35 Burst results for "Fifty Dollars"

In Luz We Trust With Linda Garcia

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:23 min | 14 hrs ago

In Luz We Trust With Linda Garcia

"Linda Garcia. Welcome to come up here for having again and again Ah. Welcome back I'm so excited for this conversation because it's long overdue and also perfect timing you moved. So I haven't seen you in person in a long time. Yes. How long ago was that? Can you believe it's year already already? Yeah that's. Insane. How do you feel I think? Well, it took a long time. I don't want to Discount Bat. It did take some adjustments and I did a lot of inward work which ironically was part of the journey where I'm at now. So it's like part of the process, and now that I'm like lifting my head above the water. Speak I feel like nothing would be happening. Had I not moved none of this like there I don't think I would be doing what I'm doing now if I still had been in La totally in I remember number Lewis and I tried to talk you out of it. Yeah because like you talked about this way before you actually made the move. Yes, and we were like, how do you know? Yeah so true you know I mean obviously, it's not an easy decision. There was a lot of ego attachment tied to like living in La. What was I going to do if I wasn't in L. A. and the reality is that like I knew I spend most of my time inside my office I'm not doing L. A. Banks. And if there's ever an la thing that is really important, I can simply outs two hour flight. You know I didn't have to make it more complicated than what it was. But what's interesting is one of the consistent messages that I kept receiving from my intuition was that I would encounter wealth. When. I moved out to Dallas shut up consistent loud and clear. It was actually more specific than that. When you moved to Dallas, you are going to be wealthy. Did you question it believed it one hundred percent so it was almost like the driving factor of having to move out here I told one person and it was Ana I saw her I think the week that I was going to move. I was invited to any event with. Nielsen. was the man awards actually end I told her I said, you know my intuition keeps telling me that when I moved to Dallas I'm going to be wealthy and it was weird even say that says that. Right. Sure. Well. Let's talk about that because even with that, there's a lot of shame in our community thinking about wealth and and having a lot of money. It's like how dare you want to have a lot of money because those people like all the beliefs that get so like put in our heads around people that have money because we look at the best you know that has all the money in you're like hanging out but I so Mila, you know with all their stuff and so there's this like sense of shame that. We grow up with around being wealthy. So how was it for you? When you kept getting that? Of course you you've done a lot of work that yes. So I did start doing the work towards that a couple of years ago a wall. So two years prior to moving. So it's been a total of three years and it's been very intentional work like I need to heal my money wounds because money was coming in and I would feel guilty about having it or I would find a way to get less of it. If. I was producing an event or opening up space I would charge my break even point how stupid is that I would urge enough to make money yes. Though I was doing that for a long time and it's very Still. Yeah. That's not okay. something. Really. I mean really it's the clearest message of Oh yeah. You don't value yourself. Exactly. It's. It's all about self worth. So share meister with with Airbus before I forget it, I sent a whole newsletter about it because this month and power sisters is. month. So we're all working on our self worth Steph and so for me unconsciously at individ-, worthy of two, hundred, fifty dollar airports because dairy I spent all this money when there's kids that are dying and children in cages and how Meghan spent two hundred fifty dollars in the pair of electronic set Dr Necessary Right. So what I was doing, this is how like annoying or unconscious works to like sabotages right. So I realized that I had like fifty pairs of different kinds of headphones. Word for different things like some were good for phone calls the wired ones were the ones that are good for phone calls. The wireless were only good for like walking my dog and listening to podcasts because if somebody called me, nobody could hear me ahead over. That were good for like listening to something and like whatever right? Like all the fifty ones that I had had a recent to be, and then when I did the math pam you've bought three. Air Pods. Bright like we do that all the time I mean I know a beach Lucas I live at both solid cotto it's not. It's crazy how we will justify spending a lot of little bit of money. And not the one time. This is a good investment.

Dallas LA Linda Garcia Nielsen. Airbus Steph L. A. Banks Mila Lucas Lewis L. A. Meghan
Kim Cattrall, actress and producer: I have self worth. And Im expensive.

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:11 min | 3 d ago

Kim Cattrall, actress and producer: I have self worth. And Im expensive.

