25 Burst results for "Fifty Sixty Years"

What You Need to Know About Bitcoin Layer 2s

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

08:49 min | 4 months ago

What You Need to Know About Bitcoin Layer 2s

"Everyone will come to. Our panel layer twos on bitcoin with melting juniors chief strategy officer at coin shares and nick carter general partner at castle island ventures. Welcome milton nick. Hi laura so exciting to be here. And i have to give thanks to nick in advance. I roped tim into sitek around like doing this. I wanna have. I'm risk can with you know. I'm very glad to be here though is a really great remix of of massive attack. Just before the saw's really enjoying that. Yes so was i. So let's start our discussion by just defining what layer one and layer to are for people who don't know just to make sure we're on the same page and also multiple layers are necessary at all. Shirk jonah kick it off nick. I can start. i can start in. Virtually every payments system there they functioned in layers so when we talk about layers and bitcoin or cryptocurrency. It's actually completely in line with how things work in the traditional payments base. So you know it's possible to send a wire as a consumer you know. We have access to fed wire. Want but you know for the most part when you use dollars you're transacting with credit systems or peer to peer payments like bone papon cetera. Those would be considered second or even third layer on top of more fundamental clearing infrastructure. Where you have backed payments which happen less frequently and their larger in size and those payments at the bottom of stack of higher assurances. So and they kind of settled immediately as opposed to higher layer payments which settle on a deferred basis so credit card payments are not final immediately so extend that analogy to Currency just sort of contextualized it a little bit. Bitcoin payments would be considered fast settling high assurance payments. So those are my mind can have utility scale transactions. You can use months. Value can have confidence. they're going to settle. Immediately layer to in. My view is more about deferring settlement getting more skill ability through training off against those settlement. Assurances are getting faster finality By trading off again against assurances so basically opening up the design space and mirroring. Those you know that that layered model that we have in payments itself and i think that's really how payments systems scale as far as we understand them it's unlikely that unite everybody on the bottom layer the that would be like all we ever used for. Transactions was sending wires to each other. So that's kind of my view of it multiple. Know if you've a different diagnosis. I think the way you articulated. Nick is a great starting point You know the analogy. We use often is the bitcoin. Blockchain is more akin to fed wire. And what we've seen you know. A lot of other protocols have moved more quickly to adopt layer twos. I think the ferryman particular is one that from the very early days had a mindset to sort of start moving towards layer two and one of the interesting observations is over the last six Six months pardon really as we've seen the explosion of defy a new financial primitives being implemented on top of the theory. Obviously it's resulted in a lot of challenges in network availability network throughput and rising price in in sending transactions across the network deploying contracts now. Obviously bitcoin doesn't function in the same way. But what. I think is important to note. Is you know. There is an important function here. Whereas bitcoin usage grows and the adoption of bitcoin grows a number of use cases that were utilizing for bitcoin grows. We're going to need different layers. That have these features. That are optimized for the specificity of the use case. And that's something that's talked about a bit more in other protocols that are newer and i've had an opportunity to learn from watching what's happened in bitcoin but i think it's been interesting to observe you know i'm in many people's minds we really don't ever think about the amount of bandwidth we're consuming or the cost of connectivity to the core protocol which were interacting and in many ways the way i think about bitcoin For the first time in human history we have a way to price computing activity. There is a very real price that you have to pay prioritize transactions in the meme pool and so in my view. It's actually like an internet interesting. Crossover pardon between some of the concepts around Computing connectivity and how rodham topologies work with money. Right you're basically punching routing policy using transaction fees and and money effectively that allow you to sort of create specificity in terms of what layer of the stack on operate without compromising the security guarantees of the coin and again is nick described. There are inevitably going to be trade-offs but we've observed so far as we look at. The proliferation of bitcoin is an asset across other chains. Whether that's in the form of rap. Bitcoin or other assets is people really do want to have the security. Guarantees of bitcoin is an asset. But they want to have the ability to adopt some of the parameters around how they're utilizing the network security guarantees of their transactions particularly lower few transactions perhaps being able to deploy smart contracts or a more complex as sort of logic that maybe isn't as easy to deploy bitcoin script. So i think that's very important the other piece. I'll just quickly add that. I think is really important since this conference is about developers developers developers. Tomorrow on cnn. Steve ballmer if you remember. His famous developers developers developers speech is electric capital puts out this great report on and it just came out. It's their state of the developer ecosystem report and one of the interesting observations. They have is there. A low more developers in other protocols than there are in bitcoin because bitcoin is notoriously hard to develop with and building a robust grasp of bitcoin. Core protocol takes much longer than perhaps some of these other protocols which was scripted in more familiar languages and have different types of logic. That's more intuitive to say like javascript developers or other developer communities that are much larger. So what. I think also been interesting to observe. We have this in the legacy financial system. The entire legacy financial system is built on. Something called coble right. Which is this archaic programming language. Like most people know coble really really well are probably over the age of sixty because they were designing corporate systems must seventies so there's actually really interesting technological risk that exists in our core financial system and our poor financial applications in that the group of people who know and really understanding our experts in kabul are gonna be retiring in the next ten years right so it's created this tremendous amount of pressure on the banking sector to replace some of these core banking systems. That were built fifty sixty years ago because there is a real risk of technological obsolescence not having enough talented people to step into those roles. And i started. See the same thing. Happening in in crypto. Right there aren't necessarily tens of thousands of the coin developers out there who can build really robust highly secure layers on top of bitcoin. And so it's been really interesting to see what's been happening in the sack seacoast system and i'm really excited about milan. Tax may not. Because i think one of the really important Designed space constraints that we have to get through is the fact that the bitcoin developer communities just inherently much smaller than other developer communities because the level of knowledge required is very specific amount of time it takes to become really proficient in bitcoin and to understand all of the nuances of y bitcoin. Core way does prior bibs the history of fly. Certain things are good. Ideas are bad. Ideas takes a long time. Like i'm seven years in. And i still know nothing neck. I don't know how you feel about that. But that's where i think. Layer twos can be helpful in improving extensive ability. Because you don't necessarily require a bunch of people to become incredibly proficient. Bitcoin core through layer. Tuesday can now introduce other programming. Language that really broaden the developer ecosystem and allow people from other ecosystems to be able to build on top of bitcoin without necessarily needing to go through that learning curve on that you otherwise would but again. It's just interesting to me that that's also married and legacy finance for like bank search shitting themselves because all their best. Cobo people are leaving and they don't have anyone to replace on so sort of an interesting parallel at least for me. I think it's it's

Coin Shares Castle Island Ventures Milton Nick Shirk Jonah Papon Cetera Nick Nick Carter Bitcoin Laura Electric Capital TIM Coble Rodham Steve Ballmer CNN Kabul Milan Cobo
More frequent, heavier rains strain U.S. dams

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 4 months ago

More frequent, heavier rains strain U.S. dams

"There are more than ninety thousand dams in the united states. Many of those dams are at risk of failure. Most of them were more than fifty years ago. Usually the designed life of is between fifty sixty years so a lot of our dams are already passed their design age. That's paulina. contra morality. A researcher at columbia university. She has many of these. Dan's are not only old but poorly maintained. There is a lot of variation on the safety and oversight of these dams across the country in many areas. Climate change is making the situation even more dangerous by causing more frequent and heavier rains in a recent report. Contra rowdy inner team analyzed the risks and potential impacts of dam failures. She says that if one damn fails it can cause other breaches downstream. The risk can be extensive and not just the people and homes. Floodwaters can disrupt power generation. I'm blocked roads and railways but funds to address. The problem are limited. So she says it's important to assess the risks and potential losses and prioritize repairs. Accordingly

Paulina Columbia University United States DAN
Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:37 min | 8 months ago

Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

"By, the end of this hour we're hoping to inspire you to pick up the phone and reconnect with a friend. You've lost touch with just a phone call, but hopefully a new start for your friendships and hopefully those of you who haven't made the call in six years ten years twelve will get the nerve from this show to pick up the. Phone and reconnect as one woman wrote us a true best friend nurtures the soul and that couldn't be more Trooper Anna and Regina their bond save their lives during World War Two they help each other survived the Nazi death camps and they were only young girls at the time, and now as women they a bond that so strong they consider themselves sisters. I came into the camp was eleven was nineteen, ninety, two I was a long line I don't know why. CAN'T And side. Little go nothing. It was the beginning of a friendship that would last for sixty years in the midst of death and suffering in the concentration camps of Poland and Germany. They were two little girls reaching out for each other that was looking for somebody. To. Be Nice because I didn't have no matter no more I didn't have no fad I. didn't have no family look for each other one could. We're not supposed to go from one back to the other sometimes I, would go in they say hi and then she would be afraid they're going to do something to me. She would succeed give up give out the two girls were separated several times when one girl was shipped to another camp heard it like animals onto cattle, cars, but fate drew them together each time we'll want so many cans wouldn't again too wide. Say Anything of course we should communicate. Was, then to Bruce I had. Half Time. So I was. So Hang I was yanked I needed food. Sites. To Steal from the dog, Regina had smuggled a loaf of bread with her and even though she was hungry, Regina risked her life to share it with her friend. When I saw I rapped the play. Talwar to hey. And votes. killed. I forgive put we went to well. I so what? People just Within weeks they were scheduled to be guest but liberation came I lost in the chaos they never knew if they would see each other again they were separated once more they both married and began families, and after years apart fate Ju- them together again, they discover dot only had they both resettle in the united. States. But actually we're living in the same Boston neighborhood just blocks from each other. Clam to the same street. Trout Chink hours so We're boats that shock. After the war was over a wonderful friends, their friendship grew deeper as the years passed we cannot sit and talk about those things to allow the people's because even even to my kids, this is the bond between us. It's concentration. Can I cherish? Come forget what? What fifty sixty years. If I before she dies before we we're gonNA still love each out. And an-and Regina stories featured in the book. Best Friends. Now, where's Judy night duty I, hear you had a best friend since you were what? By five five years old but you haven't seen each other more than thirty. Thirteen thirty years, thirty years really cracked and the reason for that is. We just don't find the time. I. Guess We make excuses for it and we've just never. Merged our time together to make it work. What you do talk you do communicate we communicate through letters. We've been pound pals for over forty years. and. Where does she live and where you live she lives in like Huntington, New York and I live in Naperville Illinois. Wow. Never a Greyhound bus between you. Never, would you recognize her if you saw her on the street I would hope so through photographs but I don't know. What does she look like? Last. I knew she had long blond hair. Very pretty face does she look like anybody here? Not that I see right now okay. Stand up look around take the audience know. Right there. Say. Anti.

Regina Bruce I Trooper Anna Boston JU Judy Germany Illinois Naperville Huntington Poland New York
Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | 10 months ago

Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

"WanNa. Start today's than by explaining why businesses consider offering lifetime deals. The bottom line is, is that lifetime he is often generate a large lump sum of revenue of cash. It's a cash grab really they might partner with a deal signed with large affiliates or they offer it to their list, and because such an incredible deal, it's a lifetime deal. They'll get lots of sales at the start people see this as a way. To Fund, their business at the star. So that's kind of the motivation behind lifetime deals outside of that. It also gives you new users, new customers, people to give you feedback the star and people that are invested. That's really the positives and and there's not really much outside of that. That's positive. Just being frank but for many people, that's a lot. You know making a lot of money at the start to fund the business. Can, really help them and really propel the business to avaiable full-time option for them and allow them to make some hires and scale quickly the issue is that most products and services have a running cost. So even if you say for example, sell a lifetime deal for a thousand dollars per customer yes. You'll earn a thousand dollars, but each customer will have a cost for each subsequent year to come. Agree. Thirty forty, fifty, sixty years for long as that person is alive right and some of us don't really do the math and that leads me to my I tip. You got to do the math. How much does it cost you per customer per year and a lot of people are like well, I sell my product it's course it's a forum it's something that really has a minimal cost on my end. And that's pretty much it. No you gotta dig deeper. You have cost Phantom costs that you're not counting like how much it cost you per customer for your web hosting to host your community to host your APP how much that cost on a monthly basis divided by the number of customers is cost more per customer. It's not a once in done kind of thing, the more traffic you have the more you have to pay what about customer support the more customers you have the more support staff you need the more time take from them you need. To factor that in, are there any other costs whether it's your time or money that's involved every time you have a customer, break it down because you might find out yes. This might be a very small amount per customer in it's worth to offer the lifetime deal but often more times than not when we do the math, you're like, wow, we start to break-even after five years and after five years we're losing money. Then after ten years, we're really losing money. So this really is a red flag that you can raise before you offer a lifetime deal. My next tip is you have to make sure that if you're going to offer a lifetime deal, you don't offer a deal or a plan or a product that they will not outgrow. The play of the lifetime deal is to give them something that is valuable, but is just to get them started. The point here is that get them onto your platform onto your product. And therefore get used to it. Love it enjoy it. But at some point, they're going to outgrow whether they need more contacts in your APP or the want to get access to more training. Basically, we're talking about here is you want to offer them the basic of basic plans. It's still valuable. It's still something that you would charge a monthly or annual basis for normally but. You, WanNa push them towards upgrading anytime. You're running a lifetime plan you should aim for seventy percent of the people that by will upgrade out of the lifetime plan. So lifetime is something that's basically temporary this takes a bit planning the six a bit of a branding and package INC when it comes to offering this lifetime deal so don't rush into a lifetime deal if. You're not ready. Make sure you're crafting the right one. So you know that people will be graduating to different plants off the lifetime. The third thing I want to mention is often in my experience lifetime customers in general, not all of them of course, but in general will tend to be difficult customers to deal with what you mean by that well, people that don't invest much. Will actually cost you more time and more headaches people that actually pay you a lot of money. They do the work that get the most out of it and they're professional they get it. They understand the onus is on them to make it happen. But those who pay the minimum and Gopher lifetime deals people that maybe don't really take action but they will complain about every little thing if they have the opportunity of course, I'm speaking in. Generalities of course, there are lifetime deal customers that are hard working that are serious about their business and they are great and they're not headaches. But if we're talking about a percentage or a majority of the users, higher paying customers are lower maintenance customers that's just the facts of business. So I want to give you some direct advice. If you do the math, you have a graduation plan a plan to get them to upgrade out a lifetime. And everything pans out and it's very, very minimal cost on you. Even if you stretch out of twenty thirty years of this customer being active, then go for the lifetime plan if not avoided if you can even if it means growing slower if you're still looking for that cash grab, my advice is limit the number of lifetime members whether it's one hundred or two hundred people Max and then you. Close it. This will create scarcity and it will also allow you to say, Hey, this is the amount of money I will get from this lifetime offer I can work with us the influx of cash I need, and from there you're only dealing with a minimal number of customers that are dealing with the lifetime planet you have to pay for for the longevity of your business in for their

Partner Frank Gopher Package Inc
The 'ludicrous' coronavirus certificate your boss wants

Coronacast

04:52 min | 11 months ago

The 'ludicrous' coronavirus certificate your boss wants

"We're hearing about this trend that seems to be starting with. Employers or schools or day care centers are requiring a carbon nineteen clearance. What people have to guard the pay and get basically a medical certificate? Saying that they're not sick and the Royal College of General Practitioners has put out a statement saying please don't do that. For number of reasons, chiefly, because it's kind of impossible, that's absolutely right. Employer should not be asking employees for that sort of proof, because the proof doesn't exist as we've said before you've never negative test, let's say you are infected with Covid nineteen and you get the test done on day one. It's a high likelihood of negative and hopefully more positive as days go on, so you could have a negative tested means absolutely nothing, and even if you're not infected the day after you do the test, you could be infected and the day before test doesn't matter, so you're going to have the test every day before you get to work. It's completely ludicrous. Ludicrous and really not the way to go, and what really should happen is that people with symptoms should not go to work and be tested to make sure they're not positive, and then even people symptoms shouldn't go to work, even if it's the common cold, or it might even be the flu and you gotta wait interval symptoms settled. We don't have to be isolated for two weeks. If you don't have covid nineteen, the difficulty with this is that GPA's at the moment especially more. I've alerted than ever. The last thing we need is more people trying to vie for that really valuable time. Jupiter are probably not that busy at the moment actually. Doing a lot of telehealth consultations, the surgery's going back into action, but the reality here is that you're asking for tests really meaningless in in the absence of the likelihood that you might be infected I think it's fair enough. If you're maybe a little bit of symptoms, you into a protest, you want to get tested. That's fair enough, but to ask this on a one off basis for a line to say the you're covered negative on one occasion. When in fact you might well be positive is ludicrous. So what should you do if your boss does ask you? You for one of these medical clearance certificates well I. Think should show them the release from the Sterling College of General Practitioners and we'll put that up on our website and you can find. They're pretty often. Take it in one of the things that they do say in their release from the pay is that there's not an unlimited number of tests which is of course true. What do you think about this? Perhaps discouraging people from getting tested because they don't want to be wasting them. There are plenty of tests. People need to test. They should get it done. But the would I mean would put an unnecessary extra burden on testing, and there is a cost attached to that, but we've got plenty of tests. I wouldn't worry too much about that. So question from Perry about why people is symptomatic. She's asking to raise such as why some people is symptomatic. Is the viruses only mall in these people? Can it be savvy and they still show no symptoms I think she's talking about viral. Load here, so let's be clear what we're talking about here. So this is somebody without symptoms who is covered nineteen positive call positive for the SARS covey to virus. That could be two situations one. Is that your? Throughout the course of your infection and the other. Is that your committee that you're having any symptoms yet? But in five to fourteen days you will develop symptoms, and so the reason why you could be asymmetric. Right through the course of your disease is that you got a very small doors of the virus? It's likely that the doors you get an. Organism, is related to the severity of disease. One reason why healthcare professionals can get very severe disease, so if you get a walloping doors of the viruses likely, you're gonNA. Get A walloping case of the disease. It's not true in everybody, but that's one reason so. That, you could be symptomatic. Probably the biggest reason why people symptomatic is their age and children beyond one year of age through too young I don't who'd through to fifty sixty years old, the likelihood of getting symptomatic disease increases, and it's almost certainly do in that case to the response of your immune system, because essentially symptoms like coughing sneezing feeling fatigued, are all symptoms not so much of the virus, but of your body's reaction to the virus, so it's like getting an immunization in your. Your arm it goes red and inflamed that your immune system responding to the immunization, and it's a good thing because it shows that you're reacting to it and similarly with your body, so your body is reacting strongly immunologically. Then you're more likely to get symptoms, and of course this severe covid nineteen disease is actually a disease of the immune system. It's an overreaction of the immune system doesn't mean to say if you get a few symptoms like fatigue or Or loss of taste, and so on that you're heading for severe disease, but it's a sign that your immune system is reacting quite strongly to the virus, so those are the two reasons those of the virus and your immune response related to your age in particular,

