35 Burst results for "Fifty Six Years"

Coroner: Man who died after vaccine died of natural cause

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Coroner: Man who died after vaccine died of natural cause

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting a Florida corner says a man who died after receiving a coded nineteen vaccine died of a natural cause a South Florida medical examiner's office says a doctor who died about two weeks after he got fighters Colby nineteen vaccine died in a manner that's been categorized as natural fifty six year old doctor Gregory Michael died in January from immune thrombosis title Pina according to an email from Darren compres director of operations for the Miami Dade County medical examiner department the condition known as ITP can prevent blood from clotting and cause internal bleeding according to Cooper's email there is no medical certainty that the covert shot caused the disorder Michael's death was investigated by the Florida department of health and the federal centers for disease control and prevention hi Mike Crossey up

Mike Rossi Gregory Michael Miami Dade County Medical Exam South Florida Colby Pina Florida Darren Cooper Florida Department Of Health Federal Centers For Disease Co Michael Mike Crossey
Biden to sign voting-rights executive order Sunday

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Biden to sign voting-rights executive order Sunday

"President biden is expected to sign an executive order today designed to promote voting access this as civil rights activists mark fifty six years since bloody sunday. When hundreds of people marched for voting rights in selma alabama. Some of them were brutally beaten by state troopers. As they crossed the edmund pettus bridge becoming a symbol of racism across the deep south that later led martin luther king junior to march from selma to the state capital in montgomery and eventually led congress to pass the voting rights act of nineteen sixty

President Biden Edmund Pettus Selma Alabama Martin Luther King Montgomery Congress
Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

06:37 min | 7 months ago

Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

"The. Fbi and new york. Police departments are facing new calls to finally open their records related to the assassination of malcolm x. Shocked at fifty six years ago at the audubon ballroom and harlem february twenty first nineteen sixty five. This comes after the release of a deathbed confession of a former undercover new york police officer who admitted to being part of a broad new york police and fbi conspiracy targeting malcolm in the confession the former officer. Raymond would who died last year admitted he entrapped to members of malcolm security team and another crime. A plot to blow up the statue of liberty just days before the assassination. On saturday ray woods cousin. Reggie would read the letter at a news conference at the shabazz center in harlem assignment to draw the two men into a felonious federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first nineteen sixty five in his letter. Raymond would also revealed. He was inside the audubon ballroom. At the time of malcolm's assassination at least one other undercover new york police officer. Gene roberts was also inside after infiltrating the security team of the organization of afro american unity. The group malcolm founded after leaving the nation of islam. Both officers would and roberts were part of the bureau of special services and investigations or bossie. A secret of political intelligence unit of the nypd nicknamed the red squat welcomes assassination. Police arrested three members of the nation of islam. His murder but questions about the guilt of the men have lingered for decades in his letter. Raymond would openly says one of the men. Thomas johnson was innocent and was arrested to quote. Protect my cover and the secrets of the fbi and the nypd unquote ray woods letter. Echoes claims and recent books by manning marable and less pain that some of malcolm's actual assassins were never charged in a moment. We'll be joined by raymond. Woods cousin reggie would released his deathbed confession. But i i want to turn to the words of malcolm x. Himself speaking after his home in queens was firebomb just a week before his assassination february fourteenth. Nine thousand nine hundred sixty five by house was bombed. It was bound by the muslim movement. On the orders of aligned to mohammed. Now they hit come around so they had planned to do it from the front. End the back so that i couldn't get out. They had they. They covered the complete the door then they had come to the back but instead of getting directly in back of the house in this way they stood at a forty five degree angle and talk with the windows so it it glance and onto the ground and the fire hit the window woke up my second oldest baby and then the fire burn on the outside of the house but it had had that one going through that window it would have fallen on a six year old girl a four year old girl and a two year old girl. And i'm gonna tell you if it had done it. Taken my wrangling going to anybody insight. I would not wait. Goes in the senate because this the police know the criminal operation of the black muslim movement because they have thoroughly infiltrated because they have thoroughly infiltrated it. Those are the words of malcolm x. Right before his assassination right after his home was firebombed in february of nineteen sixty five just days later he was shot seconds after he took the stage at the ballroom. We're joined now by reggie. Would the cousin of raymond would author of the new book. The ray which story confessions of a black nypd cop in the assassination of malcolm x. Still with us. Civil rights attorney. Ben crump who attended that news conference with Reggie wooden at the audubon ballroom now. The shabazz center where malcolm x was assassinated fifty six years ago. Reggie thank you so much for joining us. Use read parts of the letter this weekend. Talk about your cousin. Ray would and what you understand happened the conspiracy. He alleges that he was a part of by the fbi. And the new york police department to assassinate malcolm x. Morning thank you for having me ray was was a complicated man I think be based on his past experiences he he lived with a lot of fear and caution on a daily basis which instilled in me over the past ten years but are ray was a person that lived as a lived. He lived as a as a very quiet and reserved person because of what he experienced he witnessed some horrible things firsthand and also realized that he was a part of it after the fact and so therefore ray was told by his handlers. That not to repeat anything that he had seen or heard or he would Join malcolm therefore for forty six years. Ray separated himself from the family and In fear that he will put us in danger out rey lived alone many years and he Finally in his final years when he realized that he was his cancer was a reoccurring. He wanted to reconnect with family. Because he didn't want to die alone. So i volunteered to move them to florida so that my wife and i take care of them and get them back and forth cancer treatments things of that nature and therefore he trusted me enough to reveal this information and asked me not to say anything until he passed away but at the same time knox allow them to take it to his grave.

Malcolm Ray Woods FBI Audubon Ballroom Raymond New York New York Police Department Shabazz Center Gene Roberts Organization Of Afro American Bureau Of Special Services And Bossie Malcolm X Manning Marable Woods Cousin Reggie Reggie Thomas Johnson Harlem
Democracy As We Know It

The Experiment

05:14 min | 7 months ago

Democracy As We Know It

"The life of maryland newkirk and on november six twenty twenty after a long battle with cancer. She was fifty six. She survived by her husband three siblings and three kids including her son van. Who's a senior editor at the atlantic. I'm a mom's oldest child. I am required under law to only speak good things when a life comes to an end we the ones who are left behind. We're left with a story a really a bunch of different stories like for van. There were small stories about the way. His mom looked really playing a tie or what she cared about. Walden your church. How she treated people who was an incredibly patient what she struggled with the stress rising off her but he but when van took a minute to pull back to really zoom out on the time line of his mom's life he could see this bigger story about the country. She lived in one of the things. I like to think about is the fact that when she was born it was by no means guaranteed that she would be granted the right to vote and that right to vote would be protected looking back on her life ban sees a story about democracy and it's different than the one he was taught so i was always taught that america was founded explicitly as democracy. You know you go to school. And you're taught that this was the biggest hit in global democracy since the athenians but really to me. I have been more and more convinced that the only true phase of what might even be somewhat called. Democracy in america has been america's voting writer and my mother has seen every single day van says contrary to what you might have been told real. Democracy in america hasn't been here that long. It's only been here for fifty six years this week. Van newkirk tells the short story of democracy by taking us through the life of the woman who saw the whole thing his mom. I'm julie longoria this experiment. A show about our unfinished country as van tells it his mom was born just one year before our democracy started a mother was born in sixty four. I understand that family. Storytelling often embellished. So you have to work a little bit too well. I've not yet gotten the fact checkers on some of this. But as the story goes a mother was born in greenwood mississippi. She went home in a cardboard box. That is the legend. I believe it's probably one of those. Cardboard bassin has which not that uncommon. But yeah you know they were poor and on the way home you know drove pass headquarters of civil rights organizations staging freedom summer but that's also will be known as the summer of civil rights because of the mississippi freedom summer project it was one of the main flashpoints in the civil rights movement and there were staging it out of headquarters in greenwood mississippi where she was born dan. He say what you want. I say i wanna reddish the vote. A lot of what they were trying to do was to register black people to vote to send into mississippi that stomach upwards of one thousand teachers ministers lawyers and students from all around the country and they did that in part by bringing lots and lots of volunteers. Lots and lots of white volunteers around the country to come down to mississippi. I hope we can reach the lives as many people as possible in idealistic the constitution the bill of rights. And i think it's important for everybody to have these every was met with incredible amounts of violence so about two three weeks after that. My house was five close. Been tony one of rise. Black little beaming. They should expect possibly somebody. She was born in the middle of all this. You know a time. When greenwood was a very contentious place to live for

VAN Walden Your Church America Newkirk Van Newkirk Mississippi Julie Longoria Maryland Atlantic Greenwood Cancer DAN
New Zealand Records 1st Suspected COVID-19 Case Since November

