35 Burst results for "Fifty Thousand Dollars"

City has received 9 bids to clean up 'shingle mountain' in Dallas

The Dallas Morning News

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

City has received 9 bids to clean up 'shingle mountain' in Dallas

"The city has received nine beds for the long awaited task upholding away a mountain of shingles dumped in southeastern Dallas, and it's now up to the city council to award the contract after a roughly two year stalemate between the city, the accused polluter and the land owner who owns the shingle mountain. Site Dallas officials issued a bid proposal earlier this month for the messy job of loading and hauling away about one hundred, seventy, five, thousand yards of shingles and other debris. The proposal calls for hauling the mess from the dump site along south. Central Expressway to the McCullough's bluffed landfill on Youngblood road a quarter mile away the lowest bid from Roberts trucking in Dallas was for four, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars records show the highest bid. was three point, three, million dollars

Dallas Roberts Trucking Mccullough
Justin Bieber and Chance The Rapper Are Donating $250,000 to Fans Battling 'Hard Times'

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

00:25 sec | 6 d ago

Justin Bieber and Chance The Rapper Are Donating $250,000 to Fans Battling 'Hard Times'

"All right. So Justin Bieber and chance the rapper are giving away a total of two, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars they partnered with the cash eappen. Of course, this is to promote their single holy They are giving it to people who are affected by these hard. Times they've already given away the money to somebody who was affected by the hurricane and right now, all you have to do to enter the Hashtag J., B. Chance Holy and you'll be entered to win and they're going to pick a bunch of people. So I think that's pretty cool.

Justin Bieber
How 3 Simple Phone Alarms Changed My Health, Wealth, and Relationships with Eric Partaker

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:43 min | Last week

How 3 Simple Phone Alarms Changed My Health, Wealth, and Relationships with Eric Partaker

"Eric say what's up to fire nation and sure something interesting about yourself that most people don't know aright. Well, yeah. What's up fire nation how excited to be here? This is this is an easy one about ten years ago. I was boarding a return flight to London, and shortly after the cabin doors closed I sent something wasn't right and as the plane descended I had a lot of pressure building in my chest. It soon became pain. Went through the my left arm my whole left arm went completely ice cold by colleague. Next to me he touched my my arm and I remember he said Jesus feels like it's been hanging in a meat locker. Let's Yeah I said too. I said to my I said Lewis. Like something's up man this. This is I'm scared Can You? Can you get some help? And? Louis jumps over runs to a flight attendant. And flight attendant comes overseas on I'm sweating at this point you know feeling really nauseous and she she asks us there's a doctor on board and. at I'm just you know feeling worse and worse doctor comes running over luckily I. Hopefully, there's always a doctor aboard flight nominee knocking lucky. There was one for me he came over. Took my vital signs and he just said immediately he is he said we got to land the plane like a sap i. think he's having a heart attack and when I when I heard those words, you had a heart attack. When you're when you're thirty, five, thousand feet up in the air these are not the words you want to hear. No. You're about as far away from help as you can get and I remember when that plane. On the movies when they talk about something like feeling in an eternity like life is going in slow motion I mean that was exactly what it felt like. Because at the sense, it probably didn't take that long but it felt like forever and I was just terrified on the way down that. My heart was gonNA stop completely I kept having to stop my head like James I'm going to get so close to say the in it's going to be lights out and obviously. I mean, you'd be an absolute magician if you had invited someone to your show who had actually died, right so That wasn't the case we a pain emergency lands. By the way out of a quick side note here I was just too curious to not Google this so. Apparently, it costs about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars to emergency land applying for the airline and I think my ticket costs like one, hundred, fifty bucks. So they did it. They did really poorly with me on that flight man, but you know what I will say to make you feel better if you need it, they likely have insurance for that. So the people who got screwed are the people who should get screwed, which are the insurance companies. Are True. So so plane touches down -mergency response team Russia's on board takes me into a waiting ambulance administered nitrates right away to open up the arteries. And then the ambulance sped off to a local hospital. Did you even know where you are like? Did you even know like what city you're in? No, I had no idea. Yeah. I knew when I got into the ambulance because everyone was speaking trench. Man Because that's the thing about flying over Europe. You're like I I literally have no idea where we're going to descend so that Eric is super interesting my friend I'm gonNA share something else that people don't know about you actually as you might be moving to Puerto Rico at some point in the future the I'll day unconscious. So that'd be super cool as well. So man what a way to kick off this interview of three simple phone alarms that changed Eric's health wealth and relationships, and we already can see that he needed a little change in his health. So talk to us about these three phone alarms that are going to elevate our health work in home fronts. So this is dead simple. And it was driven by that story. I just shared 'cause I have been obsessed with achievement prior to that point for ten years while at Skype Bill we we sold skype to Ebay I two thousand five for about four billion dollars at McKinsey and company. And then a few of my own businesses, but it was like achievement at all costs, right? So including the cost of my health and relationships and And after that, I need any something had to change a new. I needed some some balance and I literally I took my phone one day and I said, okay I'm GONNA put in some alarms and I'm going to label each alarm to reflect what like the best version of me would look like to power the relevant segment of the day and so let me give an example and when you're setting alarm on your phone, for example, if you have, I found, you go into the alarm. And you'll see a section called label and you can actually name the alarm whatever you want, and if you have android, you can go in it's called name you can label it whatever you want so. So for years. Now at six thirty, am the first alarm goes off and it says world fitness champion and I'm not a will fit as champion I never will be but like that's not the point, the point is that for me, that's the phrase that expresses my best on the health front, which is one of the key three areas you get your health, your wealth, or if you want to refer to it as work and your relationships.

Eric Skype London Google Europe Mckinsey Lewis Louis Russia James Ebay Puerto Rico
TikTok reaches deal that would give Oracle oversight of U.S. operations

POLITICO's Nerdcast

16:18 min | Last week

TikTok reaches deal that would give Oracle oversight of U.S. operations

"And Tick Tock recently made headlines Everywhere when Resin Donald Trump signed an executive order. That would essentially ban the Chinese owned APP in the US for national security reasons. Unless it sells its operations here to an American company. And of course, if that were to happen. We would have nowhere to go to see a million potatoes singing. To Adele. And that would be a national tragedy. This week deal actually emerged between TIKTOK and American company Oracle but some people like Zachary say trump's tiktok policy effectively changes. Nothing. The argument goes like this. It will do little to protect Americans data from the Chinese government because there are still plenty of other ways China could get that data that this move is just a new kind of security theater basically. The hard work of data security according to this actually lies elsewhere. So, Zachary TIKTOK has been banned in Indiana a few other countries, but it's still pretty popular for now it's the most popular video sharing app i. can see why it seems like fun and there are mental creative. They're short I mean the whole nature of the medium has their time limited. What happened with Tiktok this week what happened this week? Should be clear but isn't. Basically, in August, the trump administration ordered via executive order whose legality remains highly questionable that the Chinese owner of Tiktok, a company called Bite Dance. Divest itself of Owning Tiktok within ninety days or face the prospect that tiktok would be shut down in the United States. I broke the deal I said you can't do business in the United States, which is at least potentially within the power of the US federal government based on national security concerns based on national security and the logistics are complicated that you probably could order apple and other people and servers that are hosting tiktok. that. They couldn't do it and it would defacto make it impossible for Tiktok to function. So that is what began a process where the owner of Tiktok, again, a Chinese company sought an alternative way to their cell, the US portion of Tiktok or what ended up happening major deals Rocking Wall Street this morning pushing futures higher. We find an American technology partner Oracle beat Microsoft and become the technology partner for TIC TACS US operations although will not. receive its coveted algorithm so that all took talks data would be kept in the United States on servers owned by an American company and not by Chinese company because the whole point of this was that all these people using Tiktok, these tens of millions, hundreds of millions that data was potentially vulnerable to being used and therefore misused by the Chinese government. How so So the fear was because technology companies in China by Chinese law are required if. By the Chinese government to turn over data relevant data that the Chinese government could tell the parent company of Tiktok, hand us all of your user data which user data of again tens of millions of Americans. and. Then China would have that data. So that was the concern right and and that's a legitimate fact the Chinese government could order that. The problem is, of course, one via our court system, an American court can order or prosecutor can subpoena data. From our companies. So it's not like what you and I do on Google or what we do on any technology provider is somehow. Unavailable. To government if government decides that it's in its interest to get it not to mention the the various many non-government actors, the vacuum, the stuff up and use it for their own purposes that is even more important I think probably more relevant to the China issue which is. Does it matter whether the data is in this case, potentially house by Oracle massive US hardware and software company versus being housed by servers in China. In terms of the ability of the Chinese government to obtain that data, it wanted to obtain it because not just third parties that hoover up data and use it in the whole buying selling and the data market, but just spying tools. Whether it's the NSA in the National Security Agency in the United States or various Israeli cybersecurity and or cyber spying companies or the Chinese government. Most of this data isn't that secure. Not. Like. Triple encrypted quantum encrypted defense department level communications. So likely true that if the Chinese government really wanted my teens Tiktok data, it doesn't really matter whether that data's House on servers in China owned by Chinese company or whether it was housed on American servers on buying American company. So I guess, then how do we get to this point? How did you know given what you just said why has this become such a big issue? How did it start? Yeah it's a good question I I'm not sure. There's a precise answer. It's part of a whole continuum of the trump administration in particular identifying China as a proximate threat to the United States and a whole series of ways competitively in terms of trade practices hence the hundreds of billions of dollars of Chinese imported goods that have been subject to American tariffs. It's part of a multi year campaign against this massive Chinese telecom equipment company called Wa wa, which has been a leader in next generation five G. Telecom equipment in a way that again, some of the same concerns have existed which is. That the Chinese government would would use the production of that equipment as a way to spy on who met from purchase adequate. And Look a few years ago. There was a a forced sale of gay dating APP Grindr, which was also owned by a Chinese company, and so there was an earlier precedent of forcing a Chinese company to sell an American APP Social App. Because, of data concerns and finally, there's the fact that for years long predating the trump administration. China has not allowed American social media companies like facebook. To function in China. So there's the tit for tat. You know you don't let our social media functioning companies function there. Why should we let yours function here? There's Several year campaign against China which the trump administration's pursued but I think has a good deal of democratic support I. Mean if it's close to a bipartisan sentiment that China, China's a threat as anything we have right now. Why Tiktok? Suddenly became a thing I may partly have to do with the fact that it suddenly became a very big deal in the United States. I mean, this was not a company that had any footprint several years ago and suddenly as. The APP does your so it may have had to do with something that got really big and is very noticeable. Salsa not that economically important. So a lot of people would be royally pissed off Tiktok were banned. It's not like tiktok is. An integral component. To the US economy either during covid or without covid. So it's an easier target. We'll be right back. Everyone wants to become a better leader this groundbreaking new book how to lead shows you how David M Rubenstein is one of the visionary founders of the Carlisle Group and host of the David Rubenstein Show where he speaks to leaders from every walk of life about who they are, how they define success and what it means to lead. Jeff bezos Richard Branson Warren Buffett Bill Gates Ruth Bader Ginsburg Phil Knight Oprah all of them and more are featured in how to lead this essential leadership playbook illustrates the principles and guiding philosophies of the world's greatest game changers discover the expert secrets to being. Effective innovative leaders. Walter Isaacson proclaims reading this invaluable trove of advice from the greatest leaders of our time is like sitting in an armchair and listening to the masters reveal their secrets, pick up a copy of how to lead wisdom from the world's greatest CEOS founders and Game Changers Bhai David Rubenstein available in Hardcover e book or audio, and we're back I get the kind of general personal security aspect of it. Where does the national security aspect of it come in? Is it because there's concern about people who worked at the Defense Department or the military whoever having to talk in in use in their households or people in the Defense Department are not allowed to use tiktok certainly not on their phones. For before this although they may have teenagers who That's vulnerability as well. So it wasn't primarily about like US government employees who might have sensitive data that tiktok would be the back door way that the Chinese government would spy on them but it was generalized sense of any foreign government that is using private American citizen data potentially for nefarious purposes represents a national security threat. Now, it clearly has not represented the kind of national security threat in the estimation of the White House right now when it's Russian. Manipulation of social media accounts the same principle should or would apply right. If you'RE GONNA ban, Tiktok you'd probably want to take action against the a variety of Russian media enterprises that are attempting to manipulate and hoover up American user data. Some of that data's you mentioned earlier in terms of third party is available to anybody for a price just because there's a marketplace for data. Which I think either most of us aren't aware of or frankly most probably don't care if politicos data on this podcast gets sold to fourteen vendors so that it can sell you and me products based on our other computer activity most people. Either like that, or don't care about that. But the national security concern is simply because it's a foreign government that could potentially. Use, our search history or browsing history nefarious. And again a, that might be true but be it's likely that all this kind of data is obtainable irrespective of whether or not a company called TIKTOK. Happens to have access to a lot of it. It's really interesting. So into this whole story comes oracle, you know huge hardware software firm but how did they get involved here? Yes. Oracle is is a multibillion dollar firm that has had the same public profile as Microsoft or Amazon or facebook or apple because most of its business is to other large companies, you know you and I don't tend to go out and buy Oracle piece of hardware because we don't need a hundred and fifty thousand dollars server or. Network system for our employees. They're largely corporate provider throw a huge provider to the Defense Department in terms of cheer equipment and material, and they're huge software company. They're one of the early Silicon Valley success stories and the billionaire founder Larry Ellison has been probably more conservative than not I don't know that I buy into the whole. This is a reward versus. A snub to the other potential main acquirer or partner for Tiktok, which was rumored to be Microsoft but this is an unusual. This doesn't usually fit oracle's business model. Well, that's that's interesting. So what is their interest in getting involved here perceived to be I'm not one hundred percent clear about that I mean look at could allow them to. Have a little bit more of a consumer facing brand. Again, I mean Oracle's. Primarily a software company primarily a database company. Maybe this could help them increase their databases. There's no way that this is a natural fit for goal. But at the same time north this a huge cost for Oracle, maybe it'll produce some American jobs. I mean. They're looking for growth just like everybody's looking for growth, and once you get to be the size of Oracle. Growth gets harder some of they're also looking for a DIFFERENT INDUSTRY TO BE President Chore? So. What exactly did they given? What did they get here that as of this conversation is not one hundred percent clear off so it was presented as or go by tiktok. That is not the case or at least it's not the case now and as possible. The deal will be scuttled or change given that all of this has to be approved by the government has to be approved by committee. Called Syfy S, which is the committee in charge of looking at global deals in terms of US national security, but it would seem that right now. The parent company of Tiktok saw own TIKTOK and get some of the economic benefits of TIKTOK. This Chinese company called by dance and that Oracle in turn will get a massive licensing deal to house Tiktok data and information on its own. Servers and using its own software. So the concern that the Chinese government would have access to that data would be allayed meeting under this agreement arrangement because the data would be managed by and it's housing would be arranged by a US company. The Chinese government could order by dance to turn over but by dance itself wouldn't actually have access to that data. It's interesting I mean based on what you said before it's they're they're they're moving this data from place a, it's not going to be in a different place and I guess the Chinese government will no longer have a key to the door. But as you said before there's many different ways that either the Chinese government or a lot of other. State or private actors can get hold on more or less any data they want to these days right? which kind of raises the question for point of all, this is ENA. It's certainly true. It would make it a little more challenging to get that data under that kind of arrangement. It seems like this a big fight over a big company. That's not actually really about. The literal subject of the conflict here. Yeah. It is totally fair to say that whatever the imbroglio about tiktok has very little to do with tiktok. And everything to do with US policy toward China. And the trump administration looking for some High profile optic to be able to say we're we're being tough on China and protecting American citizens. Again, the oddity of Tiktok is given that so many of its users or young adults. Who Don't vote although who would be? Extremely, Acetate it. If they woke up tomorrow and there's no TIKTOK meeting, it's probably not. The most popular move if what you're trying to do is gain support during a presidential election. So it's not entirely clear what constituency the served there wasn't like a huge congressional clamor for Oh my God. We're all big imperilled by these fifteen second videos. So where do you think things go from here in terms of into in terms of the real story behind all this in terms of the U., S., China relationship and the increasing in. them of that. So I think to some degree regardless of who wins the presidential election. there. Is a train that's left the proverbial station of increasing. Distrust and animosity between the United States and China. But within the context of an incredible amount of economic interdependence that you cannot just snap your fingers and several or at least not without massive massive harm to each part of that equation both the United States and China, and that's that's pretty unprecedented. Right? Right. That's like the Cold War analogy doesn't work because there was no economic relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union nineteen. Fifty S

