35 Burst results for "Fifty Year"

Taraji P. Henson Is Single, Jamie Lynn Spears Recalls Teen Pregnancy

Daily Pop

06:43 min | 5 hrs ago

Taraji P. Henson Is Single, Jamie Lynn Spears Recalls Teen Pregnancy

"Lot of everyone and welcome daily today, we may have uncovered one of Hollywood's dating secrets. It turns out there is a not so subtle way stars have been letting us know that they are newly single it's with their straps and she hinson might be the latest led to do it. So during a recent appearance on the breakfast club to rise, did admit she was single. Here's what she had to say about her split from former NFL star Kelvin hated. The. Wow said it yet but it didn't work out. You know what I mean. Side I was like bear left do their thing. But if you're both not on the same page with that, then you feel like you're. Taking it on yourself at Mathematics Fair position for anybody to play in a relationship. she did it on a breakfast. Daddy's you already for everybody to know you were a single. Everybody I mean potential suitors as well Oh. Yes. One hundred percent because four. She made that announcement she started a little early because fans are already speculating. Something might have happened because last month after her fiftieth birthday celebration she posted some sexy bikini pigs and Calvin was not in any of the photo. She looking really hot. There's Chapman her way when you first trap is that kind of your deadwood say like guys I'm single just. I'm single at hot. I, mean I I feel like I I'm trying to think back to my last break up. Yes. For most people that is the move when you look like she does with trump even i. if I was happy in their relationship like I can't even believe that this woman is fifty years old like. That's the whole thing but I mean, yeah, I guess. So I feel like what she said was really true. You can't take on the burden of a relationship and if somebody's not going to put the effort with you the way you're gonNA put in the effort with them and finally you're like, okay Su this is my hot body for instagram else will take this on if you're not going to what hundred percent, I don't necessarily think that your thirst trapping to let people know you're single I think as human beings we need validation whether we get it at work or at home are. Like. Raji Behan is getting right now but I think you're going through a moment in your life and there's a big life change. You need that affirmation from people that it's going to be okay and that be you still got it. Again. Exactly what it is, it is a little like. Thirst trap he may be or even if it's not a bikini, you're right it's something that gives you like a positive look some makes you build your confidence because you've got a now face this new chapter in your life and your that confidence to do that, and it's the same way as back before the grab me call your girlfriend and They'll all say like you're so hot don't worry about it. You're gonNA find someone look at you. You're smoking yes. That's go out because I want all these guys have looked me and so I feel like, I'm smoking hot one hundred percent. Look let me be petty real quick because I tried to let people know that I'm single trap to the guy who I want the attention from that. Hey, I'm saying go and try to let the guy who broke my heart know that hey, I still got it body but everybody used to track back in the day before social media when you knew that your man was going to be at a wedding at a party. You yes. You're normally do you put on the heels. Be made sure your hair was like nicely qua-. People would trumpet in the ninety that was the best is. Did you get Morgan fact me up on this? You do all that work and for whatever reason the X. Show. I've let me let me explain to me. This is the give the audience life lesson that I have learned. No matter what you think his plans might be no matter how heartbroken you are you stick to what you were originally going to do. So you were going to go to the club and you heard he wasn't going you still go because then. He goes after and then you go I bit. They just happened to be so many times stick to your original plans and always look during breakup. No matter what. Then initiative you stick to your original plans and you divert you make sure you get met photo with that one friend who posts every? On the incident. Hold on let me look at that limit looking up. That's. The most fun and miserable time with my entire life. Totally one hundred percent. We all have to go through that phase in our lives I'm. Jamie Lynn Spears is getting real about getting pregnant at sixteen. So Jamie Linton talked to nylon about the Zilly one one reboot and how much her life has changed changed since the show went off the air in two, thousand eight, she says, she found out she was pregnant after the show finished and she was quote mortified to have to tell my parents this and my family this I do not care what TMZ thinks of. Other. CELEBS feel the same way it's it's not the world finding out. It's your family and your friends finding out. It's so interesting because for me if I was in that position, I really wouldn't. Be, so, scared to tell my family because I know they would love me no matter what and I know the support me they would be disappointed but. I would be more afraid to tell the people who worked on my team, my agents, my publicist, all those people who worked really hard to build this brand that was supposed to be so wholesome and was supposed to be one of these things teens looked up to those are the people i. We'd be more afraid to tell. I. would be also more afraid to tell the whole world because that's when the comments of all your insecurities to take over. Securities Will arise whenever you find your pregnant too soon or your self conscious about something or you've made a mistake and sure enough there's going to be a good good chunk of comments on your. Point those out exactly and you're like, yeah, that's how I was feeling. That's what I was worried about and I'm exactly right. I am going to get that hate I against the world that would be more scared of because you said it right most your family and friends. Disappointed they all come around especially when the babies born. They see the baby they say, Oh, you they rally run I mean if I went to my mom and said I was pregnant at sixteen I don't know how happy she would have been with me. She probably would have real I don't know what that would been but right she would eventually. I think have been. Okay. That woman's a little insane I don't know she would have been. So okay with I agree with you guys like your family at the end of the day. Loves you no matter what mistakes you make, and then the then the world judges you even if you say the wrong adjective on TV sometimes so You can't expect them.

Jamie Lynn Spears Hinson NFL Hollywood Raji Behan Kelvin Jamie Linton Chapman Calvin Morgan
You Can Ring Nobel

Your Brain on Facts

05:20 min | 12 hrs ago

You Can Ring Nobel

"A video is making the rounds on the internet this week caught on one of those smart doorbell cameras. It's 2 a.m. And a man is anxiously knocking on his neighbor's door trying to wake him. Does the man need help? Is there an emergency is the neighbor's house on fire? Was there a Prowler in the area or some other kind of threat? No doubt. The man Robert Wilson is trying to wake his across the street neighbor to tell him that they just won the Nobel Prize. My name's Moxi and this is your brain on facts. A good reputation is more valuable than money for lilias. Serious a Syrian living in Rome at the time of the big b c a d change over we have no way of knowing if Alfred Nobel ever read publilius, but he definitely had reputation on his mind the Swedish chemist engineer and industrialists found a novel way to combine good old Gunpowder with the exciting new discovery of nitroglycerin to form a truly earth-shaking invention Dynamite. It was a game-changer for Industries like coal mining and it killed people like it was nobody's business both intentionally and through many many Factory explosions. Nobel got richer with each Improvement on the dynamite then his brother Ludovic died a French newspaper ran an obit for Alfred having gotten their lines cross somewhere along the way they were shown the remote As more the paper proclaimed. The merchants of death is dead. Dr. Alfred Nobel who became a rich by finding ways to kill four people faster than ever before died yesterday. That's gotta sting. Nobel had no children and a sudden intense concern about his legacy. So he decided to put some of the money he'd made into the service of repairing his name with a real long-term strategy in his 1895 will drafted the year before he died Nobel instructed that most of his fortune the equivalent of two hundred and fifty million dollars today be set aside to create an award five annual prizes quote to those who during the preceding year shall have conferred the greatest benefit of mankind provided you benefit mankind by way of physics chemistry physiology or medicine literature and problematically vague more on that later long piece. Wait a sec. Say those of you with better recall than me. Where's the Nobel Prize for economics? There wasn't one. There still isn't a part from the one that they're kind of is. The bank of Sweden prize in economic Sciences in memory of Alfred Nobel was created by Sweden's Central Bank in nineteen. Sixty-eight. What about mathematics game popular Apocrypha is that Nobel lost the woman he loved to a mathematician and so did not consider mathematics to be important enough. There's no proof for that story sadly wage and while no one knows for sure the reason it could be as simple as Nobel really wasn't a math guy. I feel you there. Winners are announced in October and November the culmination of a Year's preparation more than six thousand people like Nobel laureates AKA past winners School in various fields and officials from various universities are invited to nominate candidates about a thousand of them for each prize, which usually results in between 150 and 250 nominees. It's not just names in a hat. You have to write a detailed proposal in favor of your nominee and no no matter how much you want to know how cleverly you think you can get away with it. You cannot nominate yourself. Also. You must be alive. Nobel prizes aren't awarded posthumously at least not any more than a few were in the early days, but it was decided in the 1970s that that wasn't their bag anymore, but exceptions make the rule and there is one notable exception in 20 job. 11:00 Canadian immunologist Ralph Steinman received the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine but he passed away between being nominated and the prize being announced akong assignments daughter. Her father had actually joked about getting the Nobel Prize shortly before he died. They don't give it to you if you've passed away. He said according to her I got to hold out for that. He didn't quite make it but they gave them the prize. Anyway, Steinman must have had a real sixth sense when it comes to convoluted award schemes because non-winning nominees are kept secret out for fifty years in part to prevent a sort of Susan Lucci situation. For those of you who don't recognize the name Susan Lucci is an American soap opera actress who was nominated for a long time. Emmy Award nineteen years in a row before she won. I always suspected that she got the Nam as a running gag after a

Dr. Alfred Nobel Nobel Prize Susan Lucci Ralph Steinman Emmy Award Sweden Moxi Robert Wilson Rome Engineer Ludovic
Trump goes after Fauci, tries to buck up his campaign team

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 d ago

Trump goes after Fauci, tries to buck up his campaign team

"President Donald Trump is again dismissing the coronavirus advice of his top scientific expert during a conference call to campaign workers the president called Dr Anthony Fauci a disaster later in Arizona he said sometimes he says things are a little bit off and they get built up but fortunately but he's a nice guy I like of what is called a lot of bad policy said don't wear a mask the president was quoted during the conference call is saying people are tired of hearing found she and all these idiots will he fire the government's top infectious disease specialist I don't want to I don't want her to me is been there for about three hundred and fifty years I don't want to learn about you told CBS's sixty minutes he was not surprised president trump tested positive for the corona virus after he held large events with few face coverings at Donahue Washington

President Donald Trump President Trump Dr Anthony Fauci Arizona CBS Donahue Washington
Could you handle a surprise $250 expense right now?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:51 min | 4 d ago

Could you handle a surprise $250 expense right now?