From The Newsroom

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

New Zealand Records 1st Suspected COVID-19 Case Since November

"Overseas now and new zealand has recorded its first community case of covid nineteen since november. The eighteenth eighteenth fifty six year old woman arrived in new zealand. On december thirty. After travelling from london and underwent two weeks of hotel isolation. the woman produced to negative tests while in isolation was released on january attain but began experiencing symptoms and return to positive test on saturday evening. She's believed to a visit. Approximately thirty locations following her release from hotel

New Zealand London
Project Car of the Week: 1969 Dodge Dart

Talking Mopars

04:23 min | 8 months ago

Project Car of the Week: 1969 Dodge Dart

"This week's projet carve. The week was the nineteen sixty nine. Dodge dart posted on the moped hunter. Facebook page on tuesday january fifth at nine a. m. let's read the ad nine thousand nine hundred sixty nine dodge dart sixteen thousand five hundred dollars. Nineteen sixty nine. Dodge dart very well built four forty. Tci seven twenty seven dana sixty with four fifty six in spool fiberglass front rear deck lead from bumper. Just put down the direct floor. Liner front end has been completely rebuilt. Everything has been changed including the torsion bars retires or hoosiers that don't have fifty miles on them. Amnesty distributors six. Al box brand new holly xp carb too much to list completely rewired with ron. Francis wiring also have the box with the extra wiring for other applications plus instructions also frontiers new and converted over to kelsey hayes. Four piston calipers shocks in front or new shocks rear. Our new drag shocks car is very fast. Title status is clean. I know what you're thinking. You're thinking here he goes again with another dart drag car. And you're right. I can't help that. I love dodge darts and i can't help that. I love drag car projects. They're just cool. I really do enjoy them. I think they're awesome. And i think that great project cars and this car just happens to be another dart. The reason why. I like this one so much is because it's pretty much ready to go to me. It looks like it just needs a few finishing touches and you're off to the races. I should say that like with any race car project. You'd go through this thing from top to bottom. But just based on what i see. I think it's a great candidate for a drag car project especially at under twenty grand. I mean this thing sitting sixteen five. I think there might be a little bit of room but you know just looking at the car and comparing it to other things that i've seen out there for maybe half the price the seems like a good bye. I will say this though. It may be kind of a handful on the street. And that's only because of the spool and the rear end ratio for those of you. That don't know a spool is a fully locked rear diff unlike locking diff the school locked at all times. So when you're turning you're gonna feel the rear end grabbing and gripping the road because the wheels will be unnaturally turning at the same rate of speed so it's kind of impractical parking taking turns and stuff. It might feel a little bit weird almost like if you're a four wheel drive on the street you know and you crank the wheel all the way and you try to turn. You're gonna feel that rear end like skipping almost The other issue that i saw was the four fifty six years. I think it would be really fun. Obviously light to light on the street. But i'd imagine if you're on the freeway a lot of could be an issue but that said you know a lot of people run these gears all the time even on the street so i guess it just depends on the type of driving. You'll be doing and if you're willing to put up with it it might be okay if you only take the car out occasionally on the streets but at sixteen thousand five hundred you have a great headstart to a fun strip car. That can possibly be driven on the street. It's a big lakhdar with some bigs and littles also has what looks to be centerline. Auto drags on it. So that's that's a plus in my book. I love those wheels. So big and little auto drags cool in my book. It's gotta side exit exhaust aluminum radiator. It's got a nice racing shift in it. Some cheap racing seats grant steering wheel. You know this things got some potential you know does it have its flaws sher- but we can work around those and we can take this platform as you get it and then make it your own. You know there's still room to improve and you know that's sure to tickle anymore. Part theseus fancy especially mind the thing even has really bars too so if you did drive it on the street the only addition to make it even more intimidating would probably be a parachute but discards cool has a ton of potential and it sure to turn heads on both the track and the street got nice orange paint a black bumble bee stripe. It's got a giant hood scoop on the front like the old school. I don't know what you call it like a pro street hood scoop. I guess I think that's the word i'm looking for. I think that's the description i can give. But it's not the typical hood that i would like to see on a mo- par but i guess it works. I like hemi hood scoops or six. Pack hood scoops. I think those are cool But it's got four. It's got the fiber last trunk so it's got four pins on that to hold it down Like i said it's got the whealy bars so cut that bad ass aesthetic to

Dart Kelsey Hayes Dodge Dodge Dart TCI Francis RON Facebook AL
The Great Gatsby

Planet Money

03:07 min | 8 months ago

The Great Gatsby

"In nineteen twenty five. F scott fitzgerald published the great gatsby and like pretty much every author. He copyrighted the book when it came out which you know fair enough the way copyright worked at the time fitzgerald and his heirs could collect royalties from the book for fifty six years. All the way until nineteen eighty-one and during that time if anybody wanted to make movie or play or anything at all based on gatsby they would have to get permission and probably pay a licensing fee to the fitzgerald family. And then according to the law after the fifty six years the book would go into something called the public domain fitzgerald's kids or grandkids wouldn't get royalties any more and more importantly anyone who wanted to could print up and give away copies of the book or rewrite it from toms horses. Point of view or create gatsby on ice anything at all and you know copyright. Is this balancing. Act on the one hand you want to encourage and reward people who write books create things but you also want to let those things enter the public domain at some point so we can all share them and tweak them and build on them and make more creative stuff. The artists figuring out how long to keep something in copyright there was nothing special about fifty six years. That's just a number that congress picked and then they decided to change it in nineteen seventy six just five years before the great gatsby entered the public domain. Five years before gatsby on ice congress changed copyright law. They said among other things fifty six years not quite long enough under the new stronger rules. Gatsby wouldn't go into the public domain until two thousand one and then just a few years before that congress jumped in again and made copies of old works last even longer under the new new rules. Gas would not go into the public domain until almost one hundred years after it was written until twenty twenty one but still sounds like some meat up year from the future to me. And you know congress could have kept pushing this date making the copyright longer and longer until the three thousand or something like that but there's been some pushback on the ever lengthening copyright period. Not enough pushback to start making the copyright shorter but enough to stop making them longer and so on january first of this year. Finally the great gatsby went into the public domain into our domain. It belongs to us now. It belongs to everybody. And what we now own i have to say is a complicated book. It has the romance and beauty of america. It also has the racism and misogyny and anti semitism of america and maybe the most american thing about the It's all about money. This is a book about why people want money and what they do when they get it and what money does to them. In other words. Gatsby is the perfect story for planet money and now that gets me is in the public domain. If we wanted to we could talk about it for a minute at the beginning of the show. Yeah say hello and welcome to planet money sticking ahead break in and then we could read the whole thing. We could read the entire book the entire book and posted on our podcast.

Gatsby Fitzgerald Congress Scott Fitzgerald America
Feds put first Black inmate to death since execution restart

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Feds put first Black inmate to death since execution restart

"The federal government has executed its first black inmates since president Donald Trump resumed executions Christopher B. although was nineteen when he abducted robbed shot and killed Todd and Stacey Bagley a religious couple from Iowa visiting his hometown of clean Texas he was convicted by a federal jury of eleven white and one black and sentenced to death during a campaign event in Jacksonville Florida president trump talked about his denying clemency they came to my office today and the death penalty for clemency I said what was the crime the crime was so horrible in his last statement the forty year old B. although ask god to comfort the families of those he killed seven inmates have been put to death by federal authorities since the summer in the fifty six years before that just three federal executions were carried out I'm Jim acquire

Federal Government Donald Trump Christopher B. Todd Iowa Texas President Trump Stacey Bagley Jacksonville Florida
Bored and Uninspired? How to Get Unstuck and Motivated.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Bored and Uninspired? How to Get Unstuck and Motivated.

