready to go, and he's like, no, no. No, you know. I'll do it or whatever. So then yeah, he's in the fucking computer lab like where their friendship blossomed in highschool where he met Dylan McKay. Just. Looking through all this footage David is throwing himself into his work. That's the right move. Just. One thing after the end of when he blows up. Mrs Scanlon when she's like take his fucking Christmas stocking and his transformers he goes. Scott accidentally shot himself in the stomach because he liked to play with guns and she liked fucking loses it and runs out of the whole thing and The best part about is the end of the scene where he's like a scanlon business scanlon come. They're still in the same house music scaling get back here. Returns around and he like picks up Scott's bed and shakes it angrily like that was the MU. I do. Quite a way that was the first time that bet ever shook. Fish. Well, the only time before they'd even came close was the vibration of the gun shot. Do you think they still got that gun the well, what a tragedy we lost our beloved, Scotty? We still have you MR nine millimeter. I think fucking Connie took that with the out to the coast duties, GonNa fucking. Incident well, it took. I saw it can take me in Casey can't find vittles on a night. You know he can hold somebody up with. Always living in the woods. Yeah. Yeah. Of course. In Society, if you do such a thing instead of saying like took my beloved Sunny Villa to my beloved bullet. wasted. Bullets called around pad. dammit. Ham. It's expensive. Okay. It's almost two dollars. Let's are going up in value. So. Like, yeah. It's kind of we're getting towards the end here and Brandon's been fucking harping on this article. He kind of sort of makes Andrea 'cause, he goes up to Andrea and he's like, Hey, what are you so upset about and she's like halfway crying, she's like I just watch again with her. It's just so so difficult, but he's a we're friends. We're going to be Fred Sir ever. She's like, okay, that's that's awesome. It's kind of fucking hilarious that they make the editor of the school newspapers say that. Because Emily's. noodling with Brandon, she doesn't like feeling like quote. Yesterday's news yes. That's nice. That's too. It's one thing you know you wanNA fuck and get a hand job that poor kids house. That's fine. You can't be like baking out in front of your friend at the school paper like you know what I mean like. It's just you know what this girl's up to your being a dickhead. Yup. You can keep it inside for a little bit So like they kind of make but he less to get this article. So he goes to confront David. Not. Confront David. Go Ask for this article. In the deejay booth and it's great because he's a that don't really have time right now. David gets the deadline dude. What do you want me to do i? Don't know fucking blow it out your ass and how about that? How `Bout Fuck you. But instead he just this is what he like. It's the big big monologue he gets and like a Christian said last night, he doesn't quite get there. He does not there. He doesn't have it now. It's. It's close though it's not that bad. It's not totally off I. think he gets if you don't have the camera on him, it's better when getting shots of like, Stupa. That guy sounds pissed. I might like him. Like stuff like that. It works when he's on camera, it's not great..

David David Scott Brandon David Look Andrea Hasbro warriors Mrs Scanlon Sunny Villa Dylan McKay principal Scotty Connie Casey Fred Sir editor Emily's.
"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