"Everybody a lot of big numbers with which to begin the program today, and then a much much smaller number, and arguably it's the smaller one that is more of a problem. One is definitive about the political machinations surrounding the American economy right now, those negotiations over a relief bill one is definitive at one's peril but we seem to have arrived today at the proverbial line in the sand by way of Refresher Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats want to spend two point two, trillion dollars on relief bill the White House, the president of the United States Treasury Secretary Steven. MNUCHIN. They say they are good with one point eight trillion dollars. Senate Republican, Leader Mitch McConnell Today in Kentucky Though said this you're correct were discussions going on between the Speaker about an hour now. That's not what I'm. GonNa put on. McConnell. Is going to put on the floor. He said a five hundred billion dollar package that'll be next week sometime. So those are the big numbers. The smaller number is two, hundred, fifty dollars just to fifty no extra zeros and it's one of the key data points from the latest addition of the marketplace. At research poll, we're going to be digging into it for the next couple of days and today as well. But the upshot is that all is not well once you get past the economic headlines One of the questions we asked people was if you had an unexpected expense of two hundred and fifty dollars, two, hundred, fifty bucks, would you be able to pay it forty seven percent of people almost half of Americans said it would be somewhat or very difficult to come up with cash. Since. The pandemic it's Ben We haven't really had much expendable income. That's Ashley. Since she's twenty seven, she's a first grade teacher in Monterey California at the beginning of the pandemic my boyfriend was laid off from his cooking job and so now it's kind of just. My salary and then the little bit of benefits that he gets, which covers blake rent food. But only barely like there's there's not much else one reason why there's not much else those expanded unemployment benefits the extra six, hundred dollars a week we told you so much about they ran out almost three months ago. See also negotiations over those big numbers that we started with. When he had the federal benefits at least we had like a little bit of wiggle room where it was like okay. If something happened wouldn't be like the end of the world right then. But now that that's gone, that's also kind of not there. Anymore Ashley's ends one of the respondents to the tenth addition of the marketplace. Edison Research poll out as I think I've said, today we through some new questions in the bowl this time cuz pandemic and some of those questions were about kids and parents and working and schooling from home. Those are among the biggest challenges millions of people in this economy you're facing and as marketplace's Megan McCarthy Carino reports it is mostly women who are facing it. Normally Emily Smith supplements her job as an heirloom vegetable farmer in Ohio with a part time winter job. But this year she's got a lot going on at home her nine year old son is doing on again off again, remote school. It changes week by week according to infection rates in our county I have to be here. He's not really old enough for me to. Go anywhere one time while he was in class, she left to run a quick errand down the street I come Rahm, and it's like he's sitting in front of the TV with his computer Smith's husband works fulltime outside the home. So she's in charge of schooltime our marketplace. Edison. Research poll found a stark gender disparity in WHO's primarily responsible for supervising remote learning sixty three percent of mothers said they were compared with just twenty eight percent of fathers. These disparities have kind of already been there but they're really getting exaggerated by how the pandemic has kind of taken away a lot of the scaffolding that makes working families tick. Darby Saxby directs the Center for the changing family USC. She says before the pandemic women in heterosexual dual income households were already doing more household labor despite the fact that dads have tripled the amount of time. They. Spend taking care of kids over the last fifty years. Now with childcare hard to find an extracurriculars canceled its mothers who are mostly picking up the slack. You know women are generally socialized to kind of be more the managers of of their kids, development and education in our poll. Roughly equal shares of men and women did say they had made career sacrifices to care for family during the pandemic or had cut hours at work to deal with remote school like Fain Young in Philadelphia who's juggling his it job with studying his BA and helping his five kids at home to definitely taken away from anything else that I would have otherwise done. And that time otherwise would be consumed either with my career or my own education. Dan. Carlson at the University of Utah has found well, moms are more likely to be in charge of remote schooling. DADS have stepped up to take more equal share of routine housework and childcare during the pandemic Manhattan stepped up the way they did it would have been even worse so it was not enough to stem the tide. You know as like a finger in the dam, the latest jobs report from the federal government found more than eight hundred thousand women had dropped out of the labor force four times more than men. I Megan McCarthy Carino for marketplace

Mitch Mcconnell Ashley Emily Smith Dads Megan Mccarthy Carino Nancy Pelosi Senate White House Megan Mccarthy United States Treasury Edison Research Kentucky Federal Government Secretary President Trump Darby Saxby Edison Blake First Grade Teacher Rahm
Interview with Amir Khan

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:54 min | 5 d ago

Interview with Amir Khan

"Dot Com. Thank you so much for for coming on the show. Georgina. Thank you for having me on. Now this is a fascinating book because it's also about your life and the human connections and you speak about the impact, the Sir, your gp Dr George had on your family growing up how important was he a role model for you in your career? Dodger George was was like a really big part of our family life ready because my mom, my mom holds doctors in really high regard. From a working customary, my mom worked away at from a cleaner to a social worker. My Dad was a bus driver and so doctors were really revered. Dr George will issue with the lady she was fear degeorge and. She she was just like the pinnacle of everything my. Doctor should be she. She knew is really well, she knew individually, she asked about those when we went to see her, she's got other family members that nick without really kind of old fashioned family. That we all kind of dream of having which is really hard to kind of get. But. But you know it was really important and I I really I remember really clearly when when Dr George Retired and she had a bit of a tea party in the waiting room. which which again, we never do that now. Kind of infection control Pepsi's but but she had she had a tea party patients mom will have wedding sorry to it was such a big deal and. I remember getting dressed up putting going to erase accuse US really sad but really excited to be invited to this. You know it was that kind of movement that I thought. Wow you know don't just can have a real impact on people's lives particularly cheap please we don't often hear about that side from from General Practitioner we a lot of the drama we imagine happens in hospital and a lot of impact league we imagine happens in hospital, but so much can happen in general position in the community. Absolutely. It's an completely integral part of our day. To Day life is not by my mother was a doctor and she was talking about how things had changed. She was a doctor for fifty years and she said one thing she really noticed now is that that people never touched you she says her main job as GP was to lay her hands on people and for people to feel that contact and cheap felt when she was a patient in her later years that just never really happened. No. No I trained GP's as well at she. I G P now full for over ten years have been adopted for. Sixty years I think now and you know you have to gauge the situation. It's not. We don't touch people complete know if if there's an elderly lady, an elderly person, you're a child. Gentle handle may have this is always you knew appropriate as needed. We go to be very careful of course, and I were give advice to my GP trainees but you're absolutely right things have have changed and there's a lot of pressure on GP's now not just through the volume of demand also the volks ticking exercise and when when it's just the doctor and the patient when it's just me and my patient in the room that coal pot of general hasn't changed in all the years that it's been around but it's everything else around not not puts pressure on that situation and can take away from those nuances are so important. Now you'll book the doctor will see now follows your fifteen years working as a GP from rookie to becoming a partner in one of the busiest surgeries it tell me about the surgery and and you're working. Patton, there, I mean, presumably the numbers are pretty overwhelming. Yes. So so it is the Biz in in inner city Bradford and we have a very kind of multicultural patient base, which is, which is brilliant. It's why I wanted to work. we have twenty, five, thousand patients registered our our our practice is incredibly jaws can. Before then there's always a big cured stations has a big rush on the phones when when the phone lines open and with admits, Yoyo Clinic lists will be full than extras will be added on because patients need to be seen, and so from the moment you get it and it doesn't matter how you getting nearly bad and I get in very early about seven quarter seven the minute you get working flat-out right through to the end of the day. But you I say all of this in my book, the kind of things that that really helps you keep you going mongst pressure is is your colleagues. Michael. Just amazing. I. Asked I went with some of the best GP's and I. Them every day the best nurses again, I learn from them as well and it makes a big difference in friends outside of work and I think that's really helped me because he is so much about GP's bailing out healthcare professionals bidding out and I think that would be a real risk if I didn't have the support of my colleagues in the friendships of my of my colleagues and so that makes a big difference for me,

General Practitioner Dodger George Dr George Retired Yoyo Clinic United States Bradford Pepsi Nick Michael Patton Partner
Vote (If You Want To & Can)

All My Relations Podcast

06:18 min | Last week

Vote (If You Want To & Can)

"Let's jump right in and talk a little about the history of the native vote and the history of the suppression of the. Native. Vote. I got to tell you that when trump I got elected I felt. Like. Sick to my stomach I. And I. Spent a good amount of time reflecting on my own personal behavior like thinking to myself did I to enough to. Try to make this, not happen. And and the answer is you know I don't often talk about national politics both through project to on my blog personally, you know because I fi-, I find it incredibly problematic and uncomfortable to talk about because you know we're living in colonial state and the federal government has actively tried to eradicate us, and there's a long history of broken promises and broken treaties. Therefore, it feels very uncomfortable to say to my fellow native people you know. Go vote in the system that's not meant for us that doesn't actually ever do the things that it's said it's going to do but go vote. anyways you know. It feels I, feel like a hypocrite just saying it. Yeah I really feel like we need to talk about it. Right Yeah it is by no means a simple decision for folks in Indian country and I think that's really important to acknowledge and to think about as we. Start to talk about this election and what we need to do. Right and you know there has been a long history of active native vote suppression for the first one, hundred and fifty years. In this country, we weren't even allowed to vote, and then in nineteen twenty four can the Indian Citizenship Act which formally US citizens but states continued to prevent us from voting, right? I. Think Sometimes, there's memes and stuff that gets posted where it's like going through the. Different marginalized groups, and when they finally got the right to vote, and it often says like native Americans nineteen, twenty four. But we know for a fact that that's not true. Because, as you said, most states still had things in place to prevent needed from voting like it wasn't until nineteen forty eight that natives in Arizona got the right to vote and then all of that. Suppression that played into the passage of the voting. Rights, act. So in Nineteen, seventy, five. So the things like literacy tests or poll taxes or all of these suppression techniques that affected other communities of Color Also affected a native folks as well. There's all of these appalling facts that have led to all of these underlying issues and voting cases as to why are people have not shown up to the polls in the same numbers you know I I often get asked. Like whoa when I tell when I'm having this conversations with non native people and say, yeah, like a lot of not a native people that I know are don't Vo are when you look at the numbers, you know you would you might think to yourself like, well, why wouldn't native people be active in this process and just want to acknowledge that it? It's it's very systemic. Done on purpose. Absolutely. Yeah. So we're like giving the dates from like nineteen, twenty, four, nineteen, forty, eight, nineteen, seventy, five but like. In twenty eighteen North Dakota changed their ID laws to say that if you were voting, you had to have an idea that had a street address on it and most native folks in North Dakota, Po Boxes, and don't have street addresses. So it was like an active step to try and suppress native in Dakota because natives have power in voting in north. Dakota and in a lot of states that have high population. So like this is an ongoing thing for native communities and then that actually that actually didn't work out well for. North. Dakota. Because all of these activists came together got really good publicity. There was a lot of grassroots organizations and then was it Ruth Buffalo ended up taking the seat. anyways. So so you know I think that's a really good demonstration of the power of the native vote especially in rural areas of Turtle Island. What I should add to this conversation. Around. You know like the the power of the native vote and the complicity of us. Even, telling each other to vote is that. You know we want to have a relationship with the people that get elected. Even. Biden beats trump's not only going to fix the dislike colonial problem. That we have. Yeah I mean it's hard because there are definitely things we can talk about that are like. Immediate. Undoing of things that the trump administration has done that have been really harmful to you need of communities, but there's also an entire list of things that are not going to happen even under a Biden Administration And there's this. Quote that I saw on the wall of the Harvard Law School Lake. Years and years ago and I think about it often in terms of these ideas of justice or like doing what's right from the federal government I will say it's problematic because it's only attributed as a quote African proverb, which obviously is a really problematic but the the Clo- is corn cannot expect justice from court composed of chickens. And I think about that in terms of. Natives asking for equal treatment or justice from the US. Colonial government is like corn expecting justice from a court may have chickens

Dakota Federal Government United States North Dakota Colonial Government Biden Administration Turtle Island Arizona Indian Citizenship Harvard Law School Lake Ruth Buffalo Biden Donald Trump
Nobel Peace Prize recognition is an amazing day, saysUN food agency