"Hey sober sellers. It's Lynn. Peachtree. City and today I am feeling man. I just came off two days of celebrating my sober bursaries. If you didn't listen to last week's PODCAST I. Kinda celebrate today's the day. I went into treatment were was still a little drunk and then the day after where I was freer of. The chemicals in my body, and now I'm coming up on Friday. This is Wednesday and on Friday I turn fifty six. So this often happens to me although not unlike most of you I think I'm having some difficulties in figuring out how I feel during the time of the COVID. So I'm going to share some of those feelings that I just started. Thinking about this morning with you here on the podcast guided by what I like to look at when I'm feeling stock and uninspired, and what that means for me when I do feel stuck if I'm thinking more deeply about it and possibly what it could mean to you. So fifty six years is not a short time on the planet, but I sometimes feel as if I've only lived for ten years kind of wider awake. So the patterns that I've developed in my life sure, I can go and take some looks sees back into my twenties and find patterns like I'm seeing today, but they're so much more profound now that I don't dowse myself with alcohol every single day. One of the biggest realizations is for me, I tend to get really bored. Three years of living a certain way whether it's in a certain place or doing a certain thing. But I really see this in myself and not to say, of course, I don't love what I do or love where I'm at. But I start to get a little wonky on the inside and I'm definitely going through one of those phases. I lived in Peachtree city for over three years. I've been doing sober. So recovery and Lynn Matic counseling for Awhile and I'm getting an inch. Not to mention I think a lot of us are feeling really bored because of COVID and I say board with a capital, B. Because we. Have really dug deep into puzzles and artwork and getting creative and yeah. Once again, my guitar sitting out in my living room, probably need to sell that one too because I'm not playing at ultimately, the drive is to get something coming in to our systems something new as I was waking up this morning I. Know I've felt a profound sense of loneliness. In probably the last four months more intensely. I miss being hugged. I. Have Said Numerous Times on the PODCAST and I'm an introvert that doesn't mean, I. Don't go out and get me some hugs every week. Just the tactile stuff that were used to a client and I were discussing this week. How we Miss Window shopping just go into TJ, maxx or wherever you have access to a lot of shopping and walking around uninhibited. Really Kinda just wasting time, but it was meaningful for me and this client that I was talking to I, don't know if that's something that you miss as well or other. Other things sped sure enough. We can't do even those things that we may have not done a lot of pre covid. We don't have a choice anymore. So this intense lonely feeling was coming over me and I couldn't quite figure out why I'm still seeing friends although I think in the last couple of weeks I've shown some signs of loneliness where I'm like, you know turning down those opportunities to be with people a little bit more which was kind of assigned to me that I might need some introspection really diving deeper into why I feel this. Stuck nece especially because I tend to enjoy the more mundane aspects of life I like to sleep I, like to rest I like good food I. Like just time. Things are teaching in me. So I wanted to get to the bottom of or at least somewhere near the bottom of why to take you through how this goes in my a little crazy brain. This morning as I was noodling this idea of what I wanted to talk about I started to I look at loneliness, and of course, type it in Cova with that while I'm googling. Up came tons of articles, mostly by the way from like march through may about how to deal and cope with loneliness in the time of covid. I read those back in March and May, and feel like I've done a lot of those things I've kept up on my connections via text and phone and Zoom I've you know gotten more involved in some groups on social media, I've reconnected to some of those healthier things romy and eating better whereas you know in the beginning I was kind of Etienne love ice cream. And I'm really worked to try and figure out how I can make it through these months of

Covid Peachtree City Lynn Matic Cova Romy Etienne
Joe Profaci

Kingpins

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Joe Profaci

"The underworld. Today's quote comes from Salvatori profanity. An influential captain in the most famous Colombo crime family based in New York City for fought. She's actions were ruthless but they were necessary to keep the families disputes away from authorities. Nowhere was this sentiment more apparent than in his famous quote. Goodfellas don't sue goodfellas goodfellas kill goodfellas cheese. Father Joe was the original head of the crime family before his death in nineteen sixty two in the years. Following the family was taken over by Joseph Colombo. The younger prophecy never expressed regret over. Not taking over for his father. He knew it was best if he worked outside of the limelight. Things were easier to accomplish in the shadows while Prophet. She never led the family. His role was important in keeping the peace profound. She was known to be a great mediator. Inter family disputes and was called in to squash any problems for example in nineteen ninety two a mob lawyer in Philadelphia named Salvatore threatened to sue a mobster named carmine Franco Avena accused Franko of skimming money off the top of their Waste Management. Racket without telling him as if the accusation itself wasn't enough to stir up trouble. Avena wanted to take the matter to court. Never the best idea for a criminal organization. The fifty-six-year-old flew in to settle the dispute at the behest of the Colombo family Ci Son was also married to a Venus daughter so in addition to helping the crime family he was protecting his own family profonde. She begged Wien not to file a civil suit. Exposing the entire business in front of a judge would lead to more charges against everyone but Avena was steadfast. That's when pro fauci uttered his famous quote to survive the mob. You had to avoid the courts. This wasn't how things were run instead. Violence was the law of the land. Profonde she didn't want Vena killed. He was family but if he didn't relent. That would be the only way forward. It took some more working over but Avena down. He and Franco settled their deal out of court weeks. Later the problem was federal officials. Had bugged. Evine is office. Every word of his conversation with Prof Archie was heard and some of prophecies comments were used to pin his men on a slew of charges. It was the biggest and most ironic slip up of his career. But he himself ultimately didn't face prosecution he was able to retreat back into the shadows just the way he liked it after a few more years of peacekeeping by the early two thousands prof

Carmine Franco Avena Prof Archie Vena Profonde Joseph Colombo Colombo Father Joe New York City Franko Evine Philadelphia Fauci Salvatore Wien
Phyllis George, pioneering sportscaster and former Miss America, has died

KHOW Marketplace

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Phyllis George, pioneering sportscaster and former Miss America, has died

"Phyllis George the former Miss America who became a female sportscasting pioneer has died at the age of seventy A. B. C.'s Thailand has her story she was Miss America in nineteen seventy one four years later Phyllis George joined Brett Musburger an irv cross on the NFL today show despite as she wrote in a two thousand two memoir it was a man's job and a good knowledge she knew nothing about the industry they must be the most resilient came in all of pro sports I think that's the best way you can put it you remember back in the fifty six year old who hosted the entertainment show people and co anchored the CBS morning news her daughter Pavel Ashley brown is a CNN White House correspondent Phyllis George will be remembered as a pioneer who inspired other women to become sportscasters as well as a respected

Thailand Miss America Phyllis George Brett Musburger NFL Pavel Ashley Brown White House Correspondent CBS CNN
Sports Broadcasting Pioneer Phyllis George Dies At 70

At Home with Gary Sullivan

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Sports Broadcasting Pioneer Phyllis George Dies At 70

"Phyllis George the former Miss America who became a female sportscasting pioneer has died at seventy she was Miss America in nineteen seventy one four years later Phyllis George joined Brett Musburger owner of cross on the NFL today show despite as she wrote in a two thousand two memoir it was a man's job and a good knowledge she knew nothing about the industry they must be the most resilient came in all of pro sports I think that's the best way you can put it you remember back in the fifty six year old who hosted the entertainment show people and co anchored the CBS morning news her daughter Pavel Ashley brown is a CNN White House correspondent Phyllis George will be remembered as a pioneer who inspired other women to become sportscasters as well as a respected

Miss America Phyllis George NFL Pavel Ashley Brown White House Correspondent Brett Musburger CBS CNN
The Arrogant Killer

Court Junkie

03:17 min | 1 year ago

The Arrogant Killer

"September twenty seventh. Two thousand seventeen seemed like a fairly typical morning for Jennifer forward. The fifty six year olds was working as a nanny and house manager for a father and his two children in Winter Park Florida. She arrived at the Berman family. Home around seven. Am to get the ten year old son ready for school. She dropped him off at seven. Fifty A M and then came back to the house little. Did she know someone was watching her that morning? Jennifer saw the father read Berman off to work at eight thirty and then left to her dentist appointment on her way back. She called Janet Grin to tell her to head on over to the Burmans home for a previously arranged job hanging a painting alarm records. Show the front door to the Berman. House opened at eleven thirty am minutes later. Jennifer called Janet to tell her not to come over after all because there was an emergency at the boys school and she had to pick him up at two thirty PM for regular school dismissal. The boys still hadn't been picked up read. Berman called Jennifer. But she didn't answer her phone and wasn't back at the house when he got there. Was it out of the ordinary for Jennifer to not pick up your kids when she was scheduled to do so yes and that ever happened before Labor in almost seven years that she had been taking care of your kids. Oddly enough he found her purse downstairs. Bathroom it appeared as though some chores had been done but not all. He calls her husband checked with local hospitals. But still no Jennifer. Finally that need Jennifer was reported as a missing person to the Winter Park Police Department. They noticed that three hundred dollars had been withdrawn from her bank account and another one hundred dollars was taken out the next day at an ATM. In Jacksonville Florida. About two and a half hours away. Police used her cell phone to track her movements and found her car abandoned in a grocery store parking lot in it they found a comforter for a bed and a bag containing bloody watch by the third day of her being missing. They discovered that she had been to a vacant lot near Disneyworld orange. County sheriff's helicopter pilots flew above it and made a gruesome discovery. They alerted deputies on the ground. Who then found Jennifer's body? She was face down in the field with grass. All around her her ankles were bound together with duct tape. Her wrists were bound together behind her with ZIP tie. Duct tape was wrapped around her entire face covering from her chin to her eyebrows. Were it appeared as though she had been dead for some time? Who Killed Jennifer Fulford? And why did they do this? Police and a jury were about to hear for