Chinese Government United States Tiktok China Zachary Tiktok Oracle David M Rubenstein Defense Department Donald Trump Executive National Security Agency Partner Microsoft Indiana Apple Adele
Trevor Noah condemns Trump's COVID-19 Response

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

06:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Trevor Noah condemns Trump's COVID-19 Response

"Back to the daily social distancing show and yes, we are still social distancing pretty soon the top of my head is going to be six feet away from my forehead. That's the plan. That's how I'm going to measure my distance from people hey, what's going on becks they s see you know the reason we still social distancing is because the coronavirus is still spreading, and this is thanks partly to people not taking it seriously. So let's catch up in another installment of our ongoing segments the pandemic. I our pandemic coverage, Hicks off in Utah State in desperate need of the l shaped tetris piece. We now know that one of the easiest ways to stop the spread of coronavirus is just to have everybody where a mosque unfortunately telling everyone to wear a mosque is also one of the easiest ways to spread idiocy after more than one weeks in schools have reopened in Washington County Liberty, action coalition hosted a rally in front of the school district building. This morning up to a thousand people showed up saying the children being forced to wear masks in classrooms is illegal and even unconstitutional. Now have gathered here in front of the Washington County. Administration building calling for. The end of a mouse mandate. If we want to wear a mask, that's fine we can take care of ourselves when George Floyd was saying I can't breathe and then he died and We're wearing a mask and we say I can't breathe but we're for story anyway I'll tell you another reason I'd hate mass most child molesters love them God. Damn. These people were crazy. In fact, you know what they should have. Let them storm the school building because maybe they would have accidentally learn something like I'm still trying to process everything that was going on at that rally no matter how many times I watched that video i. still find new things to process. Like that video is the closest thing I've seen to facebook comments happening in real life I like individual freedom wipe people are the real George Floyd. Happy. Birthday Martha Mask wearing was invented by Jeffrey Epstein. Oh and here's another reason it's hard for Americans. To get the pandemic under control even places do have rules for social distancing. This is how some people follow them growing concerns over Cova clusters especially on college campuses in Ohio police cited several people in a house near Miami University during the Labor Day weekend body camera footage captured a stunning exchange between an officer and a student or there's So, you probably know where I wanNA talk to too many people but you know the the ordinances ten people. Yeah. How many people are in the house? Twenty twenty people inside. You Might WanNa start clearing off the I've never seen this before there's an input on the computer that you tested positive for covid. When was this was? A week ago are you supposed to be quarantining? That's why I'm on my house do you have other people here and you? You're positive for Kovin? We WanNA, keep the site open. That's why. We're so screwed. The main part of quarantine isn't about being at your house, my friend. It's about being away from other people so that you don't spread the disease I'm scheduled. Know where this guy puts a condom on his buddy at this point I'm glad it's just corona virus. Can you imagine this dude handling Ebola wait so I'm not supposed to eat a monkey. Because I got to tell you there was some confusion there. Oh and just by the way. Watching this police officers body cam footage was like virtual reality game called white privilege because this kid was clearly breaking the law but the cups tone of voice sounds like he was telling him today specials Hieaux could I interest you and not breaking the law today? Get a few minutes to think it over and I'll come back so. Some people are misinformed some people a crazy and some people are both. People. Like Donald jaundiced trump president of the United States and one man super spreader overnight at a packed indoor rally president trump breaking Nevada's covid restrictions to court voters. In the key battleground state, we're going to win to that speaking to a throng of mostly mask Liz supporters, his first indoor rally nearly three months. The state prohibits gatherings of more than fifty people but trump defiant of the governor comes after you which you shouldn't be doing. I'll be with you all the while those behind the president and in front of the cameras wore masks, most of the crowd did not. But that didn't bother supporters like meal. Christianson who camped out overnight I'm not wearing a mask that's a shows that I trust my president. Okay look. I. Get why trump fan would have trusted trump before. But how do you still trust this off the he admitted that he's been downplaying the coronavirus this whole time I don't get it. I really don't get what do you mean you trust and this is like believing the Nigerian e mail scam off the he tells you that he's a Nigerian email scam although I'm a small time criminal pretending to be a wealthy prince. Will Send me some money. You know what? I liked this guy's honesty I will send him fifty thousand dollars and as for trump. How you call yourself the presence of law and order when you openly flouting the law and not even for a noble reason. No, it's just so that he can spend nineteen minutes ranting about how vegetables invented by the deep state and Hillary. Clinton and this isn't just about breaking the law. What Donald Trump is doing here is actually dangerous. The last time trump held an indoor rally. He lost twenty five percent of his black friends. So there you have it. Everyone from college students to grandma's to the president himself is helping this virus continue spreading. But I guess. That's the genius of America's Corona Virus Response. Unlike other countries that are preparing for the second wave America realized you don't have to deal with the second wave. If you never get over the first.

Donald Trump President Trump Washington County George Floyd Martha Mask America Facebook Hicks Utah State Jeffrey Epstein Miami University Ohio United States LIZ Christianson Hillary Nevada
Ryan Seacrest Checks In With Jared Goffs Roomie Patrick During Quarantine

On Air with Ryan Seacrest: The Post Show

05:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Ryan Seacrest Checks In With Jared Goffs Roomie Patrick During Quarantine

"All right. You know. The football season has begun. And we want to talk with our Rams quarterback. Jared Goff but he is busy. So we figured we talked to his roommate. Who's wearing his Jag cap right now looking pretty cool coming to us live from the. Patrick. Jared. Where they live together and they've been together for months and months of Corentin Patrick who also works in the Sales Department of Iheartradio Good Morning how you been Patrick I've been well and this you guys. been working from home for the company Yeah, I've been home since. March thirteen whenever we all left the office then president and how has it been quarantining with Jared Goff? It's been good It's definitely been a long time each. Stage has been a little bit different but we made the most of it. Yeah and when you say the most of it, what did you do to kill time? I'd say like a beginning we're doing like we leave the house this puzzle anything we can find around like or games VR anything we hanafin. To. Do. You play muscles. Puzzles I'd so cute. Dalmatian. Dog Puzzles or. One woman wants a dog. One of them was like a city like skyline talk. About everything now. They have like mini golf in the backyard to do. We have many like whole par-three Kinda hold. That's like downhills on hard knocks. Pretty so that kept US occupied hard knocks. Got Into I didn't realize they add new episodes every week I watched like in a row and say, oh, that's it. And this this year was a little bit different because there was no preseason game. So they didn't get into a lot of that stuff, but I thought was pretty good. So Patrick Conroy, Giorgos roommate, how is our quarterback feeling about? No rehearsals before the great on they did some scrimmages within within their team at so stadium which looks amazing by the way I don't know if you guys gotta channel my Gosh I can't believe we can't go to it. You know. That's painful. But it's still it's still going to be a great season without fans will still good on TV that's for sure and Patrick I understand jared Goff's on a new diet. Yes he started a new diet just kind of. Get himself feeling better looking better So I think that this should be good for the coming season on my refrigerator I put my inspiration and I've got pictures of David Beckham and I've got others up there. You know my fashion inspiration, my physique inspiration on ever get there but I liked the visual does he have a on your refrigerator? Does he have Tom Brady or somebody up on the? Pretty clean on the outside. But? No I think definitely what what he's done with his body has been great and off season. So be ready to go nobody would know it better than his roommate. What has he done with his body and it's off season. Now, here's here's. Like that? No no no. No you don't explain yourself. You do look cooler since you've been spending more time at home. Doesn't he? He's got an a Totally. Swag. In out right. Swag too when you knew us, what are those footballs in the background those footballs yeah. Those rolled his This is like their the office in his name balls from his office. Are you in his career? Where are you? This is the office we all like switch off doing zoom calls. Oh, you. Throughout here I got tour. Drawers in the bedside tapers yeah. Yeah. Laptop takes around the house we got. We got some serious. This is what's great about jared and his roommate Patrick. They're doing good things for people and I was reading here jared recently donated a million backpacks to the Inglewood School district and in March donated two, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars to the Regional Food Bank dealt families deal with the pandemic. Yes. So he's he's done a lot of that stuff. You also relaunched brand which last year on my brought in a couple of teachers but it was just the logo before, and now he got the team that kind of made a couple more clothing options for everybody more like a rather than just a logo So he's donating all his arrays, all the procedure going to the Unified Inglewood unified, school district that has of the brand merch items. Yeah that's awesome. Senior. J. G. for Jared Goff but then it looks like the number. Sixteen. Doesn't have like. A little bit of colored as to differentiate the sixteen or JD in the sixteen. But this is just a black and white or Bra I I will contribute to the costs I would love I'm going to buy one of those hats I like that. Yeah. That's really great. We'll Patrick thank you so much for coming on. Glad that you n our quarterback at the Rams Jared Golf doing well together, and I don't know when we'll see in person but we'll definitely talk this season Bre Housi- film about playing with. No fans. I think it's an he's in different I mean obviously it's not going to be the same vibe in the stadium, but you still gotta handle the business on field so whether our fans are not, it's kind of the same mentality.

Jared Goff Corentin Patrick Jared So Stadium Rams Jared Golf Patrick Conroy Tom Brady United States David Beckham Football Patrick I President Trump Sales Department Of Iheartradi Inglewood School District Unified Inglewood Unified Bre Housi Regional Food Bank J. G.
Amazon is hiring 33,000 new employees with an average compensation package worth $150,000

Talking Tech

01:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Amazon is hiring 33,000 new employees with an average compensation package worth $150,000

"You looking for work? Well, Amazon is hiring they're looking for thirty three thousand workers for corporate intech roles with average pay of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars sounds pretty good right? I'm Jefferson Graham. You're listening to talking tech. You know that there've been so many casualties from the pandemic but as I found out when I visited the local ups store today, the ups store had so many boxes waiting to be. Picked up and brought away, I'd say about five times more than average Amazon said that its corporate intent jobs will be centered around Amazon's offices around the country including Denver New York, Phoenix, and the hometown headquarters. In Seattle, the new hires work from home at first but you know Amazon they're going to expect you to show up at the office eventually write this down on September Sixteenth Amazon is going to have an online career fair. To collect resumes and give people a chance to talk to a recruiter. So even if you're not looking for work seriously one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, a year is really good money. You can find out more by going to this website www dot amazon career day dot com.