UN News

06:12 min | Last week

Nobel Peace Prize recognition is an amazing day, saysUN food agency

"The announcement that the UN. World. Food program or W P as one the twenty twenty Nobel Peace Prize is being described as an amazing day for its workers in the field. Put their lives on the line to help at risk communities. That's the message from Matthew Lyndale head of the agency's South Sudan operation in these interview with your. News Johnson. He's been explaining how the one thousand in two hundred strong humanitarian team there has been helping communities hit by the worst flooding in decades ongoing violence. So we're thrilled today to have received the Nobel Peace Prize for Twenty Twenty there are a thousand, two, hundred, and fifty will food program start working in south Sudan. Relieve your hunger for and feed more than five million people a year and clearly south Sudan for the World Food Program is one of the most complex operations. A country that's face decades of violence. But it's also having to Manage Economic Downturn Cove nineteen locust infestation more violence which continues persistently and now more recently floods have affected more than eight hundred, thousand people. So for all of WFP in south Sudan a country where we were very hard to to demonstrate the link between violence and hunger and try and stop that link rake that that relationship so that we can actually change people's lives for the better future for us. This is just an amazing day. It is certainly excellent use agency for the more than twelve hundred workers on the ground. You say, maybe you could give me some insight into what they're doing not just in terms of the emergency following the devastating flooding that had which has been the worst in decades. I remember you briefing is just a couple of weeks ago on this, but also in terms of the development projects on the ground to help. Resilience for these communities can go home. So in South Sudan Kaley, there is a massive emergency failure of work given the enormity of the food insecurity problem that the country faces and only in the last five years we faced thirty one pockets of famine. It gives you an idea about how significant the problem is here, but it's not the only problem that we need to face and it's not an emergency response is not the only tool. In all too. But obviously what we're also trying to tune in south Sudan is really the poster child for bringing Emergency Response Development activities and this building activities together as warm and part of that obviously is to change the fundamental problems that are faced by so many south Sydney citizen's issues of isolation, the issues of inequality and yet criti- and marginalization all of which creates the breeding ground or conflict and violence. So through our programs where we`re Supporting rural farmers to be more productive to have enough food for their own communities. But more importantly to create a surplus that they can trade with other communities to link those communities together to link farmer's markets and other markets and thereby creating a positive relationship across ethnic divides US Mutiti divides. Can Act they bring people together these. These that we want to invest more. Easily. Recognized I think in this these fries today and it's not just south Saddam redoing these things but also fundamentally desperately trying to show but those that would manipulate burst the time and have manipulated in the past I held accountable so that this change in south Sudan, it's a country that frankly we've been in for fifty years too long and we aim to make sure that we are not needed in this country. We've talked to make those linkages between development aid and is go and obviously we wish you very best to that and your teams in very difficult circumstances millions have been experiencing displacement and conflicts just last week the Human Rights Council highlighted a report that talked about the use of starvation. As a weapon of war, we've heard even worse than that soldiers being offered the chance to rape women in communities in you of payment I mean, you just can't imagine the kind of conditions. But when you go into a community with the WFP Bana, what is it that the agency brings? What is the agency's added value? So in South Sudan because we've built relationships with communities of the decades of presence here because we are, you know twelve hundred plus strong organization with presence across ten states and a deep relationship with the communities we serve where known entity and we have the logistics tools in our toolbox to be able to access areas. We the helicopters, planes, all-terrain vehicles, canoes, bogs, boats you. We have an enduring sir. We're able to meet people's needs when they're the worst, but we're also able to support organizations other organizations as well as community leaders themselves to make a difference in their communities. So what we are. From perspective able to do is anyone really Priam? Times as a facilitator to bring you a organizations to bring communities together that typically have had problems coming together in this country since twenty eleven since its independence country who vicious periods of civil war and has persistent national conflict local conflict walk WFP has is now trying to do is trying to ensure that our food security presence. Can Be used by other partners because we in this on our own to really facilitate a change in this environment, a fundamental change in what is causing an enabling violence to contain one

South Sudan South Sudan Kaley WFP Twenty Twenty UN Matthew Lyndale United States Human Rights Council Johnson Rape Sydney
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | Last week

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
Mumm Napa Brut Prestige Review

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:16 min | Last week

Mumm Napa Brut Prestige Review

"It's David again from cheap wine by the.com. The other wine review that we put on the cheap wine fiber.com website and I noticed lately though. I'm kind of going upscale. Everything is Bordeaux or Napa or Rushing River and well, I kind of did that again? Let me grab the bottle and see what we got here. It's it's not expensive. But it it's Mom Napa Brut Prestige and sparkling wine from Champagne house in France, but they've been in Napa since the seventies so it's fifty years. It's been a long time. It's half half 45% Chardonnay 45% Pinot Noir and the rest is a little bit of a mix of you know, greed. It's just you know, Greenfield a green show your same thing. And what was the other one, you know, what a you know, what is the the hidden grape & in Champaign? It's in all the champagne. You don't know it. So there you go, and it's from Napa and it's one of the kind of weird things because this is a Napa sparkling wine and not a French champagne. Normally when you drink Snapple why that's oh it's Napa except when champagne and then it's oh, it's Napa off cuz it's not you. Hey, we're gonna go get into that because I think that's wrong. So what we have here is like I said, it's a little bit of a dead. Grapes that are approved of champagne right here is a couple of other groups really get used aren't here but it's got the main ones they use 45 different growers in Nampa all day from parts for the line and that's really typical. They make champagne. I know one of the leading Champagnes, you know, the uses a hundred different Growers to Champaign most champagne house and then champagne don't really have much Vineyard Holdings. They they contract long-term contracts for all other groups. And you know, that's how they do it. That's how they're doing it. That's how I am doing it here. I know it's like they've been the emphasis 1970 and they've been in Champaign since like 1827 or something. So these are people know what they're doing. They brought them know how to California even though like most of the American sparkling wine bubbly houses the schramsberg Gloria Ferrer Iron Horse are Sonoma. I guess there's some up in age, you know, they bring their expertise to Napa and this is a year and half second fermentation year and half the first fermentation is in mosul stainless steel and then they put some of it in French Oak barrels to give it that kind of thing going that they blend in. I mean the other surprise champagne house all Out their style ahm how Styles there's the first fermentation for the most part was where all the tricks are. There's just there the little bit of folk a little bit of stainless steel and all the other things had picked their drapes and all that are all in there. So you're getting a real bump style especially after fifty years and now but I mean, they they've come to get their own state of Mississippi cuz in my hand here, I mean, they probably get me a maid came with the French style. They probably created some Napa style go along with it. And here's what I have to say. Very expensive champagnes are Sublime. They're just crazy of every you ever get to drink it. But which I do every once awhile, you know, sometimes our ten years in bottle. I mean and they're so the spinach ten years needs in the bottle and they have all these exotic production techniques and these things are crazy expensive and just crazy delicious, but they're regular ones are kind of reachable this thing. I found out I think Seventeen or eighteen dollars Napa Brut Prestige Brutus, not too sweet. You are not miss out from Champagne. I mean in a blind tasting most people unless there's champagne had know these things. Most people wouldn't know the difference and this is Anna like half the price unless off. I mean, they'll be cheaper come December when all the champagne zor sa land they'd probably make after sales but you know regular time $18 for what is an excellent choice. It's delicious. It's balance is pretty good at this you wouldn't know the difference. So just because it doesn't have champagne or label has Napa who how bad could it be that has Napa on the label.

Napa Mom Napa Brut Prestige Champaign Rushing River David France Mississippi Anna California Vineyard Holdings French Oak Sonoma Mosul
Eddie Van Halen, Virtuoso of the Rock Guitar, Dies at 65

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

00:21 sec | Last week

Eddie Van Halen, Virtuoso of the Rock Guitar, Dies at 65

"Rock. Guitarist Eddie Van Halen dead at the age of sixty five from throat cancer. He was a smoker. Then hell was born in the Netherlands moved to the USA and sixty two he formed rock band van Halen as you know. And the group performed for nearly fifty years selling more than eighty million

Eddie Van Halen Van Halen Throat Cancer Netherlands USA
Miami Heat's Jimmy Butler dominated Los Angeles Lakers' LeBron James in an NBA Finals game like no one ever has

The Sports Reporters

01:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Miami Heat's Jimmy Butler dominated Los Angeles Lakers' LeBron James in an NBA Finals game like no one ever has

"We obviously start with game three of the NBA Finals In which Jimmy Butler of the Miami Heat by the force of his talent and his athletic character and his toughness? Carried his team last night to a victory that kept them from being swept by the Lakers, and for the time being has given us a series I. think this goes in with I. Don't know whether it's top five or top six, your top ten greatest performances Bob I've ever seen in the finals I. Totally Concur. It was. The numbers speak for themselves, of course, forty eleven thirteen, but the the the impact the. Timeliness of it that desperate nature of it for the team It's one of the great performances, the watching finals up close and personal fifty years literally and this this one ranks right up there, and of course, I have to start off for for me with the heart warming aspect of this for me the that this, it's got a special glow about this one in the year twenty twenty Jimmy Butler on that in that game with his fourteen field goals. Attempted no three point shots he's great. Oh Do I love this this was an honest to God old fashioned real not phony Baloney. Gimmicky three point this was an honest to God labored. Triple double with four with forty points and note three point shots