Jennifer Fulford Berman Berman Family Janet Grin House Manager Winter Park Florida Winter Park Police Department Florida Labor Burmans Jacksonville
Saints coach Payton says he tested positive for coronavirus

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Saints coach Payton says he tested positive for coronavirus

"New Orleans saints head coach Sean Payton learned Thursday that he has tested positive for covert nineteen the corona virus the first employee of either an NFL team or the league to make such a diagnosis public Payton told ESPN that he came forward to motivate people to educate themselves about what they can do to help fight the pandemic Payton said he took the test Monday after he began to feel ill a day earlier but also said that he has not been admitted to a hospital and does not have a fever or cough the fifty six year old coach said that he has been resting comfortably at home where he is in self quarantine I'm Josh Rowntree

Sean Payton Espn Fever Josh Rowntree New Orleans NFL
Coronavirus in Florida: Three new cases, including fifth in Broward and the first in Miami-Dade

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus in Florida: Three new cases, including fifth in Broward and the first in Miami-Dade

"State health officials confirming three new cases of coronavirus here in Florida including the first confirmed case in Miami Dade I mean the mayor Carlos Ximenes declaring a state of emergency this morning because there are certain powers that additional powers that I think are necessary in order for us to take more preemptive steps to to limit the the spread of cover nineteen okay Miami Dade the mayor says a fifty six year old man in Miami Dade tested positive after recent trip the other confirmed cases are in St Johns county and another one in Broward bring the total number of known Florida cases to twenty six

Florida Carlos Ximenes Miami Dade St Johns County Broward Miami
Atlanta: Coronavirus hits Georgia, father and son diagnosed

Atlanta's Morning News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta: Coronavirus hits Georgia, father and son diagnosed

"Two the first two confirmed cases of coronavirus in Georgia health officials check on others in contact with the sick father and son I fifty six year old married father got a cough chills and fatigue February twenty fifth three days after returning from a conference in Milan his fifteen year old son had symptoms two days later Fulton County interim health director Dr Elizabeth Ford says those two are feeling better but a second child and the mom now have symptoms hinting at covert nineteen the good thing is again the children were home schooled but that doesn't mean they don't have other activities and so at this point we're trying to reach out to those we know may have been exposed to dad was not screened at the airport because he had no

Milan Dr Elizabeth Ford Georgia Fulton County Director
Trump’s presentation of changes in black voting is largely ridiculous — but not entirely

1A

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Trump’s presentation of changes in black voting is largely ridiculous — but not entirely

"Instance how did African Americans com so it becomes so closely identified with the Democratic Party pointed back to Lyndon Johnson fifty six years ago what's the what's the origin of what I'll call the synergy between black folks in Democrats I now right you know it's been a process I mean black people have not always voted Democrat there was a time when we voted and our own best interests and coming out of the civil war Democrats I mean blacks are recognizing that it was the Abraham Lincoln a message that they we're the party of the abolitionist they were Republican SO we align very closely to the Republican Party and then as we began to move into the Great Depression you began to see now you have Franklin D. Roosevelt black people at that particular time they would have been but need that the bottom rung of the economic ladder in here you have a Democrat president FDR's same will listen let's start social programs I ask you about some food and things like that welfare job programs SO black people began to pay attention to the Democrat party not in mass yet but they started looking at it and then you have the civil rights movement with Lyndon B. Johnson in nineteen sixty four Civil Rights bill that passed and although it was a Republican Party that made sure the bill could pass into law because Democrats wanted nothing to do with it it was of a democratic president that was that was leading the charge of the party the parties were not nearly as polarized at the time right southern I think southern southern racist Democrats were were very much oppose they were northern Democrats who were with Johnson and northern Republicans in western Republic yeah if you are a black person coming from the Emancipation Proclamation in eighteen sixty three down to nineteen sixty four of the of the civil rights bill that's a hundred a hundred plus years of Democrats being very enthusiastic in their desire to impede the the movement of black people so whether so whether it was some that was nice and some that maybe wasn't so much it didn't matter the fact is a hundred years between emancipation and the civil rights movement it with the Democrat party that was with great gusto impeding the life of black people so we asked our listeners who are conservatives of color to share why they joined the GOP here's what one person had to say hi there my name is Brian I'm not a black conservative but I am a conservative of color I used to be a Democrat it was a liberal but college I had sort of change of heart and what sort of sports my change with the Facebook group that said minorities that though the public could make me cry and it made me think no wonder the person feel that way and it made me also think you know why do I vote Democrat and so it kind of got me questioning my values and yeah and then you start thinking maybe I should start shopping around for parties and the lead now today fundamental conservative and had to be there and that is encouraged people other people of color to think yourselves if democratic card doesn't own your vote Kathy any part of Brian's story sound familiar to you I love it I love all of it and that's exactly what happened to me I've been I've been voting Republican primarily for over twenty years so this is a brand new I know we have a lot of black folks who are coming out now where at all their Medicare and I'm so excited to welcome them to the other side of the aisle we'll talk in a second about whether it's actually a lot when we look across the country but I had I'm excited about it I'm excited about it nonetheless but what but what the caller said exactly where I found myself when I was in college in my junior year I had the Pitney I wanted to get involved in politics so where did I go Hey I'm black I'm a Democrat so I went to the to the to the first Democrat office I saw sat down the white Democrats man who was running started talking to me and and the piston me a bubble popped up in my mind what what exactly does he believe what he believed doesn't align with what you believe and for the very first time I started thinking through what what do I believe and does his policies align with my policies and that was the seed that was planted that many years later has turned into me being very adamant about rescuing black people off the Democrat plantation and helping them to see what is in their own best interests but I get why black people vote Democrat I mean I was born into the Democrat party just like I was born into brown skin there was no point of separation I never remember a conversation it's just what you do here black we built this way and to step out of that essay why I'm no longer going to vote Democrat many black people like in it to me rejecting the color of my skin so it's very difficult for black people to have that appear Finney and then to have the boldness to say excuse me I'm going to think for myself that is a big deal for people to react and say it's like you rejecting the color of your skin have you ever heard that pushback from all my goodness I had that a lot I have been called every name under the bus Hey do you get all kinds you know I mean it's rhetoric right but everything in an instant and its rejection I lost all of my black friends except for two during the two thousand sixteen election when I came out saying I'm voting for president trump I mean it is literally a ten to rejecting your race and so it's very difficult we're live at the conservative political action conference on Todd's

Democratic Party Lyndon Johnson
"fifty six years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Senior from us Brian Stelter on CNN and there's a Kairat for Michael Bloomberg Bloomberg did not ice trolls claim that he would have a box to stand on it's a debate and so okay able to work CNN and MSNBC like marionettes well okay appears on their on their cable sure let me push back to the system because what yeah yes we have unemployment that is a fifty six year lows okay I understand that fantastic we have interest rates that are in the threes we got a we inflation two point one percent were three point one percent in twenty eighteen we've got a G. P. this arrival Ronald Reagan and and of course a G. P. as the as I say the report card of our economy and and GPS is driven by consumer spending all right all those things are in place and of course look no further than the likes of Walmart all the way up to Nordstrom all those stocks are great because they're what makes us talk a great is because he was pretty much for doing good having said that okay the not just want to know because he is so vilified in Haiti okay I'm a huge fan of his economy and of course and I consider myself you know independent that probably got an inner mock at the year inhibiting right now I can hear the passion like one here's your inner my agar coming out yeah there's a minority.