07:44 min | Last month

"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Maybe maybe Steve Sanders, they gotta go to quit Tarantino's house. Where we're his clothes. So that's that we cut immediately to the memorial service, which is. School the second time. In this episode, we're having a fucking sing along in the quad by the way of and do you think they were like Oh fuck. We're supposed to open the time capsule but kids dead Shit. Put his whole body in their. Great. Great. Now, we gotta wait another fifty years. Thanks to Scott. Scandal accidental suicide there. There are so many disappointed calendar people. I mean this. This is just rampant like this. You would never ending pushbacks of. Yeah. It's. It's my favorite line of the whole episode. kind of watching everybody. Everyone's really sad and it's a very sad moment you cut to dylan and Brenda. Hebron I don't want to sound like good, jerk. Which one was Scott instance funny. Looking Memorial, Dude. INTRES- with him? It is fucking. To for though because it's It is really incredible because she is like Dylan. You fucking had technology with that guy last year. He's like a thought that guy over there was discussions like, no, he was in your class blond kid, and then he just goes oh my God that. Dylan's burst appearance on this fucking show was coming out of the shadows to bend. Scott absolutely parents. It's interesting. Remainder. Scott. Scanlon. Meanwhile, his mother is right behind him. You know what I mean like it's it's memorial for someone like if you have that question, you ask it before you ask it after you do that. Yup. Just you know what? Do your best to try to do some silent detective work, and if by the end of the dead person's memorial, use still can't figure it out. Maybe quietly ask someone off to the side. Wait wait wait. Scott wasn't a guy who was dating Kelly rose you. Sure Your. Closest friends, Steve, ZANDER's. Right next to you. Oh. No Scott stead. WHO's GONNA. Run the peach pit. Aska. Dylan. That's that. Oh my God Scott's Dead Hey David. Sorry about your girlfriend now. That's Donna. Martin. Oh. Right. John I thought you said the blown one. Jeez brand. You're acting pretty good for your father Scott to be died. Brunner on everything? No. No. No. That's the friend from technaglass is I never met him, but he's surfing on the river sticks known. ACT This memorial service. We kinda get a little more. And Brandon's well, we're going to have to put out a very special issue of the blaze dedicated to Scott and they have this kind of back and forth about Andrea is. Typical brand is, why are you trying to politicize this event? Cut Killed By this fucking WWL. Billy. Barrett's time to politicize it. Now's not the time to talk about gun violence. Love for ten years, and then there'll be another shooting, and then we'll grieve another ten more. Now, the thing that's weird though is they're also arguing over which one of them was going to cover the funeral, really weird do. School newspaper You can just write your little thing about. Scott. Without having descended the fake teen. Junior to the fucking funeral over this child fucking new school newspaper covering this Kid's death that reminds me. I just re listened to I. Think it's the nineteen eighty. No respect. Rodney dangerfield album. Aligning. Your move to such a bad neighborhood, you know at the local school, the school newspaper's got obituaries. High. You heard of it. Oh. Wow. You. See that Scott. Scanlon. He checked down early. The right idea was just waiting for a shot. Oh Yeah. They're fine. They're fighting about this and there's more like. And the see the thing is who's going to cover the funeral aid. I. Agree. Really stupid. Question nobody is and like Brennan you should do it and then emily's I don't think it's right if you do it because his mom's GonNa. Freak out after we got kicked out of that party is why would you kick out of the Party? Well, we were kind of making out and emily knows what's going on here too by the way she's Oh. Wonder flag on flagging ground. Yeah. We were fucking on. We were getting their dude. Totally. She could smell, would Andrea's put So then Andrea Rotten's off and a half and Brandon, what is her problem? But? He wants. He winds covered covering the funeral. Anyway. There is this we cut to the funeral and you know the demo and here's the thing mel silver. You need to put some distance between your son and this woman that is your job as a parent like he's You don't see him yet. He's only in later in the episode, but like David Like Oh. Yeah. And she's like, well, you have to sit with the family, but my dad is here, data data, and like once that happens you need to go listen lady just greedy your own way. My Son's GonNa grieve his way. It's going to be what it is. And instead she's just like Scotts memory will be kept alive by those. Who loved him? This is David Silver. Scott's bestest bestest friend in the whole world. She says, bestest. bestest. Like six times and he's meeting white aunts and uncles, and fucking. He haw billy cousins from this fucking family. If it's a teenager, you have to give him like a good weeks. Notice before he can write and say something at a funeral courses fucking child. You can't just be a couple hours. Hey, why don't you? Just you know take all your feelings all that angst and pour it out in front of two hundred people. Exactly. Well, seventeen year old. David Silver, of course, fucking certified grief counselor. Why don't you say words? It's insane. I do like about this episode is David's Arc with him being confronted by everyone at school acting like he's going to be super devastated, and he's it's almost. It's almost tragic because he's almost like, I don't even like Scott. And that that's it's like it's a, it's a fascinating thing with his character be wrestling with because he's like he is sad that Scott is dead, but then he's also super guilty because he's like. fucking friends anymore. But he's and he's like thrust into this position of like Oh. Yeah. Everything was just like it was when you were in the fifth grade. That's the way Mrs. Scanlon thinks everything was going down and it's like devastating, watching him being pushing poll kind of a thing with his brain. I remember back in kindergarten when we were first become a friends and Mrs scanlon would just hang out in the front of school behind trees waiting come out. That all the time. Notably absent from this funeral Conrad Scanlon. Oh. Yeah. You know what's going on there? We talk and involuntary manslaughter charges. He's. He's looking for the Big Rock Candy Mountain night. Thanks. I think he's on the trails. He's heading out West Y do. Get I. Guess He Now I think he fucking wants to go surfing with Dylan. Dylan's going to be like, Hey, Mister scanlon make sure to put the safety thing around your ankle..

Scott stead Conrad Scanlon Dylan David Silver Steve Sanders Mrs scanlon Andrea Rotten Brandon Rodney dangerfield Tarantino Hebron INTRES involuntary manslaughter John I Brunner Billy Donna emily mel silver
"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