Amazon Jefferson Graham Seattle Phoenix Denver New York
Amazon wants to hire 33K new workers

Talking Tech

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Amazon wants to hire 33K new workers

"Hey. Gang. Are you looking for work? Well, Amazon is hiring they're looking for thirty three thousand workers for corporate intech roles with average pay of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars sounds pretty good. Right? I'm Jefferson, Graham you're listening to talking tech. You know that there've been so many casualties from the pandemic but as I found out when I visited the local ups store today, the ups store had so many boxes waiting to be. Picked up and brought away, I'd say about five times more than average Amazon said that its corporate intent jobs will be centered around Amazon's offices around the country including Denver. New York Phoenix and the hometown headquarters in Seattle. The new hires work from home at first. But you know Amazon they're going to expect you to show up at the office eventually write this down on September Sixteenth Amazon is going to have an online career fair. To collect resumes and give people a chance to talk to a recruiter. So even if you're not looking for work seriously one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, a year is really good money. You can find out more by going to this website www dot Amazon career day dot com

Amazon New York Jefferson Seattle Denver Graham
These smart toilets may solve India's massive open defecation problem

The 3:59

08:54 min | 3 weeks ago

These smart toilets may solve India's massive open defecation problem

"India is the open defecation capital of the world that's led to more than one hundred, thousand deaths a year we went to India to take a look at this problem and one potential solution in new line of smart. Toilets. Chang, this is your daily charge. With Ben Fox ribbon the daily charge regularly used to spend time writing on Amazon but earlier this year before the pandemic hit. We sent to India to look at smart toilets. Welcome. Ben, thanks for avenue so bad before we get into these toilets, let's let's define the problem with India facing how big is this open defecation problem in the country? There are a couple of ways of looking at it, but to the would bake it hopefully easier for people to understand it's about three hundred, forty, four, million people don't have regular access to toilets in. India. So that's more than the population of the United States, which is one of the most populous countries in the world and. To look at it as one in four people in India do not have regular access to toilet. So it's it's a huge huge problem that so so that context I mean. What did you find like? What? Like what? What a what are some of the solutions I guess specifically like what was solution you went to Goad India to see. Yeah. So I want to start by saying that open defecation isn't just an inconvenience. It's not something where it's just like uncomfortable to go to the bathroom outside I it literally, as you cited causes of death and disease, which is, which is why India is really trying to get a handle on this problem. There's this tiny startup. South of New Delhi called Garden Toilets Guard Means Dignity In. They're they're trying to be you know this new concept of a smart sanitation company in India so they not only created toilets that are built out of steel so that they Are More vandalism proof are easier to clean and can last longer, but they also added in a bunch of different real time sensors like the water sensors. Motion sensors so that they can actually make sure that they're still being operating properly and they still work in any maintenance problems. They're able to catch fix really quickly alter and degraded the system with Iot infrastructure where we are able to track it in real time how it's being made details have been used plus whether they are being maintained or not. In real time, we get to know if there are any malfunctions moreover, we are also able to track the user hygiene aspects where we get to know how many people have used the toilets, what percentage of them have washed their hands or whether they are flushing the it's not what amount of what is being used. So these other things that we basically tracking real time and it helps us build a strong connection with the community as well if we are doing comedy mobilization. We know what is the real problem of the government? Even if it is hand washing, we work with them very specifically towards hand washing. What it's actually like to be one of these facilities because you have an interesting way of describing it and it's very different when you're like outside looking in versus when you're actually in one of these, the toilet facilities. Yeah. So a lot of them look like what you would think a portable toilet would look like, but it's built out of steel. So those are those are there more basic models they also did this really interesting retro fit in a major convention center in New Delhi, and that was like a fifty thousand dollar project, which is a lot of money and. It looked like the inside of a spaceship that's how I described it. So it's all this like bright steel we walked in right when they just opened to the public and it's all this like shiny steel. The urinals are still a toilets or still the faucets or steel. It's it's really just a break up the industrial look of it they they went in they. Added these strips off off fake grass around it just so there wouldn't all be still but yeah, it's it's pretty looks kind of imposing like you walk into a bank vault or something like that, and you talk to us on the sensors of the tech that's embedded here, which is definitely not like the tech that you'd see in a normal smart toilet things like Sim cards. Talk about that like what else did you see? What else did they embed into these facilities toilets to make them smart and really smart and useful in this kind of environment bright. So some of the aspects that you wouldn't see in any normal American public toilet are these they attach the faucets and toilets Sim cards that allow them to basically do real time tracking off water usage toilet flashes. Hand watching all sorts of things like that. So number one, they're able to see if there's a maintenance problem if the toilet if toilet is blocked ran out of water, the other thing is also a health usage. So they can actually track if people aren't flushing the toilet or aren't washing their hands now granted some of these toilets, obviously our auto flash. By Some of that information at first I was kind of like Jesus sounds like a bit of a privacy issue, but it's all anonymous is number one and number two. It's actually really valuable from a perspective. So they actually go into communities and if washing is an issue than they work directly with folks with about hand washing so. Is kind of like really reimagining the concept of toilet as kind of this, this venue for a public health, and also when you in, you can kinda see they've also got various billboards and stuff like don't forget to wash your hands stuff like that. So all all these elements to reemphasize hygiene practices right and then you actually visited a couple of regular public toilets, right particular some near near some slums. What what are the described that scene in how that contrast with the toilets you saw? Yeah. So I went to a slum in Faridabad where garth toilets is based out of that was actually not that far from their co co working space and You know the toilets are from from CEO, Mayakoba He told me that those toilets had just been built by the government a year ago and they were already completely useless. They there were there were filled with feces Some of them had been vandalized some of them been locked up because they weren't useful anymore. The people in that neighborhood came up to us told us about the toilets. They're just like basically they're disgusting we can't use them. You know they're back to defecating in nearby field because you know if somebody wanted to use them they, they could contract diseases. That's how disgusting worse so. It was incredibly stark was one of the first things that I saw when I went to India and it was it was really Sad it was really sad to see that that's what people had to deal with than it was it was great to get to. Highlight some like an effort that potentially try to try to fix this problem and you follow the CEO amid how round for a couple of days in India as he showed you around here, they're facilities. What was that like? What was he like? So he's he's an interesting guy in that. You know if you think like an eel on mosque character who's like larger than life he's he's kind of the opposite. He is very mild, mannered and reserved. Doesn't doesn't crack a lot of jokes but what really kind of to wire to write about him was that he's this really idealistic person he gets really frustrated about the state of toilets in his country. He talks very tough very passionately about those things issue in the developing Rodney's Moss Olympic one means you would see the toilet, the sanitation facilities do get made, but the government also wants the products. But what happens is after months most of these. Energies and being dysfunctional, and that is largely because of the fact that these solid get vandalized easily because these are in the public space on community spaces and the fact that they do not get maintained regularly. Even, though you know she doesn't like he's not like bursting with all of this you know it's not like a three ring circus or whatever it. Still you know all of that, all of that passion is really built in about cow. He really wants to help people and it was fascinating to write about this story because he wants to help people with toilets which to me it's like something that people really think about they don't really care about. They'd rather just move on after using them and to him he spent the past five years really trying to. Make something different. Make it something better as I describing the story like a techie showcasing a thing of beauty.

India New Delhi Ben Fox Amazon CEO Chang United States Faridabad Rodney Vandalism
These CS:GO Coaches Just Got Banned For Cheating

theScore Esports Podcasts

07:59 min | 3 weeks ago

These CS:GO Coaches Just Got Banned For Cheating

"The go seen just got by gigantic cheating scandal and no I'm not talking about a bunch of nobody's getting caught hacking and the F. L. This happened at the highest level of competitive counter strike and three coaches were banned and on top of that, there's been a second investigation with up to potentially fifteen different cases of match-fixing happening at the semi pro level. It's been a rough month for couch. All right. So for a while now we've been streaming over a twitch dot TV slash the score, east sports with our talk show clouded, and if you love the stories that we cover here on donut mean well, you're GonNa love some of the conversations that we have over on twitch. We break down some of the biggest stories from East sports in streaming and we talk a little ship while we're at. So make sure you follow the channel and hit that notification button. So you know exactly when we go live and you can watch me get roasted for two hours straight the news. Of this cheating scandal broke day after esl one Cologne finished is published an investigation and they say quote we were made aware that by taking a combination of different steps of Bogin Cisco allows the coach of a team to become a spectator anywhere on the map unbeknownst to anyone else and so yeah, this coaching exploit as it's being called basically allows a coach to place themselves anywhere on the map and then swivel their camera from side to side and theoretically take any info that they gather from that and give it to their players. It's basically one giant broken cypher cam like in foward. Check this ship. Now, the bombshell at the heart of ESL's investigation is the fact that they've proved coaches from heroic MIB are and hardly talk use this exploit at multiple different ESL events leading up to esl one Cologne. Three teams competing at the highest level of counterstrike cheated in the investigation is said that the exploit violated quote section six point ten, five use of glitches and quote of esl's Rupel to be very clear is says that all of this happened prior to the start of esl one Cologne and that in fact, the exploit was actually patched out prior to the tournament started, and so these rulings are the result of a long investigation that just happened to be published at the same time that he also Cologne was finishing. The investigation also says at what tournament the coaches abused the exploit hardly coach Makino gun use the exploit at esl one road to Rio on six maps in three matches Perot's coach. Used the exploit at Dream Hack master spring in ten rounds on one map and Coach dead used the exploit at ESL one road to Rio in one round on one map on Thursday September fourth former NRP IP coach Pita admitted to abusing the coaching exploits during an EP L. Match Against Mel Sports back in two thousand eighteen and like I mentioned off the top these aren't just some punk teams cheating their way through F pl or some shit. This is the highest level of competitive counterstrike, its coaches and players competing amongst the best of the best and being found guilty of cheating in an online tournament with a prize pool of three hundred, fifty, thousand dollars on top of. That her minutes to win the European portion of one Cologne and they look fucking doing dominating some of the best teams in the world magic going from heroes to cheaters in the span of twenty four hours and the way we know about this exploit and the fact that coaches have been abusing it over the last few months is thanks to freelance East Sports, referees, me Kaos Lewinsky and Steve Dudin off they spent dozens of hours poring over thousands of different demos and meticulously documenting any time they thought the export was being used a big props goes out to those guys now unfortunately, coaches abusing this. Is, not limited to esl vets beyond the summit recently put out a statement that says basically that dead the coach for Mbr was found guilty of using this exploit and beyond the summit six in the most damaging part of the statement is where they said that dead explicitly knew how to fix the exploit and continue to abuse it anyway quote de demonstrated he knew how to fix the glitch while maintaining competitive integrity prior to see US summit six online by requesting technical timeout disconnecting and reconnecting which happened in the May first of match versus Mb. At, ESL. One Road to Rio and then from there, they go on to say that quote dead knowingly abused the coach spectator glitch to obtain an unfair competitive advantage and ours lower bracket round three match versus triumph at summit, six online on June. Twenty third and quote yeah. That whole give him the benefit of the doubt type thing goes out the window on this. Now, as you can imagine, the punishments handed down in the response online was both fast and fierce. Here's ESL's punishments. All three coaches rox hunting is banned from competing and coaching an ESL events for a year. Dead is banned for six months and hard legions. Makino gun is banned for wapping twenty four months or a full two years on top of that all three teams will retroactively be disqualified from the tournament in question while also forfeiting both their esl pro tour points and the prize money earned from those tournaments man you sell is not fucking around and. Beyond the summit band dead from the next to be Vance while also retroactively disqualifying maybe from beyond the summit six and they basically have to forfeit their prize money as well. Now, at the time of recording this, hardly June is the only team that's released a public statement on the matter and they basically said that they've dropped mechanica quote yesterday we received. A letter from ESL announcing the decision to ban or coach for two years. It was difficult for us to believe in Alexander's guilt but we had to conduct a personal investigation of this situation based on the results of internal discussions. We decided that the punishment from ESL was fair. We refuse to make any appeal and we are staying in the side of. The tournament organizers and and predictably lot of the responses from the scene on online. A whole bunch of you gotta be fucking kidding from pros to analysts to popular content creators. Of course, Brazilian fans everybody is thoroughly pissed off, and honestly people should be pissed off because while this exploit doesn't involve all hacks or a mocks or some other stereotypical idea of. It still seriously undermines the competitive integrity of CS go

ESL Cologne RIO Coach Dead Makino United States MBR Mechanica Perot Vance Pita Kaos Lewinsky Alexander DE Steve Dudin
How to break up well

Ladies, We Need To Talk

05:44 min | 3 weeks ago

How to break up well

"In your own life have you ever had a good break up I just remember feeling. So angry I broke up with my boyfriend over skype when I was eighteen in a lecture uni. And then I broke into his house it was a pretty bad way to do it but. I have very fight for what you love mentality by the end. All I could think of was I need to get out of this narcan white food do not be around me any war. I. Would constantly tech when drunk, which is now in hindsight Divorce and breaking up can feel like the bloodiest dirtiest combat you'll ever thought experience in your whole life. and. Almost everyone on the planet has been through one in. Australia in twenty eighteen alone nearly fifty thousand dollars got divorced to put that into context in that same year about one hundred and twenty thousand people got married. I WanNa make something clear before we get going this. Is Not focused on domestic violence or abusive relationships. Where talking about run of the mill breakup which astill devastating? People lose homes amass great be debt for into addiction used their kids as collateral get depressed all bottle up all their feelings and totally not cope. and. Some of that has to do with the fact that popular narratives tell us that that's the way love goes when it ends its war or didn't count. Rarely away modeled the best. Case. Scenario divorce. So, what if they was a guide? What if you could break up better or dare I say it divorce? Well, what if the process didn't have to leave both parties wounded devastated and financially? I'm Jimmy Stein's. Ladies. We need to talk about how we can break up bit up. In two thousand eight, I split up with my partner. We had kids and a house together and there was mediation lawyers, child custody arrangements and it sucked. There's a bunch of stuff I wish I needed that I know now. So let's share it a practical guide to breaking up well. In this episode, we're going to talk to a US a psychologist and a lawyer who all have skin in the game when it comes to breakups and divorce. I think for a long time we just assumed that breakups were allowed to tardily rain of your eating habits, your drinking habits, sleeping habits, how you conducted yourself in terms of going completely. Lupi and and just feeling like a bracket with completely appropriate answer to that. This is Zoe foster blake she's an Australian author and entrepreneur. We're speaking to her because she's written a book called break-up boss. Though, he's married with a couple of kids. Settled and happy. But during her early twenties, she reckons she was the authority on bad breakup and in this ladies, we need to talk guide to better breakups. Zoe is going to start with a bit of what not to do. So I would go to his house in the middle of the night. Drink dial constantly I would stalk can be aggressive towards these new partner I would. Yeah it was cool. Everything that you're not supposed to do and we really we didn't give it together I don't. Consider your behavior, and that time isn't it really making years this person if you want to get back with them but I think it was a good listening going what not to do, and so we beat further break up I realized that that was embarrassing and it wasn't a true encapsulation of my character. I didn't think but I'd let my emotions and my fees and my panic, and probably my hang up is the better of me and I. Behaved in a way that I wasn't proud of it's a real relief to hear you say that because. We all do embarrassing things I. Think during a I don't want it to sound like I'm saying look you have to have for outward appearances control you suffer God's sake women conduct yourself in the proper it's not about that. It's about. Showing courage and strength at times that are really hard in your life and not just behaving irrationally or illegally just because you're angry at someone having been a bit of a break up monster a few times in my life I realize that there is a good in a bad way to do it the really important for me was the night contact because when you've got a clearing books and a clear hit spice and that mental real estate to process what's happening even though it hurts. I march. You can move forward and it's not so much even about the anger but it's just that sadness engraving can make us put into glasses on just wanna go backwards to feel safe again because we don't dismiss the person, we miss the rituals routines Sunday night dinners at their house the family you know everything that you lose when you lose a break-up. So you've got this massive gaping hole in your life now that you desperately want to fill again with what you love and no. So you just have to be strong in that time and night context is critical because if you keep trying to hang out with them or you don't want to be rude if they're hanging out with us shut night, do that for how long is I fifty days just to establish a routine in the habit