"CAM drawl joins us on skimmed from the couch. She needs no introduction we are geeking out, but we will introduce her anyway she is a Golden Globe winning actress and producer you know her from her role as Samantha Jones on sex in the city and. She's The star and producer of the new series filthy rich on Fox which premieres on September twenty. First, we are so excited because we need some new shows in this Cogan, Environment Kim. Thank you so much for joining us today. welcomed the skimmed from the couch. Thank you for inviting man. It's good to be here. I will just say I'm geeking out 'cause I've loved you since Mannequin. So this is just So we're going to start the first question. We ask every guest, which is skim your resume for us. Oh my gosh. You know when I first started as an actress I was desperate to get credits and now I'm trying to eliminate. Oh well, you know they say don't have any regrets and I don't because even from jobs that I didn't particularly feel good about in retrospect I learned something it starts off with, of course, theater credits and commercial credits I remember getting a job on a lob laws commercial this Toronto. Before I came to the United States studied in the United States but then I went back up to Canada. And I had a clerk in a grocery store and William Shatner, he was sort of the MC selling the product and years. Later when I did a star trek movie with him, I said I. I, know you definitely don't recognize me I was shocked in. Clerk. Needless to say that's not on my resume anymore but. At the time I was doing a lunch hour theatre Gig you know and was making about one, hundred, fifty dollars every two weeks. So those those little jobs meant so much because I could I could keep in the theater I keep working as an actress and I was very grateful and when I brought it up, he simply smiled and said I don't remember. At least he was on. Yeah. So walk us through what was your big break? How did you go from the shopping clerk to being able to pick and choose what credits you have I did a show called scruples. First of all, I did a Columbo episode, which was kind of it was the hot hot show to to watch never mind beyond and they were waiting for another actress who just had dates and I was there I was told later on I was the first choice but they wanted to have some unknown entity is as an actor as one of the guest stars. And it was a really fun little role on this sort of passionate young girl who was in love with his older man. In a she was kind of nympheas but was very soulful. I got that job and Dan they were auditioning for this movie called scruples and that was really got everybody excited. It was based on a judith krantz novel was very soapy and fun and passionate. Packed with all kinds of wonderful personalities and actors and it was about Beverly Hills and it was we shot in nineteen seventy nine even before the glove, the eighties and more is more I played this kind of trouble Starlit who is bisexual and not that they really touched on that. You know very gingerly of course at the time, but it introduced me to a different level of just struggling and making due to being brought in the room because I had done that and and people like what I've done. So that was a marked difference, and then shortly after that, I did have a film called tribute and ticket to heaven and a lot of sort of films. What's one thing that we can't Google about you there's so much out there. But like what's the one thing that people would be surprised to know I think one of the things that people are surprised to know very recently is that I I am now an American citizen I think a lot of people associate associate me with being American and being a New Yorker of course, but I have just taken the plunge. So I can vote

William Shatner Samantha Jones Producer Cogan United States Judith Krantz Google Toronto Beverly Hills Canada DAN
My Husband's New Hobby is Harrassing People

