35 Burst results for "Fifty Kilometer"

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

04:50 min | 8 months ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an abc podcast. They must be a new that locals need to be in control of their lives and that we must trust were coupes to make decisions three years ago. The northern territory's chief minister. Michael gonna announced that grit island would be one of his government's first partners in something called the local decision making plan which is another way of saying self-determination developing tosses rehabilitation away young ones in this now group island with its golden sandstone coastline and mangroves seats about fifty kilometers of the east coast of omland. And it's haunted nearly three thousand people. It's a wild and beautiful spot and two fits population a one daily. Aqua traditional arnie's that live in communities that benefit for millions of dollars in royalties from a massive manganese mine on the island..

Michael gonna abc omland arnie
Breaking Down the Science Behind OneWeb's Planned Constellation

Daily Tech Headlines

01:39 min | 9 months ago

Breaking Down the Science Behind OneWeb's Planned Constellation

"On monday we talked about the successful deployment of thirty four internet satellites by uk. Communications company one web bringing their total network to two hundred eighty eight satellites. Their goal is to reach six hundred and forty eight satellites by twenty twenty two. But how in the world does the internet come all the way down from space satellites straight down into your ears right. Now let's take a closer look at some far out satellite science one. Web satellites is a joint venture with airbus. They aim to deploy a constellation of up to nine hundred. Low earth orbit satellites at around one thousand two hundred kilometers altitude to provide high speed internet. These efforts intend to compete with spacex. His starling system which currently has one thousand seven hundred internet satellites orbiting the earth at five hundred fifty kilometers altitude amazon also has plans to launch internet satellites for its project copier constellation. All of these companies are aiming towards providing low latency internet from space. But how does it work rather than sending internet signals through electric cables satellite internet beams information through the vacuum of space or it travels forty seven percent faster than fiber optic cable. This is particularly interesting for remote locations where laying electric cables is complicated in order to transfer a signal. You i need to emit one. So i and internet signal is delivered to a large antenna or earth station on the ground and this station then sends radio waves up into space targeting a specific satellite which is around the size of a large table.

Airbus Spacex UK Amazon
Astronomers Zero in on Source of the Impactor That Wiped out the Dinosaurs

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:53 min | 10 months ago

Astronomers Zero in on Source of the Impactor That Wiped out the Dinosaurs

"A new study claims the impacter belief to a wiped out seventy five percent of life on earth sixty six million years ago including all the non avian. Dinosaurs most likely came from the other. Half of the main asteroid built between mars and jupiter. The findings reported in the journal lakers came as a surprise to scientist as it's a regional space previously not thought produced. Many earth impact is however computer modeling from the southwest research institute in san antonio texas has shown that the process is that the large asteroids to earth from that region occur at least ten times more frequently than previously thought. They've also found that. The composition of these bodies does match. What scientist snow about the dinosaur. Killing impacter researches combined computer models of asteroid evolution observations of known asteroids to investigate the frequency of so-called chicks lube events over sixty six million years ago a body estimated to be around ten kilometers wide. Signed into what. He's now mexico's yucatan peninsula for me. One hundred and fifty kilometer wide crater known these days as the chicks solid greater and it was this huge blast which triggered the mass extinction event that ended the reign of the dinosaurs. The last few decades much has been learned about the chicks lube event. every advance is latina questions. One of the study's authors william bucky from the southwest research institute says too critical questions remain unanswered. Firstly what was the source of the impacter and secondly how often do such impact events occur on earth to probe that sheikh salah be impact jealous examined sixty six year. Old rock samples found on land and within drako's the results indicate the impact that was similar to carbonaceous contract meteorite that some of the most pristine material in the solar system.

Southwest Research Institute Lakers San Antonio Yucatan Peninsula William Bucky Texas Mexico Sheikh Salah
Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

The Promised Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

"The day before yesterday as we record a gardener found underneath a bush at number twenty two cream as street a cache of world war two vintage bullets artillery shells and grenades which ordinance was stowed under a bush three quarters of a century ago by members of the haganah jewish militia to keep british soldiers and centuries from finding it such a hiding place for weapons was called a sleek from the hebrew root some lama couth to make rid of and in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s there were hundreds of maybe thousands all around the country though most of them were dismantled as soon as the brits left palestinian nineteen forty eight. But you know how it is. You put your grenades and your artillery shells in your bulletin a whole under bush in your yard and then you get busy ensure the brits go home but you tell yourself you'll empty the gun whole tomorrow and if it's not one thing it's another before you know it seventy odd years of pass that is just life in the big city so this week. The police bomb squad piloted remote control. Sapper robots under the tree and they exploded some of the grenades shells and bullets. And they neutralize the rest and sent them to the tel aviv. Forensics lab for further investigation. And for those of you wondering and who isn't wondering isaac jacob adolf. Crimea was the french jewish attorney who in eighteen. Forty along with sir. Moses montefiore made the trip to alexandria egypt to plead before Dive mohammed ali for the release of jews arrested in damascus blood. Libel that rocked the jewish world that year and crimea and montefiore secured freedom for nine of the thirteen syrian. Jews accused of killing christians for their blood. The other four having already died while being tortured after that chromium became minister of justice of france under the second republic in eighteen forty eight and he later founded the 'alliance eastern elite universal in paris in eighteen. Sixty one gathers that isaac jacob adolf creamier would probably not himself have hidden guns in tel aviv in nineteen forty eight but he probably would have understood the sentiment and arguably nothing captures the haphazard semi history city of this forever new and yet never really new city. We love so al tel aviv. Alto better than a gardener. Finding an old bag of old bullets and such tucked under a shrub to shield it from the prying eyes of the brits on a street named for a man who one hundred years before that sailed with an english financier to alexandria a city. Just four hundred fifty kilometers. Southwest of tel-aviv. In order to gain the release of wrongly residues in damascus a city just two hundred kilometers northeast of tel

Haganah Jewish Militia Bush Lama Couth Isaac Jacob Adolf Moses Montefiore Aviv Mohammed Ali Crimea Alexandria Damascus Egypt Al Tel Tel Aviv France Paris TEL
Man-Made Operations Present Serious Threat To Ocean Biodiversity

Why It Matters

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Man-Made Operations Present Serious Threat To Ocean Biodiversity

"Fish contend with evermore relentless methods other threats are looming over their survival the many other activities in the oceans that perhaps go a little bit under the radar or not as indata as fisheries for example coastal zone development the removal of mangroves and see grosses for a number of purposes from mineral extraction to the building marinas to the expansion of bet's to dragging of harbors lots of those activities that perhaps one does not think so much in terms of the impact. That is the first thing. Second of course. Oil exploration and such activities that do have significant impacts most of those activities. Take place with a narrow band from the continental shelf. They will be largely within the first fifty kilometers from the coast. That is the area of the oceans that he's particularly impacted. And i'm including here. Pollution issues runoff from agriculture production. Lots of nutrients are end up in the plastic pollution and the like those areas of a highly impacted when it comes to high-seas further away from the coast than the major impact really is climate change because the ocean place a very significant role in regulating the climate for example ninety percent of the additional heat that we have produced as a result of global warming sits in the ocean and a quarter of the carbon emissions that we emit are in the ocean so the ocean has a very very significant rolling climate regulation and also a significant impact in fact. It is the geographical area that will suffer the impact of climate change. Most so when you think about temperature change what you'll see is that organisms adopt that so all fish tend to have an environmental window. They feel comfortable in and that environmental wind might be safe from seventeen to eighteen degrees if those seventeen to eighteen degrees move physically because the water is warming they will move without water and so we expect a number of species to move to. What's the polls in both directions. So that's the first impact changes in distribution. There will be also changes in production. Some species will see a decrease in production another son increasing production all that has huge implications for food production in the ocean at all levels if you can imagine for example. A fisherman suddenly going out to sea not finding the face that they're used to fishing on it's not that easy to change to another species to fish because some of them require different boats different gear on different technology and different expertise. That goes all the way. The food chain all the way up to humans.

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"And you studies found that crack in mara. The largest see on this attorney moon titan is at least three hundred meters deep and that's deep enough for a feature automated submarine mission beyond deep crack in mary's also immense nearly the size of all five great lakes of north america combined. Templeton is saturn's largest moon and the second biggest mood in the solar system in fact it's saving lodge than the planet mercury the five thousand one hundred and fifty kilometer wide world is fifty percent bigger than that. Amador of the earth's moon and eighty percent more massive. But what really makes totten unique is that. It's the only all the solar system other than earth where clouds form rain falls onto the ground forming rivers and streams which eventually flow into lakes and seas but unlike us water-based hydrological cycle titans rains made of methane and ethane on titan temperatures so cold the water's frozen solid so hard at forms bedrock. Titan's atmosphere is about ten times as big as the earth and it's primarily nitrogen laced with methane and ethane it all forms a dense golden hydrocarbon hayes high up in the moon. Stratosphere and far below lies the swirling wave covered surface of crack marae titans largest see after sifting through data from one of cassini's final titan fly bys astronomers reporting in the journal of geophysical research rebel. The determined that crack in mary's at least three hundred meters deep. The study's lead author valeria poggiali from cornell. University says the dip composition of each of titan sees has already been measured except that is for the largest cracking mari which is not only a great name that also contains about eighty percent of the moons total surface liquids the data was gathered. Cassini's t one four fly by of titan on august the twenty first twenty fourteen the spacecraft's radar survey era mary. A smaller see in the moon's northern polar region to look for the mysteriously disappearing and reappearing magic island then his cassini cruise by twenty one thousand kilometers per hour nearly a thousand kilometers above. Titan's surface spacecraft used. It's l. timid to measure the depth of both crack and marae and maure sinus an estuary located at the season seasonal the end the study's authors along with engineers from this as jet propulsion laboratory in pasadena california had already figured out how to discern lake and see depth by noting. The radars return time differences on the liquid surface and the bottom of the seas composition by acknowledging the amount of radar energy absorbed during that through the liquid. It turns out murray. Sinus is about eighty five meters deep shallow than the depths of the central crack in mary which was to date for the raiders measure. Surprisingly the liquids composition primarily a mixture of ethane and methane methane dominated and similar to the composition of nearby laghi. Amara titans second largest earlier. Scientists have speculated that crack in maybe more a thin rich earth because of its size at its extension into the moon's lower latitudes the observation that the liquid composition isn't markedly different from the other northern seas is an important finding and we'll help in assessing models of times earth like hydrological system but there are still many puzzles about this strange moon that remain one of which is the of its liquid methane. See the matt of sunlight. Titan receives about one hundred times less intense than on the earth. And this should be consistently converting the methane in the atmosphere into ethane. The overall cycle should take about ten million years so the process should by now have completely depleted. Titan's surface methane reserves yet as the study shows this dilemma ocean worth of methane out there or at least sees worth this space time still to come a new idea about the birth of the solar system and the first atlantic splashdown of a series dragon cargo ship. All that and much more still to.

fifty percent eighty percent north america five thousand valeria poggiali pasadena california saturn earth one hundred and fifty kilomete twenty one thousand kilometers Templeton about ten million years Titan five great lakes about eighty five meters mara about eighty percent about one hundred times august second biggest mood
In Situ Community-Based Oak Conservation At The Morton Arboretum

