35 Burst results for "Fifty Percent"

What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

The Small Business Radio Show

05:29 min | 2 d ago

What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

"The other day announced a new ceo. And so we're is amazon. Going in two thousand twenty one and how can small business owners actually participate hit. Help is jason boys. A season entrepreneur and nationally rise x. nationally recognized expert on amazon. He's considered the world's leading expert in dot com third party sellers. He's the founder and ceo of avenue seven media llc a seller group that harnesses the power of amazon for direct to consumer product brands. He's also the co author of the amazon jungle. The truth about amazon and the sellers guide to thriving on the world's most perilous e commerce marketplace jason. Welcome to the show. Thank you bury. Congratulations to you. Six hundred and twenty six show twelve years you know. He started with just one person. So tell me how you've been doing during this pandemic. Our business has been booming Amazon scott galloway came out and wrote a book about The pandemic amazon a company that was built for something like a worldwide pandemic and they've benefited greatly and frankly so's my business. Because so many small businesses that had regional brick and mortar retail store outlets that. Just shut down on him and folks were were kind of on the fence prior to the pandemic called and said jason get amazon tomorrow. Can you help me so our business has been. I mean we keep up very hits been it's been You know a bittersweet story. It's good news that our businesses doing great as results pandemic. But it's been a really difficult time for everyone. Any recession is always winners. And there's losers. But i tell you one thing jason happen. This year that i never thought could happen in relation to amazon. I couldn't believe they couldn't deliver in two days. Came buried i. I made some predictions in early october. That fda and amazon delivery network was going to break. It ended up not breaking but they broke the post office. They bury them with so met much volume that they literally couldn't couldn't handle it and you're absolutely right. There were very few packages that were delivered to people's doors within two day window within that one day window even still though what they did. This holiday in terms of ramping up delivery final mile warehousing added fifty percent of square footage and like four months. I mean it's historic area. It's pretty incredible what they did so just recently announced. Jeff bezos is going to step down. Ceo and there was a joke on facebook. That says well i guess he's fully invested 401k. Now that's why he's stepping down. But one predictions you have for twenty twenty one with amazon given a new ceo and the hopefully the winding down of the pandemic. Yeah well you know. I hope jeff vases is going to be okay with the pay reduction. Moving from fulltime. Ceo to just executive chairman. You think you'll be okay hope but yeah you look i. I don't think that amazon is going to miss a beat. You know the minute. The announcement came out which by the way was interesting enough announced around the same time as their blow out. Q four earnings call Historic in its own right Potentially to deflect which amazon's pr department is really good at About how great they have benefited in his really tough time for our country But look amazon's not going to miss a beat andy jazzy. Jeff clone bleeds amazon. Blew has been basically attached to jeff bezos hip for more than twenty years. He's an incredibly talented competency. Oh who took. Aws from zero to fifty percent market share in the cloud. Space according to gartner so He's incredibly talented. He will help Execute on jeff bezos division. Basil's we'll take a back seat behind. The curtain is gonna shove jesse in front of congress and answer. All those difficult antitrust questions and basis is going to work on what he loves doing which is invention and future technology. Whatever amazon looks like five ten years from now will have been developed from. Basil's mind so he's not going anywhere. He's just removing himself from some of the shall we say more uncomfortable task. It's going to land on jesse's lap in the next You know one to ten years. As i trust drums or are beating louder and louder. So let's talk about some of the trends that you've been discussing Tell us about how you think. Amazon is getting into healthcare. They are already in healthcare. I mean they're providing primary care for you know scores of their own employees tens of thousands of their employees they They famously removed themselves from joint venture with jamie diamond and berkshire hathaway recently In the rumors from within inside amazon at the reason they did that is because they were holding back and the amazon pharmacy group which spun up recently. we're saying we can't move fast you know. We can't move fast because we're being held up by chasing in berkshire hathaway. So i saw that. A lot of a lot of people in the press came out berry and said oh. This means amazon can't figure out healthcare. It's too difficult. It's too challenging. I didn't see that at all. I just saw that you know amazon. Saw this as cutting weight so that they can really focus on what they do. And that's innovate

Amazon Jason Boys Avenue Seven Media Llc Jason Scott Galloway Jeff Bezos Jeff Vases Andy Jazzy Jeff Clone FDA Basil Jesse Facebook Gartner Jamie Diamond Berkshire Hathaway Congress Amazon Pharmacy Group Berry
Why Square Stock Dropped Today

MarketFoolery

04:24 min | 2 d ago

Why Square Stock Dropped Today

"Came in solidly higher-than-expected shares of square though are down seven percent this morning. Because growth is slowing. There's always a lot to get to with square so when you look at all the numbers. Tell me what stood out to you. Yes for me. I really focused. When i swear on really their burgeoning business which you know is the cash shop. It's funny you mentioned the war on cash and they have this kind of conveniently named cash app so it was really some of the numbers that the shop drew in the quarter and for that matter the fiscal year one of them is one hundred sixty two percent. Increase your ear. Gross profit of the cash up In a lot of that is being fueled by new users and specifically cryptocurrencies like bitcoin. So i think one number is not in throughout the entire twenty twenty fiscal year over three million people transacted bitcoin in some regard which was a two hundred fifty percent increase in volume compared to fiscal year. Nineteen and then they also even gave some gave some information on january twenty twenty one st year with over one million new buyers of bitcoin so really just interesting kind of figures throughout the entire report. Kind of the bitcoin. Being such an important part of that cash app is what really stood out to me. Yeah and that was certainly part of the headline squares square announcing it had purchased one hundred seventy million dollars worth of bitcoin during the quarter so cash app is squares version of ven. Mo- it's interesting to see the reaction from the start because on the one hand. This is a stock. Even factoring in the drop today. The stock is up almost two hundred percent in the past year so i understand particularly traders on wall street with a shorter term mentality saying alright. It's been a good year. Let's let's take a little money off the table. That sort of thing on the other hand. I don't know the overall market cap of square is just over one hundred billion dollars. It seems like a business with a lot of room to run. And i was listening to some of the comments the. Cfo made around what they are. Seeing it square in terms of how sticky the cash app is in terms of the other parts of squares business. How it's this thing that sort of bringing people in and once they're in the square ecosystem. They they start trying other parts of the business. So i don't know like would you look i get the. Pe ratio is somewhere north of five hundred. But when you when you look at everything that square has going on do you look at today as a buying opportunity for people who maybe had square on their watchlist and thought well okay. It's it's seven percent cheaper than it was yesterday. Yeah actually i was looking at. You know over the last couple of weeks how it's performed and through last week year to date. I think it was up. Something like twenty seven percent and then you have over the last couple of days. You know ten percent or so pullback and these are always the days as as a long term investor that i look for you know have a business. That's in my opinion burgeoning. Having fiscal year revenue grow over one hundred percent granted excluding bitcoin. That's only about fifteen or twenty percent but as long term investor. I do think this is an opportunity. I'm not personally a shareholder of square. But it's a fascinating business to me and we've seen so much traction and really their largest growing business in terms of bitcoin transaction cryptocurrency and things like that which really doesn't seem to be dying the craze three or four years ago now. And you know it's all of a sudden habit a two year hiatus and it's got right back in the thick of things you know which squares really benefiting from. So you know. I think if you're a long term investor willing to hold for a couple of years and not too worried about a lot of volatility which has realizing probably will continue to experience over the coming months over coming quarters over the coming years I think this is an opportunity to dip your feet in or maybe increase your position a little bit lows. Fourth quarter report

Squares Square
Number of women on UK corporate boards rises 50% in 5 years

LBC Election 2019

00:18 sec | 2 d ago

Number of women on UK corporate boards rises 50% in 5 years

"Figures out today show that has been a fifty percent increase in the number of women on footsie. Three fifty boards now. Thirty four percent Sets up fifty percents in five years there now. No all male boards in those companies and five years ago. There were