Royal College Of General Pract Covid FLU Sterling College Of General Pr Perry
Easy Money For Podcasters

Build A Big Podcast - The Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Easy Money For Podcasters

"I'm David. Hooper in an urban neighborhood. Talked about it before you can sit on my porch. Sit on the steps leading up to my House. You can see the sidewalk in front of my House. And it's not uncommon. Certainly not right now. We're all quarantined. See Somebody taking a break from being cooped up inside their house walking down the sidewalk and that's not just during the quarantine it's anytime I live with what you call a walking neighborhood few years ago. I'm outside mowing my lawn. See A guy ruling up a wheelchair. He's with the dog is he. Comes to my house. The dog enters my yard and immediately takes a huge dump. I got this old guy in a wheelchair on the sidewalk in front of my house. A dog taken a huge dump and I'm trying to mow the lawn. Normally in this situation you might have a guy's got a bag so sorry man. Let me get that. This dude can't do it so it's a little bit awkward. What am I gonNA do get mad about it? No I laughed about. Hey Man stalks fertilizing my yard. I try to be nice. Trying to be neighborly so we talked for a while the small talk. He says he lives a street over and he introduces himself. He says my name is James Brown and you know what I said. Said like the singer and he was like hey say yeah like the singer actually believe it or not. I used to work with him. It turns out this guy's an old school urban radio. Dj It's an am station in Nashville an AM radio. If you don't know it used to be big. Am radio was big bounce off the stratosphere it will go everywhere you can pick it up so much farther than you couldn't FM signal. In fact they didn't even have. Fm Am was big as it was. This am station. It's still around today. It is maybe best known as the radio station. Where Oprah Winfrey got her start. People don't know this about Oprah very some people do I might have mentioned it. Oprah's from Nashville. She went to high school here. Another Weird Oprah connection. My father was her speech teacher in that high school. East high school so anyway. Am radio back in the day. When James was there it was big. It was big when he said he worked with the James Brown. It was because this was the big urban radio station. They call it black radio at the time in Nashville and they would bring these artists into Nashville. They would do promotions for them. They would pack venues and it wasn't just James Brown. He worked with the Eisley brothers every time I would see him. He had headphones on. I used to work with them. He had all sorts of great stories. But if you were looking at him now you would never know that you would see this old guy in a wheelchair with a little bitty dog over the next few years. Because I've got a dog because James was one st over I would see him all the time all the time it always be hanging out wearing headphones listening to music little dog always at aside and because. I'm walking my dog. That little dog will come. Greet s would stop we chat. We both loved music. We both loved dogs and every time he would chat he would have a story. It wasn't always about radio. But being radio myself. I'll get him. Show me how he would do. Intros an out does that old school urban dj way just to see how he would do it. And I would often tell him I would say man. I've got to get my recorder over here and get this on tape. And he always say something now. No that's I don't do that anymore. That's who I used to be. That was years ago last year. I was out in my car drove by his house. And I see a u haul and I was like man James Moven. He got sick of all this development. That was another thing that we talk about about how the neighborhood had changed. She'd been here fifty sixty years more or less grown up in this neighborhood and my father take it back to connection with. My father also grew up in this neighborhood. Just a street over from James was so I've got a connection to this neighborhood to talk about that and James Van. I guess he just got sick of this development because they're always threaten into tears house down. You know that story. Gentrification is what we call it anyway parked. My car immediately went to James's House and they're all these people in their moving stuff out. But no James and there's this dude on the couch and I asked him so what's up and he said James is dead and I was like it was disappointing because he was a friend of mine. This guy's retired as seem all the time I'm working from home. I'm walking my dog. He's out rolling around with his dog. We teach each other all the time and I was like. Oh that's not going to be the same. He's my connection to the neighborhood. You know but also thought about this story that he had and about how I missed that opportunity that history that radio history and those intros and those out rose and the way things used to be in the things that I could learn from him and I've talked about things like this before you now have missed air checks from Great Radio Legend. Here in Nashville. Because I was too scared to do it and with this it was just one of those things that I never got around to that guy that I talked to who sit on his couch. That was his son and we talked about me trying to get some James Air checks recordings. I'm still working on that. A check in with the station the owner of the station. They don't have anything. This was way back before everything was recorded but there are a lot of old air checks out there and James was really popular as a DJ at one time. He didn't go by the name. James Brown for obvious reasons. He went by the name. J Albert Brown. It was weird because he was living among people. That didn't know who was because of that. But sometimes I mentioned it to these older guys in the neighborhood and said you know James Brown a radio. Dj and they'd be the WHO J. Albert Brown. The Oh man. Jail rebrand live here. They didn't even know but they knew him. So sure. There are some recordings out there somewhere. I'm looking for them. There are a lot of people collect air checks. They're out there. I'm still GONNA look but I want you to think about this. This is why bring it up. We take for granted that there is so much on tape these days but there's also a ton of stuff that is it. It's not online. It's not written down on paper. Sometimes the people that might have been on tape there known in different ways than they are now and we don't even know they're around us. We don't know how to look them up. We don't know where to look them up. Maybe the only place they did exist is in the minds of people right now because of covert nineteen one of the things that people are thinking. A lot about is deaf and the importance of relationships. And if you've got the time you definitely have the skills you could be somebody who gets a lot of this important stuff. These stories this history. The intros in Altos of an old radio. Dj that we could all learn from. You could get that stuff on tape. Maybe it's from your family. Maybe it's from your friends. Maybe it is something that you could turn into a business. Think about that. We are on the edge of a lot of people. Dying people. Dial the time. James didn't die from Cova Nineteen. He died because he was old. He didn't take care of himself and one day. You're here and you've got these stories and you can share them with people and you can make friendships and the next day that's gone. It is gone. You can be the one to archive some of this with your skills with the equipment that you already have. You may be familiar with story core. This is an NPR show. They have a great APP. The story core APP that will guide you through a story core style interview. That's where people interview their family interview. Their friends interview people that they know and they get great interview. So if you're a little iffy on interviewing that's not the kind of podcast that you do. Sto Or Y. C. O. R. P. S. That's how you spell it. You can look up that APP. They will guide you through an interview. And maybe you just open up that Mike and let somebody talk. It doesn't have to be perfect to be meaningful. No real marketing device on this one but an opportunity for you. If you are looking to make money with your podcasting skills and definitely an opportunity for you to help humanity out so we don't lose some of the stuff

James James Brown Nashville J. Albert Brown James Moven James Air Oprah Winfrey James Van Hooper Oprah David NPR Mike C. O. R. P. Cova
Fat Tuesday Favorite: Chicago's Paczki reigns supreme in the Region