07:21 min | Last month

"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Hello, and welcome to the finale episode of Melrose to know the season finale, not the series finale A. Quarantine side show. Yeah. Wherein we talk about Beverly Hills Dunno. To End Melrose Place You know we have this We were supposed to do another episode about Brandon's getting a girlfriend is a TV star. Totally. But then in my backyard, I found this cool little pipe. You WanNa go y'all want to walk on through it Fuck Yeah Dude, I love going pipes. Here we go. Here we are where it's Scott's fucking death episode. Shit. We're in season two. It looks great Mrs. Skeleton. And he's thrown a shell at me. In, song sounds better. It does all that kind of. Stuff going to be a supersized episode I'm guessing. This. Is the next fifty years. Original air date. November. Seventh Nineteen ninety-one by the way Bush's term almost over guys. Don't worry about it. Mother Fuck. The voices you're hearing mine is Stephen Sadek. I. Am joined, of course by my best fucking friends in the world. Do I haven't seen in five fucking months? Chris, Cabin. I Eric, Ceska, how partner and? Andrew? Japan you. So yeah, this is we kind of decided like. I didn't want and just end on a wet Fart, nine, hundred hundred episode and we wanted to, we've teasing this fucking March. We should just get to it. What kind of far does this bloody? By. Oh let's not with the bloody parts. Why not? Because that's a horrible image and it sounds terrible to the ear. Oh, you to Taco Bell and now you have blood effort. Just like. This episode is a learning moment. Don't eat that. Much. TACO. Bell, you'll have bloody farts. May. I think Dylan would remember a bloody far or then he remembered Scott. That is a series high point for that, oh? I was chuckling and I have to say see by the way. We, the two of US met in the fall of the year, two, thousand and two and we were fast friends, but I distinctly remember in the fall of two, thousand, two US talking about this episode. Wasn't until today, June or July, the twenty, four, th thousand, twenty, I finally sat down and actually watched it and good gravy. This is something that's always stuck with me because it's such a bizarre episode It's also scrubbed from apologies to everybody. You know you've got a really play fucking TV detected defined this thing and I don't know why I truly do not know why exactly I mean it's not like I could see something you know with modern audiences if it was like a school shooting or something. But like first of all those hadn't been invented yet. Capacity that we have them. Now that is you know what? I mean. I don't understand what's going on well I. Do know why? Actually by the way? Yeah Yeah Yeah you see it is directed by Lars von Career. They had wanted a criterion option to be on the BLU ray of Dogville when they. Wanted to save for that, they don't want to be having it they on CBS to be happening. Why was the most expensive episode of Oh to announce the finance, the boat trip from Europe? Dame. Dana. You're right. Chris. The everyone is it's an ugly world. That everybody hates everything. It is fantastic. It is Yeah. Be this whole second season I don't know what's going on with the rights like it's. It's because look at it on on Hulu end CBS Alexis and it's really scattershot. Not This episode is missing. Episodes like the color me bad episode. Make sense to cut because like they're in the episode and you obviously have the music rights problem, etcetera etcetera. But like this one. Yeah, it's a totally just a, it's a, it's a message episode like, Hey, man fucking maybe don't have guns around. You have like eighteen fucking redneck kids running around. Christ if you have a gaggle of children following you around little baby ducks, maybe a fucking desk-drawer handgun is not the best idea minister scan, win looking what kind of dirty lead deals. He needs a Mug a gun at his desk. seriously. So it's GonNa. fucking come in and try to take out over some oil deal. I gotta get. OUTTA CONNIE SCAN. The. Hillbilly that also somehow lives in. Beverly. Hills. It's insane. I, mean, it's good that they're addressing this big gun culture I mean, we did say that this episode is hard to find and you said other ones are going to be hard to find when we do continue. We're going to go through the mall. We'll find a way and I'm sure you at home could find a way if you google enough. Yes. Yes and I will say I'm toying with the idea because this season two episode fourteen, it'll be whenever we restart this, which we will absolutely restart melrose. You promised a million times because you guys have been awesome supporting it this entire time. But when we do bring this back and we get back to hear, I we might Redo it. We might look at. A syncopal commentary possibly. Something I'm not sure if I can do this again. I got to say. A Lot. I kind of agree with you and someone said it last night. It was. It was either Erica Chris CA- Stephen I watched it this morning. One of you said that it was like extreme curb your enthusiasm and like to degree. Yes. Absolutely. I was the exact amount of uncomfortable watching Scott scanlon birthday party, not even the fucking death, the birthday party, right? Before he kills himself at his birthday party on his expense. is almost the lease remarkable part of the tire episode. Completely. Correct. All Weird. Awkward Moments. Yes. Exactly. Like the death was when I was finally able to breathe. Oh good. A tragedy at least. Being so socially awkward. So let me bring everybody up to speed on kind of what's been going on on that. inbet- In betwixt. No idea, why am I gonNA? Just showed. I mean not much. We like the Walsh Kids are pretty much the walsh kids Dylan Brenda, obviously, you're still going out But in the beginning of season two brand, we have like this weird summer season for like six or seven episodes. Long time for. And during so. A lot of things happen. David kind of. Scott goes on vacation and to Oklahoma of all places, and he's comfortable upstate on a farm somewhere. And Yada Yada Yada, but David starts ingratiate was more with the gang even more. So because Mel Silver, who is this episode? David's father starts dating Jackie Taylor. Kelly's mom, and that leads to a lot of funny awkward their Shenanigans, and now he's kind of defacto quote unquote part of the gang that explains the line..