New York Governor Cuomo Should Resign or Be Impeached Over Covid Scandal

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:28 min | 4 d ago

New York Governor Cuomo Should Resign or Be Impeached Over Covid Scandal

"Finally allowed to talk about the fact that Andrew cuomo is a garbage governor. Who got a lot of people killed with bad policy. In fact there's a piece in the week today. By ryan cooper titled resign andrew cuomo. He points out that his administration concealed data about kroger's cases in nursing homes reportedly for fear of federal prosecution stories of his vitriolic abuse and threats directed at other democratic. new york. Politicians are coming out yet even all that is only the start of deadly corrupting competence. So in keeping with judging by his by his results cuomo should resign immediately and free new york state from his dismal. Misrule says ryan cooper of the week and not at the nursing home scandal has been bubbling for nearly a year. Now it starts with cuomo's inexplicable decision back in march two thousand twenty two order nursing homes to accept recovering covid nineteen patients even if they were still testing positive a recent. Ap investigation found that. At least nine thousand recovering patients were sent back to nursing homes and long term care facilities a number that is forty percent larger than his administration had previously admitted is unquestionably worsened. The pandemic as it ripped through new york's elderly population. that's not the only number cuomo fudged nursing homes new york attorney general letitia. James investigated situation found that his people may have under counted the number of deaths associated with nursing homes by fifty percent cuomo. Then instead of the eighty five hundred said they'd been reporting. The true number was over. Fifteen thousand about a third of the state's deaths and then of course in your post reported comments from cuomo's top aide. Melissa rosa seemingly admitted that they deliberately faked the numbers as part of a cover up. His officials froze fear. The truth is going to be used against us. By federal prosecutors ran cooper says cuomo bungled the pandemic basically from the jump. The new york city metro got hammered with the worst break in the country. In the following months cuomo's compulsive bullying and control. Habits gradually drove an exodus of public health professionals from the state government including the state's health department director of bureau of communicable disease control as medical director for uppity myalgia in the state epidemiologist and then his micromanagement tangled up the early stages of the state's vaccine rollout he throughout the plan. The state health department had worked up over months substituting his own he put he put in place strict requirements that only people who qualified to get shots but then added threats of punishment for organizations that didn't distribute their shots fast enough and the result was chronic delays. His bottom line is this. Cuomo has been a garbage governor in the media. Didn't just cover for him. They featured him. He was the greatest government in america. Meanwhile ron santa's greatest villain. In america down in florida with the number two populations seniors in america by percentage after main which has seven people.

Cuomo Ryan Cooper Andrew Cuomo New York Attorney General Letitia Kroger Melissa Rosa Bureau Of Communicable Disease James Cooper New York City State Health Department Ron Santa America Florida
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 4 d ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
Pressure mounts on Cuomo over COVID deaths at nursing homes

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:57 sec | Last week

Pressure mounts on Cuomo over COVID deaths at nursing homes

"York's governor andrew cuomo on the defensive friday as calls for his impeachment grow. It is politicians making up stuff to get their face on. tv governor. Andrew cuomo went on a tirade against his critics defended himself in a news conference today over accusations that his administration purposely withheld the number of nursing home deaths due to covid by as much as fifty percent. It's all this political toxicity. And then you get some people who have a personal agenda but even far left new york democrat alexandria ocasio cortez joined a chorus of lawmakers demanding answers in a statement friday. She says she stands. With our local officials calling for a full investigation of the colonial administration's handling of nursing homes during covid nineteen as lauren green reports a democrat state assemblyman says as many as thirty lawmakers on the governor's own party support an impeachment investigation in addition to all the

Andrew Cuomo Democrat Alexandria Ocasio Cor York Colonial Administration Lauren Green New York
Transforming Healthcare With Rebecca Love

Outcomes Rocket

05:55 min | Last week

Transforming Healthcare With Rebecca Love

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Everyone saw marquez here. Today i have the privilege of hosting rebecca love. She is a nurse. Entrepreneur inventor author. Tech's speaker and i nurse featured on ted dot com and part of the inaugural nursing panel featured at south by south two thousand eighteen. Rebecca was the first director of nurses innovation and entrepreneurship in the united states at northeastern school of nursing the funding initiative in the country designed to empower nurses as innovators and entrepreneurs where she founded the nurse hackathon the movement as lead to transformational change in the nursing profession in two thousand nineteen rebecca with a group of leading nurses the world founded and is president of sand sale the society of nurse scientists innovators entrepreneurs and leaders a nonprofit that quickly attained recognition by the united nations as an affiliate member to the on. Rebecca is an experienced nurse entrepreneur founding hire nurses dot com and twenty thirteen which was acquired in two thousand eighteen by realto in the uk where she served as the managing director of us markets until its acquisition and twenty nineteen currently rebecca serves as the principal of clinical innovation at optimize rx. She's passionate about empowering nurses and creating communities to help nurses innovate create and collaborate start businesses and inventions to transform healthcare. Such a privilege to have you here. Rebecca i'm really excited to touch on this very important topic of nurses going to be with you. Thank you for having me absolutely. And so rebecca. You've done some really neat things in your healthcare career and you know before we jump into the actual details of what we're gonna talk about. I love to hear more about you than and what what keeps you inspired in in your healthcare career. I think that being a background and being a nurse And washing with the front lines going for and doing on a daily basis especially in the face of i think every day i wake up. I'm inspired by those nurses to go out selflessly to transform and take care of individuals that most of I would wonder if we would cross that. Threshold and nursing was a second career choice for me in life and it was inspired because my mom really encouraged me to pursue nursing. Because she said that. Although there's a whole bunch of great leaders in other areas we needed really strong nursing leadership to sort of transform the future of the profession. And i took it very seriously after becoming immersed in watching certain challenges that was basically in the profession. I don't know if you know. Some of the statistics but percents of nursing graduates leave the bedside within two years of practice which is nearly the largest exodus of any profession out there and we are facing potential nursing shortage of vermillion nurses in the united states. And i think what motivates me is. How can we stop that accident. And how can we secure this profession at the future of healthcare And i think. I'm still motivated by both that here that there may not be nurses by the bedside in the future as much as i am inspired to transform. What a career for nursing. Looks like that me inspire the best to choose that profession debt. And you know. I wasn't aware that's a. That's a pretty big number of of nurses leaving and also want to say thanks to all the nurses listening or if you have somebody in your family your friends that are nurses at the front line. As as rebecca mentioned it's tough and especially during this pandemic The importance of what you do is critical so so yeah let's kick things off with a thank you and yes a rebecca. Why why so many people like white white is so many people eat nursing. Yeah there's there's some interesting study that are being collaborated on this entire thing. Why thirty to fifty percent of them are leaving the bedside within cheers of practice and my dad asked me this question. He that he the. Cfo honey when you graduated with your finance degree. Were you expecting to carry the same level of responsibility as cfo laughed and he instead. Of course not. And i said well welcomes the world of nursing where you graduate you enter the profession and not only. Are you carrying an incredible boat and patience upon you. But you're expected to carry the same kind of patient and responsibility as nurses with thirty or fifty years of experience. So i think one is incredible dichotomy of being put into a world. Where even if you have little training you're going to deal with those two patients. And then secondly i think one of the biggest factors is that the profession of nursing if you call it a profession has not been cultivated along a career progression and think younger nurses that are entering the profession realized. I don't know if you've noticed. But over course a twenty year career the average increase of salary of nurses only one point five percents a year which is half the cost of the increase in wages or salaries on the average american But more importantly there is no career development. So it's not as though when you start out as financial assistance and you progress ups eventual pointed the being the cfo and nursing. The first day of your career can very much look like the last day of your career thirty years later and i think that because healthcare has focused a very long time that the roles of nurses are to be by the bedside and that that job that has driven position is not in and of itself that they've never focused on. What are the career and the ambitions of the nurse by the bedside new ford so suddenly two years into a nurse his career. They're working in day night holiday weekend rotation they've had an increase of salary of about three percent and of them are patients that are constantly dying or sick and being called to work in and they don't know where their career is going in comparison to the friends that they have chosen other careers. Who are working monday through friday. Have five weeks of vacation and are steaming. The world where these nurses aren't sure what's going on. I think there's a couple downwards playing trends. But i think those are two of the largest.

Rebecca Rebecca Love Northeastern School Of Nursing Society Of Nurse Scientists In Realto Marquez United States United Nations Tech UK Ford
This startup is making customized sexual harassment training