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

07:39 min | 1 year ago

Fat Tuesday Favorite: Chicago's Paczki reigns supreme in the Region

"All right local pastries will be kicking off at Tuesday with amazing friends he's a Polish tradition they're also breaking other sugary sweet Chicago Chicago police police police officers officers officers and and and their their their families families families bakeries bakeries bakeries located located located at at at fifty fifty fifty nine nine nine twenty twenty twenty seven seven seven west west Lawrence Lawrence Avenue Avenue they're they're selling selling area area shaped shaped like like hearts hearts and and Chicago Chicago flag flag all all falling falling off off in in blue blue line team at the proceeds from all the cookie sales will go to Chicago police memorial foundation which aids families of officers who were killed or wounded in the line of duty the owner of the billions ski is the owner and the chef of delightful pastries in Chicago and she joins us tonight welcome in Dover good evening how are you I am great I am great first let's talk about the bakery generators separate celebrating twenty years which is very cool thank you and what I love about what you are committed to you is you are putting V. best ingredients into everything that you do you know what that that's a real commitment on my end because I really believe I should have quality ingredients in my products I don't think you should have a PhD in chemistry to read my labels I believe in butter flour sugar eggs yeah I think if we have good ingredients that go into the product we have a great product and then we feel good afterwards I think a lot of the times of people take short cuts because they want to have a fast monetary gain but people don't support those kind of places so I think it's very important that people that come to delightful pastries say we have Nielsen Massey vanilla which is the best vanilla in all of United States made right here in Waukegan by this wonderful family for three generations now so it's and you know we use all butter from Wisconsin thank you Wisconsin you know my flowers from Ohio and from Minnesota you know just a lot of local ingredients a lot of great ingredients I just think you know butter should be the foundation of an fresh eggs should be the foundation for a honey cakes we use real honey you know so it's just it's just you wanted to have deliciousness you know people's people said your did your punch you made me we put you know thank you thank you you know it's funny you say that is there was a bakery that was around I won't say what it is for fifty sixty years and I got taken over by for the first time by another family they changed all the recipes they kind of cheap in the the goodness of what they were doing and they were gone in six months so knowing that you know this is gonna create nice legacy for for you and your family you know what I th I am I'm hoping one of my daughters will take up the mantle after after I'm you know after I'm ready to retire I don't know when that will be you know my mom my mom started this business so it was we started that in naming in nineteen ninety eight and my mom just retired last year and finally she gave me the recipe for punch you so as to get issues given that herself he was getting into like once I retire you'll have it but not nothing until then and you know what's what people are like what makes punch you punch you wait what what's what's so different about it so a real punch I could that's one pump check many punch keys so I'm teaching you guys Polish has been like that and so you know you will you put rom in the dough we put orange oil and that that would put lemon oil in the W's milk we use barter and you know when you eat upon check in with you know like a Krispy Kreme donut it flattens into pancake yeah well up upon check the dough springs back and holds itself yet yeah and you really did it for the dough mostly you don't really you did for the filling like American donuts have this much filling in and it's just like you can really taste the dough and that's kind of sad because the the the beauty of it is the doe how delicious how delicate you know it's fluffy it's crunch on the outside deliciously moist and goodness on the inside and I love coming up with wonderful tart fillings like Weezer long potter we use nice I make passion fruit jam is a thing that's a Polish thing hello Mister he's thing I grew up with yeah Tom is a Polish thing we love our heart to heart fillings pulls people do not like sweet pastries we you know when we post people come and I'm there like I wanna see desert that's not sweet enough that's the first thing that comes out of the mouth and yet we believe in having something rich pottery full of group Belgian chocolate and walnuts and nuts and lots of beers in a post poll should point towards you know like there's one walnut poppy toward that I make that I literally one liter of vodka goes into the entire thing while because it's that busy but then it has to sit for four days before you can eat it so all that lot of that stuff veterans but the flavor is still there so lot of Polish pastries like our have tons and tons of alcohol and actually European pastries have tons and tons sure think of tiramisu think about fruit fruit cake think of a Kinshasa toward a black forest torte absolutely all have you know somebody said oh you're just you're just you know to contributing to the delinquency of minors I first of all if you don't want rid of them in one day that's pretty when you're cooking the stuff it yeah the potency is is gone by that time now there's you've got the traditional but you've also got some really cool gourmet flavors as well let's talk about some of the traditional ones that you have so the traditional ones are plum butter which we've mentioned before Polish people are crazy about plan which I'm not a guy that brings food and booze into the studio because listeners can't see they can't taste what what I'm doing in here but I will describe this the best they can and you were so kind to bring daughters your big highlight that's that's that's my favorite then rose petal jelly that's very very traditional very Polish and we use real raspberry preserves a local company here that makes the boss raspberry preserves there's just sugar packed in lemon juice and raspberries and if nothing else that plan has a beautiful flavor you know it's a great little tart but I'm I'm chasing sweet because of what you put into the dough surrounding it so I'm getting a little bit of both it is coming in and out that's really cool thank you thank we we try really hard and then some of the other it's nice and tight is good yeah yeah it's it's you know it's it's that's the whole point about plans you kind of want to make the jam kind of to reflect the fruit when you eat fresh plums they're not sugary sweet they have that little bit of sweet and tartness and that's exactly how the jam as the crazy flavors as I call them we have German chocolate we have Jameson whiskey chocolate okay yes you got these drunken get a which I love so Jamison's here Davis is in chocolate custard I'd add that can't wait to taste that when I'm a busy guy but given the low beam yeah but you got this moonshine and lemon and that's what we've got here tell me about the moonshine so the story is I have a my packaging guy bought a house in Kentucky and I said listen Simon when you go over there can you just bring me some moonshine and he when he was getting his house built he asked everybody for moonshine and and everybody would get so upset him there's no moon shining in talking the plumbers electricians that window guys the dark eyes everybody yeah and finally he built his house is sitting on his porch and some guy pulls up right to his to his front stop and he's it's are you the guy looking for moonshiners like yeah he brings out this carton of more of these Mason jars full of money it is like a hundred Bucks the drop that often like drives right off like it was it was like a transaction and have a little remote brings it back you say's Dover I found your moon shine so I said what flavor it would be really good for punchy with moonshine enacted lemon card will make this delicious lemon curd from scratch yeah with lemon juice and butter and eggs and sugar together then we think I spy to it like a little sharpness even yes yeah

Chicago
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"We cannot accept new natural gas customers for building so guys got a builder of of thirty build a three story apartment building as he got heated. you can't do that with a heat pump so unfortunately we're going to see a lot of affects in citizens are going to be injured by this maybe one thing in California I live in Cincinnati yeah and I specifically always in the homes that I've owned here I want to natural gas because electric he doesn't work when it's minus ten degrees outside I don't want cold lumps of coal delivered anymore which was for long time delivered in the basements of homes the only the only thing to do is natural gas which is the cleanest form of energy but the liberals say even that's not clean up of course anyone nuclear either which is absolutely the cleanest form of energy so what do you do in Michigan Ohio Kentucky Indiana in the winter time the liberal sages shiver. that's right you can't keep warm without burning some I live in Chicago and that's that's basically affect the life the sun is very low in the winners the solar panels are covered by snow the wind turbines are full of lace and then they don't work very well and so you have to be you have to use combustion that's that's and not only that air conditioning in the south is one of the major reasons that over senior citizens are moving down there is a you know fifty sixty years ago when there was an air conditioning no we want to move down the cellphone be down there with ninety eight hundred degree temperatures so so these things are powered by hydrocarbons and and their miracle of our modern society and and really very very good for for all our people Steve gone so what you're saying is Dorian is not that big of a problem compared to historical models is anticipated to expectant mother nature takes the heat out of the equator and sends it up north to cool things off it's all part of the deal in fact over the last thirteen years repaired a relatively calm when it comes to hurricanes just the opposite of what the media says release flat I mean the number for the land forces actually been declining slightly since nineteen hundred we get about two every year that makes landfall some year more some years less. and the strain the the strength of storms has an increased a good news on Dorian is just been downgraded to category three so hopefully we'll miss the coast and that turned out to sea and all those buildings we built along the shore will be impacted by the way that's another factor people realize Miami for example they listen ten thousand people at nineteen hundred now there's two and a half million so we have built all these buildings along the shore and so the storms cause more damage that doesn't mean that we're the storms are more frequent or stronger though well you're making too much sense these ideas will not get out except on shows like this and Steve Gorman author of rethinking sustainable entry outside the green box thanks again for coming on the bill Cunningham show Steve go like you're willing thank you let's continue he's on the queue to hearing center dot com hotline let's continue with more after two o'clock today is Jim Moran who is the provider of the holy grail about the city and county getting its act together on newsradio seven hundred W. autumn. in nineteen seventy. his voice. the sound and adding some hall of fame Marty. this morning's last. looking through the mass right six. on seven hundred W. well. the whole Cincinnati Reds. this is from the Kane show I just left the newly remodeled hers and kia and took the all new twenty twenty kia soul first you go check it out and make sure you Tellem Riley since you. one of Saturday night live's most of worry estar Leslie Jones. somebody well it wasn't really a break up it was a a booty call I'm not into two series. September tenth on stage at Warner theatre. no yeah. the big box office don't miss the boisterous Leslie Jones one of the cricket wireless country zero. protecting men's financial means to do so contact core telling Cordell to schedule an appointment with one of our firm's Ohio or Kentucky Attorney support your men can count on five one three eight two three twenty twenty online and Kordell Cordell dot com that score del Cordell dot com two zero one east fifth street suite fourteen ten Cincinnati Ohio four five two zero two. Hey it's time to get up Caspar just brought something big to Cincinnati and it's changing everything for the better better mornings better meetings better work better play better moves better groups better everything..