ZOE Partner Jimmy Stein Australia United States Lupi
Rose McGowan Claims Alyssa Milano Made the Charmed Set Toxic AF

Daily Pop

04:59 min | Last month

Rose McGowan Claims Alyssa Milano Made the Charmed Set Toxic AF

"There's is daily top. We have so many feuds to talk about today starting with rose McGowan claim that a listen the Llano. made the charm set toxic A. Okay this whole thing started as a political view, but then it got very personal rose accused of throwing fits in front of the crew on the set of charmed rose even says she cried every ten shows renewed because a listen made the set. So toxic in a statement to news listen. Milano said hurt people hurt people commenting any further doesn't align with my wellness plan we have not yet heard back from rose or or Warner, brothers, which produced charm. So a lot to unpack here. Again, it started off very political was a Democrat argument but then rose went there why he thinks she went there to bring charm to behavior. Look, hold. One hundred percent and if we're fighting and I'm holding a grudge against somebody I'm pulling out every receipt I don't care it. One Thousand Nine, hundred, ninety, nine, hundred. This is an audit. We're going to have this fight whether you like it or not. I guess that's true and also she's trying to discredit a list right? That's her way of saying like you shouldn't. You can listen to. Elissa because she's not as relatable as you think because listen to this she may two hundred thousand dollars a week on charm and was still throwing right she didn't get paid enough. It's like a way to discredit. I don't know. That is also. To your argument, sometimes, people will buy into that and be like absolutely. You know what? She's right rose you. If she's FELICIA's really as bad as you say that I'm listed work she says, but then other people can see right through that to say like obviously you have a grudge obviously, you don't like her you've made that very clear. You said it in an interview you do not like or. Do we really trust your opinion because it's obviously very biased. I just feel like this has become somewhat sticky with rose like we can just expect her to just go off and sort of sale of these things and quite frankly does anybody really care twenty years later if the listen. Milano through set like threw a fit onset of charms like I just don't think that's relevant to the conversation like none of us were there. None of us really really cared that much about how she behaved obviously, you want to be respectful to the crew and people that work really hard. To put on a production as we all know but we've all had bad days on this show I just feel like if in fifteen years, one of us were to be like well, she was impossible to deal with. It's like, okay. Then you should have said something then I feel like it's just so kind of in line with WHO rose is trying to be now and I'm not saying that she likes her and I'm not saying that she feels like she's credible or that she believes in anything she says. Every time someone says something that has nothing to do with you. That doesn't mean you need to go and jump in on it. And I, I hate to say this because I'm not away from everybody's experiences and I always say this you gotTa pick struggle and you've got to stick with that struggle and pick up a fight and fight as hard as you can. If you're fighting in the me too movement because it happened to you I totally get it. You're also writing because somebody was in a toxic work environment made something toxic fighting another break, and then what's next if something else comes up and you're fighting about that as well take you just take it away and makes it seem like you're only saying those things because. Of the week, right right and it's also like she made two, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars a week like made that much money. It was a hit show like I don't I also don't see how that's relevant. You know what I mean like you don't need to also bring up how much somebody made I. Don't think that that's her pleasure bill, but I will say. It rose McGowan felt leg she made. made the workplace toxic that are that's her feelings. That's her way of engaging and listened with tolerance to her. She don't have to do it over the air. She can do on the phone and just throw rose a my dad if I if you thought that way and I did that to you but I, don't think. Anymore. I don't think. I'm. Giving that apology I'm sorry I. Think we know a lot of different people not everybody has a good day I. Think People think just because you're on television or you're part of ensemble cast like your life is so easy. It's a lot of hard work that goes into this. So maybe she maybe she had a bad week or month or whatever. But there's a lot of people that we've experienced that can be toxic or disruptive or difficult to deal with. But that's just sort of this part of this dysfunctional family you keep that within yourself. You don't need to go and spread around and the and the truth is like the whole point rose trying to make was was again a political argument and so politics you know just keep arguing your facts and I think that's a fair argument to have. We argue politics stop in this country. So if you want to argue that with Eliza and you guys want to go back and forth about what who vote for do that. But I say again as you guys said, keep the history out of it because honestly just makes your arguments. Lesson weaker. We aren't just there's no right word. Thank point.

Rose Mcgowan Milano Warner Elissa Llano. Eliza
Giannulli sentenced to 5 months in college bribery scheme

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Giannulli sentenced to 5 months in college bribery scheme

"A famous couple who paid bribes impose their daughters on rowing machines to build fake athletic profiles are being sentenced in Boston fashion designer Mossimo G. a newly is been sentenced to five months in prison generally in his wife Lori Loughlin the actress who played aunt Becky on full house pleaded guilty in may to pay half a million dollars in bribes to get his two daughters into the university of southern California as roaming recruits they were arrested last year in the case dubbed operation varsity blues under the deal generally will pay two hundred fifty thousand dollar fine and perform two hundred fifty hours of community service Loughlin's deal calls for her to serve two months in prison U. S. district judge Nathaniel Gorton scolded the designer for what he described as breathtaking fraud made possible by his wealth and privilege I'm Jennifer king

Mossimo G. Lori Loughlin Nathaniel Gorton Fraud Jennifer King Boston University Of Southern Califor U. S.
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Lower Brule schools to begin fall with distance learning

Native America Calling

03:55 min | Last month

Lower Brule schools to begin fall with distance learning

"This is national native news Antonio Gonzales The bay. Mills. Indian community on. Wednesday was granted the right to intervene in an ongoing Michigan pipeline fight with tribes, environmental groups and community members. A judge's decision allows the tribe to take part in case, preceding, evaluating a permit application from the energy company and Bridge to the Michigan public. Service Commission according to a press release from justice, which is representing the tribe. This is the first time. A tribal nation has intervened in a preceding before the Michigan Public Service Commission, the Regulatory Agency as determining. If tunnel will be built under waterways for the relocation of a segment of the line. Five pipeline tribes are concerned about the environment water fisheries and religious and cultural sites in a statement bay. Mills Chairman Brian Newlyn said the pipeline puts treaty rights and way of life at risk line five is a six, hundred, forty, five mile pipeline which carries oil and natural gas traveling through. Michigan Wisconsin and Canada, the company maintains the pipeline is safe. The Michigan Public Service Commission. has scheduled a virtual public hearing together comments on August twenty fourth. Indian educators say they're in a tough bind in preparing for classes this fall many tribal communities continue to be under Copa Nineteen. Schools on the lower brule reservation in. South Dakota serve about three hundred K. through twelve students and are not taking any chances superintendent. Lance Witty says, distance learning has its own problems because of Internet access and many families live in crowded arrangements. Educators know the risk they face and fully reopening. Some health concerns here that are probably not as prevalent off the reservation. We'd. He says, they're starting the year with mostly distance learning, but students will be able to come in for evaluations with their teachers. In the meantime he says, they're focused on making sure students are prepared. She'll be the first time. Our students have had devices. For homes he says, they'll keep monitoring covid nineteen to help make decisions about how to. Classes. The Red Lake Tribal Council Minnesota recently established a cove in nineteen relief fund enrolled Red Lake citizens can apply for assistance chairman. Darrell CK explained the program in a video message program provides for payment in amount of one thousand dollars to each readily enrolled adult who was eighteen on or before July thirty first twenty twenty. because for the payment need to certify that they have suffered economic impacts through increased expenditures and or decreased income as a result couvert nineteen, the funds are intended to help people with rand food or other emergency cost due to the pandemic the tribe is continuing to operate under cove in nineteen emergency orders. This week, there were forty-three positive cases reported on the reservation. A second round of covid nineteen mass testing is underway. Thursday for tribal citizens, new? Mexico US senator, Tom Udall, and congresswoman deb Haaland. Or taking part in a native vote Pamela Thursday afternoon. The virtual panel discussion will focus on protecting voting rights and tribal communities. The lawmakers are expected to discuss the need to ensure native people have. To polls and address voting during covid nineteen other panelists include representatives from the native American Voters Alliance, Education Project, and let America vote. twenty-three federal tribal broadband grants have been awarded for twenty twenty. The national tribal broadband grants are intended to help communities, develop or expand high speed Internet. The funds range from forty to fifty thousand dollars for tribal communities across the country. The program is under the Interior Department's Office of Indian Energy and economic. Development I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Lance Witty Michigan Public Service Commis Michigan Mills Red Lake Tribal Council Minnes Antonio Gonzales Chairman Twenty Twenty Antonio Gonzalez Michigan Wisconsin South Dakota Darrell Ck Interior Department Brian Newlyn Red Lake
Wall Street Reacts to Biden-Harris Ticket

WSJ What's News

06:57 min | Last month

Wall Street Reacts to Biden-Harris Ticket

"Today Joe Biden and Kamala Harris made their first appearance together as running mates for the Democratic presidential ticket. CARMELA. As you all know is smart. She's tough. She's experienced. She's a proven fighter for the backbone of this country. The middle class for all those who are struggling to get into the middle class. Connell. Knows how to govern. She knows how to make the hard calls. She's ready to do this job on day one. After the most competitive primary in history. The country received a resounding message that Joe was the person to lead US forward. and. Joe. I'm so proud to stand with you. And I do so mindful. Of all the ROIC ambitious women before me. Who sacrifice determination and resilience makes my presence here today even possible. This is a moment. Of Real consequence for America, Harris's pick is historic and has prompted reactions from around the World Harris's father is Jamaican. Her mother is from India. She's the first black woman and the first woman of South Asian ancestry on a major party presidential ticket in the US Also, Reacting Wall Street. Financial leaders were anxiously awaiting Joe Biden's pick for vice president, our tech money and politics reporter Emily Glaser has been speaking to many of them and joins me now. So Emily you bet on the phone with business leaders all day. How would you characterize their reaction? This leaders are generally really happy that Comma Harris was chosen as Biden's VP pick for a couple of reasons. But basically, they view her as a pragmatic person or realist who while she has been tough on big. Business in the past looks at the nuance issues and takes each thing at a time versus having a blanket approach as you know, the wealthiest bad or big businesses bad. We've seen president trump and his campaign try to paint Senator Harris as a radical left wing Pick Wall Street doesn't seem to see it that way. Definitely not a lot of what I. Heard from folks on the phone text messages emails. But that she's moderate, she sent her even though people don't like using those words that much anymore and that's similar to how they think about Biden and a lot of the reasons why think financial leaders are happy and pleased and cheering on this Harris pick is that she does represent a move away from. The. Far Left Progressive Part of the Democratic Party the part that Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. Are In and so they're relieved that you know things like more financial regulation or really taking back see right now it's all about economic recovery and harassed and Biden have said they think big business is good if the economy recovers and business recovers, that's good for. Everybody. You know it's interesting because after Biden made his announcement yesterday, we heard Praise from people like Senator Warren and Senator Sanders. We know Senator Harris has pledged to be tough on big banks as California Attorney General. She pushed for a big settlement with banks for their role in the foreclosure crisis. What about her record makes Wall Street thinks she's a moderate. It's a great question look like you said, she's touted her tough on banks record. But when you actually break it down, what folks in the financial community are saying is that she's made no secret that there's wrongdoing she will prosecute her background as a prosecutor, but it's also important to keep in mind that her big bank settlement was very nuanced and she did claim a lot of credit for it got brought a lot to. The State of California but we had reported earlier last year that she wasn't always really doing as much of the substance of the negotiations and she was doing a lot that solidified. The Big Bank settlement is helping her record as a politician. So when I spoke with bankers and financial executives last night and today they were saying look she's GonNa take swings at us. We get that it's politics. We're not gonNA take it personally. When there's wrongdoing you know she says she's going to prosecute. We got that but she's not going to have a blanket approach as all banks are bad or all wealthy people are bad. What were some of her other policies on the campaign trail and what do they tell us about her stance toward the financial industry. Healthcare was a really big wine and let's not forget healthcare with the most important issue on the campaign trail. Now, in coronavirus times, it's shifted more to economic recovery. But Harris struggled with this event she failed to really clearly state what her plan was initially, and then once she did she basically said she would have a government run health care plan that would still allow for private insurers an even mentioned that she proposed taxing financial transactions to pay for that. Health care overhaul. So that's something that certainly is out there would really impact the financial sector. Another one that was really big was her so called three. I'm agenda in the beginning of the primary when she was on the trail, she often would attack president trump a lot but she changed strategies partway through an efforts to really appeal more to the every man, every woman and the middle class and mentioned things like gender pay equality breezing teacher salaries and things. Like that that she hoped would get her more voters. She's also being welcomed warmly from the tech world. What can you tell us about that? You know, let's not forget that Kamla Harris has been a politician California in the bay area for a while she was district attorney. She was Attorney General She's been California senator since two thousand sixteen she knows tech executives in Silicon Valley and his raise money from them for her races for a number of years she. Also, lives part time in southern. California with her husband Doug Hav who is an corporate entertainment lawyer. So she's got these deep ties to the media telecom tech and entertainment world folks that have fundraise for her for years. They know her they think she's tough but fair and are very excited and already planning fundraisers now that she's the VP pick, she's also shown that she can raise big bucks from Wall Street donors. How might that help the Biden campaign overall? I think it will help double down on a lot of the money that they need. I saw an invite for recent fundraiser that has the high amount at two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. This is big money we're talking about a lot of the Biden fundraisers in recent weeks have raised millions while Harris and Biden do overlap on a lot of donors whether from the financial tech media entertainment world, a lot of them have known. Harris. For a really long time supported her during the primary and may be willing to give even more money than they already have to the Biden campaign now that she's on the ticket.