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

In Situ Community-Based Oak Conservation At The Morton Arboretum

"Suited to do some major impact stuff for a bunch of trees and the main focus of what we were connected over our oaks because the icn just did their assessment or trying to get this out that what is it. Forty one percent of species across the globe are facing extinction or at least of conservation concern. And i just spoke with your colleague dr murphy westwood about a lot of exit. You so taking trees to other places to help conserve them. But you are position in a way that you're doing a lot of the institute the other side of that coin which is also desperately needed. So let's take a closer look at just. What in situ conservation means to you before we look at some of the species. You're working with right. So the global tree conservation program in the morton arboretum. We have a very specific approach to how we try to save threatened tree species. We've i go through prioritizing because unfortunately we cannot save all the sixteen thousand three species on the planet and we wish we could right now but we don't have the money or manpower resources so we need to make some hard choices of what we are going to folks and that is We used a lot the redmi sting which is why you talked about with murphy and the new red list of folks which is one of our target tax on groups was published and my team members did that and so now we have a clear picture of which species need our help the most so then two approaches we can take our well. Try to go and save these species right were they occur and that's go in situ conservation so within their native range but also complement to that. Sometimes we just can't that we were not able to save the species right where they occur. So then we can compliment that with ex situ conservation. Which is what murphy. Also talked a lot about hoochie. You can do see the preservation and you can save species by having specimen symbol. Tammy berea so. My job is to focus on the in situ conservation part so where we do is that we select right now. We have tools as if he projects with two different species off endangered oaks which are coworkers brandy. Gi which is endemic micro endemic old that only occurs in the tip or huckabee -fornia peninsula in the california lack in mexico. Scowls working mogo. Well people those these resorts drink margaritas. And they have no idea that fifty kilometers from there There is these amazing biosphere reserve called sierra laguna forest biosphere reserve. And we've seen that reserve. There is the majority of the distribution of these core brand This is a very dry arid. Ecosystems very scrubby and so these are tree only occurs on by edges obese announced streams. And when you think of a stream or a river you imagine that yes. What but he's he's really funny. I guess share some pictures of you just sad there dry and only when there's hurricanes or weather events then erase a lot there and it feels app and it crashes the mountains a mountain range right there and so all. The rain gets dunked on everything. Floods the roles get destroyed. And then you pass this they rebuild it like with the sand like they have. Ob sands so anyway abc's where these oak grows but the problem is that because it's a very dry ecosystem that is also where the ranchers want to have the ratchets. That's there's water so they put these long hosts. And that's how they watered needle gardens or wetlands. Show there's a conflict between the place where the you know the specific habitat for these species. And where the ranches are and the problem. The ranchers be street because he'd provides shea in

Dr Murphy Westwood ICN Morton Arboretum Murphy Tammy Berea Fornia Peninsula Sierra Laguna Forest Biosphere Mexico California ABC Shea
Why Are Leaf Blowers So Annoying?

BrainStuff

04:10 min | 1 year ago

Why Are Leaf Blowers So Annoying?

"Hey brain stuff lauren Vogel Bob here the sounds of autumn satisfying crunch the crisp apple or fallen leaves to your feet or the teeth grinding noise of a leaf blower. Powered by electric or gasoline motors that propel air out of a nozzle to send leaves and grass cuttings flying leaf blowers are probably the most Vilnai's devices in the lawn care universe to the noise that they have met in the mid nineteen seventies when leaf blowers became ubiquitous in the United States to California cities adopted early bands of the Equipment Carmel by the sea beverly labeled the leaf. Blowers a noise nuisance and banned their use a move that has been followed by hundreds of other cities across the United States to some degree. But what is it about leaf blowers that people hate is that the decibels the constancy delete blowers pose real dangers to the health of users or others who happen to be within earshot increasingly, the answer appears to be yes to all of the above. Leaf blowers may send leaves and lawn clippings for a ride, but the gusts which reach one, hundred, eighty, two, two, hundred, and eighty miles per hour. That's about two, hundred, ninety, two, four, hundred, fifty kilometers per hour also create a nose clogging swirl of fungus spores, herbicides, and microbes. The resulting dust is so aggravating to people with allergies, asthma bronchitis, and other respiratory maladies that the American Lung Association recommend staying away from leaf blowers altogether. And then there's the air pollution operating a commercial leaf blower for one hour and it's as much smog forming pollution as you would if you drove a recent mid-size car as say twenty sixteen Toyota Camry from Los Angeles Denver, which is about a one, thousand, one, hundred mile or a one, thousand, eight, hundred kilometer trip. That's because most leaf blowers used to cycle engines they're lightweight and inexpensive, but they require a mixture of gasoline and oil to run unlike more complex engines. They don't have separate chambers for fueling lubricants when operated the engine wastes approximately one third of the combined mixture releasing carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, and hydrocarbons into the air. Three toxins are some of the main culprits in the air pollution from leaf blowers. Carbon monoxide helps for smug nitrous oxide is a prime ingredient in acid rain and has been linked to global warming. Hydrocarbons are cancer causing organic compounds that also contribute to smog formation plus leaf blowers are noisy. How noisy are they when you engage in conversation? That's a noise level of about. Sixty decibels according to the center for hearing and Communication. If you're strolling on a sidewalk in a car goes by that's about seventy decibels a leaf blower, even fifty feet or fifteen meters away can be up to seventy five decibels and right up close that jumps well into the nineties according to the World Health Organization any noise about seventy decibels risks causing physical hearing damage. And then there's the mental toll. Miss. A phony is a relatively newly classified condition in which people are angered by particular sounds like chewing or knuckle cracking although leaf blowers aren't mentioned in the diagnosis parameters it stands to reason this phony may be related to people's dislike the machines because they're extra sensitive to sound. Preliminary data shows that phones brains may have a hypersensitive connection between the auditory system and the LIMBIC system, which is the part of the brain that's responsible for creating emotions. It's so much a part of life for a phones that they can be shocked others don't feel or react the same way to certain noises. But being irritated by leaf blowers doesn't necessarily mean your phone. Erica. Walker a doctoral student at Harvard. University's Chan. School. Of Public Health discovered that is far less irritating to create a sound than it is to hear it in a survey of one thousand, fifty residents more than a dozen Boston neighborhoods, Walker found that the majority of respondents said they couldn't control or get away from noises like leaf blowers and they believed that no one really cared that it annoyed them. What's more other research has shown that leaf blowers, a low frequency noise that penetrates through outer walls into homes and businesses in a way that some other noises passing vehicles, for example do not. However. Leaf blowers have become an integral part of commercial lawn care while a leaf blower may sound like fingernails across chalkboard to you for the businesses that rely on them portion of their livelihood. It's probably music to the ears.

United States Nitrous Oxide Walker Lauren Vogel Bob California Allergies Equipment Carmel Apple World Health Organization American Lung Association Toyota Camry Boston Los Angeles Harvard Erica
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on The Good Problem

The Good Problem

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on The Good Problem

"With nights and how we look at it at an approach where we are stewards of Healthy Planet Healthy Planet four people for animals, and I don't just mean a planet. That's healthy for humans. I mean it's healthy for Animals. It's healthy for Rivers. That's healthy for our minds in everything I will being so I think they're the greatest challenges. I also think that we have a real window of Hope right now and a real opportunity to address, you know, some of the issues of our time and I really hope that we take those and that we don't look for quick fixes that we don't look too often do things that damage people animals on the planet more that we see that there's a real opportunity to make change for the for the better. If you could tell the world something and know that every month Google person would hear it. What would it be? We need to have Global solutions to Global problems. We are all in this together off one of the ways that we can do that is through democracy and other way we can do this is by being conscious of how we would leave Outlaws and making conscious decisions. I may not always be perfect decisions. It doesn't matter think about you know, what you're doing how you're living your life what you're eating where your money is going and what actions you can take whenever they are to make the world a better place and they think the other thing I would say is that we do need to listen to the science Kelly. Where's your favorite place on Earth? I've travelled extensively my favorite place on Earth is anywhere that I can walk to so, yep. Fully years back. I walked the Camino from Saint Peter Port to Santiago de Compostela that was 800 kilometres through spine and home last weekend. I walked the first fifty kilometers of the coast to walk which guys from Palm Beach in Sydney's North and finishes in Oxford in Sydney's South. So we took us fifty kilometres added was just really spectacular..

Sydney Santiago de Compostela Google Saint Peter Port Palm Beach Kelly Oxford
The Anni Hindocha Case

Casefile True Crime

04:42 min | 1 year ago

The Anni Hindocha Case

"In the light to thousands, life was going well twenty-seven-year-old. Any Indoor INDATA. The engineering graduate had a good job in Stockholm at the headquarters of Multinational Telecommunications Company Ericsson and had recently purchased Tirana potman with some help from her parents. and He's close Knit Hindu family were of Indian heritage and had immigrated to the southern Swedish town of Mariestad before she was born. Although any had moved away. She returned to her family home muffin maintaining a close relationship with her father mother older sister and younger brother. In two, thousand nine and his aunt who was the families expert match Banca introduced her to a young man named Shrayan Johnny. Twenty nine year old sheldon was two years older than any, and it was from the English city of bursts though. Like any, Hey, had Hindu parents and was one of three children with an older brother and a younger sister. Shrayan, had an economics degree from Manchester University and worked for his family successful business running nursing himes throughout England's Westcountry. Although any industry and lived in different countries, they soon struck up a long distance friendship. During a visit to London any went on her first date with when They attended a West end performance of lying king before having dinner at upmarket. Fusion restaurant. Couple had a wonderful time with trae in particularly locking the way. Any made him laugh. Despite the long distance, their relationship blossomed In February two, thousand ten, and he decided to relocate to the United Kingdom a move that would help develop a connection with train. Have Bothe- Vinod and mother Milan gave her their blessing. And he quit her job at Ericsson and on March one she moved in with her cousin in Luton. Town about fifty kilometers north west of London. Shortly after the move any cold her parents to announce that things were going well with her and train and that she had been welcomed by his family. Several. Weeks Light Up v Gnawed into nealon traveled to the UK to make trains parents. That was a whirlwind visit that included often tae a tour of Bristol and Dana at an Indian restaurant. By the end of the evening, everyone agreed that the meeting had gone well. On June Tan Sri until Gani to Paris on a private jet. After giving any a design address and Christian Dior. Shoes Shrayan took her out for dinner at the Ritz Hotel. Instead of desert any was presented with a diamond engagement. Ring Worth Twenty Five. Thousand Pounds. The couple begin planning their wedding. Day initially wanted to get married into by, but after an impromptu visit to India they fell in love with Mumbai and decided to have the wedding there instead. Anne in Sri in planned to have old traditional Hindu ceremonies. But because they wouldn't be legally binding, they would make the marriage official at a UK registry office after their honeymoon. On Thursday October Twenty Eight, two, thousand, ten, the wedding festivities began at Mambas Rene Songs Hotel. Lavish celebrations lasted for three days costing the Hinduja and Diani families around two hundred, thousand pounds altogether. The wedding concluded on Saturday October thirty with a reception held by the Wani's. Photos captured the newlyweds beaming with any dressed in a blue and green. Sorry and in wearing a silver outfit with a scarf that complimented he's broads. After the reception, the couple farewelled their loved ones with Anne, and her family weeping as they said day. Goodbyes. Train had intended for their honeymoon destination to bay a surprise. But before he could tell any that would going, he's not gonNA. Let it slip that he had booked a trip to South Africa.