Equity

03:07 min | 2 weeks ago

This startup is making customized sexual harassment training

"Is raising money. And i think this is a really cool company and i want you to tell us all about it. Athena raised money in june with two million round for anti harassment software that it would send to companies and companies basically. Install it for their employees. You'd get a nudge every month. Five minute training and it'd be kind of this idea of making a more flexible way of learning about how to deal with modern situations that might rise up better than the one hour lecture. This is a shift in its focus. Because before was doing kind of one thing and now it's doing a broader array of things when it raised in june was just doing anti harassment in zoom and slack world and now eight months later. It's another two million co led by the same firm. Gsp that let first round of it's and it's going into anything compliance related whether that's how to make sure you are not doing insider trading by mistake or or other bits like that and it's they leaned on big customers which was the impetus for this round including netflix's doom and send us and so for an early stage startup. Those are big names. They have twenty thousand active employees completing their monthly training which the co founder is a positive signal that it's at least getting engagement in some way. Are you currently caught up on your corporate training for verizon media group as managing editor one of my wonderful tasks at the company is to actually monitor our employees to make sure they follow all of the different trainings that they have to do. Because i am the one who gets. The e mails for a bunch of folks that says so and so is sixty days later on their annual compliance training. We will delete thirty male if they do not respond immediately. Did not know that was a state attorney question again dan. Natasha and i caught up on our vm. I think you're mostly caught up february's if you are not cut up would have been fired because most the recordings are due in december. So if you haven't done them you would be out nailed it tauscher. There's also some grows numbers and our notes here. Something like two hundred and fifty percent growth quarter over quarter. What is that metric tracking in the athena's since it was tracking basically the amount of people who are on the platform amount of learners. That are coming to athena. Obviously those big contracts and mentioned earlier help them be able to prove that like any startup. right now knock sharing revenue profitability et et cetera. They're just hoping to use this money to gain new customers and figure out that stuff. Later is spelled. E. t. h. e. n. a. Not of in ethene like it's like patina but it's not blockchain related. I usually ask founders for the story behind their name but recently i guess i have not been good enough to that curious enough about how that came together. I think the idea of little mini modules. Make sense. I mean some of the things i actually remember. From compliance training are like mini modules for instance detectors by verizon media and reisen media's owned by and say verizon because it has infrastructure works with government a lot and so in our corruption training which had to take. Oh yeah there's this great story of like you're working hard at work in the field and you have a city official with you. Can you offer them a bottle of water on a hot day. And i was like stir and there's like wrong committed bribery and corruption and a dig radiation to american society. You may not offer anything of value. Not even a penny. You can't offer free water bottle or kick cat.

Verizon Media Group Athena Netflix Tauscher Natasha DAN Verizon Media Reisen Media Verizon American Society
Gmail iOS App Has Out of Date Warning

Daily Tech News Show

00:21 sec | 2 weeks ago

Gmail iOS App Has Out of Date Warning

"Fifty percent of the year to ten point zero five billion dollars. Although ride hailing revenue did surpass. Its delivery business for the first time since the covid nineteen pandemic started over. Twenty twenty uber narrowed its net loss. Twenty percent of the year to six point seventy seven billion dollars. Some users reported that logging into the latest version of the g mail. Ios should've security warning from google that this

Google
New antitrust legislation would check the power of tech giants

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:43 min | 2 weeks ago

New antitrust legislation would check the power of tech giants

"Arguably the biggest problem with big tech. Is you know the bigness. A few giant companies gobble up their competition owned the digital advertising and web hosting markets control the information ecosystem and sometimes control the distribution of their own competition so far though these worries haven't led to regulation now democratic senator amy klobuchar who leads the senate subcommittee on antitrust introduced a bill intended to check the power of tech. Giant's it focuses mostly on acquisitions to prevent huge companies from buying potential competitors and it would force companies that control more fifty percent of a single market to prove that an acquisition would not reduce competition. Here's senator club shar. We all know that misinformation has been rampant on social media and it is greatly. Set us back. But there's another much more insidious problem and that is that any company that was starting to come and do cool things got bought and i think maybe you could look at this legislation as basically a reply to mark zuckerberg's email when he said about they're looking at what's happened instagram. These businesses are nascent but the networks established. The brands are already meaningful. And get this. And if they grow to a large scale they could be very disruptive to us. Google has ninety percent market share. Right now they are literally taking on a government of a major country in australia when the prime minister says hey we're gonna start making you guys pay for content and they say back. No you're not we're going to withdraw from your market and you'll have no search engine and a big part of this. It sounds like is funding these agencies right making sure that the ftc which is charged with a lot of this actually has some teeth exactly and of a numbers can't lie the ftc in nineteen eighty at one thousand seven hundred nineteen employees by twenty eighteen down to one thousand one hundred two. You cannot take on the biggest companies. The world has ever known trillion dollar companies with bandaids and duct tape. And that's why senator grassley has join me on a portion of this bill to up the fees on megamerger so we can put in over one hundred million dollars to each agency so they can actually do their job and this isn't just about tech. There's only to cat food. Companies that control most of the market. There's only two online travel agencies. You think you're getting all their choices. Go look at. Who owns them. And as john oliver closed in a segment on his. And if this all makes you wanna die good luck. Because the casket market is controlled by three companies which actually sadly no one purchase the other. It's down to

Amy Klobuchar Mark Zuckerberg FTC Senate Giant Senator Grassley Google Australia John Oliver
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
Health officials worry Super Bowl could be a COVID super-spreader

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Health officials worry Super Bowl could be a COVID super-spreader

"Now to the coronavirus crisis and the race to get americans vaccinated today snowstorm failing to stop that effort at a mass vaccination site at six flags in maryland. Despite some positive signs involving the number of new cases in hospitalizations fatalities remained stubbornly high with more than four hundred sixty. Three thousand american lives now lost and with the super bowl tonight concerns that watch parties could fuel yet another surge. Here's abc's trevor. Tonight super bowl festivities underway across the country. Fans lined up outside bars in tampa. It's harder to kind of maintain social distance. When there's so many people out health experts sounding the alarm about superspreader potential. I am worried about today. being super spreader event. We've seen this. After a lot of events and a lot of holidays. The warning comes as the university of north carolina's chancellor promises and investigation into students flooding. The streets late saturday celebrating a rivalry win against duke in spite of school officials urging them not to and in colorado with the governor dialing back corona virus restrictions restaurants. They're ready to welcome larger crowds. We were sixteen and a half people last night and today we're allowed thirty three with cold weather. It makes a huge difference officials. Fear coming super bowl. Surge could undo progress. The us has finally started to make with daily cases falling fifty percent from their january peak president biden. Making this plea. I hope people if you're watching. Be careful this weekend marking one year since the us lost its first life to covid. Nineteen worth four hundred sixty. Three thousand more. Americans have died

Fifty Percent Maryland Three Thousand Nineteen Last Night Sixteen And A Half People Today Tonight One Year Four Hundred Sixty Thirty Three Tampa Colorado More Than Four Hundred Sixty First Life Super Bowl Three Thousand More Late Saturday Six Flags
From wild idea to COVID vaccine  meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

Science Friction

05:20 min | 2 weeks ago

From wild idea to COVID vaccine meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

"Renew and november. When the first cases started the pop up and wuhan china their description of the virus there description of how easily it was transmitted between families once. We heard that we knew that. This virus had the potential to be a bad actor at that moment in time we said. How are we going to get the sequence for this virus and we started calling our friends and china. We called our friends at the cdc trying to get the sequence of this virus the minute that was published. We started to make our vaccines back on. I think it was january twelfth. We started making the first aren a vaccine that day. It has all happened. Unfathomably fast has an at twelve months later and the pfizer and maduna vaccines have made their way through large clinical trials with good results into syringes and now already into millions of arms. But this quite a back story here. We thought that it would be useful in a pandemic. We thought it would be influenza pandemic but you back in two thousand and five. When we made the initial observation we knew that aren a had a great potential therapeutics. Who with his collaborator catala career. How is a good bit to win a nobel prize for the science driving. Mri vaccines. he's one of my guests on science fiction today. What's been lost in the fast pace race to develop covid nineteen vaccine. This past year is a hidden story of dogged. Pursuit of a nollie scientific idea over decades often in the face of skeptics and nice ideas we went through pharmaceuticals venture capitalists. All other people. it said. Hey we have a great new invention here. And they weren't interested. They said now aren as too hard to work with. We don't think it'll ever work and they just weren't interested now with a pandemic bang with suddenly counting on mri vaccines lock eyes and medina's to help save us. But before this pandemic this brand new technology of marigny vaccines had never been approved for use in humans before. It's incredible isn't it. The heddon even made it to the stage of large scale clinical trials in humans. I don't think anybody could have predicted. Just how effective these vaccines were. And i still get chills. When i remember the moment when that announcement was made a few months ago biologist onto fox is future fellow and associate professor at the university of western australia. It has proved the nice as wrong. I mean given that fifty percent effective is the baa that the world health organization would've liked to say as the minimum to be getting ninety. Five percent is just astounding really hardly any vaccines have that level of efficacy. Cullen pat and professor of pharmaceutical biology at monash pharmaceutical sciences. He's team is working on two different. Mri vaccines for covid. Nineteen in collaboration with the doughy institute in melbourne change from the point of view the future of emo toy syrupy and we haven't had a vaccine working against corona virus. Before i could understand the science. And i could see how theoretically it might work. But i just couldn't see how we could actually make enough to be the billions of doses needed for the world. And that's still looking doc- rod it's entirely contingent on just to pharmaceutical companies meeting. The world's entire supply demands including ours here in australia. Will you receive the pfizer vaccine together just before christmas. We did the vaccine driven by your discovery. Can you describe what that moment was like figuring. My family always yells at me. Because i'm not excited enough. And they're right for man who co owns the intellectual property licenses to medina and i dream osman humble kind of guy. We were incredibly excited. When we saw the results of the phase three trial that are vaccine. Worked and of a safe and had ninety. Five percent efficacy. I'm already moved on to the next thing the next back scene. The next gene therapy you. I'm incredibly excited. That this vaccine is working that it's gonna make a dent in this pandemic many think that there's a nobel prize in chemistry waiting in the wings for you and dr katie. Rico what do you make of that. So people tell the too modest. And i really don't do things for prizes or recognition or anything else.