Does This Happen to You

04:57 min | 4 d ago

My Husband's New Hobby is Harrassing People

"Corona virus arrived in February and my husband retired in May, like the rest of us he is in doing what he planned gone. Ernie thoughts of traveling attending sports events or picking up a job as a substitute teacher I worried at first about what he would do when he retired he doesn't Gulf or fish and has never had hobbies. But I didn't need to worry he's found a new hobby and it's consuming hours of his time. He is now harassing people. The other day he spent an hour on the phone with our Internet provider. He found out he could save twenty dollars a month by cancelling his current contract and starting out as a new customer by the end of their conversation. He had lowered our bill by sixty dollars the day before that, he spent three hours talking to the insurance company. When he got off the phone, he said I got our premiums reduced and there's no copay. Last. Week, we got a check for one hundred and fifty dollars in the mail. What's this check for I ass? That's from the class action suit. He said class action suit. Yeah. That's why I was on the phone. So Long I looked through our records and found out we were eligible for some money. Today I opened an envelope and a fifty dollar check fluttered out. That's a refund for overpaying our dental bill. My husband said I was on the phone with them for three hours I had to speak with four different managers before the agreed it was their mistake. At first I was irritated by his endless hours on the phone. But now I'm enjoying his hobby I like watching checks drift in but even better than a cheque is my brand new stainless steel oven. Yes. You heard me right I I have a brand new stainless steel oven. Are Old of and broke and we have a yearly service contract for appliance repairs. The service company sent out a repairman, but he needed to order a part only the oven was so old the part no longer existed. My husband got out the service contract and read all twenty six pages until he got to the fine print. Do you see this he jabbed a finger at a line of print the size of fire ants. I can't see it even when my glasses on what's it say? I, ask. It says, if can't fix our appliance, they have to buy a new one. I didn't believe even with his success ed acquiring checks that somebody would give us a free appliance. I was wrong. It took him six emails, four phone calls and some texting back and forth. But we finally got to pick out a gleaming new stainless steel oven, several more phone calls and the service company installed it for free. I think you wore them down I said. I thought this was his biggest harassment success story but there's more talked our daughter into buying a service contract with the same company. But when her washing machine broke, the repairman couldn't fix it after a month of going to the LAUNDROMAT and washing clothes outside in a plastic kids swimming pool she called. Dan Do you have any suggestions we've been without a washing machine for a month. Did you read the fine print of your contract? My husband said I think you can get a new washing machine give them a call. She called them but she was too busy to spend hours on the phone and her husband is more like me. He likes the tenacity in the stomach for the necessary blitz Craig phone calls. So my husband went to work only this time it looked as if success would elude him. They sent another repairmen out, but it still doesn't work. Right our daughter complained they said, I'm not eligible for a new one. My husband escalated the situation. He even stayed on the phone when we were taking our walks, you go ahead of me. He said, as soon as we headed down the sidewalk, I've got a manager on the line. This went on for three days and then our daughter called with good news. She had a new washing machine. I can't believe it. She said no washing clothes and the kids poll. Today. My husband is on the phone with the mortgage company. I don't know what they're talking about, but it's a long conversation.

Craig Phone Ernie Gulf Harassment DAN
How to Save Money  - burst 03

Reduce Debt Increase Wealth

03:07 min | 4 d ago

How to Save Money - burst 03

"This episode is how to say, money. I've been doing some research and I've found that. Some of you out there one in four Americans have no emergency savings and you don't not going to be able to get by without a cash cushion. which is really surprising. One in four Americans have no emergency savings and you don't have a savings account and hair some of the most common excuses people use. I don't know where to say I don't know how to say. I, can't say I don't have enough money to say. Prices have gone up and now I can't save. If you're using one of the -scuse Est. shame on you in distant excuse. I always found it. To be gratifying. When I paid myself. I as what I referred to it. Even, if I could only put five dollars a pay or ten dollars pay and to a saves account, and that's where you say to get started. Savings Account. As what you fine at your bank. So if you have a checking account and you don't have a savings account, you need to go to your bank set up a savings account. I bleed nowadays, it may be lower but one I set up my savings account some years ago. You had to have at least fifty dollars to get it started. They may work with you. If you've been if you've had your checking account with them for a long time, they may late let you get started for less money than fifty dollars. But if he can't scrap cy script up and put aside fifty dollars to get a savings account started, you're really in bad shape. Remember. I way to reduce debt is to pay the minimum balance on your credit cards. If you start paying the minimum balance on your credit cards, instead of an extra fifty or one, hundred, ten or twenty or whatever the extra you've been paying that should free up some money for you to get a savings account set up. and. Get one started if you don't have one or at least get your emergency fund start. So it's all interrelated personal finance as the inner related if you don't do one part of it. The rest of it's not gonNA work. It's GonNa fall apart and you're GONNA be in trouble one of the biggest keys to financial success as three accounts. I check, account the US to pay all your bills. And you WANNA keep track of the bills you're paying. So that's why you have a checking account because it keeps track of that for Ya. Savings Account. Money were you set aside? To have an emergency fund.