Shrayan Johnny Ericsson London Trae Anne UK Milan Mariestad Christian Dior Stockholm Tirana Mambas Rene Songs Hotel Ritz Hotel Bothe- Vinod Sheldon Multinational Telecommunicatio Bristol Luton Manchester University United Kingdom
Anni Hindocha

Casefile True Crime

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Anni Hindocha

"And He's close Knit Hindu family were of Indian heritage and had immigrated to the southern Swedish town of Mariestad before she was born. Although any had moved away. She returned to her family home muffin maintaining a close relationship with her father mother older sister and younger brother. In two, thousand nine and his aunt who was the families expert match Banca introduced her to a young man named Shrayan Johnny. Twenty nine year old sheldon was two years older than any, and it was from the English city of bursts though. Like any, Hey, had Hindu parents and was one of three children with an older brother and a younger sister. Shrayan, had an economics degree from Manchester University and worked for his family successful business running nursing himes throughout England's Westcountry. Although any industry and lived in different countries, they soon struck up a long distance friendship. During a visit to London any went on her first date with when They attended a West end performance of lying king before having dinner at upmarket. Fusion restaurant. Couple had a wonderful time with trae in particularly locking the way. Any made him laugh. Despite the long distance, their relationship blossomed In February two, thousand ten, and he decided to relocate to the United Kingdom a move that would help develop a connection with train. Have Bothe- Vinod and mother Milan gave her their blessing. And he quit her job at Ericsson and on March one she moved in with her cousin in Luton. Town about fifty kilometers north west of London. Shortly after the move any cold her parents to announce that things were going well with her and train and that she had been welcomed by his family. Several. Weeks Light Up v Gnawed into nealon traveled to the UK to make trains parents. That was a whirlwind visit that included often tae a tour of Bristol and Dana at an Indian restaurant. By the end of the evening, everyone agreed that the meeting had gone well. On June Tan Sri until Gani to Paris on a private jet. After giving any a design address and Christian Dior. Shoes Shrayan took her out for dinner at the Ritz Hotel. Instead of desert any was presented with a diamond engagement. Ring Worth Twenty Five. Thousand Pounds. The couple begin planning their wedding. Day initially wanted to get married into by, but after an impromptu visit to India they fell in love with Mumbai and decided to have the wedding there instead. Anne in Sri in planned to have old traditional Hindu ceremonies. But because they wouldn't be legally binding, they would make the marriage official at a UK registry office after their honeymoon. On Thursday October Twenty Eight, two, thousand, ten, the wedding festivities began at Mambas Rene Songs Hotel. Lavish celebrations lasted for three days costing the Hinduja and Diani families around two hundred, thousand pounds altogether. The wedding concluded on Saturday October thirty with a reception held by the Wani's. Photos captured the newlyweds beaming with any dressed in a blue and green. Sorry and in wearing a silver outfit with a scarf that complimented he's broads. After the reception, the couple farewelled their loved ones with Anne, and her family weeping as they said day. Goodbyes.

Shrayan Johnny Trae London UK Mariestad Christian Dior Anne Mambas Rene Songs Hotel Bothe- Vinod Ritz Hotel Milan Ericsson Sheldon Bristol Luton Manchester University Gani United Kingdom England India
How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

BrainStuff

03:03 min | 1 year ago

How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

"Imagine your average three-year-old human child something around three feet or a meter tall probably covered in jam a now imagine that child trying to get off the ground with a pair of wings bid have to be pretty big wings. Welcome to the plight of the Indian condor species name Volt Hor griffiths the heaviest flying bird in the world. Weighing in at up to thirty three pounds or fifteen kilos, they keep their heavy bodies in the air with some of the longest wings in the world there wingspan can range over ten feet long that's over three meters. There are only a handful of birds carnally living on our planet have larger wings spans, and they're all pelagics, birds, a plastic birds being seabirds that soar over the open ocean for weeks at a time, such as fast petrels and sheer waters. As far as we know, the largest brand ever fly was the Pella. Gorna Sanders C., which lived twenty five to twenty, eight million years ago and was twice as large as the biggest bird living today with a wingspan of twenty four feet over seven meters. Seabirds can accomplish this. Thanks in part to the literally uplifting winds that flow over oceans the Indian condor. Mostly relies on updrafts high in the Andes mountains across much of Western, south. America. The problem with being such a huge bird is that it makes getting off the ground or even flapping those giant wings and flight a bit of an ordeal. Soaring is easy once they're up in the sky and that's mainly what Andean condors do they just float like hang gliders in the air currents sometimes serving the ground for dead animals to eat as a scavenger and sometimes just having an APP. But this means that taking off is the most costly part of the birds overall energy supply. Scientists have always known that they spend very little time flapping their wings but a study published in July of twenty. Twenty and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found the Andean condors flap, their wings, a sum total of almost never. Not, only to the researchers find colossal birds, flap their wings one percent of their total flight time they discovered a bird could fly for five hours and more than one hundred miles or one hundred, fifty kilometers without flapping them once. The research team found that weather didn't affect how much flapping the condors were doing. Study Co author Hannah Williams a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior said in a press release. This suggests that decisions about when and where to land are crucial as not only do condor's need to be able to take off again but unnecessary landings will add significantly to their overall flight costs. All of which means that in Congress must understand how to use thermals, thermals being invisible patterns and bubbles of air moving all around in the atmosphere to their advantage, and they must understand this much better than scientists previously gave them credit for.

Max Planck Institute For Anima Gorna Sanders C. Pella Postdoctoral Researcher National Academy Of Sciences Hannah Williams Congress America
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

"About fifty kilometers from where we where I sit. Do Things in? Bazeley. Off around seven. Zero the now. Again, you every on pleasantly. is been a huge effort to try and come up with a whole evil new material every year. Is Young guys actually young make I'd go to. The carry it on. Most elevate the doing live Young kids now business which is. Louie liking my finally thought again Albany. Time to family and business right on direct. TV A huge chunk by year to this just two weeks. doing the annual me say. It was. Preparation for sure sure. Other was. either. A full-time professional reason, which don't really once a day. To make. A living out of this because if I do. All kinds of Compromises you. Playing to the gallery I'll be. Doing what they want, role of what I want to sell, we're other things right. Is. Trying to make a living out of being. The leader of magic law remind you. Right all right I absolutely. Right though, is the my family business all that. I basically chose founded.

Louie Albany
Elon Musk's Starlink internet-from-space satellites leave astronomers 'frustrated'

The Tech Guy

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Elon Musk's Starlink internet-from-space satellites leave astronomers 'frustrated'

"I want to go back to starling for this episode. That's the. That's the thing that I'm very torn about. An many photographers are very torn about because on the one hand. They promise this this fast Internet for almost everyone anywhere because it comes from satellites, but on the other hand there are asked to photographers and. astronomers who are not that happy about this because. What these satellites do and definitely, or you're likely have seen articles about it. They add new light dots to the sky, and those dots are turned out to be bit of a problem so now I have to say though this is musk's spacex and they're going to plan a launch guest Dan back. As twelve thousand of them, there's already hundreds in the air, but one thing they did talk to astro photographers, and they understood their concerns. They are now putting a sun shade on these satellite something. No other satellites do so That's and that's what I wanted to explain what? To what's actually happening than what the reason for this is, so? They initially had one of the satellites with the White Antenna Arrays, being painted black just to see if that would. well first of all reduce enough lights to to make them more invisible, and also about, and it turned out. This didn't really work because they were heating up too much, and they were blacks colors space. And they weren't reflecting infrared now. I got good for for watching the sky, so that didn't really work and. I think we have to I. Look into what is the problem because when you WanNa, take a photo of the sky and of the night sky, or if you have a telescope, and you WANNA take an exposure off whatever faraway galaxy, then you will too along exposure, and that long exposure means. Things that move during that exposure will be visible under picture so instead of having just a dot from a satellite you have a stripe, or in case of x and the and the starting system, Yup multiple strike especially when these satellites have been launched, and when they're still on their way to the final orbit, which takes weeks or This is nothing new, but with the prospect of maybe one hundred times more satellites in the sky, it might be a little problematic. So so. I'm I'm kind of happy. That's basic is listening. Trying. So they tried the what they call dark sat, which is the painted sat and that didn't really work and then. As you said they are now, have a test satellite up which has visor that shades these parts from the from from the sun, so there won't be sun falling on those areas of the satellite that are reflective that doesn't mean the satellite won't be there, and it won't block late, but at least it will afflict collect light. And it will also not make them completely invisible to the astronomers what they are looking for what they're trying is they wanna make them invisible for the naked eye, and now they have worked with an observatory to really understand the problem and it. The problem is not necessarily that there will be additional things on the paper. Because what these? What these sky watchers do, is they? They do what's called stacking. They take multiple photos and right. Take out what is different between them. So that's a method that is is being in use already. The big problem is that these telescopes use what's called CCD sensors, though if you if you're in your camera in your Ds Alanya Murless Camera, you probably have a a C. Moss sensor and the Sima. Censor If you overexposed Pixel, then that's pixel that's over exposed. The rest is not affected. What happens with the CD's is that. If you overexposed group of pixels from pretty bright satellite like if those are really saturated pixels if there is if they are what we call blown out, then that has the chance to to affect more than just these pixels. It might affect an entire row of pixels. It's called blooming, so that takes good. Might knockout an entire row of other pixels, and that is the big problem, so. What they are working now on is several things. The first is the the visors. To reduce the reflectively. And the second is that they as soon as those satellites are in their in their final. Like. Five hundred and fifty kilometers up there. they have their their solo areas, which are also reflective what they call a shocking configuration, so it stands on top of the satellite, so she look at it. It's pointing away from the earth and what they can do is and what they're planning to do. Is they planning slightly? Rotate the satellites in a way that the the the the the whole era isn't visible from the Earth so. Reflections are pretty much shielded that way too so there's multiple things they are doing. To to get a hold of this, they have that. We don't really have results just yet I think as of today there's there's one of these visor satellites up there, but they seem to be so convinced that this is going to work that they are. At. They are planning to have all the satellites from now on quickly these visors.

Ds Alanya Murless Camera Spacex Musk DAN C. Moss
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

Seek Outside Podcast

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

"So you learn you learn from the first trip that I will will folded this done. Yeah we had. We learned a bike. The pride and end the financial cost was part of it. Too Right Nam. And we're in the wood river there was no bailout option. Really like even had we turned we would have had to bail out. Yeah once we went through that scorch the bailout option taken as long as there was no good bail out option on on the wood river. That's why it's really not a good idea. Guk Yeah it was. Kinda it's really committed and that's what I learned you know subsequent to Some of these trips says it's not about you know fifty kilometers Bush. Blacking is not equivalent to fifty kilometers bushwack. Like there's some fifty kilometers. Bush whacking. It's easy you can do that in a day and sometimes it's literally will take you two weeks and you still can't do it so you gotta sometimes you can know enough to be dangerous right. And that's how I was at the at the beginning. I had nothing experienced that think I had enough experience but I was incorrect. So then between those two trips we did trip A first ascent of the upper monk men river in provincial park which is a Tumbler Ridge area. And that was a really cool trip where everything went. According to plan where we hiked in to monk Middle Lake and we went and climbed up Paxton peak which is You know again no formation. No trail that sort of thing. We ended up climbing this mountain. The fog which was unfortunate because we never did get to see what it looked like there. and there wasn't enough detail. Topo maps to like know which way to do it so we kept getting cliff doubts but there was a series. I think it was like twenty four marked waterfalls on our on our float out And it was just beautiful. Beautiful area actually went back the next year and ice climbed those waterfalls But it's Yeah it's it's SORTA thing that very few people get in there because it's A. It's a long multiday hike and the pack. Rafts made it much more easy when you go to the river. When there's no trail to hike through there would take forever but tariffs through there. It's actually a very pool drop in nature where there's Basically easy paddling and then waterfall easy. Paddling waterfall. Home news was that trump was about five or six. It really should take more like that part of what you know. We were young and energetic and we only had five days right. So we wouldn't do. You believe people would take five days just to hike into the lake but we hiked into the lake and then went up into the turns they call it up into the mountains climbed the mountain. You know come back and rafted out in that same amount of time which paragraphs helped because you can Do trips that are twice as long But ideally. It's way way more fun less punishing to take twice that long.

wood river Bush monk Middle Lake Tumbler Ridge Paxton peak
How Foodora couriers made history with their fight to join a union