Catala China Pfizer Aren CDC Cullen Pat Monash Pharmaceutical Sciences Medina Influenza Doughy Institute University Of Western Australi BAA World Health Organization FOX Melbourne Osman Australia Dr Katie
Marjorie Taylor Greene: US House votes to strip Republican of key posts

TIME's Top Stories

05:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Marjorie Taylor Greene: US House votes to strip Republican of key posts

"Report. That they're covid. Nineteen shot may not only protect against disease but also help to prevent spread of the sars o. V. two virus the news was heralded by policymakers desperate to see a vaccine that can curb the spread of the disease but scientists have been a bit more cautious if confirmed the results would represent a breakthrough in the covid nineteen vaccine race so far the shots authorized or approved around the world have shown strong protection against moderate to severe disease but haven't definitively proven that people who get vaccinated are less likely to spread the covid nineteen virus but the data say. Some experts is confusing. So it's hard to adequately evaluate the companies claim that the shot can actually slow the spread of covid nineteen or not in the study published on the lancet pre print server which means the results have not been peer reviewed a gold standard for ensuring the scientific rigor of the findings astra zeneca and oxford scientists. Report that two doses of their vaccine was overall sixty six point seven percent effective in protecting against covid nineteen disease as part of its analysis. The research team also collected nasal swabs from and unvaccinated study volunteers in the uk every week and tested them for the virus. The scientists found that positive tests were about fifty percent lower among people who got two doses of the vaccine compared to those who weren't vaccinated because people who don't test positive are less likely to spread the virus the researchers extrapolated from those data. The astra zeneca shot can transmission of the covid nineteen virus. However that may be a bit of a stretch says dr carlos. Del rio executive associate dean of emory school of medicine. It's a leap of science. That i think still needs to be proven. He says what they show is that there was either decreased viral shedding or decreased detection a virus however they do not actually show that transmission was decreased. We can say less. Transmission is a possibility but the data on. That needs to come out says del rio. We wanna state the facts and don't want to overstate the facts. That concern was echoed by health officials. In switzerland who decided this week to reject the astra. Zeneca shot the data available and evaluated to date are not yet sufficient for approval. The country's regulatory bodies swiss medic said on february third part of the concern has to do with the fact that the astrazeneca study underwent a number of changes after the phase. Three trial was begun. A fact that some infectious disease expert say makes it difficult to interpret the results for a clinical trial as crucial as this one modifying the setup once it's underway is similar to changing the rules in the middle of a game the study originally set out to investigate a single dose vaccine but was changed to two doses when concurrently conducted early studies show that to set doses of the vaccine produced a stronger immune response further because of what astrazeneca said. Were mistakes in measuring doses. Some people in the study in the uk received a half dose for their first shot and a full dose for the second. one people also got different placebos. Some god benign nina cockles solution and some a saline solution. That could mean nothing. But it's also unusual to have two. Placebos sends that has the potential to introduce con founders into the study and because of limited supplies. Some study participants had to wait more than the three to four weeks originally planned between their doses while others when told they couldn't come back for their second dose at the time they expected chose to simply not get their second shot entirely. Frankly the way they did. These trials was really confusing. Says dr paul off it. Director of the vaccine education center at children's hospital of philadelphia and a member of the us food and drug administration's advisory committee that reviews vaccines for authorization or approval. This is the stuff you figure out in phase one. You don't fool around in phase three and see what works he says. Here's what the researchers report after getting a single shot. Seventy six percent of participants were protected against disease for up to three months. Afterwards from their their levels of antibodies generated against the virus which scientists believe are important to protect against disease began to drop those results suggest that while two doses of the astra. Zeneca vaccine preferable. A single dose could still be useful for about three months in controlling covid. Nineteen that might be especially useful information to act on if vaccines are in. Short supply.

Astrazeneca Dr Carlos Astra Emory School Of Medicine Zeneca Del Rio Oxford UK Infectious Disease Switzerland Dr Paul Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Us Food And Drug Administratio Nina
Dissecting the Rise, Fall and Future of Topshop

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Dissecting the Rise, Fall and Future of Topshop

"What do you think talk shop representative young costumers here in the uk because this was prior to the international expansion. And all of that. But i remember coming to london during that time and it was. It was a destination you know it was a place that people all around the world had heard because it had become kind of representative of that kind of cool brittannia moment and all of the stuff that was happening in the uk at the time. What did young customers feel about the talk shop brand. After after this all of this new activity. I think they felt that it was as unite bill. A kind of a real ownership of it on a at this hour as we great because with because we've sort of created together but like you know it was something let's talk if that makes any sense as a so that brings me to the question. That's on so many people's minds this week as we hear the news of top shop being acquired by a sauce you. Where did things begin to go wrong for top shop in. What was the tipping point where top shop began to lose. Its way well. I think it's a very difficult question to answer. In some ways. I mean young. Fashion is roussel. you have to be constantly reinventing yourself to make sure that you'll always relevant to your customer base. I felt well. You know bennett grain had taken over a two thousand. I had been very clear as soon as he joined the business. I didn't want him today any conflict. Because he wasn't china he was. You know an acid struck him more than anything else. He bought as an insult them again. I had a lot of conversations when he was not a retailer. In the way that i saw a return should be said was sort of capture the margins in the business but then pejorative that time. He then broke kate. Moss and hats off to him. She was a great choice at the time we hadn't wrote any celebrities weeks outlets limiting wasn't really talk shop. It was all about design evoke nelson. I knew that she would be incredibly with the with the talk shop customer base but also knew that it would it allowed to get into top shop if he lied to enter into an stop being apart top shop and i knew that i couldn't work with him. I could. I could do this with my team because we were all incredibly passionate because we understood it. I could not with him. Why not because we just had temporarily different views about everything is was that you basically that the buying decision was that you bought something as cheap as you could possibly buy. A new sold differs much. As you'd be get foreign mike. Philosophy was that you would make sure that you designed on bought something. That was so amazing that no one will be able to resist. It said we will philosophically. We had a very different view. The business so assigned that he took over he i think he felt that he knew young fashion that he could cross the business. And i'm sorry but you know he's he's. He's a middle-aged mom who doesn't have very much retail general certainly didn't ever about young fashion on. I think from that moment on probably He started to make decisions about cultural. Besotted run it in a way. That's a Realize that that a business needs to be constantly. Reinvented that you need. Passion within the union huge passion from everyone involved and if those people are not as passionate Do i really have to do this. then i think it's i think he is very quickly. My feeling was that before he kinda came into it. It was like we were a room full of people together. All of us creating together something. We were terribly proud of. I'm so it was amazing but we were doing it together. I think he his his view much was was a top down management. I'll tell you to do that. You'll do it. And i think that's not just a very very different thing. You know if someone says to me you've got you do that. Yeah i'll do it. But maybe i'll do it but i wanted to very well whereas if i feel on upon something creating something that i will give it everything and i think that's what it needs and needs everything. Is that ultimately why you decided to leave that. You could bring your everything you know what what happened to precipitate your departure. Well just just. Purely the fact that i knew that he he had an end that he would now become involved in social and a half million. Just didn't want to work for that. You know. I didn't have to work for him. You know and also. Let's not forget. I was by that time in my early. Booties and i kind of thought you know what this is. This is young high russians. I am no longer opposed. I kind of grown answer bit. I could do something else better. And i could give everything to another to another type of business. Oppose the other thing that was happening of course during the rise of top jump was also the rise of other big fast fashion houses whether that be zara or you know h inam the other new giant global companies looking back now the companies. That took that as fast approach to fashion are now really being in the the really the kind of the focus of fashion's Climate crisis challenge. You know the all of the training that we've given to customers to buy things cheap by things often and then dispose of garments. How do you see that whole fast. Fashion sector now. Top shop included with the addition of players like a sauce and boohoo. People calling them. Ultra fast fashion. It seems to me that it's this part of the fashion industry. That's most problematic as we think about this. Ten years left before we can get these carbon emissions under control industry that contributes ten percent of global carbon emissions. What's what's your take on that. Now while i you know a lot of people that have accused me of having been one of the False fashion and then sort of turned around and said a watch. Now it's it's not the right thing to do. But i. I never set to to create disposable passion. I says create something that was accessible to you. Know the great things are accessible to a lot of people and it's been on a journey myself in over the last sort of. I guess ten years. When i began to start feeling that this was moving in that. This was wrong that you know that we were that the fashion had lost its value. If you like that would just literally buying things in throwing them away wearing wants to moving because it was so cheesy do that i began to feel seriously compromised by that and began to build that i that i should leave the business and five because i couldn't i couldn't Begging apartment of such an incredibly damaging industry which which we now know that it is and to buffet and we didn't really know not Templeton fifteen years or so prior to that we did pass. We didn't know what we didn't think about it. And i think. I think it's it's very difficult and i always seems to me is certainly in young false fashion that the the they the customer base it is soon of splitting and that you have only sort of what the numbers but but it feels like this little v fifty percents Who recognized that. Passion is a real problem and have moved to depop hamilton. To buy vintage charter shots. Recycling up cycling read cetera. And and yet. I'm still two percent who are still buried addicted to is seriously mean. That addicted took Having things immediately. I think it's very hard to say those people. You can't have that. I think what you have to do is offer some sort of bad but alternative is as exciting or is as as tempting or whatever the sort of the yes away from from from. What is that doing. Because i agree with you. I mean it almost feels like we're coming to an end. Endpoint what. I do take what i am. Encouraged by is the fact that if you nonsense question about ten years ago i would have said that. Eighty percent people was with selected fashion. Maybe ten fifteen twenty percent. We're actually starting to realize that there was a different pop that could travel