Senator Harris Joe Biden California Senator Sanders Big Bank VP President Trump Carmela Elizabeth Warren United States Attorney Democratic Party Emily Glaser India Connell Roic America Vice President
Defund The Police??? - burst 01

The Midnight Patriots

20:58 min | 2 months ago

Defund The Police??? - burst 01

"Patriots Paul Spartan here from the Midnight Patriots. So, one of the. Feel about anchored now. When we started this insanity we always tell people. The reason we do this is because insomnia sucks almost as bad as tyranny. We would have these conversations between ourselves the group chats. Throws and things like that. We thought, hey man, you know we should just record a podcast but the more we looked the more expensive became. We Cross anger. Anger gives you all the tools you need to do this to make your voice heard and get your voice out there. You have an opinion you gotta use anchor everything from recording to editing to distribution that you'd be all the tools that you need. To allow you to record your podcast right for your phone or your computer. Anchor covers distribution by getting on. Apple. spotify and many many others I mean how you can make money right from your own podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need in one spot in one place simple and effective. So get yourself anchor make voice her. All Right Patriots welcome again to another episode of the Midnight Patriots. Here from the Mile High Command Center the paper to PRICELESS DOT COM studios. Of today, we're going to be discussing the defunding police movement an idea that has picked up steam recently has become a rallying cry for far left protesters, rioters and seemingly anarchist groups. And we wanted to put some thoughts out there about this It seems to me that. We have a problem that requires more of a solution than just defunding. Systemic racism in my opinion is Beth. now, some people would with that. That said. If the narrative that we're going to be that is being shoved down our throats is to be believe that people of Color of. All Ages? Seated shining see in this country are being quote hunted by racist armed hate-mongers. Now that said if if that is in fact, the case. Why would you wanNA define the one organization that has the legal authority in the equipment. To protect you. That seems like a pretty fall said, it seems like a false dichotomy false comparison a false premise to start conversation PHOENIX. What are your thoughts? You know I'm GonNa take this a step further. The phone, the police movement. That is going to move a certain direction and stop. Once, they have figured out that. The one entity. That has sworn upon their own life to defend. There's like. Is Actually doing the job. We. Look at Minneapolis looks. legit. Atlanta's for the three top of my head. All of them have the same premise of less defunding. On the police, define the police. It went a step further into. Let's abolish the police install a private. Very. Force. That has absolutely no training. As No understanding of each individual law that a grand jury a whatever. If. Going to try and paying on. A criminal, a offender, a day walker anybody. Whatever you WANNA call it. So. My name might taking this step further into the question is what exactly we're trying to de-fund. I. Do numerous other people and no. One can give me an answer. It's always just defined defunding. Okay. So Great. Now we have a narratives being Ramdan, our throat. When all in all actuality is, hey, let's just bringing this back to the wild west little set like men up. Yeah I mean that's exactly the way I. See it is if you're going to defend the police and define them then yeah. What we're GONNA have is is you know the your your proverbial gun show earth sugar your gunfight at high noon in the middle of the street. That said cryptic. What are your thoughts on the matter? While I mean if you go I, find that going to be very odd if they try and go wild west because you know the same group behind the protests in the defunding, the police are the same ones who want to raise taxes and have all these limitations on ammo and guns and everything else that. You're going to be able to do that. We're going to have to throw stones at each other. Because, they're going to keep trying to get rid of. Guns and AMMO. I mean. It's maximilian face with white gloves and We'll go back to sword fight fifth. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Because you know guns don't have near the range of a sword. A you know. That's an excellent point. I mean, they're they're trying to you know the presumptive destroyed comedy Slimy Joe. Biden. Has Basically announced that east common for the guns and they're going to basically raise taxes on firearms and ammunition to where they are completely unaffordable to anyone that's not in the billionaire boys You know that'd be that being said. How and how the me get to this point I mean you're you're talking about defunct not not obviously not us we think it's a crazy. Lunatics idea. What do they want to replace it with? I mean, let's let's be honest mental Minnesota in Minneapolis the same city council that saw fit to abolish the police department Arben has hired mercenaries for the private security force. Now. I see a far more disturbing outcome here boys, and that is that you know we have people acting with the fourth and backing of the law. And have no oath to uphold the constitution they're loyal only to money. That's a win win. If you're a leftist Marxist wants to light the constitution on fire because you have thugs running around at the under the color and force of law with automatic weapons. Now, if people think that trump is ending in in the army, what do you think's going to happen when we have quote unquote law enforcement that has no that are basically political puppets. Call that. KGB Custodio or exactly. Exactly. You'RE GONNA turn from. You know right now everybody's all up in. Arms with you know Military. Being, sent to Seattle and stuff like that like military forces or. Whatever that whatever they are that they're complaining about having martial law budget they wanNA with the funding this which are gonNA run into is you're actually GONNA run into mercenaries Latsis. You know either they're working for the buck or they think they're doing good by be judge jury and executioner for anybody they come across you know doing something they don't like because nobody can have their own opinion like and be civil about it. It's either you agree with me or you're wrong. that. You'RE GONNA run into all these fights and all these these vigilantes more or less that are going to sit there, and they're going to have guns and they're going to. Attack and kill innocent people just because they don't agree with what they think. About. Exactly. And like I said, that's a win win for Marxist politicians who have somehow seized power and now want want to run rampant over the constitutional whether we like it or not. I don't agree with with the with the with a lot of the things that bid the organization black lives matter stands for the organization to me is a self admitted Marxist. Violence approving organization now. I can't get kind the organization I. Don't think that any of US disagree the that black lives do matter just like every other. Form of life matters and regardless there everyone in this country is is is entitled to due process. I agree there's you know that there is race racism racism exists we we've seen. Plenty of it and I completely agree that that needs to go away. Of course, I'll ever. I do not believe that there is systematic I mean everybody. One way or another has the opportunity. And responsibility to themselves to. Get, the life that they want. Why agree that's? That's what that's what pursuit of happiness is all about. It's not the pursuit of joy quote unquote it was meant to the in that context as it context as written in the declaration of independence in the Constitution as pursuing your own circumstances. Working working to be what you want to be. I mean honestly I, you want to so defend the polices. The wrong way to go now do I think you know there are almost every state I can think of Over uses their budget. Or uses it incorrectly and find themselves up Shit Creek and some point now inside the funding the police. What should happen is that the police have you know? Better, I mean, honestly better training. Right I. Mean sometimes, you have the the. The police the Police Academy or whatever, and then you're thrown right out. You know on the beat with a superior or something like that, and obviously you being a fresh gumshoe sitting there dealing with somebody who's been on the force for a while you're learning from them. So you know if you get a bad cop as a superior, they're gonNA freak out because they don't know. To stop them, they don't know what to do. Because they're too worried about their job because there isn't training for that kind of thing. So I, I think that they need to revamp the training and they need to make every All officers that. that are serving should have to do. Something like a fresh training course or A. An up-to-date with all the changes that happen because we know societies like a computer, it's something it's out of date and six months. Air Every you know every year, every two years they have to get recertified training or something to that extent that just helps them. Update helps them mitigate the issues that they come across in a better way. You know take that. Then some of these God awful construction plans that they don't need to do like take Colorado's redoing stapleton. Oh God right spent millions of dollars. They're now you take that you invest in getting in creating another sub department doesn't the police but you get a another department that deals with you know Domestic domestic disturbances and. Family matters they can be counselors therapists whatever now they should have cops with them. You know in it is something that requires a police officer or Some sort of. Of Force or. Something that the police are trained for but I think some of these things like the people that do actually have mental health problems that. They you know they they don't have self-awareness were there at all they become crazy or something some of them would be able to. Diffuse the situation before a cop has to. Think that they're. Defending their life from somebody who's just acting rational because they just mentally aren't there. Well, that's the that's the real question is it is is that how how do we Do we define those situations because I'm going to get into a few things here after the after the break your boys and we will will continue on and I'm probably GonNa Piss a lot of the cops that I know off by some things going to get GonNa say so patriots stick with this year will be right back. Patriots is Paul sparking with a shameless plug for our New Year store. That's right. Midnight Patriots now offers t shirts, coffee mugs just about every other purchase where on your body the check it out go to shop midnight gatriways dot. com is way to both embrace your insomnia display your patriotism, and tell your governor to go himselves. So that Shop Dot Patriots Dot Com fifteen percent off right now for a limited time now back to the show. Okay. So as I mentioned in the previous segment, probably going to piss off a lot of cops that I know and I can't believe I'm actually going to say part of what I'm going to say. here in the Mile High Command. Center. We. Are. Unfortunately in the current being subjects of governor, jared police. Now I want to state unequivocally I. Have Zero problem that he is day openly that doesn't bother me a bit I don't care that he watches a different kind of porn than I do I don't care who he sleeps with. The guy's a timer. I gotta say I will criticize words do and I will give credit words do. Now, I'm not going to go over the whole article, but there was an article that recently appeared to the dead post about the some of the things that we were just talking about as a pretend to what I feel like our common sense police reforms. Now. I'm not GonNa Not GonNa read the article which but everybody can go look it up, Denver Post. dotcom can't believe I'm giving them pleader but. that. said. Cookie issues really stood up three sorry, three key issues really stood out for me in this legislation. Firstly that they're going to demilitarize a patrol police which I can't help but agree with okay If Your average ordinary citizen is not to not able to carry an AK47 or a ar fifteen around without being assaulted without being questioned by police than the police shouldn't have meter I don't have a problem with that and they said that the details are in the. Second. Is that. They have in fact. reinstituted or excuse me reduced. All immunity. Now, a lot of people may not know what qualified immunity is basically what allows cops to do what they do without any sort of fear of repercussion. So what? The Colorado Legislature has done is institute civilized ability for individual officers that are not accused but but found to be I don't WanNa say guilty but found responsible for the violation of an individual's civil civil liberties. And that liability is up to twenty five, thousand dollars per incident. Number three police are now held to the same standard that has gone on in corporate America in the private sector for. Decades You know we've all been through those work in the corporate world have all been through sexual harassment or bottomline harassment training okay. it's no stranger. It's that class that you have to. You have to guzzle coffee in and remain silent while world hold what sexual predators we are for. You know where we place our gaze to you know every other male male behavior that said as part of that training. What we're an abuse to is the idea of collusion what collusion means is that if you witnessed harassment or bullying or something that blatantly violates company policy or law. That if you don't come forward, report it and it's found out that you know about the new face, the same disciplinary measures as the offender. That includes that because liability Does your jobs. ETC etc.. and. This law requires that good cops deal with bad cops and report the. I don't see any of those three articles as a bad idea. Okay. Now, obviously being accused of something he's not the same as being guilty of it but. The at the very least, there is some sort of relief release mechanism or shooting relief mechanism there. To help solve the problem, a lot of people don't realize that the qualified immunity is not even really a statute. is a precedent put forward as. A. Means of fighting the drug war. which I won't get into that but that's complete total violation of the fourth minute. anyways. But it's part of a reduction of of constitutional liberties. that includes things like civil liability are shooting civil forfeiture asset forfeiture so Dumb any comments on that I mean I feel like those are good ways to actually start solving the problem as opposed to to complete quote defunding. are there issues with it certainly, but I think the mechanisms are in place to make it make closeable your thoughts. will allow me if I may. I'm going to step back, yours. You know maybe we can have social worker. With. Police escort as such. They, have. Like that in place in every department. The key of it is. There so understaffed that they cannot take on the type of workload that. A METRO AREA DENVER A. Atlanta Baltimore Mineapolis. They don't have the resources for that and. If I may be so fold. We have politicians in place in offers that hey, you can get by on a two hundred, fifty thousand dollars budget for the year for that program alone. It doesn't work like that well, then and to your point directly wouldn't that justify an increase in the overall police budget to put people like that in place as opposed to defunding will again you've gotta remember you're dealing with politicians that they can get it in their pocket. It's all just a day for them. Absolutely I agree with that cryptic your thoughts. Well, yeah and I mean that's kind of where I was going is that you know not defunding the police but. They need to instead of defunding them they need to add funds to them because to make those kinds of programs or to hire more people that they can. Do that they pay them. I mean. You know I know cops were scared life every day dealing with any of those situations I mean. In a sense, you need to pay the the therapist or the counseling or whoever those people are you need to pay them. A. In, a in a matter of speaking pay wage worth their life. Oh, absolutely I mean everybody got to eat. We all agree with that concept but job comes with certain wrists that they shouldn't be naive to. When walking into the situation I mean agree or disagree.