The Big Story

09:12 min | 2 years ago

How Foodora couriers made history with their fight to join a union

"By now I think most of us no problems with the GIG economy. It treats workers as disposable doesn't offer benefits or protection or anything we traditionally associate with. You know a job. It doesn't pay well enough either so a regular shift can barely make ends meet so for the workers not great for users. It's incredibly convenient. And it's not going anywhere and that means that if anything is going to change in terms of working conditions in the GIG. It's going to have to happen the same way. Those conditions have been changed for more than a century with organizing but before you can officially or at least in the eyes of the law in Canada you need to be classified as workers not as independent contractors or entrepreneurs so that is the first fight but once it's been one then the doors open and then we'll see who tries to walk through it and how the companies that drive the GIG economy. Try TO SLAM IT in their face. Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the Big Story Sarah. Much headway is the work and wealth reporter with the Toronto Star. She also has an upcoming podcast. That is all about the fight for working conditions in the GIG economy I saw. Why don't you start because I know you've done a ton of this reporting? Just tell me a little bit about what it's like to work in the GIG delivery economy for food or or companies like that. Yeah I've learned a lot over the past year about kind of the daily routine and kind of daily reality for these workers. I mean the first thing to say is obviously often very physically demanding job done and often quite harsh and Brinkley. Dangerous Conditions Just imagine riding your bike around Toronto fifty kilometers a day in minus twenty weather. It's it's not easy so One of the major concerns of these workers as safety on the road and that partly speaks to as well the way. Our city is designed and not being Super Friendlier. Safe for cyclists. But you know. A bunch of the careers are also drivers. And there's a bunch of safety challenges that come with that as well in terms of having to sort of be tuned in this APP on your phone and driving around the city having to find parking spots that it's very challenging The second thing is that the pay is very low. I mean it's they get for food or are they. Got Four dollars and fifty cents for each delivery. And then they get a commoner a dollar per kilometer from restaurant to drop off so there's really an An incentive and an pressure to get as many orders as you can so again. That's quite demanding in that sense. In order to be financially viable. Really have to turn out those those orders. So yeah the low pay. The unpredictable pay is is Is a major feature of the job and I think. Lastly it's the sense that there's a bit of a lack of respect. I think is how the carriers would have described it for their job and For the for the people doing it. So so that's really sort of what I've learned about the everyday realities of the job. Will you mentioned briefly when you were talking about driving? But to what extent are they tied to this APP? At least according to what you've heard. Yeah so there's been hearings at the Labor board over the past six months that really revealed a lot about how these APP companies operating and obviously most companies don't have to reveal their inner workings but in this case they've sort of had to in a tribunal setting so we've sort of gotten a window into how the APPs intervene in workers kind of daily workflow infra doors case There's an algorithm that determines when you can get shifts so basically the fastest rider the best riders. The ones that you know never are late logging into the APP. And all that kind of thing they're gonNA get first priority in terms of selecting shifts. So that's one way that the APP kind of heavily bit of control. I didn't even realize that they worked in shifts. I thought it was kind of like Uber. Where you know you log in whenever you're ready for some more now that's the major difference between Food Aura. And say Uber Eats. You can just log in and start picking up orders but with Dora. There's sort of this. Extra layer so so some of the features of the way food were operates are are unique to fidora shifts has definitely one of them and then once you accept an order you sort of have the APP beeping at you and telling you whether you're on time in terms of delivering and that kind of thing so that's another way where you're sort of interaction with the APP all the time and Auras also unique because it does have a layer of human dispatchers who careers can also communicate with While they're on shift and what we kind of learned is that those dispatchers are in some ways monitoring couriers behavior which again can restrict or change their ability to log into the APP get shifts so the dispatchers issue strikes for what they see as poor performance whether it's late deliveries or whatever it is And that can in the worst circumstances actually lead to craze being deactivated from the APP and not being able to log in at all. So you've kind of hinted at a couple of times but what is unique about food or maybe explain this just Through the Lens of who is I've an Ostos. So I've also says a career with Dora and he's being at the forefront of trying to organize the union and If this group of careers successful they will be the first at based workforce in Canada to unionize and actually one of the first on the continent so it is a. It's a big deal and really the reason From speaking to an interviewing Ivan and other carriers that they're sort of trying to form a union it goes back to wages the safety and the respect on the job and really a big part of their argument is that you know food says all of these couriers are self-employed entrepreneurs. They don't have the right to form a union. They're you know they're entrepreneurs doing their own thing. The Independent contractors that we hear about all the time exactly and this is a huge pillar of the GIG economy and what Ivan and other careers basically sat at the Labor Board. Was I mean no? There's all these ways that the APP controls the way we do our job and in that sense. It sort of resembles an employer telling you you know when to work and how to work So that was One of the main thrust of what we heard at the Labor Board and recently the Labor Board essentially agreed with the carriers and said yes. This looks more like an employment relationship. So what is the difference or at least? What's the difference supposed to be between a fulltime employees or even just a part time employees and the typical independent contractor? Yes so I went. Boil it down to say that an independent contractor someone who has a lot of power and control over the way that they do their work and these stand to either profit or lose profit from the fruits of their labor so really easy to example to think of as a contractor that you hire to renovate your house your apartment you know you strike a deal with them and then they choose how they go about doing the job whether they bring in five guys to do their work for them or you know they call the plumber to come in and do something. They're really in control of of how they do that. Work and you can say hey at the end of the day. I'm not happy I'M GONNA end this contract. But you can't be like you know. I'm going to give you a performance review and discipline you for this thing that. I don't like that you did because they're not your employees so that kind of is the essence of an independent contractor And again most APP companies Classify their workers in this way. How does the term allow up companies to get more from these workers? Well I think what it does is really reduce the burden on the company as certainly a financial burden it means that the company companies are not paying into a pension plan into an inch employment insurance neither of the workers It means that the workers have no protection under provincial employment laws. It means that they don't have the right to join a union that they don't have the right to minimum wage. So you know it's really downloading a lot of the responsibility for you know your rights and protections on the job to the individual worker and removes them from the system That is set up to protect regular employees on the job. What was food or

Labor Board Toronto Canada Dora Ivan Jordan Heath Rawlings Reporter Brinkley
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Know you are exhausted America I know your weight as well yeah we got a show of awful song it's even noisier than Betty Boop doing the two always going with my parents want me to my best song it is the second song on American Bandstand after they played the a site it's the excuse me it was it was featured in two Simpsons episodes it was the number ten so in America seventy four The Simpsons were making fun of it I don't care okay or I like that song yes my gosh we can still have nice things sexo let's fifty kilometers is that is that that's not even Bloomberg gas is not a valid quite subtle at first base lesbian okay I'm only in the winter here a lion cub soldier it is yep okay I thank I don't remember all we cancel out nice things like WTF Donnie because that's the other like every story is a story in any other normal America at any other normal administration any other normal day he's clear of mental and neurological decline is at yeah I know we joke about WTF Donnie but what but actually don't what the actual seriously so this is I know how many route with two round two months but he's on to us now so the show okay there's no intro there's three interests actually okay fifty.

America Betty Boop American Bandstand Simpsons Donnie Bloomberg
Satellite Constellations and the Future of Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

11:11 min | 2 years ago

Satellite Constellations and the Future of Astronomy

"We are back at the American Astronomical Society Meeting in Honolulu Hawaii and and we last episode. We talked about the big controversy of the construction of the thirty meter telescope. Here on the on the Hawaiian islands the Bit other big controversy. That's going on is of course. The starling constellation and literally just a couple of days ago. SPACEX launched launched the third batch of starling satellites another sixty satellites into space. And I it is safe to say. Hey that astronomers are outraged. I think that's an under Sabin. Yeah and there. There were three different arguments. Demint put forward and I have to admit at the top of this episode. I am somewhat biased. I desperately want to see the digital divide to be overcome and low cost Internet Internet to be available globally and Starlink promises. That and so a lot of what we're GONNA talk about. Today the issue comes down to whether or not you trust. Trust Elon. Musk to actually implement the low cost in the low cost Internet so the three arguments that we heard today against Starlink And one was a cultural problem of old but the children if you see satellite zipping around in the sky will people still fall in love with the stars. Will your experience visiting a dark sky site. Turn you off to astronomy if you see satellites and the cry of outrage. We heard was that people won't be inspired by the sky if they see manmade objects now I have to admit I distinctly remember exactly exactly where I was the first time I saw satellite. I I was up in the mountains of the caucuses camping beside a glacier and and I was sitting on a rock all by myself because being a teenager is hard and I was fifteen and sometimes you need to sit on a rock by yourself from your fifteen and and the satellite. I just saw something moving in the sky and I realized what it was and that realization of I'm alone on orrock beside a glacier but there's a satellite moving through my stars that at the age of fifteen was amazing moment and this idea that satellites make it impossible for people to fall in love with the stars. I I don't think that's the case. But it was one of the arguments arguments put forward and getting together to the second but but sort of like from a practical technical standpoint win. The starlings are first launched launched. They are actually very bright there about magnitude two or three which makes them easily visible to the unaided eye from many spots on the earth and they look like this train of moving across the sky. Call this this string of pearls and end and then as the starlings raise their altitude up to their final position of about five hundred fifty kilometers altitude the dimmed back to about a five magnitude which is at the very limits of the human. I can see in Nice dark dark skies and and but of course in the eyes of a of an astronomer that is incredibly bright. Eight of fifth magnitude star is very bright star in in the eyes of telescope and then the other problem is that when when when they pass across the sky they will really only be visible to astronomy when they are low on the on the horizon during the summer months. So when it's when the night is the longest the night is the shortest. You're going to get really. You're only going to be able to see these satellite right. Aided the right after twilight and right before sunrise. And and that's it you have to be and then for the for the rest of the night there won't be any satellites delights but as the nights get longer the satellites get brighter over C- over the entire night sky and so they're anticipating baiting that over some of the the big observatories in Chile and in the Northern Hemisphere. When you're in the middle of the longest nights you're gonNA see these? These satellites run across the entire sky. So so there's no question that these are going to be very bright objects that are going to move through your field of view and I leave streaks and one of the things that people keep bringing up is there's already thousands of pieces of stuff. There's eighteen thousand thousand tracked pieces that you can pull from the database right now. Eighteen thousand seven. I think you can pull from the database and you can track the position using celestis and other other things like that. Yeah so there you know we know and to adding another twelve hundred. which is the goal for link? So so let's narrow this down even further so there's eighteen thousand things up there. Prior to the launch of Starlink only two hundred objects were naked eye visible. So Oh you can only look up two hundred different things in heavens above and go outside and see them with the unaided eye with Starlink. They're adding well over for a thousand by the end of this year to the list of things that will be visible to the unaided eye and its brightness that is really the problem. I was an observational astronomer. For a number of years before realizing I am the rain God in those years years that are as an observational astronomer. I had myriad satellites go through my images but because they were low brightness objects there'd there'd be the straight line of pixels that well I couldn't see stars in but that line was the size on the sky. I that the satellite was on the sky. We starlink what's happening is these well captured. photons that are reflected off of the satellite delight. There are so many of them that they saturate the pill pixels spill over to adjacent pixels wiping out a larger swath of your detector than the satellite alone would wipe out. And when you saturate a pixel that saturation can cause the next. Several images to have ghosts hosts of that satellites passage still visible so not only. Are you wiping out. A larger percentage of pixels with that satellite but you're wiping them out across multiple images. Yeah and and so you know a lot of these these these satellites as they pass the field of view view can overwhelm the sensor and essentially make an entire observing frame worthless and the speed that they're moving is of great concern into these dreamers as they as they move through it's about. How quickly is this thing moving through your field of view? And how long do you have to not be able to take data data while this while the satellite is is moving through so so they're they're quite concerned just about overall in the time domain as well and of course the the big observatory that's going to be the most effective is the newly renamed. That's a different controversial. I know that's like a third the Third Controversy Jersey. We won't get into that but the newly but we. I think we can all agree. That the Vera Rubin Observatory is a wonderful Navarine Observatory and that is going to be the. That's that's going to be the facility that's going to be deeply affected because it just is staring wide eyed at the sky for all all night capturing as much as they can as deeply as a canon so every frame is GonNa have starlings and one ebbs and all this past them and this is this this is a problem of because it has a giant field of you. The probability that there's going to be a Starlink in any one image goes up if you have a small field of view. There's the potential that you can time your images to avoid having star Lincoln them but because this is a huge field of view. You your ability to do. That is greatly reduced. And they're going to end up picking up. STARLA starlings left and right and here's a question starts to become one of mitigation so folks are working with spacex to see okay. What do we need to do to reduce the brightness of these objects so that they aren't blowing out the detectors? Yeah there's more than that so so Someone from spacex actually gave a presentation this morning and that was actually a bit of a surprise and they didn't do a very good job of letting us know that this is is going to happen. There weren't a lot of people we have the whole ballroom and there wasn't a lot of people they're listening to her her talk. They mentioned essentially a couple of mediation strategy. So the first first thing is with this first launch they have. They've applied some darkening materials to one of the sixty satellites to see if the some of their ideas to make them to have a lower Albedo lower flexibility. And before you laugh at the fact that it's only one the thing you have to take into mind mind is these suckers were already largely built in preparation and turning around and re fabricating that takes time and so my suspicion. My hope is that that they were only able to fabricate one with the new materials fast enough to be able to test and I think it's you know. No this is how you perform an experiment right. Is You you isolate. The variable does putting all this material on one of the satellites make darker than the rest and and we'll find out what happened happens so so that's the first thing they did is experimenting and and this is a good sign. I mean this is like literally. This is the first time I think that any satellite constellation Elation has ever had a conversation with Strana mors and said what can we do to minimize our impact on your science. I don't there's you know the two hundred others others that we mentioned plus all the eighteen thousand. No one's ever tried to make them not bright in the eyes of strimmers so till the first strategy is to try at a paint them so there will be the second thing is to provide an open source real time. Location of all of the satellites in the Constellation and to communicate with the other networks. And anyone out there. Who is who is going to be relying on knowing the position? These starlink so in theory as the as the Constellation gets built your of your telescope operator. You're going to know when a Starlink is going to be passing through your detector and you'll be able to shut detector down. Wait for the starling. Pass opened the doctor again. And continue to get your to get your