Bennett Grain Roussel UK Moss Nelson Kate London China Mike Depop Hamilton
US leaders urge military to get vaccine shots

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 3 weeks ago

US leaders urge military to get vaccine shots

"The White House is focusing on military families in an outreach effort to get more people back city it against Kobe eight nineteen like the rest of the population only about fifty percent of military families are willing to get a corona virus vaccination so First Lady Jill Biden reached out to blue star families telling service members and spouses to wear masks social distance and get the shots when they're eligible isn't just a nice thing to do it's a matter of national security she was joined by the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci asked about vaccinating pregnant women and young children children are vulnerable so you wait until you get pretty confident that you're dealing with a safe and effective vaccine about she says there are trials already testing vaccinating youngsters Jackie Quinn Washington

Jill Biden Kobe White House Joint Chiefs Of Staff And Top Dr Anthony Fauci Jackie Quinn Washington
Reviewing Dapagliflozin For Chronic Kidney Disease With Dr. Jennifer N. Clements

iForumRx.org

03:18 min | Last month

Reviewing Dapagliflozin For Chronic Kidney Disease With Dr. Jennifer N. Clements

"In the commentary wrote for i former ex. You reviewed the study entitled deputy flows in patients with chronic kidney disease which was published in the new england journal of medicine in late september. Two thousand and twenty. And while i think everyone in our audiences should read the paper for themselves. We provide a link to the paper on her. I former x website. But can you give us a brief synopsis of the study methods and results. The data stay k. D. trial was an international double blind placebo. Controlled trial conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of day Ten milligrams orly once-daily among participants with chronic kidney disease with or without type two diabetes to elaborate on chronic kidney disease participants had macro albumen urea and stage two through four kidney disease following one. To one random association each group received stable doses of either an ace inhibitor or arb for at least four weeks. The primary outcome was composite endpoint of a time to event analysis and included declined of gfr fifty percent in stage kidney disease and reno or cardiovascular death. There was a secondary composite outcome. In this included the primary outcome with cardiovascular death or hospitalization for heart failure when looking at baseline characteristics both groups were similar in terms of age females race. Gfr as far as cardiovascular disease and standard of care the gfr main was about forty three and a majority of these participants could be classified as stage three. B in addition thirty seven percent of these participants had cardiovascular disease and ninety eight percent. Did receive the ace inhibitor. Or a are now after three years dabba cliff flows and reduce the primary composite outcome by thirty nine percent with a benefit. Sharon individual outcomes of decline jeff for fifty percent in stage kidney disease and long-term dialysis as saying other trials with dabba gla flows in. There was a reduction of nine percent in the composite of cardiovascular endpoint of cardiovascular death or hospitalization for heart failure now discontinuation was low and similar between both groups. But it's important to look at some safety outcomes volume. Depletion was statistically higher with dabba in than placebo even though there was no statistically significant finding placebo group did have a higher percentage of participants experiencing a reno related adverse event than compared to flows in and lastly there was no cases of you. Glycemic kato acidosis among those. That received

Chronic Kidney Disease Cardiovascular Death Kidney Disease New England Journal Of Medicin Cardiovascular Disease Heart Failure Diabetes Reno Sharon Jeff
Is it Time to Add Colchicine to the CVD Cocktail?

iForumRx.org

04:42 min | Last month

Is it Time to Add Colchicine to the CVD Cocktail?

"I think most people would consider loco to to be a positive study again. Demonstrating the positive effects. That culture scene can have on cardiovascular outcomes in looking at the conduct of the study. What do you consider to be the strengths and potential weaknesses. What concerns does it raise and does this study established culture seen as a standard of care that should be offered to most patients with coronary artery disease or just to some patients or just a limited view. Yes i'm going to go ahead and quickly Discussed the strengths. This was a randomized placebo. Controlled double blind trial. They had a large sample size around fifty. Five hundred patients were randomized. These patients were on solid background. Therapy as i discuss previously. And i think this answers are very important. Clinical question about further risk reduction in patients with cad. Yes so. I completely agree. I mean this is a a well done study with no real fatal flaws. But certainly. There's some things discuss here so i or a couple of things regarding the design of the trial. That really. Back to the generalize ability the findings so i the trial like taylor said was done primarily male patient population specifically in western australia and netherlands. So as unfortunately we see often cardiovascular literature women were underrepresented here in the extrapolation other ethnic groups may be challenged. But the. I don't see this at this. Point is a fatal flaw and i don't have any real biological reason to think that the results wouldn't extrapolate other groups next specifically the culture seem does that was used was point five milligrams which is different than the zero point six milligrams at least we have here in the us. So for some of this could be an issue in what's unknown at this point is if this twenty percent difference in concentration could ultimately impact you the outcomes whether the efficacy or safety however again my gut says it's it's probably k. We've extrapolated from some of the pericarditis data and used are kinda us doses with benefit. So with those said. I think the biggest issue kind of discuss regarding this trial is the priroda musician running phase so against dealer alluded to patients after they were enrolled went into a one month. Essentially tolerability running phase in which fifteen percent of patients actually dropped out during this phase before random ization patients dropped out about sixty percent or overall about nine percent of the overall enrollment phase was lost to perceived side effects for which about half were gi related. As you'd expect with culture scene for me this dropout rate largely for eighty are reasons. Make really me question. The finding of equal discontinuation rates between the trial arms in might skew what we might actually see in clinical practice so i don't think losing sight of shore educating patients about possible side effects from a statistical standpoint you can have the consideration that dropping patients pre random ization due to tolerability concerns. Kind of enriches your potential drug effect. You don't have those patients in the intention to treat arm who aren't exposed to the drug so possibly is looking drug effect versus placebo. Based on what you'd expect in practice you may potentially not see the same overwhelming benefit but the benefit was very strong. And i don't think adding those patients back in would necessarily change the overall Interpretation trial or the application. So really from running phases very much a A safety issue versus inefficacy issue. So alternate of. Bring that back to get back to coach. Seems place in therapy ultimate At this point. I really think lonzo to help to continue to confirm the potential benefit of colchicine in cad management. When we look at this along with other trials whether it be the local one and then probably most importantly combine this along with the whole cod study. We see it but largely consistent benefit with culture seeing reducing cardiovascular events out for those familiar with the study may also seen that at the same time the lotto co two was presented also. A study called cops was presented and this is specific australian study that looked at culture again in an acs population now. This was a negative study. But the real caveat with that is the trial was actually powered for very large difference in events so it really was underpowered to potentially detect. What we what was suggested as possibly clinically relevant differences power. Find about a fifty percent difference in. It looked like there might have been about thirty percent difference. Which is what's consistent with other studies. So kinda really negates. The ability for that trial to kind of pooh-poohed on potential benefits here and i really think ultimately what we have to ask ourselves is is this nonfatal event risk reduction enough to make a therapy part of standard therapy in will i'd say softer endpoint is at play here. It's probably at least reasonable that it's something that we can't just throw out