Jimmy Butler Lakers NBA Miami BOB
Interview with Pete Evanow

Cars That Matter

06:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Pete Evanow

"This is Robert Ross with another episode of cars that matter I'm here today with Pete Evans. I'm glad you could join us. Hello Pete is the author of Nissan's e fifty years of exhilarating performance. It was just published this year by motor books an imprint of Corto press I'm here to tell you I have the book and hand and among all of the recent automotive publications this one really stands apart congratulations on a great project pay. Thank you very much I. really appreciate that it was a labor of love I put it together fairly quickly. Because it was something that Nissan jumped on board at a last minute decision was interesting being really did make a big deal out of the twenty fifth anniversary and I don't know why. But it didn't really occur to them to do much about the fiftieth anniversary. Then all of a sudden somebody internally said we have to and that was Hiroshi Mariah. They got in touch with their licensing agency, which is emi and EMI contact and motor books motor books. Contacted me because I had written an earlier version of thirty fifth anniversary, and so we put this together really in a little less than a year. Notice. The forward is by Hiroshi tomorrow and obviously had a hand in recognizing that fifty years of Zina's as you call it Pete. You've got kind of an interesting career. Obviously, you're Z. Aficionado, but you're also a professor in the Department of Communications Cal State Fullerton probably as we talk about your book about. The history of the Z. Cars will maybe get into a little bit of the market speak that went along with essentially introducing a whole car a whole new concept to a whole new audience. That is the North American audience for whom a sports car from Japan was a brand new unthinkable concept back in nineteen seventy. I know this isn't your first. Z.. Car Rodeo either because it published Z thirty, five years of Nissan Sports car in two, thousand five. It's hard to imagine that the name plate is as old as it is for its thirty fifth anniversary. There was some pretty exciting things happening to but I guess related start at the beginning. Let's go back and look Z. Legacy from the start you and I are old enough to remember that back in the sixties and early seventies Japanese cars were by enlarge disregard I'm being charitable I'd say joke in some ways but they were no joke because of course Honda and Toyota essentially took over their respective markets and Dotson did the same but really the only sports car we had back in the sixties was the Toyota two. Thousand and that was such a rare esoteric piece of work that it almost doesn't count. Nissan did try. They had a sixteen hundred little sports car was a little convertible started as a sixteen hundred. They call it the fair lady in Japan of course, and then they brought it over here to the US, and then it became a slightly larger motor and they had it with the two liter the colored, the two thousand by remember that two thousand. Well, a friend of mine had a Canary Yellow One and I thought it was an amazing thing. It was right up there with any MGB, except that it was more reliable and. A grey little competitive car and Peter Brock raised it. So did Bob Sharp on the East Coast and so that kind of really established footprint if you will for Nissan at least from a motor sports standpoint and it gave them some credibility and it really provided the power I guess internally to look at a genuine sports car hardtop version and you can always thank Mr k. you talk Yama who pushed that card the Z. initially and he was here in America as the president of Nissan, USA and he went back to Japan. And we really have to have a sports car that is affordable and is something that everyone can afford here in the United States, and so he basically got the idea of democratising a sports car. You mentioned the Toyota two thousand GT was an incredible car but didn't really have the legs to expand. They didn't really bring it over here in significant quantities and it was a very expensive car as opposed to little roadsters. Remember Papa Bondra used to thousands for his driving school they were so good and reliable and relatively inexpensive the. Toyota was essentially unaffordable and it was fragile and even though it did a little bit of racing there just wasn't enough critical mass to really make it stick. Nissan. Really wanted to be the first to come in their Honda was here but they made really small throwaway cars to begin with them shoebox as I think the only thing smaller was at Subaru three sixty that looked like an egg with. Wales. And Nissan was ahead of their time of course, they were called Dotson then but they came out with their to forty and. Late sixty nine, but they also had a pickup truck and so those were two key markets that they used to go after slightly different audiences. But that's how they penetrated the US market at least initial. So many times a great name plate like the to forty comes about because of the vision of a single person or a tight team and you talk about the talk cut yama or Mr K. Katayama. Son was obviously an interesting guy and he must have been doing something. Right? He lived to be one hundred, five years old. That's a remarkable thing in and of itself you speak very fondly of in your book can you give us a little insight into what it took to get his own corporate colleagues superiors to buy into his crazy idea as a sports car for America I think you just a force and he just had such incredible passion. I had the pleasure of meeting with him several times and you'd him not only for my previous book but also speaking to him in several the Zekan's and car shows I mean he was very passionate. Loved people. As they said in his slogan Love Life Love People, you couldn't not like him I hate double negative but the fact is, is that I believe that his passion. and his persuasive skills were partially enough to demonstrate that he could sell this car United States and I think that's what it talked to convince his contemporaries, his colleagues in Japan that if he could have the opportunity to bring the Z. here in America, he would show them that that was the right car at the right time and he would be successful with it and they believed they were a little skeptical his colleagues in Japan but they obviously invested in the car and said, okay now it's up to you and your colleagues to make sure that this happens and it did

Nissan Japan United States Pete Evans Nissan Sports Toyota America Honda Dotson Hiroshi Mariah Robert Ross EMI Department Of Communications C Zina Papa Bondra Peter Brock Bob Sharp Z. Aficionado
Interview with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Toure Show

06:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

"The game, the structure, the style of the game that you played back to the basket center right trying to get high percentage shots closer to the basket that game has been completely forgotten, and there's very few. There's nobody who plays the center position the way you did with the back to the basket and it's like try to get the highest value shots the furthest away. But three pointers as much as you can does this style interest you disinterested you look down on it. You say you don't know how to play the game properly. Well, you know there, there are different theories about how to play the game but I think getting high percentage shots really makes a lot of sense, but it also has to dovetail with your defensive strategy also. So a great team like the Bill Russell. F- Celtics. Bill was able to to stymie any shots around the hoop and. His team. Would run and get high percentage shots down down court, and that was a winning strategy era. I mean, nobody's playing center. The way you did that is totally gone now. I think. So but that doesn't mean that someone cat had that type of skill and still come in effect the game. In a meaningful way, we talked earlier today. One of the things you said, the eighty five finals against the Celtics was one of your most important moments as a player. One of your crowning moments as a player you were the. MVP that year you guys won the Lakers one but you had to go through the Memorial Day massacre where you guys got crushed by like forty points a game over in the middle of third order and a down moment and I lived in Boston at that moment, it looked like are going to go on to destroy them. How did you come back to win and why do you think of that as one of your crowning moments as a player that series? Well I think that? What happened to me personally in that series was. Once, we made it into the finals I kind of relaxed. and. So I went into that first game thinking that. The worst is over and you know the the worst was yet to happen. So. It kind of woke me up and made me realize that I had to kick my game up a couple of levels in order to. Finish off what we started out to do because we lost. In eighty four to the Celtics and Gabe a game away. And that ended up being the the crucial game. How could you go into? A series against the Celtics who had Larry Bird who series plate you know clearly one of the great players of that time how you Gonna Like Oh, we got this. No. I didn't think that we got this but for me personally, I figured I've done my job where we're in the finals. Things. Think things will be alright and they work. One. Of the one of the chapters, one of the parts of the book that I really thought was really interesting. You talk about athletes and what they must do with how they have role models at the happy aware that they are role models and you say we can't pretend athletes are influencing our children's thinking and behavior. So we must demand higher standards from them like it or not college and Professional Sports. Machines are turning them into role models, and if they aren't willing to accept that responsibility as part of the contract, then they should seek another profession. Strong position. A little bit about why you feel that way when you went through that life right superstar High School Athlete College, Athlete, and you know the way that superstar athletes from a teen age are coddled. They are given you know love for their athletics points for their character. Society is not training them to be role models, but then they become big college players big prosed and we expect them to be role models. Are they even ready for that? I don't know you know for me. Being a black American and in the era that I grew up in all black. realized. That They would be judged by the actions of. Any problem. Black Person. And so. That burden. Was something that that you assumed. Soon, as you've got to do anything in a in a prominent fashion, you assume that burden because you knew that. All black people would be. Judged on whatever it was that you did and he's screwed up A. Set, the race. I mean that's absolutely right and you talk about that I came to realize that the lew alcindor that for the younger folk that was his name forty, fifty years ago the lew alcindor everyone was cheering. Was it really the person they wanted to be they wanted me to be the clean cut example of racial equality the poster boy for anybody from any background regardless of race religion or economic standing could become an American success story to them. I was living proof that racism was a mythological beast like Jack. Elope when when the audience is feeling like that right I assume the media is part of it. How do you? How do you rebel against that? Well. You just have to show them that they're wrong and. That that is not the case, there's a whole lot that has to be done. I into earlier. Right after Dr King was assassinated, I was involved in a demonstration on UCLA's campus and people. Would just standing there. and. It was a silent. stood. There for an hour in silence and some of US had signs and a number of times people came up to me and said, you're getting the opportunity to play in the NBA. What do you demonstrating for and they did not understand how these two things did not relate to each other at all the fact that I, I was getting opportunity to play in the NBA did not mean that what happened to Dr King was a tragedy and a crime and the. Thing to get across to people and the you know I, it's taken awhile you

Celtics Bill Russell Dr King NBA High School Athlete College United States Black Person Boston Larry Bird MVP Lakers Ucla Gabe A. Set Jack
Trump's Taxes Show He's a National Security Threat

Pod Save the World

02:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump's Taxes Show He's a National Security Threat

"On Sunday The New York Times published he blockbuster scoop detailing decades of trump's tax returns. You guys probably have some of the big headlines like the fact that he paid no income taxes at all in ten fifteen years examined that must be incredible. He only paid seven hundred fifty bucks in federal income taxes in two thousand, fifteen minute trump might face a one, hundred million dollars tax penalty depending on the results. Of An audit that is brutal but there are also some troubling foreign policy elements that we're GONNA cover today. So a couple specifics in trump's first two years as president he made seventy three million dollars from foreign sources that includes a million bucks from deals in Turkey three, million from the Philippines two point three, million from India those numbers are way bigger. When you look at decades of returns, he's got tons more money out of those places. He also paid more taxes of Robin did at home. So twenty seventeen, right the seven, hundred, fifty, year trump paid one, hundred, forty, five, thousand in India over one hundred, fifty, six, thousand taxes in the Philippines. So that feels a little bit un-american. So a couple of things you guys need to listeners accepting these foreign payments is illegal to violation of the emoluments. Clause feels like a more innocent time when we used to talk about that, it's also not the only way that these foreign countries can steer money into his pocket there've been countless stories of a government's and rooms at trump. In an effort to buy them off. But what's also now clear is that the he is just under a mountain of debt we don't really know who trump os four, hundred, twenty, some odd million dollars to. But we also know that he desperately needs any revenue he can get to stay afloat. So then as many people have pointed out a massive debt, like this will prevent you or me from getting a security clearance and having access to classified information in some ways you could argue that. This disclosure by the Times makes it even easier for these countries to find ways to bribe trump but I think they probably knew Venal to begin with. So ben anything jump out of you in this reporting especially in terms of potential for foreign influence the his financial challenges. Yeah. I mean I think there are two basic things that need to be really driven home here and they may be obvious people that it's worth really putting point on them. I who does he owe this money to and and does that give them leverage over him right and so presumably owns if he does tens or hundreds of millions of dollars to some foreign interest well, then the press, the United States is. Terribly compromise in terms of standing up to that interests let's say the Russian interests let's say it's a Turkish interest or whatever it may be. That's the problem and that's why the rest of us when we go to these jobs have to disclose all of those kinds of conflicts and that's why if we disclose too much leverage from a foreign source, we wouldn't get a security

Donald Trump Philippines India The New York Times Robin United States Turkey President Trump The Times
The Slow Regrowth of Vulnerable Coral Reefs is Solvable

Solvable

03:54 min | 2 weeks ago

The Slow Regrowth of Vulnerable Coral Reefs is Solvable

"Minds. Sarah, Hamlin I'm a scientist Mike Marine Lab in Florida and myself is growing car rates forty to fifty times a spade that Karl grows in the wild. Now there's a number of reasons while Koru is really important I mean who doesn't love going out snorkeling and seeing colorful reefs teeming with beautiful fish but they also provide us with goods and services whether that be tourism or employment the food table. And Florida align every system he is estimated to be worth about eight billion dollars not only that but these race protect I landed property from things like storm surge. So really good example of this is Hurricane Irma which was in two thousand seventeen had twenty five foot waves heating the Florida race track down in Lewke where I am and we had a storm surge at building, which is in Summerlin K. of only five foot. So we didn't have a rift system they're healthy ray system there you can imagine that that storm surge those waves would really decimate the land. So I I can hear your Australian accent Australia of course, famous for the Great Barrier Reef what's going on with climate change and coral reefs around the world? Well, wide was seeing a great reduction in live Carl Kaba So this is across the well whether it be Australia United States or any Pacific Ocean island nations. You might have heard of coral reefs as the rainforest say and that that's saying is because even the car reefs tyke out less than one percent of the seafloor. twenty-five percent of nine marine species actually rely on car roofs. At some stage of their life we're seeing Wolmar, she anik temperatures. We're seeing a lot more pollution going into the oceans, and this is resulting in las of live Carl tissue almost as much. If any consequences of climate change, I can think of the people who are really in contact with this are shocked and appalled and upset at a level that those of us who don't come into coral on a into contact with Karl on a daily basis. I don't really get I mean I have your you're in the Florida keys I have a nephew who's into a skin diving and spearfishing in Miami and he's a young guy, and just in the years he's been doing this the coral around Miami I mean he's like shocked and upset when he sees it and says, he can't really fish anymore just because of the change in the last decade, we have lost around ninety percent of that Caro cover in the last forty or fifty years and some of the race in the. Case now or the Florida Reef tractor as low as between four and six percent starting Caro cover, which is quite loy. So we're talking on zoom you have a fantastic backdrop of coral and I don't know enough to know what kind it is but we hear these terms like staghorn coral and I heard of Elk Horn coral what are the main forms of coral that you're working with and what do they look like? We have branching corals and we have massive Carl's so branching Caro's the Stag owns the call and you. Can picture what the antlers of a staghorn or alcorn look like they look exactly like that. So skinny branch is really perfect three dimensional habitat for fish and shrimp and all the Little Rafe critters out there, and then we've got a massive Carl's and these might be brain corals essentially look like the folds and grooves of a brain stock Carl's have They polyps alike little cop. So little stars and their every feeling Carl's they the Carl's that are creating the race and really growing that lodge Rafe structure that remained stable off the storms