Starlink Spacex American Astronomical Society Honolulu Hawaii Constellation Elation Chile Demint Third Controversy Jersey Musk Northern Hemisphere Strana Mors Vera Rubin Observatory Starla Lincoln Navarine Observatory
Wolfgat, a Far-Flung Destination for South African Coastal Cuisine

Monocle 24: The Menu

07:03 min | 2 years ago

Wolfgat, a Far-Flung Destination for South African Coastal Cuisine

"Just a few years. South African Chef Cobras. Fundamentally has is boosted restaurant Wolf cuts to the Toba many lists ranking the world's best dining spots located in the fishing village of Party Nostra a hundred and fifty kilometers from Capetown. This small restaurant with seats for just twenty diners as the reputation for serving dishes made of some of the greatest local South African ingredients. I met Cobras at Kadoorie House studio one to discuss his success the south-african cooling the identity and first of all how his background as a journalist has been free tamers arrest or two and chef working with restaurant news At the DOT website. You kind of differently. Open up your eyes and your ears to what's happening globally. So I think that must have definitely played so some small role in the output when I started applying myself restaurant sort of scenario if that makes sense in wait sort of yeah I suppose it stimulates your your thoughts you know in terms of what's possible and what what can be done. And what's a gap in the market. Because I think in South Africa we still only just starting to realize what amazing things we have on home turf and to appreciate. It are indigenous produce and to present that as something that can be on a global stage and we sort of forging a South African culinary identity not which hasn't existed. In my opinion you're also talking about the importance of good storytelling. You learn as a journalist your I suppose definitely am. I still still do a lot of research for menus for the kind of inspiration for the restaurant. We situated historic voting on a very significant archaeological site with an old cave. That's located right underneath. The building said there's a lot of storytelling these a lot of early history that inspires everything everything what we do and how we compare the menu. How while we'd like to serve the Food and what we want to think of when they when they eat these things? It didn't more about your cooking philosophy as you are already making clear. We're talking about very very local food super local ingredients and so forth. Yes very intuitive menu. In a way whatever inspires us you know seasonally from the landscape. The way they're the history very much of that coastline and then picking indigenous succulents seaweeds wild herbs the whole teams involved every morning. Literally we up picking what's necessary for today's menu and it's about a six kilometer radius around the village. Everything comes from that radius. Not Everything I mean. We do get flour away from a neighbouring village a couple of hours away and we get of course we get more dry goods supplied like like any other strong on all local but not everything is sourced from you know that six kilometer radius but in each dish we always highlight an element that we've picked in that. Very like hyper local location. What are some of your favorite dishes just to paint a picture of listeners of what you get served at this restaurant I like really simple food? I like the combination of textures and flavors to be the surprise element around like things is to be to overwork. Layered all complicated so often dishes have only three or four ingredients. I like to combine elements of the land and the sea. So it could be an alien being that we puree and then serve with and some local green succulents or on the current or the menu. That just finished because we're now in a break Our our ultimate menu. We actually served one of the simplest dishes ever for our main course which was venison with seaweed so yeah literally like two elements like a surf and turf with local Springbok served with a kind enough Nari same species what's used for Sushi that grows in our local rapports poor fire and we found out in sort of a happy accident went way of this very special technique to get really really sulky. So it's always quite a nice surprise for gas because you see the sort of big almost chunk of seaweed on the plate and it looks like it's going to be a textual challenge and there's like this really silky smooth Emami slightly smoky seaweed that just really complements the venison quite well so two elements on the mate and it looks really simple. I mean you can't really do too much in terms of plating even so it's very pared-down pared-down and minimalist dish but then the flavors are just completely unexpected. And I'm quite new. Well we're resolve African food. Now what do you think is happening in your home country. It's a very exciting time because for so long we've had a bit of a Lack of confidence in our own produce and We have so many different cultures in South Africa. It's such a melting pot of different cultures and histories and traditional foods that we don't really have one single so African cuisine but now finally people are realizing that we need to create this momentum and for us the way to start in a small more way was to look very locally so to do something regional because then at least you get a little bit of an identity already and that you can work with but I think in the bigger context South African shapes differently becoming a lot more conscious that these sort of collective thing that we need to work together to establish. Tell me about your principles at work. I was reading that in your restaurant. There is no really high rocky over there and and it's interesting what people you've been hiring over there they don't necessarily we have massive qualifications so I work with a team of five For Women One man all born and raised in paternoster. None of them have any for more food background. Whatever or restaurant work our training and yes? We don't have any hierarchy or any distinction between kitchen in front of House. How does it work quite well? We're a Small Well oiled machine and we everybody does everything and often. It will mean that you you pick ingredients for a dish that you'll be doing the preparation for you know you do the part of that dish this necessary during service to finish preparing and you'll often often carry it to the table so it's kind of you come full circle and you can explain to the guests exactly what the dishes made up of and even the technique so for me. That's a real synergy energy in being that hands on in creating and serving the menu so you know just the way drawn or a or a chef you basically fulfill all the

South Africa Capetown Party Nostra Kadoorie House DOT Paternoster
Volkswagen raises forecast for electric car production

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Volkswagen raises forecast for electric car production

"Fold Vulcan is raising the bar for its production of battery powered because saying it will reach a goal of one million per year two years earlier than planned Volkswagen says it will turn out a million battery only because by the end of twenty twenty three instead of the end of twenty twenty five it'll reach one point five million the announcement comes as European automakers are under pressure to meet low emissions limits aimed at fighting global warming faults rock and is planning to boost sales by introducing the ID three about free mobile sending for around thirty thousand euros with a range of up to five hundred and fifty kilometers on a single

Volkswagen Free Mobile
Boeing Starliner Orbital Flight Test Landing Scheduled

Cigar Dave

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Boeing Starliner Orbital Flight Test Landing Scheduled

"Story we've been following the latest updates from NASA on the condition of the Boeing starliner capsule that has been in orbit after failing to dock with the I SS here senior VP of Boeing Jim Shelton vehicle status really excellent all our avionics systems are good our life support systems in the cabin all look great thermal management power is neutral or better meaning we're you know we're able to orient the spacecraft right now it's in a circular orbit about two hundred and fifty kilometers above earth its schedule for a landing tomorrow morning at five fifty seven at the landing site New Mexico as also a backup window at one forty eight in the

Nasa Senior Vp New Mexico Boeing Jim Shelton Fifty Kilometers
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"A fifty kilometer radius gets are you dying tablets in case of radiation poisoning and here they are in my own bathroom cabinet for boxes one for each member of the family to be taken it says here only on the instructions of the authorities it's not exactly reassuring me that need decent send audio that's why so many Swiss were relieved when the energy minister Doris Louis tartan ounce to radical change in policy no more nuclear power the bush tendon array Oct older than the existing reactors will keep on going for as long as they're safe we estimate sheet has a lifespan from coming on stream of about fifty years so the last one will be closed in twenty thirty four and imagine the wait is almost Switzerland's power come from if they're able to take that stations like this all flowing but where is the power being sourced well I love to that comes from hydro power and increasingly so it's and will have to switch to renewables but it's not it's going to be difficult I think certain does not have coal it doesn't have oil and it has traditionally when they're being shortages imported power sometimes from France which is of course generated but nuclear power or for me to the coal fired power stations and there's huge pressure now from the public to really do things that will help with the environment and slow down climate change is something I think the government's not gonna be able to do or images on this site have to still be there unfortunately thank you very much indeed for being with us.

Switzerland France Doris Louis
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Lists I six hundred fifty kilometers from John when we will not take it back from taking up orders to Cuba as senator make mom your first stop for many trees thank you can the minister outside the Senate about helpful coalition governments economic plan is helping to defend Australia against Africans one favor thank you and thank you senator Mike mon well when you have a strong economic plan you can do a whole lot of things lock responding to reach to the economy which would be incurred if we got Africans want save on shore we are protecting out three thousand seven hundred peak produces the thirty six thousand drawings that work in the pork industry and my can show that this disease which kills I think of the peaks that infects from our shores it means when you've got the finance resources at your disposal you can today I want to actually check the non direct flights from daily when you need to you can actually ran pop the inspections at the borders increase your ex trying all possible from affected countries and through the mission we've been out of tech detect installed on the twenty seven tons of cooked pork product from a six I assist countries from reaching out shortly it's that responsiveness that we made thank you senator Kinsey senator minor second thank you can the minister advise the Senate's on risks to out strong by security system.