Coronary Artery Disease Western Australia Netherlands Taylor Lonzo United States
"fifty percent" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"By fifty percent the reforms that have been endorsed by both the right and the left putting for other presidential candidates and maybe you can it's a cutting incarceration by fifty percent if elected we there there should be no it is also thank you okay the answer the answer is yes of course and reduce prison population by more than fifty percent now there's a lot of talk in United States by mass incarceration the reason people talk about mass incarceration unless particularly is because a disproportionate number of people in prison disproportionate to the population statistics arm of minority descent where black and Hispanic and this is supposedly a reference to Americans it deep seated criminal justice racism well the reality is that unfortunately a disproportionate number of black and Hispanic people in the United States are committing crimes as a percentage of the population generally and that is true from it in everything from murder statistics to violent crime there certain crimes are disproportionately white I crystal meth is a disproportionately white crime people were arrested for crystal meth distribution I just proportionately white there certain types of white collar crime there disproportionately white and when you're talking about violent crime you're talking about murder for example the the people who are committing murder are disproportionately minority races now that is not a referendum that is not a statement about race innately being linked to crime is just pointing out that if you are arresting a disproportionate number of people from a population group that is not necessarily a reference to the racism of the system that may be a reference to the people who are actually committing the crime it's not the fault of the police to talk about the criminal justice system so the the and that's the entire basis of the let's free hundreds of thousands of people from prison argument is that the system is inherently racist and therefore we need to let hundreds of thousands of people out and we're going to reduce prison populations by fifty percent so let's look at what the prison populations in the United States actually look like in terms of the crimes that they've committed I don't care about the race of people in prison I don't care about the race of people in any industry I don't care about the race of people in United States generally I'm not interested in the racial demographics of the United States I care much more about what people think what people do because I thought we were supposed to not care about people's race because that's called racism so instead let's focus on what people have done to get themselves in prison now we can all agree if somebody is innocent in prison they should not be in prison and we all agree on that so the question now is which guilty criminals should be allowed to go free because that's what Joe Biden's talking about he's not suggesting that lots of innocent people are present he suggesting that a lot of people who have been convicted of actual crimes out to go free this is more than fifty percent should be really so let's look at the actual percentages of people who are in prison so first of all the vast majority of people in prison and by the vast majority I mean thirteen out of every fifteen people who are in prison are in state prisons not federal penitentiaries most crimes that are committed in the United States are state level crimes and most of those crimes happen to be violent crimes country to popular opinion the vast majority of crimes with people are in jail are not people who are pick and were picked up for smoking dope on the street that is simply not correct when you look at state prisons Hey this is information from the prison policy initiative which is a fairly left wing group I'm prison policy they have a solid break down here Iggy if you're watching the show that you can see this particular chart why should subscribe state prisons currently holds about one point three million people seven hundred and twelve thousand of those people are in prison for violent crimes a hundred thirty seven thousand for assault a hundred seventy two thousand robbery a hundred sixty three thousand for rape or sexual assault eighteen thousand for manslaughter a hundred and seventy nine thousand for murder he said that means the single largest plurality of people who are in prison for violent crime are in for murder so that's a lot of people want to be in prison it seems to me if you can install the robbery rape or sexual assault manslaughter or murder there's a very solid case that you should be in prison and that represents over half of the people are in state prisons then there another two hundred thirty five thousand people were in state prison for property crime and they'll be fraud burglary theft car theft other property that's that's a large share of folks we back any moment first the initial part of being an adult is doing some stuff that you may not want to do right getting on this ride flights working late in getting life insurance if you need life insurance you probably haven't thought about you probably think all I'm young and I'm healthy or you think I don't really want to think about death tonight well the fact is if you don't think about.

fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"But cigarettes, e you are working really closely in the commercials sense. I guess maybe slightly different segment. We're looking at initially with metal. But it's a really interesting paternity. Isn't it retail banking was linked the the vogue thing? The estimate seems like. And I think we're gonna see a lot more in the space in the in the coming on Sunday year at if you look at this space in general is being an deserved and in June. And if you look at what's been on offer for them, it's been. Just not great in terms of the product offerings. I think it's this is great to see. It's fantastic for the customers. If you think about kind of this business segment the backbone of the UK economy fifty percent of small businesses don't make it through the first five years of business and some of the reasons for that they just don't have enough time time in the day to minors stuff. I'm really have a good view of the cash flow. So seeing propositions that are trying to bring together, I think is really powerful completely rude. This significant base in this space. And actually, the the best stands businesses have been offered is essentially a retail Kern county, you have to pay full. That's not do Nuff. So I'm sure we're aligned on that which is the thesis behind metal for zoos forward-looking, businessman king. How'd you create four looking business banking as you say helps people make better decisions because usually it's? Silly decision around not being in control of cash flow. Not being in a situation where you understand whether you can hire a person or a piece of equipment, or whatever it is. And the reality really, I think that all of this goes through is and we can Jason Simon. We can kind of attached to this really is. Being an entrepreneur is actually bucking terrifying. But the reality is up to be an amazing thing. But the reality of doing on a day-to-day basis is like a mental note of the found things that you might have to do or haven't gotten around to and what we're trying to do with metals get us to the point where actually we can make it. So people have to spend less time worrying about the business and actually more time making that, and that's exactly I mean, we just una research in in the space, and we see that on average people spend three hours doing admin definitely going up. You know, when I'm gonna get to that amount month year, if you can save some of that time superpower completely Rick think even though we look at that, especially because we look at that change from commodity products. The ability account just to give you a balance this transactions ability to move money. The number of jobs to be done that the gap between the basic data and the financial management of small businesses. Huge is bigger than the speed and space for. Retail banking. So I think that's what makes the SME space, really ripe. Because it's you know, we don't run cash based businesses. We have invoices that ju- we've got bills. Do we've got this whole overlapping complexity that stretches out a couple of months and behind a couple of months and the ability to to have an account. I think helps with that complexity brings real value in customers..

Kern county Jason Simon UK Rick fifty percent three hours five years
"fifty percent" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Percent male fifty percent female, and our our investment portfolio has forty percent female founders. So it's just back to the prior conversation. We think that because we are more diverse. That's why our portfolio is w reflects it. So what what would be my advice to women founder? So I do think that in contrasting women founders a very well prepared. They have done. Their homework. They they know a lot of the details of their business and their market, and they spent a lot of time on that. Which is more prepared than the male founders that you see in general. I would say, yes. In terms of the awareness of the details. Sometimes though what that which is great to be aware. But and I think there was like a Harvard study that sorta showed this, right? So. Women founders often pitch and get asked questions more about sort of the the downsize in the costs of their business and less about the upside they paint, a more reasonable picture and so- realize that it's great to be very grounded in the data of where your businesses today. But I in every other venture capitalist is investing in what we think the future of your business is going to be. So you're pitched to us has to reflect that balance. So it's awesome. That you're super homework and knowledgeable about where your team and your product in your customers and your businesses today..

founder Harvard fifty percent forty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on WLAC

"That hit that benchmark fifty percent. Fifty percent equity trillions of dollars in equity in the US that people and people don't realize how much equity they have sitting in their homes. Yeah. I mean, tons town. Where if I mean like, oh, yeah, I can count hundreds of them. Yeah. So that's our lack of inventory because people don't want to sell as they don't want to go and all that money on a new house Acklin sit and put so yes. So as you say that to set up one thing but em I and if you're still paying mortgage insurance refinance. And if you're worried about the cost of refinancing weakened position, you skip two months payments, cover your cost refinance. And put you back where you principle balance was before the refi. And now you dropped your your your am I and if you keep on paying what you're paying right now. You're going to pay your house off even faster. What? What people not I don't know. This is gonna sound really bad. I'm so sorry. I'm so sorry, everybody. Would you not realize? I mean, I guess people just don't know that they can get that off of there at that point a threat sitting fifty percent loan the value, wouldn't I mean because the first thing that comes to my mind is I'm so sick of this stuff. Why can't get wind? Can I get it off my loans to pay it anymore? I just don't know that I would have why would wait 'til fifty percents to get to that point. So is it a is there just percent, and it's seventy or eighty we're we're getting ready to jump into all that exactly what I'm just wondering. What might be what the mindset would be of? It's just lack of knowledge on that. Or just somebody forgot about it. Or or what do you think that driving factor is flag of knowledge? I think.

US fifty percent Fifty percent two months
"fifty percent" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Hey, DC. Right now at vision works all prescription. I wear every frame. Every brand is fifty percent off. Yup. A nifty fifty percent. Thanks to our friends and family event. What's even better? It applies to both glasses and sunglasses. That's right. At the vision works friends and family event. You can save fifty percent on all prescription eyewear. Why? Because we like you DC a lot vision works. We're here to help you some restrictions apply see store for details. Hey, DC right now at vision works all prescription eyewear. Every frame. Every brand is fifty percents off. Yup. A nifty fifty percent. Thanks to our friends and family event. What's even better? It applies to both glasses and sunglasses. That's right. At division works friends and family event, you can save fifty percent on all prescription eyewear. Why? Because we like you DC a lot vision works. We're here to help you some restrictions apply see store for details.