Carl Kaba Florida Karl Little Rafe Great Barrier Reef Mike Marine Lab Florida Reef Hamlin Caro Hurricane Irma Australia Scientist Miami Summerlin Sarah Rafe Elk Horn Pacific Ocean Island Wolmar
Unpacking Israeli History

Israel Story

03:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Unpacking Israeli History

"Back in twenty seventeen, the New York Times published an article about Amadeo Garcia Garcia. The. Last Living Speaker of the top story. Once, spoken for centuries by thousands of members of an Amazon tribe Madeo, the sole survivor, and the last person on earth to know the language his tried which had lived uncontactable for centuries along Amazon River in Peru slowly died out due to the weapons diseases brought to them from intruders when Avodados brother passed away his last remaining relative the missionary asked Amodio how he felt. Adele responded in the broken Spanish that he had. The only way he had to communicate with outside world he said. It's now over for us. Why? Dale no longer has some to speak to and when you have no one else to speak to, you will lose your language. That's why was over for Amodio. Losing a language is like losing an identity, a culture history. I don't mean to sound over dramatic here but losing a language is really losing oneself. Looking back at the history of the Jewish people that Jews faced a very similar problem. And the reality today is that over the last one, hundred, fifty years, a modern miracle took place for almost two thousand years Hebrew the language of the Torah the Bible and so much Jewish literature you know the prayers was mostly reserved for the ritual. And now. Jews. Over the world's beekeeper, a language that was essentially dead as a spoken language. Something like this has never happened in history of language. The. Fact that the majority of Jews around the world speak Hebrew today is not something to take for granted. There are approximately fourteen point, seven, million Jews in the world and six point seven, million of them live in Israel where Hebrew is the national language. And many hundreds of thousands outside of Israel, speak language as well learning it in. Jewish. Day schools and summer camps or at home. Short. The Bible prayers and religious texts were written and read in Hebrew. Literally nobody spoke in daily life for like almost two thousand years. So How'd an almost extinct biblical language reemerge as spoken language in the span of only a few decades? Was Zionism that deserves the credit Certain. Figure named Elliot's Ben Yehuda. And what is it always obvious that Hebrew would be the national language of the Jewish state. Let's jump back in time to learn about the history of the Hebrew language details about the spoken language of Hebrew in ancient times are not perfect. Here's what we know. In the Bible the Jews otherwise as Hebrews spoken ancient Biblical version of. Biblical Hebrew was the spoken language of the Jews for over a thousand years. But one of the Romans destroyed the second Jewish Temple in seventy CE HEBREW AGAIN. To die. Out.

Amodio Amadeo Garcia Garcia Israel Amazon River New York Times Living Speaker Peru Adele Dale Ben Yehuda Elliot
Trump nominates Barrett for Supreme Court Post

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trump nominates Barrett for Supreme Court Post

"The president's pet, she is a woman of unparalleled achievement George. Clooney Eric. I am truly humbled by the prospect of serving on the Supreme Court a pivotal choice in polarized time. They will set policy for fifty years. Republicans on track to confirm Barrett before the election will start the hearings on October the twelfth sparking fierce pushback from Democrats Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump have stolen two judges from the American people expect. Kids to strike down the portable care. ACT The debate ahead with two senators set to question trump's important

Donald Trump Clooney Eric Mitch Mcconnell Supreme Court President Trump Barrett
RBG in Her Own Words

Can We Talk?

05:18 min | 3 weeks ago

RBG in Her Own Words

"Hi It's no rouse and Judith Rosenbaum. And this is, can we talk the podcast of the Jewish women's archive where gender history and Jewish culture meet in this episode we're honoring and mourning the loss of Supreme Court. Justice. Ruth Bader GINSBURG. The first Jewish woman to sit on the nation's highest court Justice Ginsburg died on the eve of Russia China after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. In the days and nights following her death the steps of the Supreme Court have become an impromptu memorial. Thousands of people have gathered to express both grief and gratitude leaving flowers, writing messages and chalk lighting yard site candles. Some have even blown show far in her honour Ruth Bader GINSBURG was not only unapologetically Jewish but she and her experience as a jewish-american really guided her work. The Biblical Dictum Setback Sabatier Dove Justice Justice. You shall pursue adorn the walls of her chamber and the Word Setback Justice was embroidered into one of the lace collar. She famously war with her robes though tiny person justice GINSBURG was larger than life a Jewish hero and an American and feminist icon she stood for gender equality and racial justice and modeled fighting steadily for what you believe in. Her famous friendship with Conservative Justice Antonin Scalia showed that you can disagree and still get along. She was a role model for so many people, but it's important to remember that she had role models to in two thousand and four justice Ginsburg spoke at a Jewish women's archive event marking three, hundred, fifty years of Jewish life in America. She talked about some of the Jewish women who inspired her. One of them was Henrietta sold. Zolt was born in eighteen sixty in Baltimore and like Ginsburg was both visionary a doer who faced in overcame many obstacles as a woman. She founded DASA and helped build the social service infrastructure of what became the state of Israel. So here's ruth. Bader. Ginsburg one of our heroes talking about one of her heroes, another inspiring Jewish woman from history. In my growing up years, my mother spoke of glowingly. Though new had to say no. Better than any other person whose words I have read. Sold had seven sisters. And brother. When her mother died the man well known for his community spirited endeavors. Hi, imperative. Offered to say the codfish. The mourners fair that Ancien customer instructed to be recited only by men. Zone responded to that carrying offer in a letter dated September sixteen. Nineteen sixteen here Kuenssberg reads the key passage of the letter Henrietta sold wrote in response. It is impossible for me to find words in which to tell you. How deeply I wish touched by your offer. To Act as. Well my dear, mother. What you offered to do is beautiful beyond thanks. I shall never forget it. You will wonder then that I cannot accept your offer. I know well and appreciate you say about. Jewish. Custom. That only male children recite the prayer and if there are no male survivors. A male stranger may act as substitute. And Jewish custom is very dear and sacred to me. Yet I cannot ask to say after my mother. The cottage means to me. That the survivor publicly manifest. His intention to assume their relationship to the Jewish community, which is parents had. So that the chain of tradition remains unbroken. From generation to generation. Each adding its own link you can do that for the generations of your family I must do that. For generations of my family. My. Mother had eight daughters and no sun. And yet never did I hear a word of regret. Past, the lips of either my mother or my father. That one of us. WAS NOT, a son. When my father died, my mother would not permit others to take our daughters place. In saying the cottage. Until I am sure. I am acting in her spirit. When I am moved to decline your offer. But beautiful you offer remains nevertheless. And I repeat I know full well. That it is much more in harmony with generally accepted Jewish tradition than his might while my family's conception. You understand me don't you. Flee or celebration of our common heritage while tolerating indeed appreciating the differences among us. Concerning religious practice. Is, captivating, don't you agree?

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Justice Antonin Scalia Supreme Court Henrietta Judith Rosenbaum Pancreatic Cancer Ancien Israel Russia Zolt Baltimore Kuenssberg China America
"fifty year" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

06:14 min | 2 months ago

"fifty year" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"The transformers. David vs warriors. That's why this is deleted streaming, they used to Hasbro name but. That's probably it. Might. Be Right. Please robot toy please take. Robot card. Whatever he freaks out honor and she like he's I can't do all this by myself. You're pushing too hard. She loses it. She's a fucking. Anyway, there is some insane details in here though like she's rummaging through this box shit, and she's like Oh David Look at. That one fourth of July. You remember that oh? Of course, Scott loved all holidays and then she's like Oh and here you go. David Scott would've wanted you to have this? It's his Christmas stocking. Ladies fucking Jewish. What is he going to do with a Christmas stocking? Brought to this House David. I'll tell you what to do with that Christmas stocking. You put it on your door in college when you got away Oh. Yeah. There you go. All this is going into garbage. Meanwhile. Brandon has to get this interview with David. Silver. That's kind of the thrust of the second half of the episode. He's trying to he's trying to. Again like you don't need this, you really don't like just. Like Andrea again, always talking about it looks like it's the fucking post going out. It's a fucking. Brandon, I'm thinking about putting your article about Scott Right next to what we're going to get for lunch. The next week. Do you think the best place for it. Brandon of winning the story. Next to the fucking cafeteria menu scandal story we have going. So like there's a lot of David. Blows. Up On don at least twice. Treats her like shit in this episode, and she's just like she finally snaps back like Hey, I know you're going through some shit, but I'm the only one that is the cares about you and like really Blah Blah Blah I. got everyone of that party what the fuck is a yeah I. Guess you're right. And then he winds up watching a video of Scott that he took which is cut a devastating to look at. It's horrible I think. Like. There's a sequence where David is walking down the hallway. Any stopped like every second by somebody and one of them is this teacher vice principal whatever this fucking dude is. WHO's like? Hey, man. I got sort of volunteer to edit this footage. We need this shit from the fucking time capsule ceremony like cut and ready to go, and he's like, no, no. No, you know. I'll do it or whatever. So then yeah, he's in the fucking computer lab like where their friendship blossomed in highschool where he met Dylan McKay. Just. Looking through all this footage David is throwing himself into his work. That's the right move. Just. One thing after the end of when he blows up. Mrs Scanlon when she's like take his fucking Christmas stocking and his transformers he goes. Scott accidentally shot himself in the stomach because he liked to play with guns and she liked fucking loses it and runs out of the whole thing and The best part about is the end of the scene where he's like a scanlon business scanlon come. They're still in the same house music scaling get back here. Returns around and he like picks up Scott's bed and shakes it angrily like that was the MU. I do. Quite a way that was the first time that bet ever shook. Fish. Well, the only time before they'd even came close was the vibration of the gun shot. Do you think they still got that gun the well, what a tragedy we lost our beloved, Scotty? We still have you MR nine millimeter. I think fucking Connie took that with the out to the coast duties, GonNa fucking. Incident well, it took. I saw it can take me in Casey can't find vittles on a night. You know he can hold somebody up with. Always living in the woods. Yeah. Yeah. Of course. In Society, if you do such a thing instead of saying like took my beloved Sunny Villa to my beloved bullet. wasted. Bullets called around pad. dammit. Ham. It's expensive. Okay. It's almost two dollars. Let's are going up in value. So. Like, yeah. It's kind of we're getting towards the end here and Brandon's been fucking harping on this article. He kind of sort of makes Andrea 'cause, he goes up to Andrea and he's like, Hey, what are you so upset about and she's like halfway crying, she's like I just watch again with her. It's just so so difficult, but he's a we're friends. We're going to be Fred Sir ever. She's like, okay, that's that's awesome. It's kind of fucking hilarious that they make the editor of the school newspapers say that. Because Emily's. noodling with Brandon, she doesn't like feeling like quote. Yesterday's news yes. That's nice. That's too. It's one thing you know you wanNA fuck and get a hand job that poor kids house. That's fine. You can't be like baking out in front of your friend at the school paper like you know what I mean like. It's just you know what this girl's up to your being a dickhead. Yup. You can keep it inside for a little bit So like they kind of make but he less to get this article. So he goes to confront David. Not. Confront David. Go Ask for this article. In the deejay booth and it's great because he's a that don't really have time right now. David gets the deadline dude. What do you want me to do i? Don't know fucking blow it out your ass and how about that? How `Bout Fuck you. But instead he just this is what he like. It's the big big monologue he gets and like a Christian said last night, he doesn't quite get there. He does not there. He doesn't have it now. It's. It's close though it's not that bad. It's not totally off I. think he gets if you don't have the camera on him, it's better when getting shots of like, Stupa. That guy sounds pissed. I might like him. Like stuff like that. It works when he's on camera, it's not great..