Midnight Patriots Minneapolis Paul Spartan Harassment Denver Police Academy Atlanta Patriots Mile High Command Center Beth. Phoenix Spotify Seattle Apple. United States Shit Creek Colorado Legislature Kgb Custodio Biden Officer
Defund The Police??? - burst 01

The Midnight Patriots

20:58 min | 2 months ago

Defund The Police??? - burst 01

"Patriots Paul Spartan here from the Midnight Patriots. So, one of the. Feel about anchored now. When we started this insanity we always tell people. The reason we do this is because insomnia sucks almost as bad as tyranny. We would have these conversations between ourselves the group chats. Throws and things like that. We thought, hey man, you know we should just record a podcast but the more we looked the more expensive became. We Cross anger. Anger gives you all the tools you need to do this to make your voice heard and get your voice out there. You have an opinion you gotta use anchor everything from recording to editing to distribution that you'd be all the tools that you need. To allow you to record your podcast right for your phone or your computer. Anchor covers distribution by getting on. Apple. spotify and many many others I mean how you can make money right from your own podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need in one spot in one place simple and effective. So get yourself anchor make voice her. All Right Patriots welcome again to another episode of the Midnight Patriots. Here from the Mile High Command Center the paper to PRICELESS DOT COM studios. Of today, we're going to be discussing the defunding police movement an idea that has picked up steam recently has become a rallying cry for far left protesters, rioters and seemingly anarchist groups. And we wanted to put some thoughts out there about this It seems to me that. We have a problem that requires more of a solution than just defunding. Systemic racism in my opinion is Beth. now, some people would with that. That said. If the narrative that we're going to be that is being shoved down our throats is to be believe that people of Color of. All Ages? Seated shining see in this country are being quote hunted by racist armed hate-mongers. Now that said if if that is in fact, the case. Why would you wanNA define the one organization that has the legal authority in the equipment. To protect you. That seems like a pretty fall said, it seems like a false dichotomy false comparison a false premise to start conversation PHOENIX. What are your thoughts? You know I'm GonNa take this a step further. The phone, the police movement. That is going to move a certain direction and stop. Once, they have figured out that. The one entity. That has sworn upon their own life to defend. There's like. Is Actually doing the job. We. Look at Minneapolis looks. legit. Atlanta's for the three top of my head. All of them have the same premise of less defunding. On the police, define the police. It went a step further into. Let's abolish the police install a private. Very. Force. That has absolutely no training. As No understanding of each individual law that a grand jury a whatever. If. Going to try and paying on. A criminal, a offender, a day walker anybody. Whatever you WANNA call it. So. My name might taking this step further into the question is what exactly we're trying to de-fund. I. Do numerous other people and no. One can give me an answer. It's always just defined defunding. Okay. So Great. Now we have a narratives being Ramdan, our throat. When all in all actuality is, hey, let's just bringing this back to the wild west little set like men up. Yeah I mean that's exactly the way I. See it is if you're going to defend the police and define them then yeah. What we're GONNA have is is you know the your your proverbial gun show earth sugar your gunfight at high noon in the middle of the street. That said cryptic. What are your thoughts on the matter? While I mean if you go I, find that going to be very odd if they try and go wild west because you know the same group behind the protests in the defunding, the police are the same ones who want to raise taxes and have all these limitations on ammo and guns and everything else that. You're going to be able to do that. We're going to have to throw stones at each other. Because, they're going to keep trying to get rid of. Guns and AMMO. I mean. It's maximilian face with white gloves and We'll go back to sword fight fifth. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Because you know guns don't have near the range of a sword. A you know. That's an excellent point. I mean, they're they're trying to you know the presumptive destroyed comedy Slimy Joe. Biden. Has Basically announced that east common for the guns and they're going to basically raise taxes on firearms and ammunition to where they are completely unaffordable to anyone that's not in the billionaire boys You know that'd be that being said. How and how the me get to this point I mean you're you're talking about defunct not not obviously not us we think it's a crazy. Lunatics idea. What do they want to replace it with? I mean, let's let's be honest mental Minnesota in Minneapolis the same city council that saw fit to abolish the police department Arben has hired mercenaries for the private security force. Now. I see a far more disturbing outcome here boys, and that is that you know we have people acting with the fourth and backing of the law. And have no oath to uphold the constitution they're loyal only to money. That's a win win. If you're a leftist Marxist wants to light the constitution on fire because you have thugs running around at the under the color and force of law with automatic weapons. Now, if people think that trump is ending in in the army, what do you think's going to happen when we have quote unquote law enforcement that has no that are basically political puppets. Call that. KGB Custodio or exactly. Exactly. You'RE GONNA turn from. You know right now everybody's all up in. Arms with you know Military. Being, sent to Seattle and stuff like that like military forces or. Whatever that whatever they are that they're complaining about having martial law budget they wanNA with the funding this which are gonNA run into is you're actually GONNA run into mercenaries Latsis. You know either they're working for the buck or they think they're doing good by be judge jury and executioner for anybody they come across you know doing something they don't like because nobody can have their own opinion like and be civil about it. It's either you agree with me or you're wrong. that. You'RE GONNA run into all these fights and all these these vigilantes more or less that are going to sit there, and they're going to have guns and they're going to. Attack and kill innocent people just because they don't agree with what they think. About. Exactly. And like I said, that's a win win for Marxist politicians who have somehow seized power and now want want to run rampant over the constitutional whether we like it or not. I don't agree with with the with the with a lot of the things that bid the organization black lives matter stands for the organization to me is a self admitted Marxist. Violence approving organization now. I can't get kind the organization I. Don't think that any of US disagree the that black lives do matter just like every other. Form of life matters and regardless there everyone in this country is is is entitled to due process. I agree there's you know that there is race racism racism exists we we've seen. Plenty of it and I completely agree that that needs to go away. Of course, I'll ever. I do not believe that there is systematic I mean everybody. One way or another has the opportunity. And responsibility to themselves to. Get, the life that they want. Why agree that's? That's what that's what pursuit of happiness is all about. It's not the pursuit of joy quote unquote it was meant to the in that context as it context as written in the declaration of independence in the Constitution as pursuing your own circumstances. Working working to be what you want to be. I mean honestly I, you want to so defend the polices. The wrong way to go now do I think you know there are almost every state I can think of Over uses their budget. Or uses it incorrectly and find themselves up Shit Creek and some point now inside the funding the police. What should happen is that the police have you know? Better, I mean, honestly better training. Right I. Mean sometimes, you have the the. The police the Police Academy or whatever, and then you're thrown right out. You know on the beat with a superior or something like that, and obviously you being a fresh gumshoe sitting there dealing with somebody who's been on the force for a while you're learning from them. So you know if you get a bad cop as a superior, they're gonNA freak out because they don't know. To stop them, they don't know what to do. Because they're too worried about their job because there isn't training for that kind of thing. So I, I think that they need to revamp the training and they need to make every All officers that. that are serving should have to do. Something like a fresh training course or A. An up-to-date with all the changes that happen because we know societies like a computer, it's something it's out of date and six months. Air Every you know every year, every two years they have to get recertified training or something to that extent that just helps them. Update helps them mitigate the issues that they come across in a better way. You know take that. Then some of these God awful construction plans that they don't need to do like take Colorado's redoing stapleton. Oh God right spent millions of dollars. They're now you take that you invest in getting in creating another sub department doesn't the police but you get a another department that deals with you know Domestic domestic disturbances and. Family matters they can be counselors therapists whatever now they should have cops with them. You know in it is something that requires a police officer or Some sort of. Of Force or. Something that the police are trained for but I think some of these things like the people that do actually have mental health problems that. They you know they they don't have self-awareness were there at all they become crazy or something some of them would be able to. Diffuse the situation before a cop has to. Think that they're. Defending their life from somebody who's just acting rational because they just mentally aren't there. Well, that's the that's the real question is it is is that how how do we Do we define those situations because I'm going to get into a few things here after the after the break your boys and we will will continue on and I'm probably GonNa Piss a lot of the cops that I know off by some things going to get GonNa say so patriots stick with this year will be right back. Patriots is Paul sparking with a shameless plug for our New Year store. That's right. Midnight Patriots now offers t shirts, coffee mugs just about every other purchase where on your body the check it out go to shop midnight gatriways dot. com is way to both embrace your insomnia display your patriotism, and tell your governor to go himselves. So that Shop Dot Patriots Dot Com fifteen percent off right now for a limited time now back to the show. Okay. So as I mentioned in the previous segment, probably going to piss off a lot of cops that I know and I can't believe I'm actually going to say part of what I'm going to say. here in the Mile High Command. Center. We. Are. Unfortunately in the current being subjects of governor, jared police. Now I want to state unequivocally I. Have Zero problem that he is day openly that doesn't bother me a bit I don't care that he watches a different kind of porn than I do I don't care who he sleeps with. The guy's a timer. I gotta say I will criticize words do and I will give credit words do. Now, I'm not going to go over the whole article, but there was an article that recently appeared to the dead post about the some of the things that we were just talking about as a pretend to what I feel like our common sense police reforms. Now. I'm not GonNa Not GonNa read the article which but everybody can go look it up, Denver Post. dotcom can't believe I'm giving them pleader but. that. said. Cookie issues really stood up three sorry, three key issues really stood out for me in this legislation. Firstly that they're going to demilitarize a patrol police which I can't help but agree with okay If Your average ordinary citizen is not to not able to carry an AK47 or a ar fifteen around without being assaulted without being questioned by police than the police shouldn't have meter I don't have a problem with that and they said that the details are in the. Second. Is that. They have in fact. reinstituted or excuse me reduced. All immunity. Now, a lot of people may not know what qualified immunity is basically what allows cops to do what they do without any sort of fear of repercussion. So what? The Colorado Legislature has done is institute civilized ability for individual officers that are not accused but but found to be I don't WanNa say guilty but found responsible for the violation of an individual's civil civil liberties. And that liability is up to twenty five, thousand dollars per incident. Number three police are now held to the same standard that has gone on in corporate America in the private sector for. Decades You know we've all been through those work in the corporate world have all been through sexual harassment or bottomline harassment training okay. it's no stranger. It's that class that you have to. You have to guzzle coffee in and remain silent while world hold what sexual predators we are for. You know where we place our gaze to you know every other male male behavior that said as part of that training. What we're an abuse to is the idea of collusion what collusion means is that if you witnessed harassment or bullying or something that blatantly violates company policy or law. That if you don't come forward, report it and it's found out that you know about the new face, the same disciplinary measures as the offender. That includes that because liability Does your jobs. ETC etc.. and. This law requires that good cops deal with bad cops and report the. I don't see any of those three articles as a bad idea. Okay. Now, obviously being accused of something he's not the same as being guilty of it but. The at the very least, there is some sort of relief release mechanism or shooting relief mechanism there. To help solve the problem, a lot of people don't realize that the qualified immunity is not even really a statute. is a precedent put forward as. A. Means of fighting the drug war. which I won't get into that but that's complete total violation of the fourth minute. anyways. But it's part of a reduction of of constitutional liberties. that includes things like civil liability are shooting civil forfeiture asset forfeiture so Dumb any comments on that I mean I feel like those are good ways to actually start solving the problem as opposed to to complete quote defunding. are there issues with it certainly, but I think the mechanisms are in place to make it make closeable your thoughts. will allow me if I may. I'm going to step back, yours. You know maybe we can have social worker. With. Police escort as such. They, have. Like that in place in every department. The key of it is. There so understaffed that they cannot take on the type of workload that. A METRO AREA DENVER A. Atlanta Baltimore Mineapolis. They don't have the resources for that and. If I may be so fold. We have politicians in place in offers that hey, you can get by on a two hundred, fifty thousand dollars budget for the year for that program alone. It doesn't work like that well, then and to your point directly wouldn't that justify an increase in the overall police budget to put people like that in place as opposed to defunding will again you've gotta remember you're dealing with politicians that they can get it in their pocket. It's all just a day for them. Absolutely I agree with that cryptic your thoughts. Well, yeah and I mean that's kind of where I was going is that you know not defunding the police but. They need to instead of defunding them they need to add funds to them because to make those kinds of programs or to hire more people that they can. Do that they pay them. I mean. You know I know cops were scared life every day dealing with any of those situations I mean. In a sense, you need to pay the the therapist or the counseling or whoever those people are you need to pay them. A. In, a in a matter of speaking pay wage worth their life. Oh, absolutely I mean everybody got to eat. We all agree with that concept but job comes with certain wrists that they shouldn't be naive to. When walking into the situation I mean agree or disagree.

Midnight Patriots Minneapolis Paul Spartan Harassment Denver Police Academy Atlanta Patriots Mile High Command Center Beth. Phoenix Spotify Seattle Apple. United States Shit Creek Colorado Legislature Kgb Custodio Biden Officer
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Not to exceed fifty thousand dollars. So at one hundred grand of account balance you can borrow fifty at two hundred grand you can borrow fifty five hundred grand borrow fifty. Now, you must repay the loan. And it must be repaid over a maximum of five years with at least quarterly instalments, but most companies are going to take the money out of your check every single month. And if you default. You get tagged with a big income tax Bill and penalties. If you're under fifty nine and a half. Now, usually while people are still working the companies taking the loan payments out of their check and everything's fine. But if the company goes into downsize mode, are you find another job or you quit? You get fired. You get laid off all of a sudden you find yourself with a big problem. And that is you'll have sixty days. And that's it. If you can't get that money put back in to the plan. Well, then say a sixty day period of time. And payback that loan you're going to have an ordinary income tax. It. Now, I've been criticized by many inside and outside the financial services industry because I have been a strong proponent of using 4._0._1._K loans to lower your other high interest rate debt. Sixteen eighteen twenty two percent credit card. Or maybe an automobile loan. That's that's killing you financially. Speaking. But you always must be prepared in the event. You lose your job. How you're gonna pay that thing back. Now, there.