Cincinnati Cordell Ohio Kordell Cordell dot Leslie Jones cricket wireless Warner theatre. Caspar Kentucky Attorney seven hundred W ninety eight hundred degree fifty sixty years thirteen years ten degrees
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:00 min | 2 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Law at Princeton and Georgetown, respectively, and went on to work in the federal government under presidents. Reagan and Bush, the younger, he was also a pharmaceutical executive and was CEO of the Hudson institute. A conservative think-tank since two thousand thirteen Daniels has been the president of Purdue University, where he froze, the price of tuition cut the cost of room and board that alone is enough to make him an outlier in the college pricing market, but there's more. One program at Purdue that you've instituted that. I'm really interested in. I think everybody would be interested in is what's called backup boiler the Purdue Boilermakers the mascot. It's an income share agreement in which if I understand correctly, students can defer, some are all short tuition payment in favor of repaying Purdue, a share of their later income, you have the essence, right? It's not a deferral of tuition and produce paid. But instead of the Czech comings and the federal government in alone. It comes from an investment fund. We participated, but so did other foundations and now in some private investors, and his equity, not debt. So the student doesn't borrow the money, the wrist shifts from the student to the investor if things don't work out, well the investor investment fund. That's on the hook quite the opposite of student that so an income shared agreement. I, I saw it in essay by Milton Friedman from fifty sixty years ago. It's not a complete replacement, but it's a better option certainly than the private loans that many students have to take on. There's a lid on how much of the heavily federally subsidized loans. The student can take when they need more. They sometimes wind up with these pretty expensive debt instruments. So I talk about this, as you know, working your way through college after college. And if it doesn't work out again, you're not on the hook just dotting cylinder stand a typical of one and it would vary with what the students studied. But a chemical engineer from Purdue University would pay about two and a half percent of income for maybe six or seven years. Somebody who studied let's say psychology it might be four or five percent of income. Whatever that income is, and just to be clear, that's because a psychologist making a lot less than a chemical engineer. Correct lightly to make less. Now, let me ask you this from the investors perspective. Let's. Say I'm invested in the fund that is funding this backup boiler program to what degree can I hand BIC the students that I'm investing in? Can I buy trench of just the chemical engineering students do I have to have the psychology and history students in there, too? If you can't Jerry Vic the way we're doing it. You know, if this thing becomes a broad national movement that it'd be all kinds of ways others might approach it. We're in our third year now, getting close with our students total and beginning to accumulate some experience still early days, but the repayment history is, is very good for all of them. And. We have consumer protections somemore graduates are going to hit the jackpot early they're gonna do so well happens every year they're going to get promoted to three times. There's a top cap beyond, which you're not required to it's two and a half times. The initial outlay that right doing half times what was invested. You know, the, the real thing that we hope to happen, here is that this movement will spread in a lot of other schools started getting interested in it because they see it'd be better for their students. there are indeed a lot of other schools and startups by the way looking into income share agreements or i._s. as as a way to rewrite the college tuition equation one of the beauties of an essay is that you're lining interest with a student christine bredemeyer is head of admissions and enrollment at the hobart school that's a four profit software engineering college that opened in two thousand sixteen in san francisco it's now got a few other campuses this school is free until only if the students fund job over forty k. and once they do find a job that is paying them a nice salary typically our students are earning over one hundred k. as their first full-time soffer engineering position it is seventeen percent of your income for three and a half years how does hope to cover the costs of running a school if they're not taking intuition partly through private investors like any startup but also through two million dollars in investment that's drawn from ed lee an online marketplace for income share greets so i think the easiest way to think about it is it's kind of like the nasdaq although you're not investing in companies or corporations you're investing in human potential investors only see a return on their money when a student is successful and same goes for us so everyone is playing the same game we want our students to actually find successful jobs hogan's founders were also interested in diversifying the tech world in that regard offering free tuition is useful so it's giving a lot more people access to quality education we have over sixty percent people of color thirty percent plus women we have a lot of college dropouts we have teachers and artists a lot of musicians over forty percent of our students are first generation post secondary students and thirty percent of our students english is not the main language spoken at home Homerton says that all of their first one hundred five graduates are employed in that all of them are paying their dues as scheduled if our students are not getting jobs than we don't get paid, and we close as a school. And I think colleges, that's what they kind of set out to be originally was to help get students into careers. Another career building school with free tuition is Lambda. An online learning startup backed by silicon valley's. Why combinator among others lamb to offers programs in fields like data science, and you ex design at no charge with Lambda getting seventeen percent of a graduate salary for two years as long as they get a job paying more than fifty thousand dollars with payments capped at thirty thousand dollars. So, yes, there seems to be momentum for the private for profit model of an income sharing agreement. But what about the traditional nonprofit college model and what kind of role can or should government play the Obama administration pushed to make? federal loans cheaper and put an interest rate cap on loan payments but other countries have gotten much much much further australia for instance has for decades offered free tuition letting graduates pay back the government wants their employed with the payments collected through the federal tax system that is a very tidy system especially if most of the universities are state run as they are in australia there was however one big loophole what if an australian graduates from college then moves abroad to work aren't they stealing a free education from everyone else who stays behind and pays back there tuition australia only managed to close this loophole in two thousand sixteen after more than twenty five years of ex patriot aussies not paying their government i wondered about a similar loophole when we had rhode island governor gina raimondo on our show last year she had just made community college in rhode island two ish And free that led me to ask her this. What kind of residency requirement is there afterwards? If I get a free community college degree from you. And then I move immediately to Massachusetts or California do I have to pay you back? We ask them to make a pledge that they'll stick around for a couple of years. So, yes, the deal if you have to go full time, because we want people to graduate, you have to keep up a minimum grape point average can't get into trouble to be an outstanding. And we want to live in Rhode Island for at least two years after you graduate. bramante may want them to live there so that rhode island recaptures the tuition funding through state income taxes but rhode island currently imposes no penalty if a student gets a free tuition and moves away the austrailia loophole in new york state meanwhile governor andrew cuomo is not taking any chances his plan to offer free college qualifying families requires graduates to stay in new york for at least as many years as they received free tuition otherwise tuition bill will be converted into a no interest loan that would have to be repaid you can see why the sort of plan free college education with repayment through the tax system wide be easier at the federal level with the i._r._s. doing the collecting in fact a friend of mine is currently trying to design such a system and he's gathering allies from the education and financial and political communities so if you are a high ranking Elected official democrat or Republican, and you want to hear more from my friend, and his allies drop me, an Email radio at freakonomics dot com, and I'll hook you up. my friend like many others who are trying to think creatively about the college tuition debt problem recognizes that the current system is unsustainable and that it could be really damaging to our long-term economy and to our society but a smart solution will require a lot more political will than would seem to be available at the moment especially at the federal level where political affiliations are so polarized these days as to render bipartisanship nearly impossible Political affiliation is also a big issue on college campuses, and I asked Daniels about this..

Purdue University rhode island Rhode Island Daniels Purdue Boilermakers president Milton Friedman Hudson institute Princeton governor andrew cuomo Reagan new york Massachusetts Jerry Vic executive australia silicon valley
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Mom's places five fifty sixty years old. Oh. Four boards and everything, but we had a foul with termites of last year. For quite a while. Just curious all this wet weather. We've had over the course of the year. How much is that hunger? The termites at all. Because we've got some trees. Thoroughly need to be taken down taking down. That are the the either the fell. The draw that haven't been treated yet. And I also. I'm curious if there's any left up stairs versus the base for that already. If you guys do I think you do for treatment. That will tell you throughout the whole Al restrictions on what you can tell with where the termite larvae. Too. Well, the it's a thermal not infrared it's thermal, and it will let us know if there's termites inside the wall or inside of would we can see that if they're active or not and to answer your other question with all the wet weather that helps termites they need the moisture they want the moisture they used that they can bring the moisture from the ground into the home that's done all the time. And. They need that. So it's very important for them to have that moisture if the winter continues the way it's going where it's not brutal. But it's not warm, and then we get into a real spring lake where it starts to warm up late March. And we don't get any more snow whenever that happens. The termites are gonna swarm like crazy now forming doesn't mean that the colony is is bigger or smaller. It just means that they're mature. And they're gonna swarm sometimes they don't swarm because of the weather. They're still there. So it's very important have your home, inspect it. You said you had a treatment. Did did you get the warranty with the treatment? No. It was at one time at that point. Okay. Most companies should off. Well, they're supposed to offer a warranty for that. But at any time if you need an inspection, we can come out with Thermo immature and look at it and determine exactly what what is done. But the success of the treatment depends on one the material to very important, the percentage of the material that's used a lot of guys watered down, and it's legal. The other factor is the the equipment. That's used to apply it and to how it's applied. So the technician that's doing it. You know, if they're in a rush, it's not done, right? The math is wrong. Whatever there's a lot of variables in there. And unfortunately. Most pest control companies in spring have another technician or two that all they do or retreats for termites we've never had to do that. So it just comes down to what the material was that was used on there. And again, the percentage and how it was done. But. Who full of answered all of your questions. The only other piece will be attracted to the termite. I think there's.