David David Scott Brandon David Look Andrea Hasbro warriors Mrs Scanlon Sunny Villa Dylan McKay principal Scotty Connie Casey Fred Sir editor Emily's.
"fifty year" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

07:21 min | 2 months ago

"fifty year" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Hello, and welcome to the finale episode of Melrose to know the season finale, not the series finale A. Quarantine side show. Yeah. Wherein we talk about Beverly Hills Dunno. To End Melrose Place You know we have this We were supposed to do another episode about Brandon's getting a girlfriend is a TV star. Totally. But then in my backyard, I found this cool little pipe. You WanNa go y'all want to walk on through it Fuck Yeah Dude, I love going pipes. Here we go. Here we are where it's Scott's fucking death episode. Shit. We're in season two. It looks great Mrs. Skeleton. And he's thrown a shell at me. In, song sounds better. It does all that kind of. Stuff going to be a supersized episode I'm guessing. This. Is the next fifty years. Original air date. November. Seventh Nineteen ninety-one by the way Bush's term almost over guys. Don't worry about it. Mother Fuck. The voices you're hearing mine is Stephen Sadek. I. Am joined, of course by my best fucking friends in the world. Do I haven't seen in five fucking months? Chris, Cabin. I Eric, Ceska, how partner and? Andrew? Japan you. So yeah, this is we kind of decided like. I didn't want and just end on a wet Fart, nine, hundred hundred episode and we wanted to, we've teasing this fucking March. We should just get to it. What kind of far does this bloody? By. Oh let's not with the bloody parts. Why not? Because that's a horrible image and it sounds terrible to the ear. Oh, you to Taco Bell and now you have blood effort. Just like. This episode is a learning moment. Don't eat that. Much. TACO. Bell, you'll have bloody farts. May. I think Dylan would remember a bloody far or then he remembered Scott. That is a series high point for that, oh? I was chuckling and I have to say see by the way. We, the two of US met in the fall of the year, two, thousand and two and we were fast friends, but I distinctly remember in the fall of two, thousand, two US talking about this episode. Wasn't until today, June or July, the twenty, four, th thousand, twenty, I finally sat down and actually watched it and good gravy. This is something that's always stuck with me because it's such a bizarre episode It's also scrubbed from apologies to everybody. You know you've got a really play fucking TV detected defined this thing and I don't know why I truly do not know why exactly I mean it's not like I could see something you know with modern audiences if it was like a school shooting or something. But like first of all those hadn't been invented yet. Capacity that we have them. Now that is you know what? I mean. I don't understand what's going on well I. Do know why? Actually by the way? Yeah Yeah Yeah you see it is directed by Lars von Career. They had wanted a criterion option to be on the BLU ray of Dogville when they. Wanted to save for that, they don't want to be having it they on CBS to be happening. Why was the most expensive episode of Oh to announce the finance, the boat trip from Europe? Dame. Dana. You're right. Chris. The everyone is it's an ugly world. That everybody hates everything. It is fantastic. It is Yeah. Be this whole second season I don't know what's going on with the rights like it's. It's because look at it on on Hulu end CBS Alexis and it's really scattershot. Not This episode is missing. Episodes like the color me bad episode. Make sense to cut because like they're in the episode and you obviously have the music rights problem, etcetera etcetera. But like this one. Yeah, it's a totally just a, it's a, it's a message episode like, Hey, man fucking maybe don't have guns around. You have like eighteen fucking redneck kids running around. Christ if you have a gaggle of children following you around little baby ducks, maybe a fucking desk-drawer handgun is not the best idea minister scan, win looking what kind of dirty lead deals. He needs a Mug a gun at his desk. seriously. So it's GonNa. fucking come in and try to take out over some oil deal. I gotta get. OUTTA CONNIE SCAN. The. Hillbilly that also somehow lives in. Beverly. Hills. It's insane. I, mean, it's good that they're addressing this big gun culture I mean, we did say that this episode is hard to find and you said other ones are going to be hard to find when we do continue. We're going to go through the mall. We'll find a way and I'm sure you at home could find a way if you google enough. Yes. Yes and I will say I'm toying with the idea because this season two episode fourteen, it'll be whenever we restart this, which we will absolutely restart melrose. You promised a million times because you guys have been awesome supporting it this entire time. But when we do bring this back and we get back to hear, I we might Redo it. We might look at. A syncopal commentary possibly. Something I'm not sure if I can do this again. I got to say. A Lot. I kind of agree with you and someone said it last night. It was. It was either Erica Chris CA- Stephen I watched it this morning. One of you said that it was like extreme curb your enthusiasm and like to degree. Yes. Absolutely. I was the exact amount of uncomfortable watching Scott scanlon birthday party, not even the fucking death, the birthday party, right? Before he kills himself at his birthday party on his expense. is almost the lease remarkable part of the tire episode. Completely. Correct. All Weird. Awkward Moments. Yes. Exactly. Like the death was when I was finally able to breathe. Oh good. A tragedy at least. Being so socially awkward. So let me bring everybody up to speed on kind of what's been going on on that. inbet- In betwixt. No idea, why am I gonNA? Just showed. I mean not much. We like the Walsh Kids are pretty much the walsh kids Dylan Brenda, obviously, you're still going out But in the beginning of season two brand, we have like this weird summer season for like six or seven episodes. Long time for. And during so. A lot of things happen. David kind of. Scott goes on vacation and to Oklahoma of all places, and he's comfortable upstate on a farm somewhere. And Yada Yada Yada, but David starts ingratiate was more with the gang even more. So because Mel Silver, who is this episode? David's father starts dating Jackie Taylor. Kelly's mom, and that leads to a lot of funny awkward their Shenanigans, and now he's kind of defacto quote unquote part of the gang that explains the line..

Scott scanlon Erica Chris David kind Melrose Dylan Brenda CBS US Beverly Hills Taco Bell Mrs. Skeleton Brandon Walsh Stephen Sadek Europe BLU Oklahoma Bell Bush google Andrew
"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:41 min | 7 months ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Slip down to make sure that there could be a young Replacement for him. And you know We GINSBURG and Stephen Bride did not do that. During the Obama Administration the Democrats really need to play to win. Take back record all right out of let me let me just challenge you a little bit here and I say this as someone who was raised by a pack of lawyers and and and did a year of law school and still remains fascinated by all these things like where does where does that begin right like you just use. Examples of how Kennedy basically orchestrated this whole thing to get cabin on there. You know and and there's been various different reporting about it and we. We could probably argue to what extent he did but certainly Ginsburg brier refused to sort of contemplate. The idea that they would step down and sort of like put that type of strategy in their forefront of their minds have certainly the prerogative And you know the the idea that we need to to win the political battle but we we hear stories of like you know what was done with Fordis- in the idea of like Merrick Garland and I see Chris coons going on the air. You know six months ago and saying if we win back the Senate the first thing we should do is reinstated institute the Filibuster for for for justices. I mean this is like a what point do in this comes from lawyers and I and I understand it right. I mean like I say I was raised by a lot of them. At what point do does the sort of the broader institution of law as opposed as distinct from? Let's say the conservative movement and all the lawyers who make up Who are who? Who who serve that have been to Diagram. Covers both of them? At what point did they say we're going to give up the ghost on the Supreme Court not being a political body because it seems to me that you know you've outlined that at the very least the Republicans it more aggressively gave up? That goes fifty years ago. But I you know. I think you can argue that coming out of reconstruction they had given up that ghost. It's just that The the the Democrats the laughed. They don't seem to sort of be able to let go of that vision of the Supreme Court. I think that's right. And I think as a result you know they're bringing you know a watered down to a nice site. I mean you know I Mcconnell has been very clear you know he. He refused to have any Hearings at all for Maryland and then. He went out of his wages. Hello Kentucky Audience Dot long ago of course if there were a vacancy in the last year of trump administration.

Supreme Court Stephen Bride Democrats Mcconnell Kennedy Obama Administration Ginsburg brier Merrick Garland Senate Chris coons Maryland Fordis
"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:50 min | 7 months ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The Court of Appeals The next step and then it gets up to the Supreme Court and again five to four. They say nope. There's no obligation of any remedy across the district line. So if blacks are trapped in Detroit and were unable to give him an education because there aren't enough weights and each weight too bad so the combination of these two rulings mutually ensured. We would not have equality of education this country. 'cause one said you don't have the right to equal funding for your district and the other said if you're in a big city where so many minority students were you've no right to integrated education and again if eighty four been there. It would have been fired for the other way. So those are the key education rulings that have obviously implications Through the decades that followed and and and continue on today and I think in many respect also Made our education system so susceptible to the Corporate Reform Movement. That we have more or less just sort of passed through And which also did a tremendous amount of damage to our education system. And the other sort of I guess I twin horse of the apocalypse of of inequality as you as you outlined it is Has To do with our campaign. Finance system and really what that ultimately means is the failure of politicians to be responsive to the issues sets and the needs of ordinary people as opposed to monied interests. Exactly right and you know I talk about how the World Report that came out in twenty eighteen By Thomas Ticketing other on this. And they said there were two main drivers of inequality in the United States one was educational inequality which we just talked about. The other said was the lack of progressive taxation. Which you know. The top tax rates have gone down so much In in recent decades and that really is both of these are attributed to the Supreme Court and the reason are terrible unfair taxes attributable pinker is just what you said is that starting nineteen seventy six. The Supreme Court just begin striking down campaign finance law after campaign finance law and as a result the Supreme Court ensures that wealthy individuals and later corporations really have undue influence Congress in the legislatures and it really did starting nineteen seventy six when the same conservative court decides that money equals speech and they struck down. It was after Watergate. Congress actually passed a very strong campaign. Finance law really would have changed the role of money in our society and the Supreme Court strikes down strikes down the limits on expenditures. And says you have a First Amendment right rich person to spend as much money as you want to get someone elected. And that's really been the undoing of our democracy Let's talk about some of the Those you know those cases in the sort of the the The I guess the like you say Buckley v Vallejo is the most important one. Just give us a sense of what was involved there and then I guess we could talk about Obviously that that goes through a series of other cases to get to citizens United Buckley. V Vallejo is the original sin in that regard right and So as I as I said after Watergate there was just tremendous tremendous popular pressure on Congress to pass campaign finance or for reform because people forget now but watered the Watergate scandal dishes being about breaking into the Watergate Hotel. There were major major campaign finance improprieties uncovered of corporations. You know delivering money to the committee. Re like the president in paper bags and things like that so Congress does pass this very strong reform. It gets challenged by James Buckley the then. The New York's conservative senator and some other people The D. C. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington. Dc which is the case. I actually uphold the entire law and quite reasonably says. This really isn't about speech. You know this you know that giving money to campaign isn't really speech and it also has very strong language about how this is very very important for Congress to act to protect our election so that was a great ruling from the DC circuit. It goes up to the Supreme Court and they reverse and as I said. They created this framework. That you know Is still with us where they said. Okay well if you're giving money to a campaign that could lead to some. You know our fear of corruption. So we're going to allow regulation of that but if you're just spending money on.