United States
Conviction politics: Floridas disenfranchised felons

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:12 min | Last week

Conviction politics: Floridas disenfranchised felons

"Joe Biden took to the campaign trail in Florida, this week. As a rally for Hispanic voters Mr. Biden emphasized seemed like a eight point. Getting people out to vote. So please. This election. Make your vote her. Through your vote, your voices her. Make a plan to vote has been pointed out. Make your plan to help your community for. But the very act of voting in this year's election has become contentious. President trump has been railing against mailing voting is having little evidence of fraud this whole ballot system where you can send it in. and. It's not even requested. We're not talking about it solicited. They're unsolicited ballots and they're sent in is very dangerous or our country and in Florida a fight over voting rights for former felons could see hundreds of thousands of people disenfranchised. So. In Two thousand eighteen voters in Florida approved a constitutional amendment allowing felons who had served their time except for murderers at certain sex related offenders to vote in elections. After that amendment passed Florida's Republican legislature passed a law saying, that's fine. They can vote but they have to pay back all the fines, fees and restitution costs of their incarceration. John Facile is economists. Washington correspondent. So that's the sort of thing that sounds quite reasonable. Right if you stole one hundred bucks from someone, you gotta pay back what you stole before you can vote but Florida's criminal justice system is unusually reliant on fines and fees from offenders. So you have people who had been convicted of felonies poor people who had to pay fifty dollars to get a public defender or one hundred bucks for some sort of fee to file a complaint. then. You also had fines levied on them that were quite heavy. So I spoke to one woman who was convicted of her part in a fraud scheme that she says was unwitting, but she was ordered to pay back fifty, nine, million dollars and no. One's ever going to be able to do that. I spent time with another young man who was convicted of a felony while he was basically just out of school and it turns out that when he went to registered to vote, he owed four thousand dollars to the county where he was arrested nobody had ever told him. That and other courts allowing this law to stand the courts have let it stand on Friday the last court in Florida weighed in and they've let the stand the court said the fines and fees were part of the criminal sentence. So they couldn't be said to a fully completed their full sentence until they had paid off everything they were told to pay off. So it looks as though almost eight hundred thousand people who thought they would be able to vote may not be able to vote and so is the supreme court likely to weigh in at this point now again? It's probably not going to go to the supreme. Court again, they declined to hear it in July, before that last appeal they declined over the strong objections of Justice Sotomayor who accused her colleagues of continuing trend of condoning disenfranchisement that's in Florida is this happening else? Well, the rules regarding where and how felons can vote changed dramatically from state to state you have some states like for mountain main where people can vote while in. Prison and you have some states like Florida used to be where if you've been convicted of a felony anytime, you never have the right to vote. So it's a Patchwork of laws regarding felony and franchise, but the trend has been over the past decade or so to loosen restrictions rather than strengthen them. But as we've seen in Florida sometimes that involves bats lighting sometimes the loosening isn't as loosened practice as it appears it should be. Felons aside, how easy or hard is it in general for people who exercise their right to vote in America? It's harder than I think it should be it's harder than most people think it should be it used to be the case that the Voting Rights Act which was passed in nineteen sixty five required jurisdictions with a history of voter discrimination. To submit any changes to how they conduct elections to the Justice Department in two, thousand, thirteen, the supreme court basically gutted it. The Voting Rights Act they said that requirements should no longer apply since then around seventeen hundred polling places have closed and previously covered jurisdictions, the largest numbers were in Texas Arizona and and most of those places are in heavily minority district. There's also the problem of long lines often what I found that I was recovering Super Tuesday in Texas before everything shutdown is that in suburban precincts. White it was much easier to vote than in inner city precincts, which were which were heavily African American of the Tino. In two, thousand, sixteen around half a million voters failed to cast ballots at their polling places because of problems at those polling locations. So I think people tend to think of voter suppression as as physically keeping people away from the polls that really doesn't happen. What does happen is that the exercise the franchise is likely to be much more onerous if you're a non white than if you're white, are we seeing any of those problems this round this time round for the election that's coming up. Yeah. We saw them in full force in Wisconsin in their primary earlier this spring in April. Shortage of poll workers as much of America does as result, they're only five precincts total in the city of Milwaukee, which is the state's biggest city in which had one hundred, eighty precincts in two, thousand sixteen. There are a lot of places that are really concerned about having enough poll workers to have all the polling place that should be open poll workers tend to be retirees, which puts them at high risk of Covid, and so a lot of them understandably don't WanNa come out and and sit in the crowded place for long hours. But there's a fear that this shortage of poll workers is GONNA lead to a lot fewer polling places in there should be. Perhaps. It's a naive question but why would anyone want to make harder for people to vote? So there are those who say that because Republicans are so dependent on older white voters who tend to be the most reliable voters that is in their interest to make it harder for non white and young voters to vote. Donald Trump. When he was talking about expanding postal voting essentially gave the game away. He said they had things levels of voting that if you ever agree to it, you'd never have a republican elected in this country again. So it seems as though Republicans rather than trying to appeal to as many voters as possible regardless of race color creed or. Are really trying to tailor the electric to best suit themselves. What about voting by mail something that would seem obvious into pandemic but that's been hugely divisive. This round hasn't it. Yeah Donald Trump has been inveighing against it, which is odd because there's a ton of research that shows that voting by mail tends to improve turnout but not for any particular political party more recently, he has been encouraging his supporters to vote by mail I. Think he has got nervous that if Democrats vote by mail and huge numbers and Republicans don't vote by mail at all then this may lead to an imbalance in the results that doesn't favor him. There have been polls that have showed that as many as fifty percent of Democrats, more plan to vote by mail whereas only one in five Republicans do you can imagine it sort of pandemic situation in red states where Republicans don't want to go to the polls but think that voting by mail is corrupt is now trying to walk back some of the damage you may have caused. How do all these trends impact the election this year? Do you think John? I think that between the president inveighing against the election warning that it's going to be rigged concerns about foreign interference. There is an alarming number of Americans people on both sides of the aisle who thinks that this year's election won't be free and fair I. Think there are concerns that people may be less likely to vote and that once they vote, they'll be less likely. To accept the results of the elections that is going to lead people to lose faith in democracy itself for those who do want get the vote out what are they doing about it? Well, people can check their registration status early, they could make sure that their friends and neighbors are all registered. I think there's a lot of worry among Democrats because traditional touch points that. They use to register voters you know the DMV or college voter registration drives those aren't happening now because of the pandemic and there are fears that young people are not registering at the numbers they should be. But for Florida's felons, there have been organizations that are working to pay off fines and fees almost four million dollars have been raised so far. Bloomberg who had been. Running for president said, he will spend one hundred million dollars of his own money to help Joe Biden win in. Florida. I think there's there's a hope that some of that will go to paying off fines and fees, but unfortunately, it looks like whatever happens not everyone who thought that they would be eligible to vote will, in fact, be eligible to vote this fall in Florida.