Brian Stelter CNN Michael Bloomberg Bloomberg MSNBC Ronald Reagan Walmart Nordstrom Haiti
Miami: Mar-A-Lago Intruder Sentenced To Six Months For Resisting Arrest

Rush Limbaugh

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Miami: Mar-A-Lago Intruder Sentenced To Six Months For Resisting Arrest

"Tional a Chinese woman arrested at Mar a Lago December will serve six months in jail for resisting an officer without violence fifty six year old Jing Lou was found not guilty of trespassing the president trump's Palm Beach state after a one day trial jurors convicted of resisting arrest jingle likely be deported once she gets out

Officer Jing Lou Donald Trump President Trump Palm Beach
"fifty six years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Back I went to a fifty six year old man he came to me just yesterday he's a man whose marriages got three kids you came with his son he was referred by a doctor who does alternative concoctions which I don't agree with very much but he knows when to send his sick patients to me and the starter set this meant to me this man has been seen by a variety of doctors of right of hospitals she's a very solid citizen he sat right flank pain and difficulty swallowing for three months and he's had trouble swallowing he could barely swallow anything you can give some liquids and that's about it he's lost thirty pounds in three months whoa and he has this pain that's terrible pain yeah and Dawes could be someone finally looked into esophagus because he couldn't swallow a week ago so took about three months I could tell you so often elsewhere people take care of patients like molasses this man came to us and I tell you did come to me and we we arrange for him to have a pet scan immediately within minutes we got it arranged where is elsewhere three months later his beloved intractable pain suffering and pain unable to swallow you as a mass in his throat he has a biopsy proven cancer and well he's losing weight is unable to function is forgetting concoctions that don't work like vitamin C. and other things they just don't really treat cancer they also so as you also how can I eat better to have my cancer go away it just doesn't work that way when you have cancer you need a treatment that really works and changing your diet or cutting out sugar or whatever is not going to change a thing this man had endoscopy had a mass in the bottom part of specific is going into the stomach called the cardia it was a circumferential is in case in the esophagus esophagus is a two between the mouth of the stomach and you can't swallow the cancer travels it's terrible it's terrible pain he lost so much weight really in weeks is a poorly difference of Adam carcinoma he's a smoker and smoking certainly contributed to his diagnosis of four dark so frequently about stopping smoking and we talked about how to get rid of the pain and the cancer with radio surgery it's a double bonus most likely is cancers traveled the got scans that were not a cat scan it was basically useless he still doesn't know where the cancer is here we immediately got a range for a pet scan he wants to do it tomorrow not today so a range of per his request with his daughters are from school and this is the work we do so with us most likely we can shrink down this esophageal cancer we can get him eating again we can relieve the pain and suffering and we have lots of experience with thousands of patients through the container most likely we can get him eating and opening up his esophagus and getting rid of his pain and this is the work that we do and I'm grateful he of the trust to come here and we hope to reciprocate the trust by getting him better by shrinking down the cancer opening up the esophagus and getting rid of the pain and that's what we do every day here at thirteen eighty four Broadway anyone speak about a woman whose fifty eight years old she was born in Panama she's single she has no children she works in computer technology she K. K. with the right breast cancer use it one of the most prestigious hospitals in New York there were six months of chemotherapy for her right breast cancer and then they want to cut off her breast well she was saying she found her breast cancer herself was a mass of the breast of the mass of their armpits are already traveled is the Vance cancer she had chemotherapy and then they want to DO mastectomy and she just did not want to have a mastectomy and many many women who come here do not want to have a mastectomy and when I came to New York of the big hospitals ninety seven percent of the women with breast cancers we're getting mastectomies where is in my practice women come with the same diagnosis same women the same diagnosis ninety percent were keeping their breast why is it that ninety percent of women with breast cancer here keep their breast of ninety seven there are ninety seven percent loss their breast well it's the mentality of course it's the push for surgery course for doing the most radical things in the most expensive things even though studies show that mastectomy is not better it's not better and psychologically we know it's much worse for the woman so this woman refuse the most active at the super pro for big hospital she came here and we treated her one more thing I did tell you that as we treated her six years ago I treated or six years ago with this advanced breast cancer she declined surgery lumpectomy any form of surgery she declined she only wanted our treatment she was treated here with good success and remains cancer free all these years and that's our this week doing great happy happy happy happy the highest happiness ratings you could possibly imagine this is what we do it radiosurgery New York we talk about all the options all the patients I heard a radio advert is from by one of the big house was saying we choose the best treatment for you now when you guys chose the best treatment you did mastectomies ninety seven percent of the time that was not the best treatment that was the best treatment for the hospital and for the surgeons and friend is the reason for the president of the hospitals making ten million dollars a year it was not the best treatment for the patient the best treatment for the patient is to give all the information honestly and accurately and that the patient understand that they don't have to have missed active reserve to lose their arm in there like in their here there knows the best treatment is honesty is the best policy is honesty and that's how we work here at thirteen eighty four Broadway where patients learn all the options and patients can choose and patients can avoid radical surgery that the forms and causes dysfunction of each person's body we don't like that we try to avoid that whenever possible when such a leader when speaking about deformity or wants to go to a man seventy year old man is a businessman is a longstanding girlfriend for decades at a prostate cancer Gleason seven PSA ten so high risk cancer yet no cat scan evidence of spread no balls get over this is Freddy went to the see the chief of urology one of the biggest hospitals he thought that if you went to see the chief of urology who get the best possible care well you saw the chief of urology at this big hospital and he had said to say the surgery he was promised all kinds of things by this chief while he was left impotent I can tell you that the surgery was done years ago he was left impotent he was left in cotton and he's been using a catheter ever since that surgery and when he had the surgery this is now seven years ago when he had the surgery he had blood clots after the surgery he got infected in the wound he had the urinates through the wound into a bed pan his stitches of the wound broke open and it was leaking urine and ever since that time this prolonged terrible recovery his erections were gone he's been unable to urinate yes structures the urethra is a multiple procedures siesta Catharism self and then even worse than all that is is PSA started rising the PSA started rising meaning the cancer came back we saw the big chief of the big urology department the big hospital first listen seven PSA ten cancer and was a disaster is in the hospital three weeks his stitches broke open he was passing urine through the stitches he's been unable to urinate on his own for seven years he's had no attractions for seven years and then the PSA started rising which means the cancer came back so everything terrible you can imagine happened to the site man other than dropping dead on the table and he came to me I should tell you came to me five years ago with recurrent prostate cancer after all those bad things happen to many of surgery at the big hospital and we offer treatment to him to try to give him a second chance to live and he came to me.

"fifty six years" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on AP News

"Understanding and support of the fifty six year old Metallica co founder. Friday September twenty seventh the choir confessional Democrats are looking at other actions by president trump and his administration when it comes to Ukraine including the ouster the US ambassador to Ukraine a B. Jackie Quinn with more the top Democrat on the Senate foreign relations committee Robert Menendez fired off a letter to secretary of state Mike Pompeii asking him why ambassador Marie you of one of its was removed and if Pompeii had approved of what Menendez calls a per version of US foreign policy because of the whistle blower complaint alleging president trump pressure to foreign country to investigate Joe Biden and his family the ambassadors ouster in may and a campaign to discredit her is coming into focus including president trump calling her bad news when he spoke with Ukraine's president insiders tell the Associated Press elements of Ukrainian government wanted your bond of it out because she was pressing for corruption investigations Jackie Quinn Washington three house committees of issued a joint subpoena to secretary of state Mike Pompeii seeking documents related to the impeachment enquiring giving him until next Friday to comply the committee's also notified Pompeii their schedule depositions for five state department officials including your vantage Harris County Texas a sheriff's deputy Sundeep Dhaliwal was shot and killed today during a traffic stop in the Houston suburb sheriff ed Gonzalez as the police cars dashcam shows Dhaliwal walking back toward his car when the other driver got out ran up to him and shot him in the head to be shot so violently ambush styles it's just beyond words. in doing so perhaps he was protecting someone else maybe something else was going to happen because this is a little.

Mike Pompeii trump president Ukraine Robert Menendez Jackie Quinn Sundeep Dhaliwal US Joe Biden co founder Senate Marie Associated Press ed Gonzalez Harris County Texas Houston fifty six year
"fifty six years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"White supremacist indictment sat the democratic presidential candidates who made fighting climate change the central theme of his twenty twenty campaign Washington governor Jay Inslee announced today that he's ending his bid it's become clear that I'm not going to be carrying the ball I'm not going to be the president's on withdrawing tonight from the race a one hundred fifty two count indictment filed a Nevada state court in Las Vegas charges nineteen men and for women with being part of a white supremacist gang with ties to state prison in street crimes or murder to drug trafficking and identity theft the indictment alleges the defendants are members or associates of the Arian warriors saying they took part in a criminal racketeering enterprise a group formed after the parkland school shooting March for our lives today laid out its gun control platform school shooting survivor David hog explains why it's called for a ban on assault weapons is warranted he's a weapons of war that never should have been on our streets in the first place I can guarantee you that the framers of the constitution I never would have imagined the weather like there are fifteen being in the hands of an American citizen I never would have imagined somebody going into a school movie passes from customer information may have been compromised during a recent data breaches correspondent bill Michaels tells us the movie ticket subscription services confirming a security lapse that happen because a critical server was not protected with the password that's according to the website techcrunch it said the breach affected tens of thousands of customers exposing their movie pass cards in their personal credit card information a Roman Catholic priest in Pennsylvania is accused of stealing nearly one hundred thousand dollars from his parishioners standing out on a beach house in man he met on a dating app fifty six year old Monsignor Joseph McLuhan was arrested today for staff from Saint Joseph Catholic Church in.