Sixteen eighteen twenty two pe fifty thousand dollars five years sixty days sixty day
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Fifty thousand dollars that he says will go toward areas schools and religious groups with hopes the fair will draw some forty thousand people from the area Jackie page. WWW NewsRadio nine fifty. Stargate January seventh. Not many astronomical objects are also units of measurement. But one that is stands in the east at nightfall near the tip of one of the horns of Taurus the bull. You need a telescope to see the crab nebula because it's not very bright at visible wavelengths in xrays, though. It's one of the brightest objects in the sky. In fact, is x Ray brightness is defined as one crab the basic unit for the brightness of all x Ray targets. The nebula is the remnants of a supernova a massive star. That blasted itself to bits almost a millennium ago as seen from earth shock waves from the expanding debris heat gas and dust causing them to emit x rays. More xrays come from electrons that are spiraling through the powerful magnetic field generated by the stars. Dead core studying the xrays helps strana immerse piece together the history of the star. And the process of its destruction. They reveal the chemical composition of some of the stars debris, which was produced in the star itself and during its demise. And they help trace the magnetic field that weaves through the nebula. In fact, x-rays are important tools for studying many of the most powerful objects and events in the universe, which can reach temperatures of hundreds of millions of degrees. Hyder objects produce radiation at shorter wavelengths with the hottest producing the shortest wavelengths of all especially x-rays more about x Ray astronomy tomorrow. Starting w w j is made possible by Cranbrook institute of science metro Detroit explores the natural wonders of the universe through changing exhibits programs and planetarium shows. Now, a Bloomberg business report from the suburban Cadillac Buick. This this debt clicks may.

Ray Cranbrook institute of science Bloomberg Detroit Hyder Buick Fifty thousand dollars
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Fifty thousand dollars. Word the word freedom from. If you live and work in city county in Denver like, I do I actually play Denver city income tax. And it's not even worth me trying to spend my time to get back at the end of the year. I forget what it is. I might pay one hundred and forty bucks or something and income tax in Denver. And I never tried to get it back because it's not worth the time and the effort my time's worth more than one hundred forty bucks an hour. And then probably take me two hours even using turbotax to fill out the forms to get the money back. I'll check this year and see if that's still true. So I've contributed to this free shuttle service if you've ever shopped in the city and county Denver, and you've paid a sales tax which you have. You're paying for this. It is not free. Why do we always say something is free when it is never free? Somebody has to pay the freight for this. And I don't know who I'm more upset with the the media that keeps touting this as a free service. Ford Motor Company that is actually taking two hundred fifty thousand dollars taxpayer money and using this to provide a free service because you know, Ford's not doing it for nothing. So there's gotta be a profit motive somewhere for Ford for the subsidiary afford to make some sort of money. Unless of course, I would guess I could argue that chariot might be a nonprofit arm of Ford Motor Company, and they're willing to take a loss because then they can write that lost their taxes. City government bills a service. Brandon city shuttle is a coveted solution to the first and last mile gaps. Those are the spaces between the bus train, stop, and your origin or destination. I have a suggestion. If you are using public transport transportation, which is already being subsidized by the taxpayers anyway. So when you pay your little whatever you paid ride the RTD, whether you right, you're riding a bus. You're writing the light rail, whatever you're writing, whatever, you're paying Garin rest assured, the rest of us are subsidizing the fair that you are paying. So you're not paying your full fare share. Remember, we're always hearing about people need to pay their fair share with all of you using light rail or RTD, you're not paying your fair share because the rest of us are subsidizing your fair. And then here's where other irritates me. If you are using RTD. And you can't get from the last bus, stop or RTD or light rail. Stop. And you can't get from there to your house or your home. What's called the last mile? Walk. Right. A bike. Call an Uber. Call a taxi. Why should we also subsidize your last mile, well, Michael? But Michael, I'm poor. I'm poor. I can't afford to go that last mile. Maybe just maybe. Did you get a bike? Maybe just maybe you walk. You know, there's some people hear stories about this all the time people that walk miles and miles to a job because they can't afford a car for a while until they walk because we're trying to save the money for a car or maybe they're trying to save up money to buy an RTD pass. I don't know..

RTD Denver Ford Motor Company city county Michael two hundred fifty thousand dol Fifty thousand dollars two hours
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Twenty to fifty thousand dollars. Hormones tend to be a little cheaper, there's ways to do it, but in something that can be accumulative cost over the course of our lifetime. And so that can also get really expensive. You would said depending on where you live a great deal of this may be covered by insurance then. Yeah, that's one of the major changes that have happened probably in the last five to ten years that. The feeling has really been that patients who have the what the psychiatrist from gender dysphoric, but we not call gender incongruence. So it's a, it's a condition which their lives can't be happy. It's not a preference. It's not as better surgery. It's a critical surgeries, you know, for their life just as you might say, heart surgery or that cancer surveys or some other kind of surgery. And I think once we came to that realization, sort of naturally followed that these two should be covered. You know, this is something that's important to pay since that's important for their life and their wellbeing, and it's not just something that they're doing for fun or for other reasons. And then again, from that perspective, I think absolutely insurances should cover, and this is something that patients need to have done to feel that it's important to them. The way you described gender affirmation is very different than a lot of the way people. Conceive it, they think it's choice and you describe it, how would you, how would you explain that to somebody? How would you get that across to them that that's not a choice that it's an assessing. Somebody does somebody somebody that doesn't understand why someone would go through that. Yeah. I mean, they've been a lot of really good study showing that if you feel that your body is not your body creates a lot of psychiatric this is it's a depression anxiety and which in turn can have systemic problems, you know, leading to like hypertension or coronary disease and all of the body stress responses. So like it's clear that one, if you're healing that you're in the wrong body and that you have, you know this gender dysphoric or gender incongruent has major physical effects and to increasing. We sewn that these surgeries change. So the natural history or change the outcomes for these patients. So if you do the surgery, you know they're like psychiatric conditions, it's depression. Anxiety are Levy it substantially the medical conditions follow from these. Pencils, Kathy problems also Levy it'd I mean, in my mind, there's no question that this condition percents conditions, right word has like massive effects on the body, and it's something that's doctors we can fixed. So why shouldn't there too? Yeah, I'm I other Dhiraj. I'm just kind of stunned right now. It's just in a wonderful way of those points across, and they hope to listeners really take that to heart dress, not only in their own lives, but the people around them who are considering transgender becoming transitioning into a different gender as this is who they are not choice so it can cause other problems. We've seen it with suicide rates. We've seen him with being kicked out of homes and stuff like that. So losing friends and family over this is a big choice. Some people have to make a special convention states, but it goes across everything. I'm not gonna say anything more. This. Has been the Brown and Brown cow show. We'll be back just after a few minutes. We're going to start talking about age and gender reassignment surgeries or other JJ and gender major greasy and already learning. We'll.

Levy Brown depression hypertension Kathy fifty thousand dollars ten years
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Two hundred and fifty thousand dollars so if he had been in a car accident that day that have been his fault, everything would have been, gone, or, potentially, gone it, scared him so, much he, refused, to leave the. Offices until we helped him correct that through his insurance company and it was Was very easy to do and not only did we help them get the proper protection we showed him, how? To restructure it in such a way that it didn't cost him near as much? As, he thought he did so that's what we. Do with every single. One of our clients Keith I get that the issue here is is that you know people are thinking well what, do you guys do car. Insurance home owner's liabilities that what. We do for clients Nope no but, we analyzed that that's right you know we're, not we're not the world's, foremost experts in all the areas. Of your model because nobody can. Be an expert you need to have a team around? You and that's why we're we what. We call ourselves as the macro manager of our clients live now we're, experts in some areas of the model, some products that that we provide for our clients whether it's money management. Insurance different different insurance products alternative investments whatever may be but we covered the entirety or, the full gamut of what people are doing. Financially because it's super important. That they have all their TS crossed all their is dotted right what's important that people, need to understand And about the macro manager is. Our job is not to bring you and put you on the model and then help you fire every visor you have that would. Not be beneficial so what we do is utilizing the model we. Help, you analyze what the current advisors are, doing for you or, what you're doing, for, yourself in we're gonna find? Weaknesses or areas of your model that could create uncertainties down? The. Road, and our job is. To help. You eliminate, those uncertainties. Not to fire the people who may have created them so in many instances what surprises our newest clients. Are that we will sit down and help, you restructure and analyze what, an adviser is doing for you and then perhaps send you back. To that same adviser with some strategies and ideas, to make that process work better so the funny, part about all this, is, that as I'm sitting, in dopey, and for the, ones that have come off of the radio and thank you very much for meeting with us we appreciate your business and we appreciate working with you obviously the funny, part? Of a about all this is that They're, very very surprised I would say the scope and the The, maximum, association theory that we bring to them? Rather than just hey what's the newest latest and greatest product and that's what that's what I hear from most of the people that are either on the radio and TV, shows it's, what product are you going. To be able to you. Know put it in my. Life that's gonna make me success there is no such thing so let's help our. Listeners, kind of understand how we think about the protection area obviously maximum protection for the minimum cost is always what we think because we want to. Bring? In as much cost savings to our clients as, possible? Right so I don't know. The fifteen. Percent. Savings thing right you hear on. The, TV that's right you you need to be saving money obviously, you're not going to create wealth if you're not saving money and I like it. Back to the early days when we started working with computers and I remember taking some courses on doing some computer programming and I remember the phrase junk in junk out in the, idea being as if you didn't set up. That programming correctly you never going, to get, a good. Result same thing in your financial world That.

Keith fifty thousand dollars
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Thousand dollars a year four hundred and fifty thousand dollars so he finally retires and he is released from the payments legally because he retired in two thousand ten was the agreement when he retired yeah stopped exactly years and years and years go by and morris county probation service that handles all this says that they just discovered that he had missed a payment and he says that's impossible that i missed a payment it was automatically taken out you never saw the money right he saying you guys are the ones who got the money yeah so if it's missing your fault not mine right he goes back through his records and sure enough the very final payout that was supposed to be paid out was twelve hundred and fifty dollars on november thirtieth twenty ten that was the final payment it was taken from his wages and he's now saying they are insisting that i must pay again and are threatening with court action for this oh for the payment and outstanding interest on the money all the way back for eight years and a lean on top of that he prints out his records he goes in person he shows them all this they say yep yep that was definitely taken out but she never got the money so you have to pay again he says no no no i never got the money if she never got the money and it came out of my check that means a went through your hands you guys didn't pay not nothing to do with me and they said that you have to pay he says i already paid it and this goes on and on like this this actually was in this bamboozled column which ends with reviewed a letter from probation the court order ending the alimony payments in two thousand ten indeed it shows the twelve hundred and fifty was garnish we reach out to the court sharing the evidence to see if it could free this guy from the payment a few days later he finally gets a phone call was one of the employees ease and it was not encouraging according to the man she denied that she or any colleagues ever told me i would still have to still pay the lost alimony payments again irrespective of the evidence of my pay stub but the employees also said that without a new order acknowledgement the missing payment would remain on his record as if he's like some deadbeat all very confusing crap but all i know is when i got to the point in that story early on when it was four hundred fifty thousand dollars all i could think is why do we even still have alimony especially for that length of time fifteen years of alimony and she couldn't find a job exactly fifteen years and this is one of the lucky guys there are some cases still on the books that its lifetime alimony is bill said even once you're retired you still have to keep paying even if you got a pension you have to give her half and then still pay more off of your hat where she's making more than you are from from job you had all these years and you know i think in very rare cases the only cases i could see alimony making senses if the woman were disabled and unable to work and you knew this either going in or for a long long part of the marriage before the divorce if the circumstances were you know a very very old marriage where they had always agreed that she would never ever work and they were together fifty years say you know like a couple of almost eighty and then they get divorced i can understand that but for the average divorce case in new jersey those aren't the averages and the average divorce case the woman is perfectly capable of working and it's basically babying woman to say that she needs alimony it's treating women like children to say that there should be any sort of long term alimony so we wanna know do you think long term alimony should even exist anymore and who has what guys or women have a horror story about alimony one eight hundred two eight three one zero one point five three eighteen here's new jersey fast traffic heads up of your.

fifteen years four hundred fifty thousand do fifty thousand dollars Thousand dollars fifty dollars eight years fifty years
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Hundred fifty thousand dollars two months later ten republican agee's wrote this letter to the trump administration calling for a federal ban on online gambling adolescents biggest competition where we are gun know we we met bill newton neta very different kind of conference for state based consumer advocates in the basement of a dc hotel newton doesn't have corporate cash here's what happens when he wants to meet with his state ag florida's pam bondi your only option is to fill out a form on the website and click submit if that happened anything happens it's not just the republicans democratic agee's are courted by trial lawyers and lobbyists to wet more modest receptions like this one in washington dc marquette university's all no let they're not just giving money out of charity they're expecting something out of this both sides dispute that ragas tell cbs news it quote has been successful in supporting candidates that will defend the rule of law republican attorneys general have this mindset and that's what drives their actions nothing else these agee's do a lot more than just decide who to prosecute and who to ignore they can have a big influence on policy at the state level and if they band together at the federal level and of course there are limits on how much these companies can give an individual politician but there's no limit on how much they can give an association like ragas and depending on the state some of these agencies don't even have to report the fancy trips or how much they cost nancy cortes reporting tonight we'll update the bay bridge snafu in the mess in emoryville that's causing all traffic is on the way kcbs news time eleven thirty.