John Cuba senator Senate Australia Mike mon senator Kinsey six hundred fifty kilometers twenty seven tons
Rebuilding lives after terror in Cameroon

UN News

03:59 min | 2 years ago

Rebuilding lives after terror in Cameroon

"Meru a bustling regional capital set in the dry and dusty plains of numbering cars ten times over they ferry people around the city of around Hoffa million people many who live here have been through the most matic experiences having been forced to flee villages close to the border which had been attacked by terrorists line to Boko Haram or other obs- How do we get these women or any victim to recover and rebuilder lives and that's of course much more complicated because it requires a lot of longer term assistance Daniel Dickinson and in this special UN use the leaders on podcast from Cameroon. I'll be looking at what can be done for people who have suffered at the hands of violent extremists people who through no fault of their own have lost everything and who now need somehow restart their lives it's noon and the hottest time of the day and Moore but trees provide comforting shape right at this outdoor workshop a couple of blocks from the main thoroughfare of this city one man and four women in brightly colored robes sit in a circle on the floor working diligently stitching leather sandals the leather has been cured from slaughtered animals and the souls and made from discarded vehicle tires it is one of the women in June two years ago she was forced to flee her home in the town of Mohra and what's the north of Moore after it was attacked by Boko Haram everybody got Amanda mckellar dignity coogan embody local there was fighting but I didn't realize I was frank read at the time my husband had gone to work he was killed there the local chief came by my house and told you that had to flee the children that day I was so scared had never felt feel like this before I don't know how to explain it I didn't eat a had no strength I was overwhelmed by the situation I'm in to Sally's home was burnt to the ground in panicked surrounding that attack she lost everything she still doesn't know what happened to her husband whose body she's never seen she now makes up to two passive sandals each week and sells vegetables on a small stand outside the workshop to make ends meet these offer only sources of income so she's pleased to have received the training I like walking IBP thanks because I would like to get more training and then maybe have the strength to raise my children my husband died two years ago and it's only now that I'm beginning a new life with I five hundred to sally as just one of around two hundred fifty thousand people who fled terrorist attacks in northeast Cameroon in the vernacular of the UN she's known as an internally displaced person or ADP body it's not just cameroonians reflected by terrorist groups like Boko Haram as I spoke to her some two hundred and fifty kilometers north tens of thousands if people were pouring across the border from the Nigerian town of Ram just a few miles away into the village of Gura in Cameroon honoring renewed attacks by terrorists

Cameroon Sally Daniel Dickinson Hoffa UN Moore Amanda Mckellar IBP Mohra ADP Gura Two Years Fifty Kilometers
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Hour US forces have begun pulling out of Syria that according to news reports the White House says Turkey will soon invade northern Syria casting uncertainty on the fate of the Kurdish fighters allied with the U. S. here's Ben wedeman Turks have made it clear they want the so called safe zone along the almost four hundred and fifty kilometer border between Syria and Turkey to be thirty kilometers with inside Syria which is basically would encompass a variety of large towns and cities that are currently under the control of the Syrian democratic forces those in the forces I did the United States was closely aligned with in the war against ISIS and the Syrian democratic forces are clearly very unhappy with this move they put out a statement did this morning just a little while ago saying that the United States is not abiding by its commitment with the STF keeping in mind that in the beginning of September the Americans and Turkish forces began to patrol a smaller part of that border and not well within it so certainly this it does represent something of a big trailed by the United States of one of its most important allies in the war against ISIS and it brings into question what art Turkey's intentions we have heard from the Turks that they want to settle as many as two million Syrian refugees currently in Turkey within this part of Syria but we need to keep in mind this is not where those Syrians come from these are Sunni Muslims from western Syria bean resettled potentially no part of Syria that is largely Kurdish so this has serious implications they could certainly destabilize a part of Syria there has been relatively stable now for several years Ben wedeman reporting it's nine passed the lawyer for the first whistle blower who came forward with accusations concerning president trump and his Ukraine interactions is representing a second whistleblower Bob Constantini has that story no one from the trump White House was on the news programs in one Sunday tweet president trump re tweeted a letter sent by the chair of the Senate foreign relations committee to leaders of Australia Italy and Britain urging them to cooperate with Attorney General William Barr as investigation into foreign influence in the twenty sixteen election and on fox news Sunday futures Lindsey Graham announcing he will insist that the whistleblower one or two whatever they come forward under oath testify so the public can judge your credibility if that doesn't happen in the house I will make sure it happens in the Senate was lower one or two is a reference to the attorney for the first intelligence community employee who was alarmed by president trump call the Ukraine's leader announcing officially a second person is joining the complaint and the attorney says a second whistleblower has first hand knowledge of the call president trump doesn't think so twenty word is they're going to the bench in another whistle blower is coming in from the deep state also with secondhand info the object of the president's concerns about corruption former vice president Joe Biden wrote an op ed piece in The Washington Post calling Mr trump wholly unfit to be president facing how subpoenas secretary of state Mike Pompeii who was on the phone call president trump had with Ukraine's boredom is a Lynskey we'll obviously do all the things are required to do by law now the administration is denying all requests and subpoenas until the full house voted for impeachment inquiry Bob Constantini Washington it's eleven after the hour the Supreme Court is back today with a new term the nine justices will face a blockbuster docket if the twenty twenty election campaign hovering in the background John Laurence reports the highest court in the nation as a number of high profile cases on hand this will all happen as an impeachment investigation into president trump takes place across the street and the capitol building tensions are already flair.

Syria US thirty kilometers fifty kilometer
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on KOMO

"Less than their male counterparts I'm in case there's something big coming up in Ridgway Colorado I'm Jim Bohannon with more later on all ahead on American in the morning seven after the hour US forces have begun pulling out of Syria that according to news reports the White House says Turkey will soon invade northern Syria casting uncertainty on the fate of the Kurdish fighters allied with the U. S. here's Ben wedeman Turks have made it clear they wanted this so called safe zone along the almost four hundred and fifty kilometer border between Syria and Turkey to be thirty kilometers with inside Syria which is basically would encompass a variety of large towns and cities that are currently under the control of the Syrian democratic forces those in the forces I did the United States was closely aligned with in the war against ISIS and the Syrian democratic forces are clearly very unhappy with this move they put out a statement did this morning just a little while ago saying that the United States is not abiding by its commitment with the STF keeping in mind that in the beginning of September the Americans and Turkish forces began to patrol a smaller part of the border and not dwell within it so certainly this it does represent something of a big trailed by the United States of one of its most important allies in the war against ISIS and it brings into question what art Turkey's intentions how we have heard from the Turks that they want to settle as many as two million Syrian refugees currently in Turkey within this part of Syria but we need to keep in mind this is not where those Syrians come from these are Sunni Muslims from western Syria bean resettled potentially no part of Syria that is largely Kurdish so this has serious implications they could search in the destabilize card of Syria that has been relatively stable now for several years Ben wedeman reporting it's nine passed the lawyer for the first whistle blower who came forward with accusations concerning president trump and his Ukraine interactions is representing a second whistleblower Bob Constantini has that story no one from the trump White House was on the news programs in one Sunday tweet president trump re tweeted a letter sent by the chair of the Senate foreign relations committee to leaders of Australia Italy and Britain urging them to cooperate with Attorney General William Barr as investigation into foreign influence in the twenty sixteen election and on fox news Sunday futures Lindsey Graham announcing he will insist that the whistleblower one or two whatever they come forward under oath testify so the public can judge your credibility if that doesn't happen in the house I will make sure it happens in the Senate was lower one or two is a reference to the attorney for the first intelligence community employee who was alarmed by president trump call the Ukraine's leader announcing officially a second person is joining the complaint and the attorney says a second whistleblower has first hand knowledge of the call president trump doesn't think so twenty word is they're going to the bench and another whistle blower is coming in from the deep state also with secondhand info the object of the president's concerns about corruption former vice president Joe Biden wrote an op ed piece in The Washington Post calling Mr trump wholly unfit to be president facing how subpoenas secretary of state Mike Pompeii who was on the phone call president trump had with Ukraine's boredom is a Lynskey we'll obviously do all the things are required to do by law the administration is denying all requests and subpoenas until the full house votes for impeachment inquiry but Costantini Washington it's eleven after the hour the Supreme Court is back today with a new term the nine justices will face a blockbuster docket with the twenty twenty election campaign hovering in the background John Laurence reports the highest court in the nation as a number of high profile cases on hand this will all happen as an impeachment investigation into president trump takes place across the street and the capitol building political tensions are already flair dozens of protesters appeared outside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's house Sunday the first three of justice Brett Kavanaugh confirmation calling for him to be removed Republican presidents have nominated far to the Supreme Court including justice Neil Gorsuch our job is just to.

thirty kilometers fifty kilometer
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"In place known to worse for wear after the weekend producer David oziel an audio mixer Alex into the control room Jeff mackay in the news room all here to help us kick this week into gear and we begin overseas there are reports this morning that American troops have begun withdrawing already from areas along Turkey's border this comes just hours after the White House said U. S. forces in the area will move aside clearing the way for an expected assault by Turkey Ben wedeman reports from Beirut Turks have made it clear they want to do this so called safe zone along the almost four hundred and fifty kilometer border between Syria and Turkey to be thirty kilometers with inside Syria which is basically would encompass a variety of large towns and cities that are currently under the control of the Syrian democratic forces those are the forces I did the United States was closely aligned with in the war against ISIS and the Syrian democratic forces are clearly very unhappy with this move they put out a statement this morning saying that the United States is not abiding by its commitment with the STF keeping in mind that in the beginning of September the Americans and Turkish forces began to patrol a smaller part of that border and not well within it so certainly this it does represent something of a betrayal by the United States of one of its most important allies in the war against ISIS and it brings into question what art Turkey's intentions we have heard from the Turks that they want to settle as many as two million Syrian refugees currently in Turkey within this part of Syria but we need to keep in mind this is not where those Syrians come from these are Sunni Muslims from western Syria bean resettled potentially in a part of Syria that is largely Kurdish so this has serious implications they could certainly destabilize a part of Syria that has been relatively stable now for several years thanks to correspondent Ben wedeman monitoring developments there from bay route is now nine minutes past the hour on first light as we bring it home now to Washington where a second whistleblower has emerged to offer up some information we assume on president trump's relations with Ukraine as a White House fights off the impeachment enquiring Bob Constantini is following that for us Michael late last night the White House issued a statement saying it doesn't matter if there is a second whistleblower details of the phone call were made public and it doesn't change the fact the president did nothing wrong in one Sunday tweak president trump re tweeted a letter sent by the chair of the Senate foreign relations committee to leaders of Australia Italy and Britain urging them to cooperate with Attorney General William Barr as investigation into foreign influence in the twenty sixteen election and on fox news Sunday futures Lindsey Graham announcing he will insist that the whistleblower one or two whatever they come forward under oath testify so the public can judge your credibility if that doesn't happen in the house I will make sure it happens in the Senate was a lower one or two is a reference to the attorney for the first intelligence community employee who was alarmed by president trump call the Ukraine's leader announcing officially a second person is joining the complaint and the attorney says the second whistleblower has first hand knowledge of the call president trump doesn't think so twenty word is they're going to the bench and another whistle blower is coming in from the deep state also with secondhand info the object of the president's concerns about corruption former vice president Joe Biden wrote an op ed piece in The Washington Post calling Mr trump wholly unfit to be president facing how subpoenas secretary of state Mike Pompeii who was on the phone call president trump had with Ukraine's boredom is a Lansky we'll obviously do all the things are required to do by law now the administration is denying all requests and subpoenas until the full house voted for impeachment inquiry Costantini reporting from the White House exactly eleven past the hour now folks.