Monsignor Joseph McLuhan bill Michaels racketeering Nevada Washington Saint Joseph Catholic Church Jay Inslee Pennsylvania techcrunch assault David hog murder Las Vegas president one hundred thousand dollars fifty six year
"fifty six years" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on AP News

"Jail police say fifty six year old Michael Dale Hudson terrorize choppers and ignore deputies orders to stop before crashing the golf cart into a cash register Hillsborough County sheriff's investigators say when they got to the store Watson was at his golf cart and blocking the liquor store entrance the Tampa Bay times reports he was demanding to speak to a manager as deputy spoke to him they say he suddenly drove toward the store's main entrance customers had to jump out of the way as he barreled through the door he raced toward the checkout area hitting several customers is facing several charges now including aggravated battery warning labels for products that contain a potentially cancer causing chemical didn't get approved by the White House the moves aimed at California as it fights one of the world's largest agriculture companies California requires warning labels on life with the products widely known as the weed killer roundup the EPA however disagrees it says it's research shows the chemical poses no risks to public health California has not in force the warning label because Monsanto the company that makes round up sued and a federal judge temporarily blocked the warning labels last year until the lawsuit could be resolved the German economy Europe's biggest could be shrinking German exports were a little lower in June in the previous month and dropped eight percent and ten year on year terms Germany's economy is believed to have turned in a feeble performance in the April to June period after returning to growth in the winter a full concert ported by recent data economists at unicredit bank predict to point one percent decline in GDP compared with the previous quarter foreign trades traditionally a mainstay of the German economy faces uncertainty caused by deepening tensions between the US and China ongoing issues between the US and Europe and the prospect of Britain's exit from the European Union radio I'm to McGuire president trump had this to say about a letter he got from north Korea's Kim Jong own it was a great letter about what he's doing he's not happy with the testing is the very best thing that we did he wasn't happy with the testing with that in the letter he's a great future for North Korea hours.

trump president McGuire European Union Monsanto Tampa Bay golf Hillsborough County Michael Dale Hudson Kim Jong north Korea Watson Britain China US unicredit bank Germany Europe EPA
"fifty six years" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on 710 WOR

"How about a fifty six year old woman? She has a daughter she came with her mother. She's has a history of asthma. She's been on medications for that. And well, she came to us with a mass in the Volvo. So the Volvo is the woman's genitalia area by the labia. By the vagina. So for four years. She had a mass on the left labia growing and growing and growing and hard and growing and Houston by gynecologists to undo radical surgery on her radical surgery means to remove the labia and part of the vagina and part of the lymph nodes, and she was seen by gynecologist shed a biopsy. She was advised to have radical surgery, which she refused. She lost thirty five pounds overweight. Went from one seventy two one thirty five. She is five feet seven. She says she has poor energy, and she has neuropathy. She thinks from her medicine should she's taking I examined her and well, she had a mass in the inguinal area. So that's the groin on the left side that was about an inch two and a half centimeters in size and on the labia shit. I five centimeter Maso massive mass more than two inch cancer on the labia extending from the. Into the vagina, and she's had gone four years with this cancer growing, and she let it grow because she did not want have radical deforming surgery on her genitalia on her labia, and she came to me and we treated her and she didn't want any chemo. She wanted only noninvasive radio surgery pinpoint treatment, that's the work that we do here at radio surgery, New York, no cutting, no bleeding. She got no chemo shed only pinpoint radio surgery invisible. Beams to attack the cancer on her labia inner inguinal area, we staged her up. There was no spread of the cancer. This all happened two years ago, and she came in this week cancer free. So we were able to take a woman who let the cancer grow for more than four years who refused surgery refused. Chemo would rather. I guess die of cancer than have chemo or surge. Serie came to us for non invasive treatment, we treated her and she is in her second year of remission doing very well perfectly. Well, I examined her spoke to her. I saw her tests. She is doing perfectly. Well, and this is the work that we pioneered when every hospital in America every facility in America. Even the most biggest super duper every doctor even all those guys with starched coats and black stethoscopes or standing so proud when every doctor and every facility every hospital thought standard treatment was okay. One doctor stood up to all and said, it's not okay. There's better technology. There's better technology for our patients to give better care. And that's why I'm here to tell you about better technology in education and learned that there are options is heard about a man who unfortunately had surgery on his head and suffered terribly and just sort of a woman who had evolve our cancer. And declined surgery is cancer free doing well pleased with therapy fully functional, and that's the way we like it here at thirteen eighty four Broadway. Seventy one year old man. Born in North Carolina. He is married with two kids. He has diabetes had a rising PSA. And well the biopsy showed cancer showed it a year before he came to me. So he had a Gleason seven cancer, which is a more risky cancer. Gleason describes it was a man who said just saying cancer or no cancer is not enough to explain better. Is it a rapidly growing cancer aggressive or not aggressive, and he found an aggressive cancer this man, and the man didn't want surgery in the surgeon kept on pushing them for surgery. So he just because he'd rather die again than to have surgery much like the woman, I just explained. So rather than doing surgery, he waited?.

cancer chemo Volvo asthma Gleason North Carolina Houston diabetes New York America four years thirty five pounds Seventy one year five centimeter fifty six year five feet two years two inch
"fifty six years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Six six as we go to the phones and get some advice on teaching kids about money. Audrey is checking in from Renton Washington this morning. Good morning, Audrey good morning, Michael. I'm kinda sad. You started with me because I'm fifty six years old, and I've never had any kids and not only that I've never been married, but I do have a guess about this. If you like to hear for me. Absolutely. Okay. So I think you should start teaching kids about money when they're four years old. And I just kind of pulled it out of the air. But you know, I mean, that's kind of the feeling I have, and you know, what you're actually right there. I'm looking at a Columbine. Dave ramsey. You know, this guy has a lot of stuff on the radio about about money. And he's got a thing on his website about how you teach kids about money. He's got a study by the university of Cambridge at finds that money habits and kids are formed. By the time. They're seven years old. And he says they see, you slapping, down plastic every time you go out to dinner or the grocery store. They'll they'll notice that. And they will not think that stuff really costs money. Yeah. It's just like everything with kids. You know, like, they learn all the different languages so much easier when they're young it's just one of those things, but I have a few other ideas, too if you'd like to hear, okay? So I think this is just a guess, but I think kids like all people are different. So I don't think anything is going to work for everybody or nothing's going to work for everybody. You know, you gotta be different. But this is what I think might work for some of them 'cause kids like games, that's how they learn. So I think you know in your early with him, you should make it a game like saving money and doing how compound interest works and kind of showing them that Bank statement, humor her showing in the Bank statements. How oh look look, you know, I mean, it's not so much now. When interest show him how compound interest works, and how you could make a, you know, if you start out now, you could easily have a million by the time, you're tired or whatever. And then I think that's the same with the stock market. When I was in the third grade we had a game in school about just trading trading stocks and things like that. It was really fun. I mean, I did I one, you know, it's really fun. It made me want to be a stockbroker, which I I never did do that. 'cause a lot of other things got in the way. But it was just really fun. Always remember that. And this was a thick. So I wanted to be a stockbroker when I was in the third grade. And I mean as a woman, you know, that so that. So I think it's just making it a game. That's my idea not knowing anything really about kids. The Dave Ramsey Lewis has a thing that struck me as sort of like what you were saying he says, you got to show them that stuff costs money and says you grab a few. They should have like a money jar. They put money in. And then you take some money out of that jar, and you take that to the store, and you physically hand that money to the cashier and that he says that has more impact than a five minute lecture. 'cause I know my son will see me at my desk and be paying bills online. And and clicking online doesn't seem to have any connection to the fact that you have to work, and it's real money. And now, that's if I pay this Bill now, I've got less money in my Bank account, and or less money to do something else that we'd like to do and so hard to make that reality, especially when everything now is online or it's out there in the cloud somewhere, you know, anyway, Audrey, thanks for the call this morning. I really appreciate hearing from you. You betcha. All right. Let's check in with you know, Ryan we haven't talked to Ryan. This is on the way to Kansas City. We haven't talked to you for awhile for awhile Ryan, what do you think about the teaching kids about money? Thanks.