Scott scanlon Erica Chris David kind Melrose Dylan Brenda CBS US Beverly Hills Taco Bell Mrs. Skeleton Brandon Walsh Stephen Sadek Europe BLU Oklahoma Bell Bush google Andrew
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:41 min | 6 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Slip down to make sure that there could be a young Replacement for him. And you know We GINSBURG and Stephen Bride did not do that. During the Obama Administration the Democrats really need to play to win. Take back record all right out of let me let me just challenge you a little bit here and I say this as someone who was raised by a pack of lawyers and and and did a year of law school and still remains fascinated by all these things like where does where does that begin right like you just use. Examples of how Kennedy basically orchestrated this whole thing to get cabin on there. You know and and there's been various different reporting about it and we. We could probably argue to what extent he did but certainly Ginsburg brier refused to sort of contemplate. The idea that they would step down and sort of like put that type of strategy in their forefront of their minds have certainly the prerogative And you know the the idea that we need to to win the political battle but we we hear stories of like you know what was done with Fordis- in the idea of like Merrick Garland and I see Chris coons going on the air. You know six months ago and saying if we win back the Senate the first thing we should do is reinstated institute the Filibuster for for for justices. I mean this is like a what point do in this comes from lawyers and I and I understand it right. I mean like I say I was raised by a lot of them. At what point do does the sort of the broader institution of law as opposed as distinct from? Let's say the conservative movement and all the lawyers who make up Who are who? Who who serve that have been to Diagram. Covers both of them? At what point did they say we're going to give up the ghost on the Supreme Court not being a political body because it seems to me that you know you've outlined that at the very least the Republicans it more aggressively gave up? That goes fifty years ago. But I you know. I think you can argue that coming out of reconstruction they had given up that ghost. It's just that The the the Democrats the laughed. They don't seem to sort of be able to let go of that vision of the Supreme Court. I think that's right. And I think as a result you know they're bringing you know a watered down to a nice site. I mean you know I Mcconnell has been very clear you know he. He refused to have any Hearings at all for Maryland and then. He went out of his wages. Hello Kentucky Audience Dot long ago of course if there were a vacancy in the last year of trump administration.

Supreme Court Stephen Bride Democrats Mcconnell Kennedy Obama Administration Ginsburg brier Merrick Garland Senate Chris coons Maryland Fordis
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The Court of Appeals The next step and then it gets up to the Supreme Court and again five to four. They say nope. There's no obligation of any remedy across the district line. So if blacks are trapped in Detroit and were unable to give him an education because there aren't enough weights and each weight too bad so the combination of these two rulings mutually ensured. We would not have equality of education this country. 'cause one said you don't have the right to equal funding for your district and the other said if you're in a big city where so many minority students were you've no right to integrated education and again if eighty four been there. It would have been fired for the other way. So those are the key education rulings that have obviously implications Through the decades that followed and and and continue on today and I think in many respect also Made our education system so susceptible to the Corporate Reform Movement. That we have more or less just sort of passed through And which also did a tremendous amount of damage to our education system. And the other sort of I guess I twin horse of the apocalypse of of inequality as you as you outlined it is Has To do with our campaign. Finance system and really what that ultimately means is the failure of politicians to be responsive to the issues sets and the needs of ordinary people as opposed to monied interests. Exactly right and you know I talk about how the World Report that came out in twenty eighteen By Thomas Ticketing other on this. And they said there were two main drivers of inequality in the United States one was educational inequality which we just talked about. The other said was the lack of progressive taxation. Which you know. The top tax rates have gone down so much In in recent decades and that really is both of these are attributed to the Supreme Court and the reason are terrible unfair taxes attributable pinker is just what you said is that starting nineteen seventy six. The Supreme Court just begin striking down campaign finance law after campaign finance law and as a result the Supreme Court ensures that wealthy individuals and later corporations really have undue influence Congress in the legislatures and it really did starting nineteen seventy six when the same conservative court decides that money equals speech and they struck down. It was after Watergate. Congress actually passed a very strong campaign. Finance law really would have changed the role of money in our society and the Supreme Court strikes down strikes down the limits on expenditures. And says you have a First Amendment right rich person to spend as much money as you want to get someone elected. And that's really been the undoing of our democracy Let's talk about some of the Those you know those cases in the sort of the the The I guess the like you say Buckley v Vallejo is the most important one. Just give us a sense of what was involved there and then I guess we could talk about Obviously that that goes through a series of other cases to get to citizens United Buckley. V Vallejo is the original sin in that regard right and So as I as I said after Watergate there was just tremendous tremendous popular pressure on Congress to pass campaign finance or for reform because people forget now but watered the Watergate scandal dishes being about breaking into the Watergate Hotel. There were major major campaign finance improprieties uncovered of corporations. You know delivering money to the committee. Re like the president in paper bags and things like that so Congress does pass this very strong reform. It gets challenged by James Buckley the then. The New York's conservative senator and some other people The D. C. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington. Dc which is the case. I actually uphold the entire law and quite reasonably says. This really isn't about speech. You know this you know that giving money to campaign isn't really speech and it also has very strong language about how this is very very important for Congress to act to protect our election so that was a great ruling from the DC circuit. It goes up to the Supreme Court and they reverse and as I said. They created this framework. That you know Is still with us where they said. Okay well if you're giving money to a campaign that could lead to some. You know our fear of corruption. So we're going to allow regulation of that but if you're just spending money on.