technician spring lake Thermo five fifty sixty years
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"All right. Thank you very much, by the way, just out of curiosity and give me the number one song in Syria. All right. I'm very curious. They may not have a chart that is very it's a very good point. All righty, everybody. Mark in Zagreb, Croatia out just the other day. I said why why don't we get more calls from Zagreb? And here we go. How are you Mark? I you Croatian or American. Call your show quite a few. You're the Croatian. Yes. You're the Croatian Croatian. Yeah. You the friend in Macedonia who told you about the show? I love that. Yeah. Okay. I remember good to hear from you. Thank you. Okay. Onto my question. I understand that a good God created the world where human cruelty. I mean, humans have free will the what about animals offering? I mean, the food chain. It's cruel animals almost exclusively torture each other. And we have no free will so in that type of Gandhi good, listen, I have wrestled with that question is a completely legitimate question because human suffering, you could attribute to human free will but animals don't have free. Will why did they suffer? I don't have an answer. So let me give you buy big my big answer to the whole problem of suffering. This was this was offered by a rabbi Milton Steinberg about fifty sixty years ago. I find it very very very telling. The believer in God has to account for one thing. Unjust suffering. The atheist has to account for everything else. I find that to be a very powerful argument. I fully acknowledge that that is an unanswerable. It's an unanswerable issue. I I it. It. That's why I call by work the rational bible. I I do not depart from reason. I do not let faith reason leads me to faith. But it. But I do not allow faith to. Overwhelm reason. There was another rabbi Louis Jacobs at British rabbi who wrote a book, titled we have reason to believe it's the only book whose title changed my life. The book is a great book. But the title changed my life because there were two meanings to the words, we have reason to believe the obvious is there are reasons to believe. But the second one was the was the life changing understanding that I brought to his title. We have reason in order to believe we are to us reason to believe that's what I have tried to do my whole life..

Zagreb Croatia Gandhi Milton Steinberg Louis Jacobs Syria Mark Macedonia fifty sixty years Milton
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Hello, welcome to another episode of the weeds on the bucks media podcast that work. Matthew yglesias Sarah cliff, and as recline we are can Winnie to end the year last weeds the air it's been a year. So we're going to do some in many years. I don't know. So I can do some reflections some year end type stuff, you know, sit back. Ponder expansively. The first thing we wanted to talk about is what have we learned this year? What have you learned? So I learned a lot about political identity this year part of that was because of what was going on a Baltics part of it is because of this book, I'm working on. But this to me felt really useful for understanding some of the fights. And there's a lot of good work here. I'd recommend the Mason's work on civil. I'm gonna recommend white paper later in the episode that relates to this too. But. I think that we are having a conversation about identity politics. It is pointing at something very real. But getting at it very backwards. And what's happening is people are starting with things in politics. They don't like, and then tracing them back to the identities that that inflect or lead to them. And I think that's bad. Right. And they're recognizing the politics is a collision of lot of different groups, and what's coming out of that feels link problem to people, and I've been really trying to come at this from the other perspective working upwards from understanding of identity, and how to fix politics, and then going up into what our politics looks like now. And I think if you if you do that any work upward from that research on identity formation, not downward from something upon you, don't like if she get a lot of useful information, and the big thing that I've come to think about is Democrats and Republicans as being political identities all the evidence is over last fifty sixty years that those kind of core political coalition identities left, right? Red blue democrat and Republican. Is a good way to talk about it. But not actually think the best way to talk about it. Because a lot of people who are say in the blue coalition do not think of themselves as Democrats the vote very regularly for Democrats. There's a lot in there. That is merging with race geography and religion and idiocy in ways that fifty years ago a lot less true. And so we now have what what Mason calls these mega identities. And if you understand politics is being inflicted by that, and as convicts is getting absorbed into that a lot of things make a lot of sense, something you recognize is that the way in which entity politics is really really profound almost all encompassing. It's literally everything is identity politics that goes too far. But there's no politics. It doesn't have any kind of identity in it whatsoever. Because they're no people who don't have that. I have found it to be a really useful model and framework for understanding a lot of the collisions and fights that that we're going through. So can I question about that? Yeah. So I hear this idea sort of all the time about the partisan clash. Sh- becoming a clash of of identities. And I don't I mean, I I don't want to say too much about public unnecess- and identity 'cause I don't I don't know any Republicans. But it strikes me that among Democrats there appears to be fairly intense residential and social segregation along racial lines in big blue cities and then separately like endless bitchy continuing Bernie versus Hillary arguments from 2016, which all have their in different ways, like strong ideological components. It never looks to me like this team spirit of unified. Like, we're all co partisans together, we have this this shared blue identity. But then I do I've seen not as much as you. But like I have seen some of this macro research. That's like, yes. People increasingly identify with with a partisan group. But then like. I'm ground like I walk around DC, and like black people in white people still seem to me to have very distinct identities, even when they're all Democrats. So a couple of things so one of my little like obsessions that we should talk about identities politics, but nobody's going to do that..

Sh Matthew yglesias Baltics Sarah cliff Mason Bernie Hillary fifty sixty years fifty years
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

"The next fifty sixty years of his life will serve I tweeted this out. And I believe it one day if this kid ran for president I would be on board twenty thirty even knowing his politics would What are vote. you? The care that kind of cares. Character gonna look at what costs are we attaining all of this love and accolade respect. That's all I'm saying, look, Jalen Hirsch was already a nine in Basseterre ship for Alabama football even before SEC football championship get he's won a national championship game before. So all I'm telling my son is what a degree of increase in terms of fandom in love and respect. Or you're going to get by having another moment like this versus two years of eligibility somewhere else. You're looking at it from a fan, and being celebrated those are my I know I think Jalen and his father looks like as a main do people respect you more as a man right now having gone through this experience and done what you did album. You could sit here and think Alabama did me wrong. But I'm a better, man. And I'm seen as a better man from this experience. Then almost anything. But that's perception. And that means I'm defining myself based on what you see in me. And that's not that's not priority. That is highly regarded but priority is did I define my life. Did I dictate terms? And did I live up to my dreams? Did I chase my dreams? Don't cut them short. Because now you had to compete Alabama hasn't done anything wrong to Jalen hurts dig about it. I agree. All they said is compete. Oh, you're the best until we got something better. Now if you're not good enough in situations. That's okay. Coaches transferred players transferred. That's the system your goal. What was your goal when you went to Alabama? If that's my son. I remind him of that goal. Don't let them beat that goal out of you. Because now they got to and they've moved on beyond you. I'll just say if I had a heist vote would probably go to jail. He is the greatest thing I've seen in college football this year. I welcome to the show with lock them while they were joined now by a great guy fresh off a huge fight this weekend. Deontay wilder who retained his WBZ heavyweight title. Fight fighting Tyson fury to a draw. Welcome diatta. I'm going to tell you the first thing that blows me away like a basketball player real Kevin Durant. Brothers four..

Jalen Hirsch Alabama football president Deontay wilder Basseterre Kevin Durant SEC Tyson basketball fifty sixty years two years one day
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

"This crystal is so awesome. And then you're starting to get into this feedback loop where you're starting to develop the proof, and it's coming in and your identity is becoming that of this shop owner. So that's another thing. I wanna talk about to identity. I think that that is a big role into Friday feelings, and as you're forming your identity, probably even as you're forming your frontal cortex before the age of twenty five I think, it's I think it's you know, you can still be anything or do anything. I don't know about you. But I feel like the older I get and I'm still young, but you know in my late thirties. Now at this point. I'm starting to feel like my. Identity is becoming a little bit more fixed. And if I'm approaching something new that doesn't fit this identity that I've already formed for myself. I feel a little Friday or unsure or uncertain or you know, all the all the bad feelings. Yeah. I've definitely had lots of thoughts around how I would feel if I were starting this business ten years ago or even five years ago because they've been it would be really different. I think a lot of my feelings have to do with my age, which really makes me even have that much more compassion for bosses out there who are, you know, forty fifty sixty years old who were changing what they're doing and doing the thing in facing their feelings like my hat goes away off to you guys for sure because they think things something does happen, especially when you cross that like thirty threshold where you are who you are and changing it is that much harder. You have to prove it that much harder to yourself. It makes me wanna like look into that a little more just to like really uncover what's happening there. But mostly I want. Concrete within myself. I also have these like win. Then statements that go through my head like when I'm sixty years old. That's when I'm really going to become an artist like a capital a painter artist, or that's what I'm going to write my memoir. That's when all these things are going to happen. So there's another thing that happens on the other side of age where it's like, oh, well, once I have a little more experience under my belt, or when certain things are in place. That's when I'll do this thing. Right. But no, I'm gonna do it. Now, apparently. Okay. So you've hit some bumps in the road from finding just the right candle containers. You're right like who knew how much drama could be around sourcing a candle canoe who to funk it. I would have probably rethought. My first product if I knew it was going to be that hard. But yes. But then like some bigger upsets kind of happen like your business partner your original business partner unexpectedly quitting. And so I'm curious to hear what you learned from these bumps aka failures right there. Well, some of those aren't failures they are bumps, but you could take them personal he s and see them as failures probably you could. And and I will admit that. I did I did for some period of time on both accounts where you know, whether it was those containers, which I actually am very happy to say at the moment. I think we have solved the problem though. I'm also going to knock on somewhat. But then yes, my business partner also very unexpectedly quit, which was completely blindsided. Me I was not expecting it. Which what unexpected means and it hit me pretty hard because she was also a friend of mine, and I thought that we had some better open communication. Than that. And it, but it also taught me actually all of these things have taught me a lot. And whether that is, you know, consistently battling brand new fraud failings or Friday feelings that had pretty much quieted themselves to just come roaring back or or if it was something like sourcing, which seems very practical or something as like very feeling deep as having as having my business partner..