agee newton marquette university cbs nancy cortes bill newton neta washington Hundred fifty thousand dollars two months
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"She put in fifty thousand dollars because that's very typical fifty and one hundred are the two most common amounts more hundreds and fifties but that's okay and so she probably had if she was getting thirty six hundred a month that's forty three thousand so that's eighty six thousand so she probably had a death benefit eighty six thousand dollars so here she put in fifty could get that back anytime she needed it was liquid available to her if she changed her mind or be needed it for or part of it for some other reason we really see very rarely see people actually just solve it you know they they might take a little bit out and put it back but anyway but she could and then the death benefit would have been eighty six thousand dollars that means that what she put it in and if if six months later she suffered a massive stroke and passed away that fifty thousand dollars would've turned into eighty six or gone to her heirs tax free that's not a bad thing she posted away stroke is exactly and that's what we're talking about here so so so so that was fine and she really she had a history of years with not using that account or anything so that worked out but knowing that but knowing that the eighty six thousand would be would be worth for long term care eighty six thousand twice over additionally which is two hundred and forty fifty thousand eighty six thousand types three times three hundred rafter two hundred so when she put the to the fifty thousand dollars in she knew that she would get that fifty that eighty six thousand was the death benefit she would be able to draw that out over two years which came out of the thirty six thousand six hundred dollars a month and any of that that she didn't use would go to her air so she's bad sixty thousand of it twenty thousand would be leftover for now all of this tax free yeah now she could run through the whole thing and more besides as the insurance company digs now if they don't get any that's not true what was that true.

fifty thousand dollars eighty six thousand dollars thirty six thousand six hundre six months two years
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hundred and fifty thousand dollars would pay an additional twenty five hundred dollars per year in taxes those with homes weren't five hundred thousand would pay an additional five thousand dollars a year those with home's worth one million dollars would pay an additional ten thousand a year for thirty years on top of existing taxes further more you would not be able to escape this by selling your house and leaving you know why you're not gonna be able to sell your house nobody's gonna buy your house in chicago with this kind of taxation on it and the people that that come up with these rules this this is the reasoning from the federal reserve bank of chicago new taxes would not affect people thinking of moving to eleanor while they would have to pay higher property taxes that would be offset by not having to pay as much for their new homes in addition current homeowners would not be able to avoid the new tax by selling their homes and moving because home prices should reflect the new tax burden quickly in other words they fully expect the value of you in chicago illinois who own your home's the value of those homes to plummet with the application of these new property taxes so people arriving in the state are going to be able to afford your house because you're going to have to practically give it away which means you're going to lose every bit of equity and wealth you have in your house if you try to sell it and leave current homeowners would not be able to avoid the new tax by selling their homes and moving because home prices should reflect the new tax burden that means nobody's gonna wanna buy they are admitting they're admitting that the dynamic results of this is going to be to destroy the eleanor housing market but that they have to do it to come up with some money to help fund underfunded pensions so in other words they're just gonna confiscate wealth from current homeowners because they will pay whether they stay or not through an immediate reduction in home value this proposed tax will only address five state pensions there are six hundred and fifty other tensions in illinois particularly those who overlap jurisdictions in chicago which grossly underfunded.

chicago illinois eleanor twenty five hundred dollars fifty thousand dollars five thousand dollars one million dollars thirty years
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Hundred and fifty thousand dollars would pay an additional twenty five hundred dollars per year in taxes those with homes weren't five hundred thousand would pay an additional five thousand dollars a year those with home's worth one million dollars would pay an additional ten thousand a year for thirty years on top of existing taxes further more you would not be able to escape this by selling your house and leaving you know why you're not gonna be able to sell your house nobody's gonna buy your house in chicago with this kind of taxation on it and the people that that come up with these rules this this is the reasoning from the federal reserve bank of chicago new taxes would not affect people thinking of moving to illinois while they would have to pay higher property taxes that would be offset by not having to pay as much for their new homes in addition current homeowners would not be able to avoid the new tax by selling their homes and moving because home prices should reflect the new tax burden quickly in other words they fully expect the value of you in chicago illinois who own your home's value of those homes to plummet with the application of these new property taxes so people arriving in the state are going to be able to afford your house because you're going to have to practically give it away which means you're going to lose every bit of equity and wealth you have in your house if you try to sell it and leave current homeowners would not be able to avoid the new tax by selling their homes and moving because home prices should reflect the new tax burden that means nobody's gonna wanna buy they are admitting they're admitting that the dynamic results of this is going to be to destroy the eleanor housing market but that they have to do it to come up with some money to help fund underfunded pensions so in other words they're just gonna confiscate wealth from current homeowners because they will pay whether they stay or not through an immediate reduction in home value this proposed tax will only address five state pensions there are six hundred and fifty other pensions in illinois particularly those who overlap jurisdictions in chicago which are grossly underfunded.

chicago illinois twenty five hundred dollars fifty thousand dollars five thousand dollars one million dollars thirty years
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Dumb People Town

Dumb People Town

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Dumb People Town

"Zayn pile of pasta on lasagna night and a team os that she got squirted stuff on her hand and cannot go to work a couple of months she is suing for fifty thousand dollars yes those double jason fifty thousand it also kind of feels like she'll settle like it's enough amount where you're gonna settle at my at my over twentyfive she should settle for like free pasta for life that's bottomless breads or where to put your goddamn hand when you're or a an oven mitt like they should learn how to evaluate a situation this looks hot yeah i mean i'm sure smoke was coming out of it you dummy if it judgment if it was that hot there definitely was like smoke coming this is all her again we are far as we know dude right there is no way it wasn't also why do you just stick a fork into lasagna you trying to take the top layer fan dummy this is it you take a knife knife and a fork scenarios yeah all right there you go that's a many guys that's a many guys school yeah old school many i actually like it we should just throw these in every once in a while because it is fun just to the three of us agreed we have great guests coming up by the way sarah silverman i believe next week so check that out and guys rate and review this podcast we can always keep going up higher come see us in chicago and in oklahoma west silence springs cherokee casino on the fifth of may and the fourth is in chicago yet north bar get your tickets now because those shows are selling it we are close to those shows that i want to tell people to because people would hit us up i think they will be able to release some tickets that day of for the podcast right if you missed out on that come to the standard shift susan it'd be so much fun and we'll probably do a little people town something fun and they'll they'll be three of us will throw in something fun for you if you get shut out of the podcast for sure.

jason chicago sarah silverman oklahoma fifty thousand dollars
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"She put in fifty thousand dollars because that's very typical fifty and one hundred are the two most common amounts more hundreds and fifties but that's okay and so she probably had said she was getting thirty six hundred a month that's thousands so that's eighty six thousand so she probably had a death benefit of eighty six thousand dollars so here she put in fifty could get that back anytime she needed it was liquid available to her if she changed her mind or be needed for part of it for some other reason we really see very rarely see people actually solve it you know they they might take a little bit out and put it back but anyway but she could and then the death benefit would have been eighty six thousand dollars that means that what she put it in and if if six months later she suffered a massive stroke and passed away that fifty thousand dollars would've turned into eighty six and gone to her heirs tax free right that's not a bad thing away a stroke is exactly and that's what we're talking about here so so so so that was fine and she really had a history of years with not using that account or anything so that worked out but knowing that but knowing that the eighty six thousand would be would be worth for long term care eighty six thousand twice over additionally which is two hundred and forty fifty thousand eighty six thousand types three times three hundred and fifty roughly two hundred so when she put the to the fifty thousand dollars in she knew that she would get that fifty that eighty six thousand was the death benefit she would be able to draw that out over two years which came out to the thirty six thousand six hundred dollars a month and any of that that she didn't use would go to her air so if she spent sixty thousand of it twenty thousand would be leftover for her heirs now all of this tax free yeah now she could run through the whole thing and more besides as the insurance company digs now if that's the case the that's.

fifty thousand dollars eighty six thousand dollars thirty six thousand six hundre six months two years
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Hundred and fifty thousand dollars we can very reasonably expect that overtime and not won't probably take all that much time we'll see this cost drop rather dramatically so yes we agree with warren buffett that future generations standard of living is going to be better than prior generations standard of living which has been the case with pretty much every generation throughout tie but there is a bit of bad news a little bit of contradiction to warren buffett's message and it comes from a new survey from td ameritrade they surveyed members of gen acts that you that's my enemies and these are people ages thirty nine to fifty three these are the children of baby boomers and the genetics generation according to td ameritrade thirty seven percent of them that's more than one out of three will never be able to afford to retire uh and ballet forty three percent of them admit that they are behind in their savings forty nine percent of them are worried they're going to run out of money if they stopped work and two out of ten of them say they aren't doing anything right now to save for the future that is really really scary and and think about all said these are the generation of people whose parents are the boomers they're going to be meeting k her here in the future they're gonna be needing help so don't put yourself in the position where you can't even afford your own lifestyle 'cause.

warren buffett baby boomers fifty thousand dollars thirty seven percent forty three percent forty nine percent
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"And fifty thousand dollars which is interesting because an area like seattle and belbey in puget sound a lot of houses of course that's kind of a starter home price and so that will affect a lot of people here won't affect people in most of the country but again california washington new york places where prices are higher that's definitely going to affect them there one interesting thing i noted when this was going through the political ramifications of this donald trump did not in the republicans did not do well in states like new york and california will which of the ones that guy hammered the most in the item i see the actions new york and california si edge father kind of interesting that i think there's a little political targeting going on there but uh swelled opinion on that could we also talked about not just acquisition debt but refinanced it yeah in the past um you could deduct debt on refinance up two hundred thousand dollars that is now gone so if you get a second mortgage or refinance dead lines of credit what we're saying here is that a good direction on the interest may be gone it's so there's in me some planning around getting mortgages now i think we didn't have before yeah and also really keeping track of the sources of the debt in order to do the tax return yeah that's another thing i used to be it is add up all your mortgage interest and it was real simple you put it on their and generally you got it now we're gonna have to track sources as it acquisition desert refinance debt forgot to break it down some deductible some is not so that is not simplification right there i a guarantee that i have a miscellaneous itemised deductions any changes there yeah those are now all gone no more none of those what if some.

seattle washington donald trump new york california two hundred thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

"Folks fifty thousand dollars a year the percentage of his income at two million dollars is dramatically lower than the seven point five percent of your total income that a middleclass guys pay for this same stuff do you get the point when you tax that stuff so when you tax said snubbed joe you are to percentagewise not not nominal mom percentagewise you are hurting middleclass people because they consume more as a percentage of their income than rich people do that's the point that's how the europeans of is that makes sense show britsh people and middleclass people both eat they both house themselves and they all have cars but but the percentage of their income spent on that stuff for middleclass people is far more so when you tax that stuff using a vat you suck middleclass college try that's how the europeans by sucking middleclass wild dry pay for free healthcare and yet rice continues to insist that somehow rich people are paying enough in the united states despite the fact that if he wanted to institute a very system is espousing free healthcare it's not the rich people that are going to pay more it's hugh you're gonna get screwed but again don't let you know liberal fairytales ever get in the way the truth folks the fund shout ahead again thank you again for great week folks i really enjoyed doing this your beat a lot to me in a very serious note so thanks for tuning please go to budge you know that cobb subscribe to my email us thus suddenly these articles and i will see all on monday think his third dan bongino jio get more of them online anytime at conservative review done coma you can also get dan's podcastone i tunes or soundcloud and followed in on twitter 247 at d bongino.

joe rice united states d bongino hugh cobb dan bongino fifty thousand dollars two million dollars five percent
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"On the house for fifty thousand dollars i need debt of seventy thousand dollars so what i'll do is uh i'll take back a note for seventy thousand dollars and i'll take in paid fifty thousand dollar debt so there's a twenty thousand dollar difference in their so we have this wrapper on mortgage a covers both mortgages and iot you the seventy thousand dollars i'll pay you the note on the sabbath day you take the money from the seventy obey the fifty and it will go on down the road until these these notes pay off so i started doing that you know and people started losing money people got ripped off both of the buyers the sellers the noteholders everybody started taking measure everybody else got to be really nasty dirty business then they started this thing in this got to be another big it was uh owner finance notes so i'll buy you this house at us all by this house are to round sell it to you the tenet on either a leasepurchase agreement or contract for deed now on a leasepurchase agreement would basically said is your pettitte into you elect to be a buyer once you like to be a buyer some portion either zero or some other amount up to some point would be considered your downpayment monies that have been paid from your security deposit end or your rents would be considered you downpayment and then you would just go ahead and get a note for the difference neither go that get a note or maybe i would want to finance the note for you all that type of a deal and a lot of that stuff got done but the problem with that is that the people buying homes actually thought they own homes but they didn't they were still just tenets and so whenever the landlord wanted to get rid of him he just get rid of them at all that would go away or what would happen is a landlord might lose the house foreclosure for not making the payments and the people who've been paying on for years thinking there were going to buy it ended up with no house it was gone uh that's a leasepurchase agreement next thing was called a contract for deed where you'd literally sign a cadre actually if i pay you 100 and twenty pain twitter ten years twelve times a year for.

the house pettitte seventy thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars twenty thousand dollar fifty thousand dollar ten years
"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"I'm thinking about the word that i i just did an an and some new projects that armed i'm going to be doing in the near future and i'm gonna tell you right now there's no way that's that's just way off the charts and i think that's the point of the guy who built it look what i can do for five fifty and it's if it's not you know that's not going to work he understands okay but the point is even if you even if you just heavily inflated that of five grand and you will you and and we even took it to ten so you're you've increase the cost of a 20fold yeah still doesn't touch the low bid of 65 grand that it would take to build that if the government will the government i won't say the wasn't the low bid that was the government estimate between sixty five and a hundred and fifty thousand dollars right to to complete it yeah between sixty five and a hundred and fifty thousand dollars for the construction of those particular of of stairs and so it just it shows you what happens and we've talked a lot about private sector verses government we have talked about old over and over again and especially with healthcare this week is very important to bring this up on an on on healthcare why the public and more and more republicans now believing that more government involvement more of a monopoly control over the product and services of health care does a better job bob than the private sector when it's proven a i've always said look at everything around you right now everything in your home wherever you are right now if you're just waking up in your bedroom look at every single thing and i mean every single thing the sheets address or the clock the lights the walls the curtains anything that your brain when you're scanning right now you're looking right not every single thing there was made in the private market in order to make a profit and you're basically satisfied with the stuff that you have for the most part people are very happy with the things that they buy that they can choose to do it but in healthcare we believe that a monopoly does a better job at for the life of me i don't understand how people lose those those critical thinking skills from the progression.

bob fifty thousand dollars