Supreme Court Congress Court of Appeals United Buckley D. C. Circuit Court of Appeals Watergate Hotel Corporate Reform Movement Vallejo Detroit United States DC president Washington New York senator
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:16 min | 6 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"I think it did pave the way in some ways for you know liberals to do things like reject Judge Bork down. The road So I I think I think it it aged meeting somebody boulder role for the Senate but But I think that you know in in in my looking back on it. The real tragedy works is over lost opportunities that we have there to have a liberal court to last longer. And what's incredible is that what is his name is really never mentioned now. you know if you go to a loss to. Yale law school where where was graduate of the most brilliant graduate of your law school? He's just not talked about. He's considered in the BARRASSO and It's an overreaction. You know he did some things. The main issue got Got In trouble for was accepting money from a foundation that was run by a Wall Street financier but it was a good foundation and judges injustice. Who actually did do consulting work at the time. It sounds a little strange now Although we do judges and justice certainly do a lot of speaking occurrences but there there. Just wasn't that much that terrible but the idea that Ford is now considered a liberal harassment. He's very much a conservative embarrassment. Because he's really mean exhibit in how the Conservatives used skulduggery to take over the court and sixty nine much as they used it. You know half a century later with Merrick earl to hold onto the liberal majority. So that's the Ford is next project. I think people should know but it's just not when the people are talking about off Okay let's move on to the cases that that follow this right wing. Takeover of the court We've cases like San Antonio School district versus Rodriguez that we can talk about and Milkin be Bradley Alati case and dangerous re Williams. Where where do you WANNA start in terms of an in some ways? We have sort of different Tracks depending on what the issues are right and then I to you mentioned are absolutely critical and I say that you know not only because When I graduated from Moscow I became public interest lawyer for the ACLU Southern Poverty Law Center. And I worked on education tastes and I was really me and my colleagues working in the shadow of these cases because those two rulings Rodriguez nineteen seventy-three and Milliken nineteen seventy four really close the door to Progressive Reform in education. Coming from the Supreme Court Rodriguez was a case in which poor Mexican American Stevenson parents in Texas sued Texas because there were such enormous funding disparities between rich and poor school. This baited maybe education say very equal. They made the very logical argument that if the government is going to provide education to children The equal protection clause says do that equally government is supposed to treat its citizens equally. They won the Federal District Court level. Three Court judge unanimously ruled for them. It gets up to the Supreme Court and in nineteen seventy three. The court rejects their case. Five to four and you know that one.

Supreme Court Rodriguez Federal District Court Yale law school Ford Judge Bork Senate Merrick earl Texas San Antonio School district harassment Moscow ACLU Bradley Alati Progressive Reform Poverty Law Center Williams Milliken
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:11 min | 6 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"New state. They moved to Connecticut and Connecticut had a awaiting a residency requirement. That you had to be there for year before you got welfare. And some people put people move their for their first year. Wouldn't get welfare. The Supreme Court struck down now. There were those who had hoped that they will do it. Even more expansive ways come up with some kind of broader rights welfare or something like that according to do that in Shapiro it grounded its decision on the rights to travel but still it was a very very important decision that in practical terms delivered welfare to a lot of people who are being denied it and I guess I guess my point is that that's the type of case. Because we're we're starting to see like analogs of this case in the Roberts court where you start to slowly Develop a line of cases that begins to expand or contract. writes in some fashion and that that Shapiro case could have been radically the building blocks of expanding the State's obligation to its citizens. That's right and you know one of the things I talk about. In the book is there was h really robust movement in the sixties of poverty. Lawyers who were there were many of them around the country and they were very wind. Chill who were an academic? There were a lot of poverty. Law Academics will working Wyndham who were trying to establish much broader right so actually in nineteen sixty nine. The same year that Shapiro. B Thompson decided Frank Michelman who was then a young Harvard law professor constitutional epicenter. He's still a professor there now. Really very disgust much discussed article in the Harvard Law Review the first article in the Supreme Court issued that year argument there was actually perhaps a constitutional right to subsistence to things like food and healthcare from the federal government. And that was the high watermark but those arguments were being made and some people hope that Shapiro Thompson would be the case in which the court embrace that kind of broader idea about Economic Rights.

Shapiro Thompson Supreme Court Harvard Law Review Frank Michelman Connecticut Wyndham professor
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:54 min | 6 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The Supreme Court thinking outside. Things always works In nineteen fifty four with Warrants FIRST YEAR ARRIVING COURT HANDS DOWN. Brown versus education and After that begins we slow but eventually fairly successful project of desegregating schools in the south and the same time. They are transforming many other areas of law. This is the period in which we got the Miranda decision. Which leads to tell you that you have the right to remain silent before the question. You we got giddying Wainwright wainwright which promised every poor criminal. Defendant the right to a lawyer. We got Decision striking down the poll tax. We got decisions striking down Force prayer in public schools so in many many areas. The Warren Court was Transforming Society for the better When you say activists I mean what made the Warren Court activists? Well the Warren Court was not afraid to strike down laws or to Issue orders to institutions when it's thought unconstitutional things going on so for example Striking down laws. We just didn't south segregating not just schools but you know Jim. Crow segregated every aspect of society. The court was willing to strike those laws down in the way that the court had not been before. But also you look at the decision like Gideon B wainwright guaranteeing every indigent defending the rights to aware. That's a huge thing with that is imposing on every jurisdiction in the country and affirmative obligation to come up with lawyers for people that was inexpensive ruling for every city and county and state in the country. The Warren Court wasn't afraid to do that when they thought it was a constitutional rate that had to be vindicated. And let's just I so there's really two different elements to activism in this context. One is A willingness to strike down laws and really in some ways act contrary to a Legislators legislative will based upon the Constitution. And then the other is to create mechanisms or requirements to protect constitutional rights. As in like you said in Gideon I think that's right exactly and these were thing that the court had done at some time in the past it it more often that the conservative direction In nineteen twenties court was being activists to strike down progressive legislation including laws against child labor. But here in the sixties Starting fifties mainly the sixties. We had a liberal quote was actually willing to do this activism on behalf of the most disadvantaged members of society. Okay and so.