partner fraud forty fifty sixty years sixty years five years ten years
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"It's really interesting is that so much journalism of the last fifty sixty years has always been there in the no the journalists while they screwed that over the financial crash in two thousand eight and they got it wrong, either Brexit, and they got it wrong. They have a Trump. And now, we know they don't know anything they know that we know that they don't know. And so we're in that world, and in a way, that's what this show is trying to get out. And if I could be nice to Rosie, I think she was a head of her time with this. Because when we started doing this show, and she had this idea. These people are on the wing what you're talking about. Now is the fact that we've all slipped into this swamp of knowingness and started to invent our own strange dreams, and we're just waiting to see who's going to get out of those dreams and turn them into a big narrative. It could be the right could be the left, and I think those elections on Tuesday. We'll give you a pointer to what might happen in the future on that as rosy K and Adam Curtis talking too much lower end Adam Rose's collaborative downs, which is called MK L. Is that the Southbank centre in London next Thursday? The eighth of November in a moment will ask how worried we should be about AI powered border guards before that though. Let's catch up with some of the day's other stories. For the first time Turkey's, president has directly accused the Saudi government of being behind the murder of the journalist Khashoggi, Richard type arrogant avenues article in the Washington Post to say the order to kill him came from the highest levels of the Saudi government. Please also said that he doesn't think in king salmon himself was involved in the decision a Pakistani cleric known as the father of the Taliban has been killed in the country the motive for the killing of Milana Samuel hawk remains unclear. He ran a Madressa in northern Pakistan where many Taliban leaders, including the group's founder had studied. And the man who had been dubbed the real super. Mario has died. Mario Seagal was eighty four years old. He was an Italian American property developer the US state of Washington in the nineteen eighties. He leased a warehouse to Nintendo then named the star of that newest video game after him many years later, he joked that he was still waiting. For the royalty checks. This is the monocle daily..

AI Mario Seagal Taliban Saudi government Rosie Adam Curtis Brexit Milana Samuel hawk Washington Post Adam Rose Southbank centre Washington Khashoggi Nintendo Madressa US London Pakistan Turkey murder
Kristin Davis Reignites SATC Feud with Emmys Throwback Photo

Lori and Julia

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Kristin Davis Reignites SATC Feud with Emmys Throwback Photo

"With lows in the low six. Tonight, rainy and mid sixties tomorrow. Currently it's sixty and guess what cloudy at the mytalk studios. This is a mytalk dirt alert update a quick look at what's happening in entertainment dug up a lot of good dirt on mytalk mytalk. Listen. After fifty sixty years of life performing Bob Seger

Bob Seger Mytalk Mytalk Mytalk Studios Fifty Sixty Years
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on KSRO

"SRO I'm Pat Kerrigan happy Friday to you it seems like it was just. About a year ago I remember having a conversation in the chaos RO newsroom in saying boy wouldn't it be nice when smart is up and running and is just a normal part of our daily routine and sonoma's county here we are a year later and on the. Live line with us is the general manager of smart? For men Syrian and Mr. Mansouri and glad to have you back good morning and happy Friday for Noma county and happy anniversary one year. Anniversary of the smart train what's the biggest thing you've learned over the last year you know we learned what. A difference we made in the quality of life for people who are now using our train six hundred ninety one, thousand seven hundred forty eight people just These specific about if you have just new and we carried sixty two thousand seven hundred. Twenty six bicycles in less than a year We see a lot of smiles we see ourselves as a, safe and. Reliable transportation option those who were stocking local roads and and highway. Wanna. One now have another option and we are very very happy so over six hundred thousand riders the? First year, and Mr. men sorry and how how much is that. In alignment with what you thought would happen. In the first, year you know we we thought we'd be somewhere around seven hundred thousand we adjusted our forecast. After. The October fires as you know we lost, six thousand homes and, you know thousands of people had to change their commute, pattern sure. And now as we have a justed. Again we're coming back very very strong just. Likes Anoma county is coming back very very strong and a ridership is on the rise the whole summer is being surprisingly very heavy even Those schools are not. In session people are now CDs as a way of. Life around sonoma's marine county well that's just what you wanted it to be I, know that for a, fact and. We have to talk about to particularly this week the second what. Looks. Like the investigation is ongoing but what looks like another suicide on the smart train tracks this past? Week at, the, at Nevado station and is is it is it. A sad reality and part of a community's. Train experience well, look at it this way we haven't had, trained in north bay for about fifty sixty years. And. How we all behave around the train and, the train tracks is, something that we work with every day we need the, newspapers radios. And televisions and every single one of. Your listeners help you know public safety is. Absolute Number one please don't try to beat the gates we have footage is of cars that they go under the gates and you know pedestrians try to beat the. Train you can be the train so just taken outdoor extra seconds or. Minutes, or two and make sure everybody's safe so. It is something that that you, know we're going to continue doing community outreach but you know we we wanna take these time and really, tell you about this Saturday and Sunday if I may take a minute and one more question about the about the, the other? Circumstance though before we dive into the smart fest this weekend and? That, is about you know the. Existing warning systems aboard the train I know that you know I was on the smart train it is very very high tech and I talked to your chief of police about. This and and wondering what you have to say about what warning systems there are. Available on, the smart train to Warn the engineer if there's some thing or some one. In the tracks ahead well no such technology exists yet while we have the latest technology rule, wanted to five or six in the entire nation known, as positive train control, but those, are those are not sophisticated, enough to. Deal with somebody who decides, to jump in front of a. Train you know, we have sixty, three at grade crossings where we have gates we have an open system our next plan is to try to come out with security cameras as many places as possible You know in addition to the other camera system that we have so it's something that the entire railroad industry and. Transportation industries dealing with but, we're going to continue to try. To figure out how to, have the safest possible but then every single one of us can help by by just being a lot. More careful around the trains and around the track sure personal responsibility another important part of this? Whole, equation, all right let's talk about this weekend the one year anniversary of smart tell us about smart fest well become our board of, directors wanted..

general manager Pat Kerrigan Noma county sonoma Anoma county Mr. Mansouri Nevado station engineer one year fifty sixty years
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"The uniqueness is we breaking away from the dominant model that has existed in credit card and personal loan for the last forty more than that i would say almost fifty sixty years which would i call the experience fair isaac model so that model is one where you have to be in the system to be in the system so you start by using a credit card when you're a student and you have your first footprint and generates chris your scorecard in a fair isaac invented that and he goes into credit bureau and luke gets fed as you progress in life if you fall off you become subprime these you with this is like you know it doesn't deal very well with people who are new to country at a later stage so if you decide to move to at age thirty five you have no register on experience so you're blank here's what we call thin file or if you're low income and you have to face product that are not designed for you so if you're earning less than a thousand pound a month in the uk and you only want to borrow two hundred three hundred pound there's very few supplies out there who provide shortterm loan of that nature so as a result in a we see a lot of customers ended up being not am bank but end the bank so the big difference there is the dominant model has been this you have to be an assistant to be in a system we have used psychometric to get people in the system without having a footprint then i think probably the last piece that makes us very different is how we got about resolving this problem by having a mix of retail and smartphones so we had to start by having retail outlet to enable us to end stand how our main competitors was working and to generate and structure data and understanding how we were doing the cycle metrics and we have moved gradually to app base lending so when you say retail shopfronts we have a few shop front in the u k brilliant okay when you elevate there but how do you is that how you acquire customers people see origines clyde customers aco shop front they go in and say all wonder.

isaac luke uk origines clyde two hundred three hundred poun fifty sixty years thousand pound
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"What she said i i would guess that that that that he would question i said about quantum theory because you know einstein famously did not not a big fan of quantum theory and and now einstein's been dead for you know fifty sixty sixty year over sixty years and there's a lot more evidence of quantum theory i'm wondering if stephen would would say what do you say now l the other thing is of course einstein was was the one who is lay ahead of his time in looking for a unified theory of everything and people at that in those days i thought that was nuts and now you know that's the for the last forty years has been really the hottest thing in physics we have we don't have it yet but he might want to know what he thinks of those attempts did he even at his condition ever laugh oh well he he i don't think he could laugh i've never saw how could you see a smile on his face he had a big he light up the real hit a huge smile he loved hugh i remember once we had a heated argument i'm waiting you know as usual i'm waiting minutes five six seven eight minutes for him to compose his response to what i said i'm all like you know what what's going on and i you know i wanna we gotta get to the bottom of this and he finally you know what when he finished composing it if you weren't looking over shoulder to see you know he would hit a button and his computer voice would read it finally comes and it was a joke joe did he did he with us sane it did he ever curse through that machine yes he did he ain't british curses i could just see him do that.