Supreme Court Congress Court of Appeals United Buckley D. C. Circuit Court of Appeals Watergate Hotel Corporate Reform Movement Vallejo Detroit United States DC president Washington New York senator
"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:16 min | 7 months ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"I think it did pave the way in some ways for you know liberals to do things like reject Judge Bork down. The road So I I think I think it it aged meeting somebody boulder role for the Senate but But I think that you know in in in my looking back on it. The real tragedy works is over lost opportunities that we have there to have a liberal court to last longer. And what's incredible is that what is his name is really never mentioned now. you know if you go to a loss to. Yale law school where where was graduate of the most brilliant graduate of your law school? He's just not talked about. He's considered in the BARRASSO and It's an overreaction. You know he did some things. The main issue got Got In trouble for was accepting money from a foundation that was run by a Wall Street financier but it was a good foundation and judges injustice. Who actually did do consulting work at the time. It sounds a little strange now Although we do judges and justice certainly do a lot of speaking occurrences but there there. Just wasn't that much that terrible but the idea that Ford is now considered a liberal harassment. He's very much a conservative embarrassment. Because he's really mean exhibit in how the Conservatives used skulduggery to take over the court and sixty nine much as they used it. You know half a century later with Merrick earl to hold onto the liberal majority. So that's the Ford is next project. I think people should know but it's just not when the people are talking about off Okay let's move on to the cases that that follow this right wing. Takeover of the court We've cases like San Antonio School district versus Rodriguez that we can talk about and Milkin be Bradley Alati case and dangerous re Williams. Where where do you WANNA start in terms of an in some ways? We have sort of different Tracks depending on what the issues are right and then I to you mentioned are absolutely critical and I say that you know not only because When I graduated from Moscow I became public interest lawyer for the ACLU Southern Poverty Law Center. And I worked on education tastes and I was really me and my colleagues working in the shadow of these cases because those two rulings Rodriguez nineteen seventy-three and Milliken nineteen seventy four really close the door to Progressive Reform in education. Coming from the Supreme Court Rodriguez was a case in which poor Mexican American Stevenson parents in Texas sued Texas because there were such enormous funding disparities between rich and poor school. This baited maybe education say very equal. They made the very logical argument that if the government is going to provide education to children The equal protection clause says do that equally government is supposed to treat its citizens equally. They won the Federal District Court level. Three Court judge unanimously ruled for them. It gets up to the Supreme Court and in nineteen seventy three. The court rejects their case. Five to four and you know that one.

Supreme Court Rodriguez Federal District Court Yale law school Ford Judge Bork Senate Merrick earl Texas San Antonio School district harassment Moscow ACLU Bradley Alati Progressive Reform Poverty Law Center Williams Milliken
"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:11 min | 7 months ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"New state. They moved to Connecticut and Connecticut had a awaiting a residency requirement. That you had to be there for year before you got welfare. And some people put people move their for their first year. Wouldn't get welfare. The Supreme Court struck down now. There were those who had hoped that they will do it. Even more expansive ways come up with some kind of broader rights welfare or something like that according to do that in Shapiro it grounded its decision on the rights to travel but still it was a very very important decision that in practical terms delivered welfare to a lot of people who are being denied it and I guess I guess my point is that that's the type of case. Because we're we're starting to see like analogs of this case in the Roberts court where you start to slowly Develop a line of cases that begins to expand or contract. writes in some fashion and that that Shapiro case could have been radically the building blocks of expanding the State's obligation to its citizens. That's right and you know one of the things I talk about. In the book is there was h really robust movement in the sixties of poverty. Lawyers who were there were many of them around the country and they were very wind. Chill who were an academic? There were a lot of poverty. Law Academics will working Wyndham who were trying to establish much broader right so actually in nineteen sixty nine. The same year that Shapiro. B Thompson decided Frank Michelman who was then a young Harvard law professor constitutional epicenter. He's still a professor there now. Really very disgust much discussed article in the Harvard Law Review the first article in the Supreme Court issued that year argument there was actually perhaps a constitutional right to subsistence to things like food and healthcare from the federal government. And that was the high watermark but those arguments were being made and some people hope that Shapiro Thompson would be the case in which the court embrace that kind of broader idea about Economic Rights.

Shapiro Thompson Supreme Court Harvard Law Review Frank Michelman Connecticut Wyndham professor
"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:54 min | 7 months ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The Supreme Court thinking outside. Things always works In nineteen fifty four with Warrants FIRST YEAR ARRIVING COURT HANDS DOWN. Brown versus education and After that begins we slow but eventually fairly successful project of desegregating schools in the south and the same time. They are transforming many other areas of law. This is the period in which we got the Miranda decision. Which leads to tell you that you have the right to remain silent before the question. You we got giddying Wainwright wainwright which promised every poor criminal. Defendant the right to a lawyer. We got Decision striking down the poll tax. We got decisions striking down Force prayer in public schools so in many many areas. The Warren Court was Transforming Society for the better When you say activists I mean what made the Warren Court activists? Well the Warren Court was not afraid to strike down laws or to Issue orders to institutions when it's thought unconstitutional things going on so for example Striking down laws. We just didn't south segregating not just schools but you know Jim. Crow segregated every aspect of society. The court was willing to strike those laws down in the way that the court had not been before. But also you look at the decision like Gideon B wainwright guaranteeing every indigent defending the rights to aware. That's a huge thing with that is imposing on every jurisdiction in the country and affirmative obligation to come up with lawyers for people that was inexpensive ruling for every city and county and state in the country. The Warren Court wasn't afraid to do that when they thought it was a constitutional rate that had to be vindicated. And let's just I so there's really two different elements to activism in this context. One is A willingness to strike down laws and really in some ways act contrary to a Legislators legislative will based upon the Constitution. And then the other is to create mechanisms or requirements to protect constitutional rights. As in like you said in Gideon I think that's right exactly and these were thing that the court had done at some time in the past it it more often that the conservative direction In nineteen twenties court was being activists to strike down progressive legislation including laws against child labor. But here in the sixties Starting fifties mainly the sixties. We had a liberal quote was actually willing to do this activism on behalf of the most disadvantaged members of society. Okay and so.

Warren Court Supreme Court Transforming Society Wainwright wainwright Gideon B Brown Miranda Crow Jim
"fifty year" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Science Show

"The side when mungo lady had emerged recent rainfall had refresh the surface of the win and while following a distinctive soil horizon he spotted a tiny patch of white shining in the afternoon sun it was the dengue part of a human skull today's later a team arrived to investigate and alan thorne identified it immediately as a man lying in an outstretched position hands over the groin in a catholic prepared grave the curious feature of the burial was a pink staining around the grave margins bola realized that he was looking at oca an incredibly rare resorts in the landreau area the body had been painted or spring with over two kilograms of the sacred material a ritual practice unfathomable to researches at the time the image of manga man in his grave was telecast around the world the ceremonial nature of this forty two thousand year old burial transformed global understandings of the time depth and complexity of indigenous histories and cultures oldest evidence of ritual burial with a complete interred fully modern man that was extraordinarily there's no other country in the world that's africa that has such comparable experience in this context we have the book ends of that home i graciously story out of africa to find these people in a straighter at forty two thousand years and now beyond beyond fifty thousand with that level of cultural sophistications is absolutely mind boggling in global terms the reading thing now is that traditional aboriginal views of the dream time and the dating of it by scientists is increasingly becoming confident it's not to say that the dream time is timeless but when we get back beyond fifty or sixty thousand we might as well think of it in those terms so science and traditional aboriginal views are really coming together on this particular issue light alum thorne but then concerns about what had been done the sensitivities about taking people from prepared graves jim bola in the afternoon of that dot phase of body collecting i come along and allen psalm the physical anthropologists comes along and removes the bones so you can understand the air dry bridge of everage it'll people when they heard that this taking place now you now defense when i was out there on a wandering geologist looking at climate change they wasn't aboriginal person for one hundred twenty kilometers so there was no one there could refer to nor ellen thorn could refer to so when the feelings of passion are aroused they're perfectly understandable and justifiable but in the circumstances that faced us we had no option head we not famine of salvage there's buyers my were eroding at the surface and they not been so they would be no we'll erica geria in the landreau today the aboriginal people would not have something which to probably proud.

geologist ellen thorn mungo alan thorne landreau africa jim bola allen erica geria one hundred twenty kilometers forty two thousand years forty two thousand year two kilograms
"fifty year" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Science Show

"The jim bola was able to party to look at the side was in march nineteen sixty nine when he led a group of geologists so fantasy innocuous will andrew lakes region in far western new south wales they stayed in the sheer has sheds lake munger explored the genes during the day and debated ideas at night of lamb chops and flagons of wine the eulogists harry allen reece jones contain and jomo vini tantalized by the possible association of artifacts and extinct megaphone and they excitedly fuller jim to juma to investigate the charred bones the find was far more dramatic than they had imagined as they carefully investigated shattered bundle of buns after up to piece of human joba in an instant the scale of straining history changed in bowl words we will confronted not only with human activity but by the very presence of humanity itself the skeleton became affectionately known as munger lady her cremated remains had been buried in a small round hole on a sandy beach a few meters from the water's edge there she had remained for forty thousand years as a lake system dried and the camp with abandoned as a descendants moved to other parts of their country and as the rabbits and goats and farmers arrived jim bola hadn't stumbled across her remains in july nineteen sixty eight within a year all evidence of her life and death would have eroded into the wind fortuitous nature of her preservation and the influence of her discovery only straight in public has led traditional owners such as dorothy lawson to declare that she surfaced for a reason as monty monty elder mary pepin as often told jim bola you didn't find mungo lady she found you the gist quickly fighter graft andrew the features at the burial and collected the loose fragments they then made the decision to remove the bones they were sheep grazing on the net and thunderstorm with brewing the site was federal one downpour could sweep the bones away carefully cut and removed the disintegrating calculate books in which the bones was set and packed them in the only vessel available john mulvaney suitcase some of his close la returned as patting the following day they took munger lady to camera billy griffiths and here are two of those who were there archaeologists alan thorne and reece jones on dating and the significance of mungo what happens is that the iranian in the soil is dissolved then it enters the bone sometime after death and then it decays so you have thorium raid on all these other things so you measure the different daughter projects and that process has been going on since the beginning of the world is the best method of all but the amounts are so tiny i this is just minuscule amounts the miniaturization of all this so that's the problem is so that's getting any sort of age age estimate is a real coup technically what what they've done so anyway they've tried to do the uranium series plus this electron spin resonance which is trapped electron message on the teeth and boatswain give values of the same rough order so in a sense they've tried to address the problem jim raised may turn out that these remains are themselves the literally the earliest evidence for human prisons on the continent but what is interesting of course is that most of the early sites the to have been in the extreme north here we are in south western new south wales in the southeastern corner of a straighter so whatever these dates are they are very much minimum dates because obviously they didn't just race down from the north coast to turn up in the semiarid climates and environments of wish new south wales at the national university it took physical anthropologist ellen thorn over six months to excavate and reconstruct the hundreds of fragile bone fragments contained in the calgary books there were found to belong to a young adult female of slenda bill and small stature who had been burned on a pile by the lakeshore over forty thousand ease ago what was groundbreaking was that the remains unequivocally human shattering lingering nineteenth century something that bridge people had evolved from an earlier race of hominids the news of mungo lady spread quickly around the globe and was reported in their front page of the national newspapers the bones were at that time the oldest evidence of homo sapiens outside of africa the new had become the a few years later in february nineteen seventy four jim bola returned to.