David oziel producer thirty kilometers fifty kilometer nine minutes
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Remain with the BBC news Austrians going to the polls in an early general election the Los government a coalition between the conservatives in the far right Freedom policy fell upon us in may after video sting scandal involving the former head of the freedom policy it's expected that the former chancellor the conservatives the best young could swing again when the most fates but fall short of an outright majority Bethany bell reports from Vienna since the collapse of the last government in may Austria's been ruled by a caretaker technocratic ministration now the country's going to the polls again in the running of the conservatives led by the young former chancellor Sebastian Kutz the social Democrats led by the maid of indie Wagner the anti immigrant freedom policy with its new leader Norbert hole for and the greens on the van a cobra. also in the race of the liberal NATO's coalition talks following the election unlikely to take a number of weeks who's the rebels in Yemen say they've killed hundreds of soldiers from the Saudi backed medic tree coalition and captured several thousand more in a three day offensive on the border with Saudi Arabia the Saudis have made no comment and there's no independent verification of the he's the claim Shalit Gallagher reports your blog Donnelly European also mean a law a spokesman for the who the rebels appeared on television to make the announcement describing the soldiers asked traces and the coal mines he later told the BBC that three brigades it's rented near the Saudi province of natural on and rebels it sees a large number of weapons in on the two vehicles he said the captured troops who were from different countries would be pro rated on television on Sunday but what being treated humanely the conservative policy which forms a minority government in Britain is beginning its annual conference in Manchester as political debate rages over its insistence that the U. K. will leave the European Union on October the thirty first in a departure from usual practice the conservative conference will happen while parliament is sitting off to the opposition refused to allow a recess signs hanging in the conference who repeat the policies cool to get to breaks it down. from Manchester Chris Mason reports this is a party conference like no other track six is a month away possibly but the government could face a vote of confidence before that or not and as activists name peas gather here parliament continues to sits at Westminster with the potential that the opposition parties to the best of my life awkward for the conservatives by holding their MPs two hundred miles south for votes right sits inevitably dominates but Boris Johnson others will endeavor at least to broaden the conversation to says that's a plaster over the policies they hope might prove appetizing to voters as a general election wells news from the BBC. the speaker of the US house of representatives Nancy Pelosi has said public opinion is moved behind the Democrats decision to open an impeachment investigation into president trump Mrs Pelosi highlighted what she called the cavalier attitude of the administration to was the whistle blowers complaint is the reason for the change Mr trump however said that he was being targeted by the Democrats for standing up for basic freedoms. ambassadors of again complained about conditions at the world athletics championships in council of two two more endurance races were staged in the early hours of the morning the runner up in the men's fifty kilometer walk the Portuguese veteran show Vieira said the race is being held the forty three year old also complained about the late start stating the four o'clock was a time to leave a night club not to compete. and the president of Mexico and Bolivia have led tributes to the Mexican singer and songwriter Jose Jose who's died from pancreatic cancer at the age of seventy one they've marsh has this report..

BBC forty three year fifty kilometer three day
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"PATRIARCH DOT COM Slash Space Time with Stewart Gary and of course you can find the details in the show notes or just click the orange button on our website and thanks to allow patrons because it's your generosity and support the helps. Keep our show going now. Let's stick with the asteroid disaster. Theme and scientists found that a cataclysmic collision in the main asteroid built four one hundred sixty six million years ago triggered a major ice edge on earth which changed the evolution of life on the planet forever. The findings were reported in the journal Science advances. It claims the collision and subsequent break-up of the asteroid debris between Mars and Jupiter filled the entire solar system with so much dust it caused a unique climate change event triggering high levels of biodiversity over the past few decades research sip begun to understand the evolution of life on earth depends to a huge amount on astronomical nautical events in space. One example is the Katie boundary event sixty six million years ago which wiped out all the Non Avian dinosaurs and now scientists can present another other example of how extraterrestrial events have changed the evolution of life on earth researchers found that the destruction of a one hundred fifty kilometer wide asteroid partly he stopped sunlight from reaching the earth the precious triggering an ice age now the authors claim that the climate change from being one more or less and modernise right across the planet to becoming coming one divided by different climatic zones with Arctic conditions into the polls and tropical conditions at the equator and a high level of diversity among invertebrates came came as a direct adaption to the new climate triggered by the exploded asteroid the studies little the Professor Burgess Schmitz from London versity says it's an allergist standing in the middle of a room I and smashing a vacuum cleaner bag a much larger scale the authors rich they conclusions but measuring extraterrestrial helium petrified seafloor sediments found in southern Sweden see on its way to Earth. The asteroid debris dust would be enriched.

Stewart Gary Burgess Schmitz London versity Professor Sweden four one hundred sixty six mil one hundred fifty kilometer sixty six million years
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Eight eight eight six zero eighty seven eighty five eight six zero T. R. U. K. Hey good morning Steven. good morning ARE happen do I have a couple friends of mine who have trucking companies to belong to a job give insurance company and there you had some interesting things for two thousand seventeen in two thousand eighteen in two thousand seventeen their average plane costs was seven fifty per truck Canadian per month dollars worth about seventy five eighty cents two thousand eighteen was around eight sixty are for young drivers of nineteen after twenty one years of age the plane costs for the first year was almost twenty one hundred dollars a month instead of the eight and they required their members to have them the drivers have two hundred hours of training and we're with an experienced driver on a maximum of eighteen hours driving and got twenty four hour period of three months before they go solo and then these drivers for the next year are limited to ten hours driving twelve hours on duty in the next year and in Canada only and the average company are in Canada was paying their local drivers in this group twenty four Canadian when you're thinking you're welcome our blood they all required them to have medical insurance on the drivers and anybody that goes by the border and the rubber strolled over in the group was fifteen percent world the average turnover in the Canadian larger carriers is closer to forty to fifty percent and their average driver pay was sixty cents Canadian which is forty five cents US the mile which was almost ten cents a mile more than some of the larger carriers are paying in Canada and I just thought it was very interesting the requiring all the members if they want to share a parking to have a minimum of three parking spots one drop back one regular and one with electric plug yeah they want you park in any of their other members parking and there's a lot of things we can learn from how they were doing things and the cost to bring young drivers then and they really don't feel that a new driver in the. first year should be driving more than ten hours on duty more than Paul and their shows there's a very high I. Q. that cost with these inexperienced drivers and I think that something we should look at very seriously so with three they're talking about your opening up the nineteen twenty twenty one year old Sir to interview interstate driving so you think you think that's a bad idea. I won the way this captive group I did it it's not a bad idea but they have to follow the restrictions of the cap the group and what they're finding is if they have them drive more than Jenin on duty more than twelve in the first year action it costs absolutely escalate and even with the restrictions of the cannon the twelve hours. finding their action the costs are running two and a half times what the fleet averages and they are these are our plane costs are not administration overhead these are actual accurate cost of almost twenty one hundred dollars Canadian per truck for a month right next bridge drivers and that's a very high number compared to eight fifty. so interesting numbers there on the insurance though I'm gonna that that's another key right there you're gonna put eighteen nineteen twenty year olds the insurance company's third they're going to charge a fortune to ensure these youngsters. are no more in general insurance companies unless they're in a captive now will not insure the new drivers at all unless there are restricted to working on a farm policy you are within a hundred fifty kilometer radius which is a hundred mile radius most the new insurance most insurance companies simply will not insure somebody doesn't matter for twenty two twenty three unless they have a minimum of eighteen months insurance premium and if they do insure.

Canada Jenin R. U. K. Paul Steven. twenty one hundred dollars twelve hours ten hours nineteen twenty twenty one yea eighteen nineteen twenty year hundred fifty kilometer two hundred hours twenty four hour twenty one years eighteen months fifteen percent eighteen hours
Why Is the Ocean Different Colors?

BrainStuff

05:48 min | 3 years ago

Why Is the Ocean Different Colors?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand. Romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. Starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm a production indivi- heart radio. Hey brain stuff lauren vogel balm hair someone gazing out at the ocean from the maine coast seized very different hues is them someone's squinting at the c. from sunny beach on a greek island but why does the ocean come in so many shades of blue of course ocean water is an inherently blue blue. It's clear that we see on the surface are the result of light being absorbed and reflected by the water itself. Whatever is floating and living in it and the surface of the ocean floor below low it a glass of water will of course appear clear as visible light passes through it with little to no obstruction but if a body of water is deep enough that light isn't reflected off the bottom it appears blue a basic physics explains why light from the sun is made up of spectrum of different wavelengths the longer wavelengths links appear to our eyes as the reds oranges while the shorter ones appear blue and green when the sun's light strikes the ocean it interacts with water molecules and can be either absorbed or scattered. If nothing is in the water except water the longer read portions of the spectrum tend to be absorbed by the water molecules whereas the light of those shorter wavelengths is more likely to go deep hit water molecules there and scatter back up towards her is making the ocean appear blue depth depth and the ocean bottom also influence whether surface appears a dusky dark blue as in parts of the atlantic or casts as safir like shimmer as in many tropical locations. We spoke nasa astronaut gene carl feldman. He said in greece the water is this beautiful turquoise color because the bottom is either white sand or white rocks fox. What happens is the light comes down and blue light gets down hits the bottom and reflects back up so you make this beautiful light blue color in the water darker sand rocks or other formations mean darker water. The color is further complicated by the fact that the ocean is rarely just water but is instead instead teeming with tiny plant and animal life plus suspended sediment or other natural orban made contaminants oshii offers monitor the oceans color the way that doctors read vital signs of their patients color seen on the ocean surface reflect. What's going on in its vast. Depths felt ben who's based at the nasa goddard watered space flight center in maryland studies images taken by these sea viewing wide field of you censor satellite launched in nineteen ninety-seven from its perch more than four four hundred miles above earth or nearly six hundred and fifty kilometers the satellite captures van gogh like swirls the oceans colors the patterns are not only mesmerizing but they also also reflect where sediment and runoff make water appear adult brown and we're microscopic plants called phytoplankton collect nutrient rich waters often tinting at green federal plankton use chlorophyll to capture energy from the salem to convert water and carbon dioxide into energy and then waste through this process called photosynthesis phytoplankton generate about half of the oxygen we breathe oceans with high concentrations of phytoplankton can appear blue green to green depending on the the density some length the water yellow reddish or brown tint phytoplankton serve as the base of the food web and primary source of food for zooplankton which are tiny animals animals eaten by fish the fisherman eaten by bigger animals like whales and sharks. It's when oceans become polluted runoff. The amount of phytoplankton can escalate late to unhealthy levels fellow painted feet on the pollutants flourish and them die sinking to the bottom to decompose process. The depletes oxygen from the water over the past fifty years oceans zones with depleted oxygen have more than quadrupled to an area roughly. The size of the european union part of the cause may be an increase increase in ocean temperature due to climate change since warmer water supports less oxygen in coastal areas phytoplankton blooms are suspected to be the cause title plankton may serve as the base of ocean food chain but as feldman says too much of a good thing is not a good thing on a map on feldman's office. Wall is a marker showing knowing where there's little human. Interference and ocean water is perhaps the clearest on the planet in this region off the coast of easter island in the southeast pacific ocean. The water is deep and remarkably clear due to its location in the middle of giant oceanic. I which is a large circular current. Its central location means. There's minimal mixing of ocean layers nutrients aren't pushed up from the deep bottom the purity of the water there coupled with that make the ocean appear a deeper indigo than perhaps anywhere else. Feldmann albin said the light just keeps going down down down. There's nothing bounces back. Here is the deepest blue you'll ever see in today's episode certain by amanda onion and produced by tyler playing raines is a production of iheartradio's has to works for more on in this amounts of other topics is their home planet has dot com and from podcastone my heart radio is the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows aw today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Starbucks Carl Feldman Nasa Orban Feldmann Albin Greece Maine Iheartradio Easter Island Amanda Onion European Union Maryland Wall Salem Raines Apple Fifty Kilometers
Get A Glimpse: Total Solar Eclipse Set To Pass Over South Pacific, South America

Here & Now

01:26 min | 3 years ago

Get A Glimpse: Total Solar Eclipse Set To Pass Over South Pacific, South America

"Will next Tuesday, there will be a total solar eclipse, but it won't be visible in the US, only South America and some regions in the Pacific. Paul Maili will be at sea to watch. He's an astronomer who hosts guided eclipse, tours with the ring of fire expeditions. I spoke with him just before he departed from Tahiti yesterday. I have a group of one hundred and forty six people were boarding, the Windstar win spirit. And we're headed for an area of about two hundred and fifty kilometers, southeast of a small atoll, call off awry, which is about five days journey from Tahiti by ship, and you're going to be in the path of totality. Right. For the eclipse, that's our plan. Okay. And I assume in that part of the world at this time of year, you're not going to have to deal with any possible cloud, cover oil, you never. This is a tropical area. So, yeah, we'll probably have to deal with CS and cloud cover to some extent. And because there are no reporting stations in that area were having to take our chances using whether models and satellite real time data, and who, who are these people that are willing to travel all the way across the globe to see an eclipse, many of them are experienced clip tracers, but predominantly the majority right now or excited enough after the big eclipse, and the United States in August the twenty seventeen so this will be their second eclipse.