Audrey Ryan Dave Ramsey Lewis Dave ramsey Michael university of Cambridge Renton Washington Columbine Kansas City Bill fifty six years five minute seven years four years
"fifty six years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Freedom. Today's tell Dell and we have been incredibly interesting guests today, Mr. Tim, Martin little background. Tim, Tim is an attorney. He's a prosecuting attorney for a long time. Now, his private practice attorney. However, Tim's interesting in the fact that he in a period of. One year. So join the two thousand sixteen two thousand seventeen now has purchased into nine apartment complex deals that add up to sixteen hundred and thirty four units. That's quite a bit of accomplishment and just short time. So he's obviously got his mindset and made up on what he's planning on doing. So without further ado, let me go ahead and welcome this gentleman on Tim, welcome to show. Eight thanks for having me. Great to join you. Well, Tim, let's take it from the beginning. Get a lot of great stories. I've talked to many times. Nice. It's nice knowing you and your brother both have known. Start with the story of. Way back when you decided that something had to change in your life financially. The store you told was an incredibly interesting and funny story, why don't you go and pick it up there from when you first started deciding something need to change financially for your long-term look at things. Well, del this beat straight fifty six years of age, and you know, kind of worn out as a trial attorney life span is usually around twenty years whether it be as a prosecutor or defense turning I do white collar criminal defense now. But as you said, I was a prosecutor for many years, and basically what I did is they had all my money in a financial institution mutual funds. Individuals doctors recommended by a broker and they took three beating the first one was in ninety seven and then two thousand and one tech bubble. I had sixty percent of my. Assets in text and and lost big time. And then the final straw was the two thousand eight two thousand nine beating some of those I lost half of my portfolio, and it was very discouraging. And then I came across rich, dad poor dad, and then I looked into some of his real estate seminars and watch that was our webinars, and I went out, and I bought ten single family homes here in the Chicago metropolitan area. Big mistake was I paid cash for. But nevertheless, they produced a fantastic return in my is consistently delivering between twelve and sixteen percent a year with a lot of tax advantages. And then I add the capital appreciation on the home since I bought them as foreclosures rehab them. And then was able to increase their value by almost double each one. And then my younger brother told me about lifestyles, and once I found out about lifestyles, and that a segment called passive investing where I could actually go.

attorney prosecutor Dell trial attorney private practice Martin Chicago fifty six years sixteen percent sixty percent twenty years One year
"fifty six years" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"As thin little blanket, Shirley, three more days of this. I am going to die. I'm fifty six years old. I cannot be in a situation like this as the city offered any services or any accommodations or anything like that for the folks out here. I think the city of Berkeley, it's all just a front, and I'm probably going to just really have to go around and get donations talked at places like REI and get out there and got donations from us. I can't rely on the system to help me because there's very that'll help. This full of water and mud and the rest of the campus all full of mud have to tense here. Got water in them. We're doing better than probably everybody else out here. So you can figure it gets worse as you go to any Cam. The people across the street Berthollet soaked haven't been out on the streets for many years for the most part. You just get totally wet and totally sick and your stuff August ruined. And that's how really works out here. Has the city offered any services or any accommodations or anything like that for the folks out here? Not that I'm aware of they have opened a shelter recently. And now is a good thing that got some of the people out of the rain anyway as far as actually dealing with the rest of it the city, I'm sure that they feel is less than their job. Generally. If you get help out here. It's from honest, good Samaritan comes out now people, and and in this kind of weather. Fortunately, there are people out there that do consciously round seek out people that are totally.

Shirley Berkeley Cam fifty six years
"fifty six years" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"All right. So if you're listening on a Friday drop day what you should be. It is the fifty six year anniversary of the day that we almost got blasted what to clear submarines Kate. The nuclear pockets almost happened fifty six years ago today. I didn't even know that. I know let's do a little more research guys. Okay. Strapping hop on our time machine ready point twenty one. The year nineteen sixty two the height of the Cuban missile crisis. The second in command of Soviet submarine. Fifty nine some Russian dude with a really Russian sounding name. That's right, Vasily Arkhipov. And why are we thankful for him? This Gent refused to agree with his captain's orders to launch nuclear torpedoes against US worships setting off what was pretty much a terminal superpower nuclear war. That would have destroyed all of us. So I had never heard this story. Somehow neither have I one time. I went to the movie theaters, my friends and like middle school. We all got dropped off. We wanted to see something else. But all the tickets are sold out. So there's this this movie about Kennedy and the Cuban missile crisis. Pretty like all like we were like middle school kids with like a bunch of old people watching it, but I didn't retain any of it. So I was really interested to see fifty six years ago today, the US had been dropping depth charges near the submarine that this Russian guy was on in an attempt to force it to surf. This. But they didn't know the US was unaware that they were carrying nuclear arms on that sub almost almost setting it off and the Soviet officers who had lost radio contact with Moscow concluded that World War three had begun. Right. So they're in the submarine with nukes. They can't hear from anybody. They're like oh shit. It must be on. So two of the three officers on board were like, let's fucking go L F. Gee, let's blow this US marine out of the water. Let's go on everybody's asses, but you needed three officers consent. So those two said do it, and this guy Arkhipov was the one who said, no. How much do you think? Those other two were pussy. Shame in the other guy. You're you're the biggest. In our country is going to be destroyed. Yeah. Enormous bad peer pressure. I was wondering to like do you think he face repercussions? Or was he praised in the end like how was he received? I was gonna say. At first. But if you come up his nuclear word going on. Yeah, he's totally vindicated. When he sees nothing was going on. But talk about a trying time in our country's history. Have we ever come that close since then to nuclear war? Do you think since the Cuban missile crisis no-nonsense Cuban missile crisis? I wouldn't think so that was that was crazy. It was crazy for me to think like we're in our time machine right now, we're back there in the in the sixties, and like people had no idea that this was crazy thing is happening offshore. I think I would be my bell bottoms at LA smokin sakes, like listening to the Partridge family. No, probably so. But I mean, there was always that thought in the back of everyone's mind that this might happen. I mean, they in schools they would do the bombing drills. And I it was always especially once this became forefront on the news that this was going on. Yeah. People were genuinely concerned that something serious might happen. So it was very scary time for country because you still see those shelters everywhere those nuclear shelters in the older buildings. And it's like, oh, yeah. Kind of forgot about that time. We almost you also wonder looking back like, I I see current news cycles, and you see like fearmongering that happens in new the new cycle. Now. Like how much of that stuff was accurate like McCarthyism my going on in the Senate and congress like how much of that actually was going on..

US Vasily Arkhipov Partridge family Kate middle school Gent Kennedy Moscow Senate congress fifty six years fifty six year
"fifty six years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

05:16 min | 3 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"In retirement funds that's in ross traditional ira as and arlen case your house is paid for two things paid for that yeah so how much is your house worth houses probably worth about three hundred thousand so you're at least a millionaire very good well done so millionaire how much of that did you inherit you're breaking up i can't hear you that not a dime nothing not done so and you're fifty six years old and you're millionaires and you started with nothing what's your household income one hundred seventy thousand and that's pretty suddenly went up probably in the last five years that's one of about thirty thousand most y'all ever made that's the most we've ever made yet never made over two hundred thousand your millionaires in your houses paid off in your fifties well done right well done your classic everyday millionaire good for you what do you do for a living i'm an office manager and my husband is in sales you say a self uber did you steal any of this money no no we get rich all the all the rich people are crooks right rich rich people are evil and i'm talking to you just don't sound evil to me right now i'm sure there but off and save money right raised three kids and grown and grown and gone and so what do you tell them how do you tell that when you're telling them how to be a millionaire what do you tell them just use your head you gotta work you gotta educate your yourself i mean the baby steps that i i have three kids that are doing that right now and then getting themselves and and you know in a good spot older twenty nine thirty one thirty two so they'll all be millionaires both on their forty yeah i sure hope so i hope for them will depend on their incomes and what they do they're smart anyway why i love it's gonna talk to yes what i would do it baby step seven i just max out everything i can't keep the government's hands off so let's you can do sixty five hundred each on your you're over fifty on your ira roth iras and you can do eighteen five on your 401k's plus the match india both have 401k we do but now i thought we could do the catch up on the floor along that's true you could do the catch up on the 401k and on the roth that's true i don't know it may still be maxed at eighteen five i don't know what's the catch what are you what are they telling you on that that you can do i would think in twenty four thousand is what i was told i didn't know that so yeah if you can do that then loaded up load up everything because especially if it's roth ira's so i definitely that's okay let's let's do all you can do all day that's the thing okay so once i it the pay is maxed out in the very max then you would invest in mutual funds yes everything's marched out i would invest in mutual funds pass that just good growth stock mutual funds something with low turnover ratio that doesn't have the taxes do own it because it doesn't sell them the stocks inside the mutual fund very often but thanks for letting me interview too because that's what we do when we're doing the everyday millionaire theme our with chris hogan is we just find regular millionaires and say how'd you do that and you know what she hit exactly the data points of all the things we've learned about millionaires now there's all kinds of millionaires out there i mean they're millionaires make money in the nfl and there's millionaires that our country music stars but they're not most of them all the famous people and sports figures are less than one percent of the millionaires most of them are office managers and sales people that's what she said right the regular people and they get their house paid off in about ten years and their house continues to go up in value and they don't fool around with debt what used that to get wealthy and i put money in their 401k a lot of it often every month and i don't have debt and they put money in their 401k use your head that's what she said wasn't it mean common sense this is how it's done people you can do it this is the dave ramsey show hey guys played thompson chief production officer for the dave ramsey show this hour's up but you'll find more on our.