Warren Court Supreme Court Transforming Society Wainwright wainwright Gideon B Brown Miranda Crow Jim
"fifty years" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Science Show

"The side when mungo lady had emerged recent rainfall had refresh the surface of the win and while following a distinctive soil horizon he spotted a tiny patch of white shining in the afternoon sun it was the dengue part of a human skull today's later a team arrived to investigate and alan thorne identified it immediately as a man lying in an outstretched position hands over the groin in a catholic prepared grave the curious feature of the burial was a pink staining around the grave margins bola realized that he was looking at oca an incredibly rare resorts in the landreau area the body had been painted or spring with over two kilograms of the sacred material a ritual practice unfathomable to researches at the time the image of manga man in his grave was telecast around the world the ceremonial nature of this forty two thousand year old burial transformed global understandings of the time depth and complexity of indigenous histories and cultures oldest evidence of ritual burial with a complete interred fully modern man that was extraordinarily there's no other country in the world that's africa that has such comparable experience in this context we have the book ends of that home i graciously story out of africa to find these people in a straighter at forty two thousand years and now beyond beyond fifty thousand with that level of cultural sophistications is absolutely mind boggling in global terms the reading thing now is that traditional aboriginal views of the dream time and the dating of it by scientists is increasingly becoming confident it's not to say that the dream time is timeless but when we get back beyond fifty or sixty thousand we might as well think of it in those terms so science and traditional aboriginal views are really coming together on this particular issue light alum thorne but then concerns about what had been done the sensitivities about taking people from prepared graves jim bola in the afternoon of that dot phase of body collecting i come along and allen psalm the physical anthropologists comes along and removes the bones so you can understand the air dry bridge of everage it'll people when they heard that this taking place now you now defense when i was out there on a wandering geologist looking at climate change they wasn't aboriginal person for one hundred twenty kilometers so there was no one there could refer to nor ellen thorn could refer to so when the feelings of passion are aroused they're perfectly understandable and justifiable but in the circumstances that faced us we had no option head we not famine of salvage there's buyers my were eroding at the surface and they not been so they would be no we'll erica geria in the landreau today the aboriginal people would not have something which to probably proud.

geologist ellen thorn mungo alan thorne landreau africa jim bola allen erica geria one hundred twenty kilometers forty two thousand years forty two thousand year two kilograms
"fifty years" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Science Show

"The jim bola was able to party to look at the side was in march nineteen sixty nine when he led a group of geologists so fantasy innocuous will andrew lakes region in far western new south wales they stayed in the sheer has sheds lake munger explored the genes during the day and debated ideas at night of lamb chops and flagons of wine the eulogists harry allen reece jones contain and jomo vini tantalized by the possible association of artifacts and extinct megaphone and they excitedly fuller jim to juma to investigate the charred bones the find was far more dramatic than they had imagined as they carefully investigated shattered bundle of buns after up to piece of human joba in an instant the scale of straining history changed in bowl words we will confronted not only with human activity but by the very presence of humanity itself the skeleton became affectionately known as munger lady her cremated remains had been buried in a small round hole on a sandy beach a few meters from the water's edge there she had remained for forty thousand years as a lake system dried and the camp with abandoned as a descendants moved to other parts of their country and as the rabbits and goats and farmers arrived jim bola hadn't stumbled across her remains in july nineteen sixty eight within a year all evidence of her life and death would have eroded into the wind fortuitous nature of her preservation and the influence of her discovery only straight in public has led traditional owners such as dorothy lawson to declare that she surfaced for a reason as monty monty elder mary pepin as often told jim bola you didn't find mungo lady she found you the gist quickly fighter graft andrew the features at the burial and collected the loose fragments they then made the decision to remove the bones they were sheep grazing on the net and thunderstorm with brewing the site was federal one downpour could sweep the bones away carefully cut and removed the disintegrating calculate books in which the bones was set and packed them in the only vessel available john mulvaney suitcase some of his close la returned as patting the following day they took munger lady to camera billy griffiths and here are two of those who were there archaeologists alan thorne and reece jones on dating and the significance of mungo what happens is that the iranian in the soil is dissolved then it enters the bone sometime after death and then it decays so you have thorium raid on all these other things so you measure the different daughter projects and that process has been going on since the beginning of the world is the best method of all but the amounts are so tiny i this is just minuscule amounts the miniaturization of all this so that's the problem is so that's getting any sort of age age estimate is a real coup technically what what they've done so anyway they've tried to do the uranium series plus this electron spin resonance which is trapped electron message on the teeth and boatswain give values of the same rough order so in a sense they've tried to address the problem jim raised may turn out that these remains are themselves the literally the earliest evidence for human prisons on the continent but what is interesting of course is that most of the early sites the to have been in the extreme north here we are in south western new south wales in the southeastern corner of a straighter so whatever these dates are they are very much minimum dates because obviously they didn't just race down from the north coast to turn up in the semiarid climates and environments of wish new south wales at the national university it took physical anthropologist ellen thorn over six months to excavate and reconstruct the hundreds of fragile bone fragments contained in the calgary books there were found to belong to a young adult female of slenda bill and small stature who had been burned on a pile by the lakeshore over forty thousand ease ago what was groundbreaking was that the remains unequivocally human shattering lingering nineteenth century something that bridge people had evolved from an earlier race of hominids the news of mungo lady spread quickly around the globe and was reported in their front page of the national newspapers the bones were at that time the oldest evidence of homo sapiens outside of africa the new had become the a few years later in february nineteen seventy four jim bola returned to.