jim bola forty thousand years six months
"fifty year" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"It's perfectly legal for landlords to turn someone down based on their source of income antonio fascinated by is executive director of the homeless persons representation project in baltimore and williams lawyer she says fifty years after the fair housing act we see this as essentially one of the last frontiers of ensuring that people have access to fair housing landlords say it's not discrimination adam skolnick is executive director of the maryland multi housing association a trade group this was all about the governmental bureaucracy that comes with aching voucher as opposed to any other issue skull nick says landlords who accept vouchers face inspections and paperwork the public housing authority determines how much rent they can charge almost one wimbledon i take rogers i love the income stream while mid that and i find it worth dealing with the agony but that's why our association thinks it should be somebody's choice fair housing advocates say say that choice perpetuate segregation and concentrated poverty jill williams eventually did find a place to live on the way out to see it we passed several complexes where she says her voucher wasn't accepted there including of here no such now sexually she's fifty nine now her gray ponytail pokes out of a woman veteran coastguard cap partment right on the corner ground level outside the grounds look neatly kept but she says she doesn't feel safe going for walks and it's far from her family it was disappointing because i couldn't live where i wanted to live and i just never thought that i would find income discrimination as well as at my age heaven experienced discrimination because of my color williams hopes to move to annapolis maryland capital so she can advocate for the homeless and because they're discrimination based on source of income is prohibited in baltimore i'm amy scott for marketplace.

executive director baltimore adam skolnick nick jill williams annapolis maryland capital amy scott maryland multi housing associa fifty years
"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Her and worked with radio lab to examine the policy and lots of nassir is reporter for radio lab here's lots of prevention through deterrence is basically just another name for the national border patrol strategy enacted in nineteen ninety four and basically the idea of strategy was to block off you know the most heavily trafficked areas of illegal immigration which were you know in cities like pasta or san diego or south of tucson but then leave open as only routes to cross these pre remote and naturally hostile areas like the desert that then led to people crossing in these more remote areas and then people dying and what we found in our part of our reporting and this is also in the work of this timothy done is that one of the roots of this policy is this lawsuit this there was a school in l pasta it's really right across the border it's called buoy high school and what happened was that the border patrol they had as part of their strategy and early nineties of apprehension people who would cross they would basically spend a lot of time at the school because there was a hole in the fence across from the school so a lot of migrants would be crossing illegally the border patrol would be stationed at the school in doing that they would also be a harassing a lot of students and staff at the school and at some point students and staff said we're tired of this and they sued the border patrol very unlikely they win they win against the border patrol but in response to that because it was big national news story that was one of the factors that then made the border patrol sort of sit back and think you know what we need to rethink our whole strategy and as part of that they came out with this totally different strategy instead of waiting for people to cross and then apprehending them the new strategy would be to sort of position the border patrol agents on the border right on the border to prevent people from coming in the first place and so that was sort of.

reporter tucson buoy high school san diego
"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

"We were sending kids to the department of you services that's kids prison by leaps and bounds and they would come home and what would they do what they know best continue to commit offenses because they became unemployable they perhaps didn't have education to rely on the reality is we lost a population of young kids and to what george just chill blazer she took her budget she asks the state of ohio for any extra money any extra favors she took the budget that was already there and she created a series of programs when you come into a court she would give you a chance to stay in your home life go to school but still adhere to these programs that she was set up for you that she created through her courts and monitoring and as a result of these programs are numbers dropped by more than half of the amount of people she's sending to kids services aka kitty jail so tell that you saw this judge do you wish you had gone through a program like that i do i do you know michael have had a lot of conversations pacific ly with regard to programming and i believe that good programming is good security and the prison and as we start to transcend from prison back into the community how we take a look at how we are affecting people when they aren't secure and controlled them by moments as extremely important with regard to the outcome of those specific individuals once they get back into the community at we don't start to take a look at people's values if we don't start to have a conversation about integrity and some other things that it will take to be successful once you release then i show you that most people will go back so three your own personal experience in through this documentary what our viewers supposed to.

george ohio michael
"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Hi my name is kristen i'm calling from evanston and i wanted to talk about what my daughter's school does for martin luther king day they do an assembly they have the kids perform they be passages and sing songs and it's like the most beautiful thing to see all the children up there so appreciate mr or sixty five for making it a priority got a comment for the show hit us up on our facebook page tweet us at the takeaway or leave us a voicemail at eight seven seven eight my take your ideas and takes a huge part of who we are let us know what you're thinking about this is the takeaway they are not just gangs of kids anymore they are often the kinds of kids that are called superpredators no conscience no empathy that was the first lady hillary clinton at a campaign speech in nineteen ninetysix six husband bill clinton's second term she was making the case for criminal justice reform to support president clinton's violent crime control and law enforcement act that super predator idea it's stuck alleged gang members and young people of color were labeled dangerous uncontrollable it was the start of a cycle of juvenile punishment that continues today this week hbo's vice launching their sixth season with the episode raised in the system actor michael k williams host the episode he also starters omar little on the hbo series the wire trauma whether it be physical sexual mental health or just plano good oldfashioned lack of resources in the home you take a.

evanston hillary clinton bill clinton hbo omar martin luther facebook president michael k williams
"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Our guest charles mckinney said dr martin luther king junior's legacy has become distorted over time and listeners we are hearing from you how is dr king's life addressed in schools today penatta stephen elementary school music teacher from nyack new york mice didn't have the impression that dr king was powerful speaker close friend of the president and widely accepted more leader i emphasized to them that he was arrested for protesting around twenty times vilified by the press and threatened with physical violence regularly i also talked to them at length about the poor people campaign emphasizing the fact that much of dr king hoped to achieve particularly economic quality for all races has still not yet been accomplished my name is peggy and i'm calling from england new jersey and i am actually a middle school art teacher the decision about who does what to celebrate it is usually left up to me and they might have a little bit of discussion but unfortunately it's not taking us seriously as i like i am a black woman and it is serious and important to me so i make a point of trying to incorporate some project around that time however is just not enough devotion put to this and it's sad because i teach an urban school district and our kids really should learn more by name is gin yell and i'm calling from hollywood florida i have a son in fourth grade and they do a little bit about martin luther king and a little bit about rosa parks but they don't really go into it it's incumbent upon the parents to teach the children because this will only going touch the circus.

charles mckinney president florida martin luther king dr martin luther penatta stephen elementary sch new york peggy hollywood
"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

"It also represents potential there are a growing number of organizations a growing number of activist organizations growing number of of mainland organizations right shout out to black lives matter memphis grassroots organizing coalition coalition of concerned citizens the fight fifteen out memphis right shoutout to so many organizations in town who were doing the work of building engaging in this in this beautiful struggle there's a growing number of people working in the school system who underst who are starting to understand come to an understanding of the deleterious impact of segregation on education right we can't get around it we we simply can't right so there's a growing group of people who are saying look let's start having let's start having some real conversations about how we move forward right what's the definition of insanity you keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results well you know what for the last fifty years we've engaged in a series of practices and patterns that have gotten us here we gotta try some thing we gotta try something different and so there's a critical mass of folks i think in this town some elected officials some other civic some other civic leaders a few folks in the foundation arena where we've got to get a few who got to get a few more them on board we're starting to say hey you know what some of these old patterns and practices they're not working it's time to start thinking about about new approaches and so so we see that in memphis again we see the reality of inequality but we also see so much potential to to confront those realities professor charles mckinney associate professor of history rhodes college thank you.

memphis professor charles mckinney associate professor of history fifty years
"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

"People of african descent in that city today yes that and that number is is virtually unchanged from nineteen sixty eight right we've got the highest black child poverty rate in the country but also we have we made gains yes we have made gains right so when we look over the course of the last fifty years we see a dramatic expansion of the black middle class but also we see poverty rates and african african american poverty rates virtually unchanged henry louis gates was once asked to talk about this period is fifty year period and he says you know what the easiest way to talk about this say it was the best of times it was the worst of times is there enough economic opportunity given the cloud of race within memphis to allow someone to achieve your level of success today memphis is going to have to be honest with self right about what memphis can do so on the one hand we say we want people to achieve and we say we want we want to expand opportunities for african americans on the other hand we tell oh companies in corporations that they should move the memphis because they can pay their employees slave wages the chamber of commerce used to have a some language on their on their website before activists pointed it out that you know they talked about hey you know move your company here come to memphis because you know we're not unionized and you can pay you can pay people really really low wages if we extrapolate for a minute and look at memphis as sort of a hyper focused example of something in america what does it symbolize given all the controversy over apparent growing inequality in america right now what does memphis tell us what should we be thinking about as we honor the legacy of dr martin luther king junior memphis represents reality and potential it represents the reality of of persistent racial inequality represents the reality of what what town what city when a county can look like when the majority of the people in that in that space when african americans are systematically routinely shut out of the halls of power.

memphis henry louis gates chamber of commerce america dr martin luther fifty years fifty year one hand
"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"fifty year" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And then when he died racial problems all of that now and it makes me wonder just what kind of a world we are living in and what's going to happen now martin luther king try to help roseanne away from not having a violence or any kind of rubs i think they should have sast pray that his family then find in the memory of all he tried to do for the land he loved so well always willing to share my king with the world he caused he was a symbol of the finest man is capable of being yet to us he was a father and a husband today we mark fifty years since the assassination of dr martin luther king junior king was in memphis support the city's striking sanitation workers they were protesting abusive working conditions and low wages the night before he was killed king spoke at the mason temple in memphis delivering what would become known as the mountaintop speech a long life long has its place but i'm not concerned about that now i just wanna do god's will and he's allowed me to go up to the mountain i've look over i see the promised land i may not get there with you to the night people will get to the promised land in a sense dr king for shadowed what was to come the following night april fourth nineteen sixty eight martin luther king junior was shot and killed as he stood on the balcony of the lorraine motel today the lorraine motel stands as did back in nineteen sixty eight it's no longer a functioning motel it's more the national civil rights museum dr king while he's grown larger than life he's an icon of the civil rights movement and a symbol for many but for trolls mckinney whose an associate professor of history at rhodes college in memphis there's a danger in the wake kings images in stride into our national consciousness professor mckinney warns us that danger should not be ignored we've worked hard to produce a version of king that is like a black santa claus fright to dissenter king to move him away from the political idealogue to move away from the person who was comfortable with mass based protests and that's a problem because that's that's not the real king right that's not the historical king.

memphis king mason temple lorraine motel rhodes college mckinney martin luther king roseanne dr martin luther associate professor of history professor fifty years