ira arlen 401k fifty six years one percent five years ten years
"fifty six years" Discussed on The Ralph Report

The Ralph Report

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on The Ralph Report

"Agent colson fifty six years old you guys watching agents of shield this season so good love that show that i'm rod regas from csi miami and criminal minds he's forty three years old michael fast bender who currently can give liam niece and a run for his money when it comes to the size of his johnson forty one years old today and jesse plemmons from fargo and breaking bad is thirty i'm ralph garman i walked the showbiz beat as you know a love hearing from you guys and i always appreciate it when you take the time to reach out you can do it in several ways you can always write me ralph at the row report dot com and you can also leave your message at one eight three three high ralph like these folks did last week i was talking about how i find it so curious that when i see another mustang owner someone with the same type cars me i always make a point of nodding and waving and smiling and it's weird sort of family it's like a car love thing that goes on between the owner cars and i didn't know if that was unique to me or mustang owners heard from a ton of you folks and yes you also fear some strange weird connection to people who have the same car as you including this gentleman a ralph sam or third general from homo and about the things you learned over the weekend i just wanted to comment on your connection with other people that drive the same vehicle here in oklahoma actually live in tulsa route sixty six passes through and there's lots of classic cars and definitely car culture here and i say that that is pretty common especially along route sixty six they go route sixty six people do it all the time so i guess it's pretty common thing but strange isn't it like i said it's strains that simply owning the same car would create a bond between.

miami michael johnson ralph garman ralph sam oklahoma liam jesse plemmons tulsa forty three years fifty six years forty one years
"fifty six years" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Um i think that this is my personal ping i don't think the nfl will be superpopular in like fifty six years because of the science as coming out on concussions uh and i think why we fell over the game was because it was violent and we love that and we love the aspect of mean be in man in god that was what football was to me and now all of these rule changes the flags um they tried to bring celebrations back they took that away for a while but they're they're bringing back trying to lead the plays have fun again in i think that's their way of of understanding what's going on but i think at the end of the day like i'm a little must sense i got to sunset i'm not letting him play movable oh no question um he owed dead took autos hate headshot is the only you'll need those uh and as the science gets more and more clear on that i think that i don't know about viewership but i think participation in football is gonna stop to dwindled sob a huge huge problem and so at because of that like when i you know what young kids when i talk to him now they love basketball yeah in love soccer they lower yeah like a lot like soccer my name because they really are games may have fief obey everybody cracker resume saying it's like they they love it but when you look at the nba who even though you have players that speak out all the time brunell from the brandi step steve kerr pop you know i mean granted the fan base is not quite the same as it is for the nfl right but their ratings are soaring in a big reason is like is it one need a basketball is a global gay automatically right then you have is a level of inclusiveness in the nba you know somebody like jaanus is like one of the biggest stars in the league yet the greek freak you have all these light is a coolness about the nba that people love and that product like.

nfl football soccer nba brunell basketball steve kerr fifty six years
"fifty six years" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

Casefile True Crime

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

"On may stood ain't 1990 north at fifty six years of age which was facing the possibility of having decide would bought to her new husband of less than a month that day the doctors called the family in including the reverence his the nola and a debbie everyone gathered around is the doctor explained to the results with a trace and toxic metals test with the look on the doctors face i thought it must be true reverend more had bank poisoned by the way kill but that what rome the family leeson does the doctor explained that it was an assad poisoning at all the reverend system showed something else twenty toms the lethal dose of arsenic how the reverend had survived the doctors dinar believing he must have had a seriously robust body his ostaninko rebels were far beyond anything night of a same you know living patient in the hospitals history he would survive near that they knew what was going on although he would likely never regained sensation he had lost any chance and fate blamed can flooded in reverend more cease dot nala that she was worried she would be looked at but nellor and blanche went to their family pasta reverend james russia to discuss they concerns nola said blanche's a friday going to think she had something to do with it to which the past the replied blanche that's just crazy no one would ever think that about you the hospital alerted police who arrived unquestioned reverend mall as you blame bed which only days earlier was looking lockett was going to base deathbed he tell police wholly new they begin to ask questions about his new broad in her boss.

nola leeson assad blanche james russia lockett fifty six years
"fifty six years" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"And you've been living under iraq we all now the indictments against trump's former campaign manager paul manafort well it turns out one of the areas and the twelve page indictment stemmed from a fifty six year old grandmother in brooklyn who were is a neighbor had blogger who blogs at length that if the cia you know the various issues going on in at bucolic carol garden brooklyn bank and back in february she was taking a stroll through the neighborhood at noticed on this beautiful brown street of fellow brown sense that there was this one really dilapidated brownstown and was taking pictures of it and then sort of a disgruntled name bear walked up to her and she's like this dan brown's dan you know it's on by trump's farmer campaign manager crumbled groundball so the blogger ends up going to look at public records finds the cell of the home like a license for permit and she sort of like seems like something sketches going on here but i don't really know how to read these documents person on her had blocked right says can anyone out there helped me figure that picked up by like wnyc well so i wasn't aware of that i asked him that um but then paisley to other there were two lawyers and the neighborhood who were like all they're like okay we'll go check this out so basically on nights and weekends they were like going through reforms arms length document citizen journalism at eight dead they started their on blog called that was like basically the address three 77 union chronicling all this.

iraq trump paul manafort brooklyn cia brownstown bear dan brown campaign manager citizen journalism fifty six year
"fifty six years" Discussed on The Big Podcast With Shaq

The Big Podcast With Shaq

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on The Big Podcast With Shaq

"She's she's funny as hell loved that woman lover and she is so good on blackish sheet athena its pull it shack it's a political dion coal oh my god it's of the un's that investi young coal is so funny on blackish charlie he's the politically he is so politically incorrect the show so politically incorrect from all sides though right and it shows laurence fishburne may i lot what castile i was shocked the other day there shined out how old's laurence fishburne conspiratorial scabby and like his 70s i thank right i would say like 72 maimi new laurence fishburne is much younger than that are you kidding me like severely younger than that like severely light like mid50s mauresmo no i'm telling you let let's warm with laurence tisch per down laurence fishburne glenn right now is fifty six years old shot off the front door he's 56 i found that out the other day there was his birthday and they're like oh actor laurence fishburne is fifty and i went he 856 i thought he was in a seven is i thought he was like sixty five he's fifty six two he turns fifty six this year is that a rough life i live tough he's funny a natural and whoever plays anthony anderson's momma all i woman's she is so awesome she's like the new age on esther with issues like a sex we asked the space and so she knows it is no she plays like a sexy art esther she's got out she got a meantime young and she she's a bible tote and woman she's got a vicious thing about everybody she's awesome a what a great show i loved what abuses controversial boom.

un laurence fishburne laurence tisch anthony anderson laurence fishburne glenn fifty six years
"fifty six years" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"fifty six years" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Baseball's in the average what about fifty five fifty six years of age the average fan of actually sitting now watching a baseball game that's gotta be younger and it's got to be more cool once they are in in marketing this better and not being so stiff when it comes to the unwritten rules and all that that i think that's going to be better for the sport speaking to baseball there's been a twist to the story that we brought you yesterday about the baseball umpire that suing major league baseball will tell you what that is next dickerson in hood filling in for beaumont you got the right time on espn radio the right time with money joel his office week but still the right time ideas screen radio with dickerson in hood is pit radio presented by progressive insurance customers who switched to progressive save an average five hundred dollars call or click today and find out if we could save you hundreds on your car insurance we gave you the story yesterday that angel hernandez longtime major league baseball umpire jonathan is suing major league baseball and rob manfred in his upset about joe tori he claims that they discriminate when it comes to hiring and promoting empires there are only ten of the one hundred on pires that are africanamerican or hispanic so i'm definitely not going to uh i don't know if if they discriminate as far as they're hiring practices angel hernandez is point could be incredibly valid i don't know but as we talked about yesterday the only thing i will tell you i am a guy that never complaints about empires or referees never.

Baseball dickerson beaumont jonathan joe tori pires angel hernandez espn rob manfred fifty five fifty six years five hundred dollars