stephen einstein joe five six seven eight minutes fifty sixty sixty year forty years sixty years
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"In the israelpalestine jordan lebanon in a in the lebanon steelers it's up to fifth merely fifty percent of the population of lebanon the christian uh in in syria at wolves 15 to 20 percent fifty sixty years ago in palestine it was certainly fifty percent at least on the full 1941 h m and in iraq of very high significant under the figures there on but that had decreased jammeh christian communities and very very strong in the middle east it's actually western policies in the region let's have decimated the christian community and which of also helped helped build on the ideology which also comes from saudi arabia i mean there's one of the other or cress ironies of the whole thing know all western governments saudi arabia alone closest friend and yet it's out from saudi arabia comes the worst form of i'm one of the ideology extremist ideology both is at the heart of so much killing and destruction of the lots of the support for the terror for terrorism comes from saudi arabia and yet we at but because of what was he because of oil because or economic interests we are the arming saudi arabia to the tune of billions of dollars who had obliterating yemen in ah they're we are obliterating another country unarmed on the british government is involved in this as well in a billions of dollars of of them uh armagh arms a concert of saudi arabia from from britain in a a we're concert now the ideology has it's been growing in the middle east um but a lot of muslim i think you what people don't realize them in syria particularly a loss of the sunnis even all if you like secular muslim serve survey brave they live in the time this community in once the preserve that um so they're faithful muslims but pro but but once preserve a secular diverse society with respect for other communities but there is this dangerous i'm while the ideology um and salah offers on which has there um which is strongly represented among the circle rebel groups.

lebanon syria palestine iraq saudi arabia yemen british government britain salah fifty percent fifty sixty years 20 percent
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The greatest reporting of the prison that we have seen in the last fifty sixty years mankind amen a man a man from the little cnn reporter at nearby game low yes we are the greatest we've done the greatest job on reporting on the president in the last fifty sixty let's not even stop there let's say since the dawn of time we dawned the greatest reporting on a president that anyone's ever done abe are you kidding me but she's eaten if it just real quickly finally incomes bob woodward in the tone is a big ask here i agree about survey club for the reporting particularly on television commentary there's kind of selfrighteousness at and smugness inla in people kind of uh ridicule win the president worthy aymen's now hey mad aim hallelujah no complete silence on when we reported on nixon uh as obviously had a very different era but uh there was weak ezzat adopter toned of ridicule the tone was wetter the fact active before we go i had ask about something that you that you inform me about before we go i've got to change is subject now because now you're criticizing us and i can't have that because i was given the amiens and a halla louis is to bernstein who was attacking the president calling our job the greatest at less fifty to sixty years if a maude a j man a man a man hallelujah yes we've done a great job a they've gotten no the they have no realization of the kind of job they've actually done which has been horrific they gave him no criticism at all to the last president they gave the they never paid attention to the fact i mean the the cult trump ally are all the time and he's he's the you know had his share of lies but never did they call barack obama out on a lying virtually every day uh they didn't even notice it they didn't care about it the did know reporting on it there was critical what was it that five percent of the mainstream media reports have been positive on death row the wall i in the first sixty days as for sure and this year has been a boot horrifically negative toward president trump yet seville like it's 62 to 65 percent or something of all reporter yes has had a negative i it was.

reporter president bob woodward aymen amiens maude barack obama cnn abe nixon louis bernstein mainstream media fifty sixty years five percent sixty years 65 percent sixty days
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Had twenty thirty forty fifty sixty years to live and you're not financially free i was saying if whatever you're doing whatever it is if you think you've got the right map whatever you're doing hasn't it made you rich your map isn't working it's just not working guys within five years every one of you should be able to replace you passive income now really easy if you're broke it poor civic del on poor c that's fine it's easier when you poor because you only have to replace next to nothing let's get you out that welfare check buoyed i'd be a big move our will do that and while it i do that because if you figure out how to get off the welfare checking prieto double it again in double again double again end up being somewhere but you'd rather just stay safe uh the old saying why take you put up first base to go to second uh because you got to go to second base where he can hit a tworun but many people think they're going to sit at first base in some way somehow they're gonna fall and when they get back up they're going to be at home run to study work their way here's another one miss lindsay lohan luigi lowlands career to off after mean girls debuted in two thousand four but it wasn't long after that personal and professional troubles began to chip waiter uh her butting bank account her hard party ways in unreliable reputation led to the decline in the mainstream acting although she did at still in sixty four different events i looked it up in two thousand twelve the irs has seized control verse scarlett aired stars funds to ban over two hundred thousand in back taxes in two thousand thirteen low had did a series of interviews with oprah that reportedly earned her two million dollars but most that money was embarked of earmarked for taxes rehab fees and further i arrest debts leaving her with a paltry five hundred thousand dollars here's girl was making tens of not hundreds of millions of dollars and she's broke mouth five hundred thousand dollars broke but men it.

prieto bank account irs scarlett oprah five hundred thousand dollars twenty thirty forty fifty sixt two million dollars five years
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is bloomberg business week with carol massar and julia generally from bloomberg radio snap is an incredibly big platform baz kabila very big business insists that the market put all of the value into that it was going to continue to grow and be thirty forty fifty sixty year old so what's thaksin would snap is going to be benefit probably overvalued in a wall frank dynamic human even amongst everything being overvalued we're going to have to do something innovate that's gary v her czech vein or media speaking to bloomberg scarlett food about snapchat the company behind the popular messaging apple and public earlier this year to considerable fanfare but as bloomberg's knacks checking reports it has a pretty serious problem max let's talk about snap owner of snapchat went public in march of this year sura its first day of trading and it's kind of been townhill sense yeah snap has been ten of one of the digs sort of turnaround to serve reverse turnarounds i guess of of this year it was kind of a widely seen as as one of the hot tech companies going into its ipo in april it was value at at around twenty billion dollars it had this you know kind of yang woundr can see evans spiegel had this amazingly successful product spectacles which is like a camera that you wear on your your your face and and all that kind of just seems in retrospect maybe a little bit of hype so so a couple things have happened one of which in the most important thing is facebook basically facebook and anyone who's really paying attention this but for for years facebook has been sort of quietly and meticulously taking snaps best features and knocking him off and releasing them to it's much much larger audience and basically wall street after getting very excited about snap sort of changed its mind and.

carol massar baz kabila thaksin apple bloomberg snapchat facebook julia gary evans spiegel thirty forty fifty sixty year twenty billion dollars
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"And what it is as well as a symbol i think of whether iraq can be held together as a country because iraq really is about different ethnicities different sects competing perhaps cooperating and then if they can't do a deal over koekoek than the contrary dealer the future of the country you mentioned the various tensions that exist that this dispute was a waste of rumbling along in the background wasn't it has the referendum forced the issue i think it has been the the dispute the kurdish claim to koekoek goes back generations fifty sixty years or more and this has been a constant bone of contention between the kurds and the baghdad government going way back unigue room way way back before saddam hussein but no i think that when it came to that independence referendum at the end of september through the iraqi kurds overplayed their hand because they were in a pretty good position the control cook which they was wounded they managed to seize it at the time when the whole country was falling apart when ias were sweeping through at a couple of years ago and nobody was making moves to kick them out and now it seems that they didn't resist when iraqi forces and also shia militias went in there to clear the man but you know just because there is now an iraqi flag flying apparently from the governor a building in the centre of koekoek instead of the kurdish flag that doesn't mean to say that the underlying problems have been solved and i think that if they cannot do a deal about coq venice yet another sign that iraq is on the road to disintegration as a unitary country that was jeremy bone.

iraq saddam hussein koekoek coq venice jeremy bone baghdad fifty sixty years
"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"fifty sixty years" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Forty fifty sixty years republicans fighting against every attempt to provide healthcare to people and so the it's there there's there's not a thing that unites them here right other than the the fact that it's barack obama's health care bill that's the one thing that unites and they don't care about anything else other then raised alma the obama leg legacy that we can take down and they say that you know that they've made this promise that they would repeal obamacare fully last eight years and trump and some of these other people republicans keep telling them if you don't keep that promise voters will punish you ray which i think even if i was just giving political advice to republicans i'd say like yeah i realize he made that promise but your voters don't want to lose their health insurance either hey like maybe they think yeah you made a promise but if you're republican house republican in an estate with a huge medicaid expansion i'd go back and say i know i've been saying repeal obamacare for the last seven years but i also know that there's some things right with the law and its covered a lot of people and so i'd rather go try to improve the law with the other party and then to take it away from people and looked at slip governors like john case except that governors like brian sandovol nevada said that zoellick there are republicans had done that it's just they don't they don't exist on a number of them don't exist in the senate right now and you know you're not just proffering some theory about republican voters think there are polls that show it plenty poor strongly four republics were strongly for.

republicans barack obama obamacare health insurance john case brian sandovol nevada zoellick senate Forty fifty sixty years eight years seven years