jim bola forty thousand years six months
"fifty years" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"It's perfectly legal for landlords to turn someone down based on their source of income antonio fascinated by is executive director of the homeless persons representation project in baltimore and williams lawyer she says fifty years after the fair housing act we see this as essentially one of the last frontiers of ensuring that people have access to fair housing landlords say it's not discrimination adam skolnick is executive director of the maryland multi housing association a trade group this was all about the governmental bureaucracy that comes with aching voucher as opposed to any other issue skull nick says landlords who accept vouchers face inspections and paperwork the public housing authority determines how much rent they can charge almost one wimbledon i take rogers i love the income stream while mid that and i find it worth dealing with the agony but that's why our association thinks it should be somebody's choice fair housing advocates say say that choice perpetuate segregation and concentrated poverty jill williams eventually did find a place to live on the way out to see it we passed several complexes where she says her voucher wasn't accepted there including of here no such now sexually she's fifty nine now her gray ponytail pokes out of a woman veteran coastguard cap partment right on the corner ground level outside the grounds look neatly kept but she says she doesn't feel safe going for walks and it's far from her family it was disappointing because i couldn't live where i wanted to live and i just never thought that i would find income discrimination as well as at my age heaven experienced discrimination because of my color williams hopes to move to annapolis maryland capital so she can advocate for the homeless and because they're discrimination based on source of income is prohibited in baltimore i'm amy scott for marketplace.

executive director baltimore adam skolnick nick jill williams annapolis maryland capital amy scott maryland multi housing associa fifty years
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"We were sending kids to the department of you services that's kids prison by leaps and bounds and they would come home and what would they do what they know best continue to commit offenses because they became unemployable they perhaps didn't have education to rely on the reality is we lost a population of young kids and to what george just chill blazer she took her budget she asks the state of ohio for any extra money any extra favors she took the budget that was already there and she created a series of programs when you come into a court she would give you a chance to stay in your home life go to school but still adhere to these programs that she was set up for you that she created through her courts and monitoring and as a result of these programs are numbers dropped by more than half of the amount of people she's sending to kids services aka kitty jail so tell that you saw this judge do you wish you had gone through a program like that i do i do you know michael have had a lot of conversations pacific ly with regard to programming and i believe that good programming is good security and the prison and as we start to transcend from prison back into the community how we take a look at how we are affecting people when they aren't secure and controlled them by moments as extremely important with regard to the outcome of those specific individuals once they get back into the community at we don't start to take a look at people's values if we don't start to have a conversation about integrity and some other things that it will take to be successful once you release then i show you that most people will go back so three your own personal experience in through this documentary what our viewers supposed to.

george ohio michael
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Hi my name is kristen i'm calling from evanston and i wanted to talk about what my daughter's school does for martin luther king day they do an assembly they have the kids perform they be passages and sing songs and it's like the most beautiful thing to see all the children up there so appreciate mr or sixty five for making it a priority got a comment for the show hit us up on our facebook page tweet us at the takeaway or leave us a voicemail at eight seven seven eight my take your ideas and takes a huge part of who we are let us know what you're thinking about this is the takeaway they are not just gangs of kids anymore they are often the kinds of kids that are called superpredators no conscience no empathy that was the first lady hillary clinton at a campaign speech in nineteen ninetysix six husband bill clinton's second term she was making the case for criminal justice reform to support president clinton's violent crime control and law enforcement act that super predator idea it's stuck alleged gang members and young people of color were labeled dangerous uncontrollable it was the start of a cycle of juvenile punishment that continues today this week hbo's vice launching their sixth season with the episode raised in the system actor michael k williams host the episode he also starters omar little on the hbo series the wire trauma whether it be physical sexual mental health or just plano good oldfashioned lack of resources in the home you take a.