DC fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on The Science Hour

"And I have been determined to be the end at all and comes from the mother. And that we now know is from the mother. And so it's more like only with you and I was in the end, it's almo book. Surprisingly, when they do the whole genome, it was about fifty percent. Neanderthal fifty percent Denisovans now you could get that from a mixed population. But when they look at the way the DNA was arranged in the genome launch chunks and so on. It showed that this was a first generation hybrid. This is a daughter of a meeting between an Amazon woman answered in a man. I mean, I think the very first in east of DNA that was analyzed had hints of Neanderthal in it. So we use something like this could be happening. Yes. There were traces of Neanderthal deny in the first incident specimen that was analyzed. So it looked like it was a little bit of interbreeding the Russo traces of even more can't deny in that seven. So there was already hints interbreeding was happening with more than one species. And of course, modern humans. We got evidence of our Sammeng Nanto deny. Ended DNS so the breeding was known and in a sense, it's not surprising to have it confirmed in this way because we know that these populations were more closely related to each other than we in the Amazons. For example, say we Neanderthals hybrid is maybe fifty thousand years ago. Neanderthal Judaism's are more closely related. So in a sense, it's not a surprise, but to actually find direct evidence of inner tiny bone. Fragment from thousands from the cave is remarkable. That's that really gets me. You know, the shit chance that the boat they were looking at at that moment had just that kind of information that, yes, it is a story Shing. And as the authors say, this must mean surely given the rarity or faucet evidence that this can't be a very rare event. At least when these populations met, it looks like they did mix. You said that they are genetically distinct more closely rated than we ought to either of them. But I'm sort of trying to work out what the history was that separated them then brought them back. Together and then you get this mixture. Well, that's one of the positive aspects in a sense of the story that, okay, on the one hand, it looks like when they met they mixed. But on the other hand, the scientists wouldn't be at a recognize these as distinct populations that have come together in hybridize an, it's the had distinctive regional histories. So we known the Android homes where evolving in the western part of Eurasia for some four hundred thousand years. And we inferred that Denisovans revolving in eastern Asia and maybe south East Asia for a similar length of time, nearly four hundred thousand years since the separation of those two groups..

East Asia Asia Amazon Amazons Eurasia four hundred thousand years fifty percent fifty thousand years one hand
"fifty percent" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Were operating at about fifty percent it's pride monday this is it's like this every year we're we're toward return yeah yep charles berkeley your comments on social media that's that's good i'm not sure guys yeah i don't know no yeah you never touch the wood shavings you put it in a bag it's just been one thing after another so i don't know it is coming up on seven you're doing the pride parade can't believe that right less crazy what was it like for you love to see the parents.

fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Nine six talk ta okay no matter how you doing are you get into one way or the other now what i gotta do if i got a map to this little computer thing up with all thanks thanks tobacco i can see some of these things but sometimes it's a it's a long it's a long road but this one's pretty easy ron and honolulu is next persistence would be his middle name this ought to this ought to be an interesting departure is an american citizen immediately can't they repeal these anchorbaby laws or is it a part of the constitution but then there's this thing called amendments to the constitution i'm a dummy when i get the fact that if you're if you're born in this country i get it and that had that has been incentive mover for i would say probably fifty percent of the burst in southern california are are fifty percent oh my goodness maybe that's why they won't break up of course it's the big loophole my friend and and look who would ever be grudge a destitute family trying to get into this country for nobody i knew that numerous times right evacuate there's no more important in our country in the world and our kids and for us to have to take our kids and throw a million more kids that don't speak the language don't have don't i mean it's just not right you've gotta come here the right way i don't mean to sound artless either don't get me wrong all of us feel that way right around i it it is interesting you know this is a very very tough place to be melania trump i mean you know i just said listen miss barbara bush offices terrible of course it's terrible but then you know some of these people said on the on the early morning talkers they got plenty of property how many folks they want to come to their house and sleep on their yards when it's an mba nimby but there is a whole slew of people out there that are just gave me in our system at until we have legitimate borders and whether or not you want to build a wall or if you wanna put troops up and down the wall i kind of think that putting troops there is awful because we don't want somebody going in even though the national guard is strictly there to to keep us safe engaging with these people that are so desperate to sneak into this country look at that accident earlier i mean is there anybody anything sadder than that there are actually was a caravan of cars there's this one suv five people died in this thing there are fourteen people in this in this car at least five of that killed several others hurt going over one hundred miles an hour crashing during a smuggling the while fleeing from border patrol agents in south texas fourteen people went out of control more than a hundred miles an hour and overturned on highway eighty five ejecting most of the occupants the sheriff for a democ country gun county rather marion boyd said from what we can tell the vehicle ran off the road and caught the gravel and then tried to reconnect and it flipped over several times and four victims were dead right there at the scene boys that awful thing anyway multiple the occupants in the suv were believed in the country without legal permission the driver and one passenger were believed to be us citizens and by the way this is a very lucrative trip they make you know even if they lose their buy another car next week they don't care they get they charge hundreds of dollars for each person and sometimes even more than that and there's it's it's like a traffic jam.

fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on WFLA News Radio

WFLA News Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on WFLA News Radio

"Fifty percent fifty percent and if you tell your adviser in advance well hey if the market drops fifty percent i'm okay if i lose maybe ten maybe ten percent and i say to them all right do you wanna know what that looks like because i'll show you i'll show you xactly based on the past we go back to two thousand eight and i'll show you what happened with a portfolio that lost say ten percent when the market lost basically fifty remember back in the year two thousand two thousand was actually march tenth of the year two thousand dot com turned into dot bombs two thousand one we had in september remember september eleventh nine eleven of course all right so nine eleven through december of two thousand two it just dragged all the life all the energy out of the market and markets lost close to fifty percent but you know those big big wall street firms that are out there we all know their names there's a bunch of them there's not one that said hey watch out america there's gonna be a crash next week there's going to be a crash next month that doesn't happen so you need to work with an adviser that is going to build the right type of portfolio i can tell you this during the financial crisis that went from two thousand seven until april of two thousand nine a lot of people watch forty five fifty percent low to negatively correlated portfolios lost nineteen percent which wasn't real great but it certainly wasn't fifty two thousand three two thousand one they lost about four and a half percent not forty five not fifty so what's problematic about investing today megan is there's a lot of people that say hey we got you diversified we've got you covered don't worry you're okay and i look at these portfolios and i i don't see it i don't see the true diversification you have to walk away from aggressive bull market sometimes in order to protect your wealth it all starts with a phone call call.

megan america fifty percent ten percent forty five fifty percent nineteen percent Fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on Important If True

Important If True

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on Important If True

"All right where you got rid of fifty percent of the glitter fifty percent of the glitter fifty percent of the average is down there's at least one stupid gold flecked that falls you till you die yup yup you're never getting rid of it though it's this this mistake will haunt you 'til the end of your days i'm sorry good luck though all right we have we have an email that came in from all e accident remember if this is this might have been a tweet from ali or something this is just our friend ali yeah you can just say everybody it just says well just as all he writes and i i seemed it was a reader but this is our friend ali who i guess is a reader anyway i don't leave me alone dulcet tones a failing me this was an article about it crayfish species i couldn't believe it this is amazing this is this is actually important if true in the most classes and means absolutely true true yeah and it seems to be true which is inconceivable to me so it actually be how we die twist ending against all odds yeah so this is an article from the new york times entitled this mutant crayfish clones itself and it's taking over europe this is a species called the marble crayfish before about twenty five years ago the species simply did not exist a single drastic mutation in a single crayfish produced the marbled crayfish in an instant the mutation made it possible for the creature to clone itself and now it is spread across much of europe and gained a toehold on other continents in madagascar where arrived around two thousand seven it numbers in the millions and threatens native crayfish the crayfish lay eggs without mating the progeny were all female and each one grew up ready to reproduce in two thousand three scientists confirmed the marbled crayfish were indeed making clones of themselves for nearly two decades marbled crayfish have been multiplying triples on the legendary star trek episode so this is.

ali new york times europe madagascar fifty percent twenty five years two decades
"fifty percent" Discussed on Jalen and Jacoby

Jalen and Jacoby

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on Jalen and Jacoby

"Copy able to here's what you had to protect the integrity of the approximately fifty percent of the teams that have never won an nba championship may everybody still feel that level of inclusion that when training camp stars we got a chance to make the playoffs we got a chance to make a run this year will you take the best sixteen records you don't want to have to wear one coffers has twelve teams any only cover other conference only has four well hopefully will see this change soon we'll be talking about it forever if we don't mixed yeah medicinal the nba p a executive director michelle roberts was asked about marijuana and how it's being legalized state to state and would it be legalised in the league she was asked if it currently was and here was her answer no it does not exist now we're exploring it i think there is some movement toward accepting it as an appropriate use to address pain but we're not there yet jaylen this is and this isn't as simple as it sounds on paper do you support that lifting the ban of medicinal use of marijuana in the nba ultimately i supported because if these states are legalize it found a way to regulate it the uk as a private entity tried to punish four and again walling talk about this be a nfl players we don't talk about this other major metropolitan spores because they truly don't pub.