Paul Maili Tahiti United States South America Pacific Fifty Kilometers Five Days
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

05:26 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Hi, welcome back. Rush Limbaugh, your guiding light meeting and surpassing all audience expectations every drop this in. When just cleared from the daily wire, but actually about an NBC poll, which was announced Sunday on meet the depressed. This has got a terrible. Visit got to rip them apart. NBC news. NBC polling data shows that Bernie Sanders voters are low information and are not happy. Low-information voters are two leading. The democrat party primary and NBC poll debut on meet the press Sunday reveal the characteristic of Bernie Sanders voters that wasn't flattering. It turns out. The less, you pay attention to politics, the more likely you are to support the socialist candidates for the twenty twenty democratic presidential nomination led, of course, by crazy. Bernie, Chuck Todd delivered the bad news to his panel and people watching us on social media were downright insulting because what it says, is people who pay the least attention to politics. I e watch NBC news, people that pay the least bit of attention to the drive by media are more prone to support socialist candidates. In other words, people that don't watch lives therefore, don't know. A lot therefore are low information voters happened to be the people propelling, the democrat party primary race. The less, you are paying attention. The more likely, you are a Bernie Sanders supporter reported f Chuck Todd this Monmouth poll. Showing Sanders losing ground to both sleepy Joe Biden and Elizabeth. Warren is catapulting mayor Pete. They're trying to raise a lot of money to be taken seriously. But I just absolutely love this, because the media, of course, thinks that their audiences, the most informed and the most sophisticated in the most area than all of that. And their own poll has revealed. They're the list than form. And the less. They know the more they are inclined to support governments, like Cuba. Venezuela. And heels a by the way, speaking of which. If you are too old to remember the quote unquote, Soviet Union. That was an eighties nineties thing if you're too old if if you just if that's ancient history of you weren't old enough for you. Weren't paying attention back then. You really need to watch a series on HBO culture noble, six parts, episode four. I think aired last night or episode five. It's coming up on the on the conclusion. But if you if you have HBO you can stream all. Episodes back to back except for the finale, I think is next week. I've never seen a show that so accurately portrays, what the Soviet Union was as this, and it's all about the nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl and how it happened how it shouldn't have now the Soviets try to cover it up, how they were in capable of dealing with it. How they had no ability to tell the truth to themselves their people about anything about how their people live about how it just. Last night's episode I almost started crying watching last night, then I'm not making that up last night's episode. I didn't even wanna tell you last night, episode. They had to kill every animal within a two hundred fifty kilometer, maybe square mile area of the nuclear plant, and they, they recruited people that had never been in the military at never fired guns to go shoot pets to lure people's pets outta there. They had to kill them because they were infected. They radioactive head to do it and bury them in concrete. It had to be done, but they depicted it. Which you don't often. See, but it's not that I mean, any nation would have had to do that. It's not that alone that portrays, the Soviet Union, the idea that, that anybody in their right mind could have ever advocated for that system for that country. And this is not a political they just do an accurate portrayal of what life was and how the government operated at the time the sure noble meltdown happened, and it's just. You sit there and it's something you how can anybody? Anybody think tanker intellect to anybody ever advocated for that? Particularly in comparison to the United States. Quick time out. We'll.

Bernie Sanders NBC Soviet Union democrat party Chuck Todd Rush Limbaugh HBO United States Joe Biden Venezuela Cuba Warren Pete Elizabeth two hundred fifty kilometer
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

The Forward with Lance Armstrong

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

"I mean, this is not it's, it's, it's, you know, for those who. Didn't follow the sport back then, you know, traditionally we had, we had a lot of things we had typically to longtime trials, you know, you'd have anywhere from forty to fifty kilometer time trials twenty five to thirty miles, plus you'd have a long team time trial. People can look at it both ways. I mean, people looked at Miguel's tours and my tours as boring because once you open up a sizeable gap, then you just play defense in the mountains and neutralize the race since they came along and one of the animate things. I personally first of all, I don't think any bike race should never should not have a team time trial. I think that's one of the fan favorites. I think it's an opportunity to see eight guys working in unison with the highest technology, going fast going hard. I think people love that I don't know why you wouldn't want to have that in every single by every major bike race. I think it's I think it's too beautiful event. And then, you know, on the individuals they've, they've just scaled those back, just to try to create, you know, and you know, aggression or or animation in the mountains. But we looking back on it. We can't say that we've seen that you could argue that if some guy as a climber, loses three minutes. He's now incentivized. To be even more animated in the mountains than so tough tough tough tough to now. Yeah, I remember I mean you know, they obviously can mean a grant organizer date and they kind of have their own rules..

Miguel fifty kilometer three minutes
"fifty kilometer" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

07:55 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometer" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"New York or across the globe. Learn fly matters I on Kevin McCullough Chapman is back with us from food for the poor. And Todd it was only a few months ago, you were sitting in my studio with me again, then and the poor had just discovered a brand new. Community that had been in essence cut off from the outside world. Some some factories have gone up some planting plants have been grown in that region for a period of time, but they were without food, and they were with access to clean water than the truth is if you go anywhere across the island nation, you just find this repetitive. Kind of scenario where people don't have enough food to eat, and they need the clean drinking water and the food the food for the poor can distribute to them if you can give us an update on that community. But also talked to us about the people were helping this time. Yes. So you're talking about the community of Kyle e which is about what's up in the mountains about maybe forty fifty kilometers from Port-au-Prince. But boy, it sure takes mean forty or fifty kilometers. That's what about thirty thirty five miles. But it took hours to get up there because the roads are so bad. It's so remote three thousand people up there that as you said Kevin used to work in the in the sugar cane fields. But those factories pulled out it was actually the dole fruit company back in the day. And they've pulled out of there. And so these people just left flat and now just slowly wasting away. Their houses falling down water near a source of water is an hours walk through the rugged mountains, very very dangerous, and then the water's not even good and because of the drought they used to be able to do some farming and kept themselves alive. But as I visited with those families on my last trip there last year, it was just pure was hopelessness, and you know, save for pastor. Dominic who is working with food for the poor to bring food and water into that community. It would be without hope candidly, Kevin. I haven't got an update on the specifics of what's been going on in that community. I know that we were beginning at the time when I was there last time beginning to figure out, okay? What's the best way to bring water to these families because they lived kind of up the mountain and water was down the mountain. And so you've got a little bit of a challenge there, but we are and have been bringing food into that community. So at least, you know, we're keeping them from starving and bringing some barrels of water in on a regular basis as well. So, and you know, that's the thing that I love about health food for the poor works. You know, when we discover a community like this that by the way, foot four goes where no one else goes so beautiful all of these people that have they think they're forgotten and then suddenly food for the poor shows up partnering with someone like pastor Dominic and we begin to make a difference. But we don't let them linger in weight either. Kevin. I mean as soon as we discovered them, we will make sure that they know where on the job we've got a plan. And the meantime, your hope is not lost. You're you're you're not going to starve we are going to take care of your water needs. And then of course, we moved from there into a long term situation. But. Thanks to our listeners. I believe last time there were about ninety families of those three thousand families that were able to be held. And so there's ninety families of the three thousand that are not starving right now. Because our listeners heard about them and said we're going to step up and do something about that. Now that leaves Todd a lot of people still in that even just that one community that that are in massive trouble. Yeah. And this drought has not has not stopped. You know, the the rain is still not falling in Hades. A matter of fact, the soil just continues to deteriorate and now the families. They're more desperate than ever because you have to you have to understand it. It's kind of hard unless you happen to be, you know, someone who is a farmer or grew up and understand the kind of agricultural lifestyle. You know, you plant today in what you all that toil and work and expense today doesn't pay off for many many months to come right? But they have nothing to plant today. As a matter of fact, I talked to so many families when. I was there last time they actually sold their farming implements because they said, well, we we need food. And these are the only things value that we have. So they know that even when the rains come again, and they can get a fresh start. They're gonna have to buy the seeds. They're gonna have to re by their tools. I think it speaks to the level of desperation that families in Haiti are facing right now. But friends you can make a lifesaving difference. You can bring a miracle. You can answer their prayers twenty seven dollars a month. Not even a dollar a day, and you could be taking care of not one. But if you call right now to families through food for the poor providing them every member of that family of four two meals a day to lifesaving meals a day for the next year, and you're part of bringing life-saving clean safe drinking water to that communities. I just hope that you will get on the phone right now, you sense the urgency, and my voice you hear it because lives are hanging in the balance. Here's the number eight five five nine zero seven forty six seventy three nine eight five five. Nine zero seven four six seven three which spells hope, you found people that no one else was helping and if we don't keep them in the forefront of our mind, if we don't say, you know, what these families still are not where they need to be. Yeah. We helped ninety of them last time. But if we don't reach them there's going to be more of them that perish. And I just that that just makes me feel good about what for the Poor's doing. But it bothers me there's there's this burden in ache in my heart that these people have not found those solutions yet, and it's going to take a long time three thousand families. That's a lot of that's a lot of people. The the good thing. Kevin is that you know, we have so many people that that are available to hear what we're talking about today. I mean think about how many thousands of people are listening to our voices right now. And so, you know, maybe you weren't aware of of how deep the struggle is in Haiti, but you are now what really encourage you to do is do something, you know, because we're gifts daunting where gets a little bit frustrating. Sometimes is we reach all these people, but very few people will actually do something. Well, actually, take action. So I want you I want to encourage you to be exceptional. I want you know, if we could just have, you know, two out of every ten people hearing this right now. So you know, what I'm not just going to hear this and say, oh, that's too bad. I'm actually going to do something tangible to make a difference. I'm gonna give a little bit of money here to make a difference in this situation. That's how lives are saved. That's how prayers are answered. That's how the situation Haiti. I believe with all my heart will also be rectified. You're right. It's a it's a long term battle. But we focus on doing it one person at a time when family at a time when gift at a time, you know, Mother Teresa said she said that I'll probably fumble this. But the gist of it was just because you can't say save all of them. Just that doesn't mean you can't save one. Do do what you can to save the one person that would just be eighty dollar one time gift food for your water for life and actually with everything being doubled right now you'd be saving two people. So, you know, your generosity in this moment goes twice as far. What if we became even more quote on purpose in terms of how we took that twenty seven dollars out and said okay for this month, I'm going to make sure that family survives because I am listening to what God's telling me to do. And right now if you do that it's going to be matched. Here's the phone number eight five five nine seven four six seven three eight five five nine seven four six seven three. Maybe you could do to families. Maybe you could afford a fifty dollar gift each month get to save two of your own effort and two more through the matching effort right now that's four families of those ones that have been left behind four that will now be spoken for for that. We'll have hope and coming their way because the food and the water. They know is represented by the love and prayer of God's people..

Kevin McCullough Chapman Haiti Todd Dominic Port-au-Prince New York Kyle e Mother Teresa twenty seven dollars forty fifty kilometers fifty kilometers eighty dollar fifty dollar