evanston hillary clinton bill clinton hbo omar martin luther facebook president michael k williams
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Our guest charles mckinney said dr martin luther king junior's legacy has become distorted over time and listeners we are hearing from you how is dr king's life addressed in schools today penatta stephen elementary school music teacher from nyack new york mice didn't have the impression that dr king was powerful speaker close friend of the president and widely accepted more leader i emphasized to them that he was arrested for protesting around twenty times vilified by the press and threatened with physical violence regularly i also talked to them at length about the poor people campaign emphasizing the fact that much of dr king hoped to achieve particularly economic quality for all races has still not yet been accomplished my name is peggy and i'm calling from england new jersey and i am actually a middle school art teacher the decision about who does what to celebrate it is usually left up to me and they might have a little bit of discussion but unfortunately it's not taking us seriously as i like i am a black woman and it is serious and important to me so i make a point of trying to incorporate some project around that time however is just not enough devotion put to this and it's sad because i teach an urban school district and our kids really should learn more by name is gin yell and i'm calling from hollywood florida i have a son in fourth grade and they do a little bit about martin luther king and a little bit about rosa parks but they don't really go into it it's incumbent upon the parents to teach the children because this will only going touch the circus.

charles mckinney president florida martin luther king dr martin luther penatta stephen elementary sch new york peggy hollywood
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"It also represents potential there are a growing number of organizations a growing number of activist organizations growing number of of mainland organizations right shout out to black lives matter memphis grassroots organizing coalition coalition of concerned citizens the fight fifteen out memphis right shoutout to so many organizations in town who were doing the work of building engaging in this in this beautiful struggle there's a growing number of people working in the school system who underst who are starting to understand come to an understanding of the deleterious impact of segregation on education right we can't get around it we we simply can't right so there's a growing group of people who are saying look let's start having let's start having some real conversations about how we move forward right what's the definition of insanity you keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results well you know what for the last fifty years we've engaged in a series of practices and patterns that have gotten us here we gotta try some thing we gotta try something different and so there's a critical mass of folks i think in this town some elected officials some other civic some other civic leaders a few folks in the foundation arena where we've got to get a few who got to get a few more them on board we're starting to say hey you know what some of these old patterns and practices they're not working it's time to start thinking about about new approaches and so so we see that in memphis again we see the reality of inequality but we also see so much potential to to confront those realities professor charles mckinney associate professor of history rhodes college thank you.

memphis professor charles mckinney associate professor of history fifty years
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"People of african descent in that city today yes that and that number is is virtually unchanged from nineteen sixty eight right we've got the highest black child poverty rate in the country but also we have we made gains yes we have made gains right so when we look over the course of the last fifty years we see a dramatic expansion of the black middle class but also we see poverty rates and african african american poverty rates virtually unchanged henry louis gates was once asked to talk about this period is fifty year period and he says you know what the easiest way to talk about this say it was the best of times it was the worst of times is there enough economic opportunity given the cloud of race within memphis to allow someone to achieve your level of success today memphis is going to have to be honest with self right about what memphis can do so on the one hand we say we want people to achieve and we say we want we want to expand opportunities for african americans on the other hand we tell oh companies in corporations that they should move the memphis because they can pay their employees slave wages the chamber of commerce used to have a some language on their on their website before activists pointed it out that you know they talked about hey you know move your company here come to memphis because you know we're not unionized and you can pay you can pay people really really low wages if we extrapolate for a minute and look at memphis as sort of a hyper focused example of something in america what does it symbolize given all the controversy over apparent growing inequality in america right now what does memphis tell us what should we be thinking about as we honor the legacy of dr martin luther king junior memphis represents reality and potential it represents the reality of of persistent racial inequality represents the reality of what what town what city when a county can look like when the majority of the people in that in that space when african americans are systematically routinely shut out of the halls of power.

memphis henry louis gates chamber of commerce america dr martin luther fifty years fifty year one hand
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And then when he died racial problems all of that now and it makes me wonder just what kind of a world we are living in and what's going to happen now martin luther king try to help roseanne away from not having a violence or any kind of rubs i think they should have sast pray that his family then find in the memory of all he tried to do for the land he loved so well always willing to share my king with the world he caused he was a symbol of the finest man is capable of being yet to us he was a father and a husband today we mark fifty years since the assassination of dr martin luther king junior king was in memphis support the city's striking sanitation workers they were protesting abusive working conditions and low wages the night before he was killed king spoke at the mason temple in memphis delivering what would become known as the mountaintop speech a long life long has its place but i'm not concerned about that now i just wanna do god's will and he's allowed me to go up to the mountain i've look over i see the promised land i may not get there with you to the night people will get to the promised land in a sense dr king for shadowed what was to come the following night april fourth nineteen sixty eight martin luther king junior was shot and killed as he stood on the balcony of the lorraine motel today the lorraine motel stands as did back in nineteen sixty eight it's no longer a functioning motel it's more the national civil rights museum dr king while he's grown larger than life he's an icon of the civil rights movement and a symbol for many but for trolls mckinney whose an associate professor of history at rhodes college in memphis there's a danger in the wake kings images in stride into our national consciousness professor mckinney warns us that danger should not be ignored we've worked hard to produce a version of king that is like a black santa claus fright to dissenter king to move him away from the political idealogue to move away from the person who was comfortable with mass based protests and that's a problem because that's that's not the real king right that's not the historical king.

memphis king mason temple lorraine motel rhodes college mckinney martin luther king roseanne dr martin luther associate professor of history professor fifty years