michelle roberts marijuana pain nba uk executive director nfl fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"You can exceed fifty percent of the so if you have a five thousand square foot lot your footprint can exceed twenty five hundred fifty percent that that's what i wanted to grab you on because we know that you can't put a secondstorey on with exactly the same square foot at the top story and the bottom unless you do it at the very beginning so there's certain things you've got to live with but that means that if you're worried about the the footprint on the property the footprint in the air doesn't count does it in other words you can build as long as your association and you're you're subdivision his second straight you can do that yes so in if you're footprints fifty percent you know when you're first level is says you're you're say your first on the five thousand square foot lot and you just have a one uh story structure and its twenty four hundred square feet that's just your first level where you can still go on top of that as well and like you saying long as there's nothing within the the deeds or associations or anything other than that so uh for most of the properties hearing on average around 5000 and you know the nor ones uh but then dinner we've got some out in the windward side and nuwan area areas where they can accede that even going to ten thousand plus on a square footage but you can actually get a pretty good size home today in you know for me when i talking to a lot of my families ideally depending on the size of their property we like to see if we can go with the onestorey on this day they know for sure that they wanted with two and the reason being is a drama musical you can't you can't put a bear on your stairs eucanada you can live on there so if you can have a single level home also it it allows you to aid with your home so if a you know as you get to age maybe the knees don't work as good as they used to or things of that nature at least you're still able to move around your house i know some more families when we come in there they want to do some work on their home and what's happened as if god dude lower level additions because they have their bedrooms all upstairs and a living air in a kitchens our downstairs and now it's a little a hard for them to go up and down the stairways every day.

fifty percent twenty five hundred fifty perc
"fifty percent" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Fifty percent rental fifty percent ownership i see it happening it's all around us every report i read report after report says the same thing people are not buying they are renting so let's talk about why builders are not building well first of all because no one's by that's the most important reason the second reason they're not building is because they can't afford to build homes that the average first time owner homeowner would want to buy the old people that used to buy expensive homes they no longer one expensive home plate see what happen owning expense of bones does to their financial situation later in their life and younger people can't afford more expensive homed but builders can't build inexpensive homes anymore why because a governmental regulation the government has destroy the construction business on four five different frauds it's all it's unbelievable was just talk about the regulations for energy the energy regulations alone could raise the cost of a house by thirty percent from what it would cost ten years ago what do you mean dell where you have to have a thirteen seer air conditioner compared to it eight zero airconditioner air conditioners used cost five hundred bucks they now costs ten thousand dollars now think about that i can still by the old kind of airconditioners that we use which were 100 conditions i could buy them for five hundred bucks you're paying ten an thousand dollars for an air conditioner i know because i just bought one emma high and air conditioners went out and there were told me it's five thousand dollars for just the exterior part of the air conditioner not even talk about the internal part you're talk about hot water heater regulations have gone up fourfold you're now that going to be able to buy a how water heater for less in two thousand bucks we used to buy up for two hundred dollars up the cisco down the line the.

air conditioner cisco dell five thousand dollars ten thousand dollars two hundred dollars thousand dollars thirty percent Fifty percent fifty percent ten years
"fifty percent" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on WGTK

"The and i do the x or she does the laundry am i do the x xi does this i do this now incidently i that's one form of 5050 there are a lot of forms of 5050 his the number one i do the laundry fifty percent of the time and she fifty percent of the time now as it happens i liked roles that i wouldn't divvy them up that way but it doesn't matter i do like roles i i love the masculine and feminine in the human species i think it makes i think women ache to be with a masculine man and men a to be with the feminine woman but you can't say that today can't say that because we live in in an unhealthy age where the healthy is declared its what is it it was it was actually not i who came up with this it was a liberal democrat daniel patrick moynihan remember his is phrase was a defining deviancy up and defining normalcy down that was developed by daniel patrick moynihan a democrat senator from new york state one of one of the last thinkers in the us senate he was a thinker he would today be considered rightwing republican what am i grew up he was a liberal democrat now you understand and i don't wanna bring politics into the malefemale hour but very important to understand what has happened because he would have no place in the democratic party today with his views no mcmillan whatsoever to call something deviant even that's not it's fair bolton let's forbidden so deep a 5050 man fifty percent of the time i vacuum fifty percent of the time he or she vacuums or do you have one i do all the vacuuming and he does all the gardening i do all the all the shopping in the supermarket n he or she does all the cookie do you have that as the the original 5050 was he was the wageearner and she took care of the whole that was the original every body as so in effect every has always believed in 5050 the question is what constitutes your fifty in what's the other i i admit that all things being equal if you can pull it off am i.

daniel patrick moynihan senator us mcmillan new york senate fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In individual is fifty percent controls or real infected affected by environment and fifty percent by the genetic information that's a big hole in our probability thinking that no doubt about that but just remind ourselves is that the the the aspirations of societies will obviously converge i where the possibilities are the highest and to give you a dark example gender selection is altimonte genetic selection and in societies we already know what's happened so you know we always think oh you know eugenics this thing is a thing of the positive yesterday's news we've gone beyond this certainly statesponsored eugenics statesponsored mandates to control change manipulated genomes maybe things in the past i don't know what you know it's hard to know what states behave like these days because a theme of news but but but just remind us that not all jeans are so influenced by environments there's some genes that a powerfully autonomous gender being one of them and where we where where we found such binary on and off switches are close to binary on announced which is human beings acting in their own interest personally not by stick mandate have not been averse to selecting jeans and thereby selecting children as a consequence of that just just to tell you what what the consequences has been in in concrete terms in parts of indian parts of china there are seven hundred and fifty girls two thousand boys that's a profoundly abnormal ratio and it is only a consequence of a combination of gender selection and neglect and we will look at gender selection that is a this janik process in other words that is using human genetics in its crude form because it's just basically of looking for one chromosome chromosome but it's using up so this is just remind us that sure most complex human features lie on this on on the far end of the spectrum where many genes influence things and environments live row but there are powerful things on the other end of the spectrum is well aware genetic determinants are strong and human beings have not been averse personally to manipulate change and create societies where those genomes have have have been selected i am struck by the observation which has been validated for a long time that certain genes which we know are responsible for a disease we know even the.

fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Fifty percent of the vote in the primary he will avoid a jewish runoff against one single republican competitor polling averages you're saying he short if he does hit fifty percent they're already rattling the cage is saying this spells the end of any change the republicans have of retaining the house in the midterms others preposterous there are also try that suggest that it shows that this was going to be a referendum on trump one way or another if president trump's if this guy hich fifty percent the trump era is over the trump agenda is going down the tubes all over the sixth congressional district in atlanta now you understand this is desperate is just sheer desperation panic anguish on the part of the anti trump factions who want the president to fail anyway they care and this is the latest just want you to have it on your radar want you to be aware aware of it this guy has become the darlene this osthoff has become the darling of the progressive movement in america and he's getting all the donations incidentally from around the country is not gets not from the six congressional district democrats are just plain show body anybody can slow down this for a drink and frankly i don't think you can i don't think they can't just wanted to make sure and especially for our listeners in around atlanta that you know certainly been talking a lot about you have it on your radar will senator ted cruz about it as well we're going to talk to about north korea i'm in the dallas fort worth metroplex big event tonight featuring senator ted cruz and some of my radio colleagues so we'll visit with senator ted cruz next year others tuesday edition of the mike.

the house trump atlanta president north korea dallas america senator ted cruz fifty percent Fifty percent
"fifty percent" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"fifty percent" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"That middle fifty percent is the election and my view was wrongly is a terms the fifty percent raul police speaking wallace of generous attention it would not moving towards <music> to watch major whole behavior not i was wrong and that is making you wonder what is that middle fifty percent of american what is it now because if this was a one off because the kind of karrass magic shi'ites to manage to calm people that's one thing you can reverse that but if that little fifty percent actually is to be like <music> and we're screwed then that's america well you know the philosopher gavin says there is nothing in that people must too there is no way that people must be and i think we are for the first time understanding that that is true and it's not only true it's also part of who we are but the question is if we've got this high off the country that's malleable but say how do we and go back to <music> you know justice how do we bed and the way from but just happened because we need to have announcer to that some tony buddy thank you so much and thank you all cloudy rank in selman rusty and tony cushion enjoying into public's here on february twenty i'm david remix thanks for listening to this podcast bonus of the

wallace gavin america david fifty percent