Florida Donald Trump Joe Biden President Trump Fraud America John Facile Justice Sotomayor Washington Texas Wisconsin Republican Legislature Justice Department Bloomberg DMV Milwaukee
COVID-19 Transmission is Solvable

Solvable

06:35 min | Last week

COVID-19 Transmission is Solvable

"I wanted to star. With a really dumb obvious question, which is, can you describe to me all the ways in which you can look for the presence of virus that you would be? Well, that's not an obvious question at all. Within each virus viruses just like. Any other thing they have a genetic code, and then they have a bunch of proteins and the genetic code of a virus is Arnie, which is akin to a human's DNA, and so the same way that you could do a forensic investigation of a crime scene and use DNA defined if there was a human specific human at the crime scene, you can do a forensic investigation to look for Ra to know if there was an inside of a person so. That's one way and that's this tool that these molecular tools that we call PCR, and then there's a different way instead of using the genetic makeup and the Arna to look for the virus. In this case, you could actually look for the proteins that make up the virus and that's where these antigen tests really shine. So you can either look for the genetic code or you could look for the proteins I like to call these rapid antigen tests, transmission indicating tests. There's one other major way which is a quickly and that's to. Look for the immunological response to the virus, because humans are good at making immune response to viruses. So it's a different way and that's antibody based detection but that's I put it in a whole different category because it usually comes after infection. Yeah. So the first way looking for the aren a is the kind of gold standard that's exactly right and so if I go to the hospital and get a today, get a Cova test, the looking for giving me the using to see if I have fires in my system that's right and what's the cheapest that a PC tests could produce result that actual price of tests can be done for about six bucks maybe. Even less so it can be really cheap, but the differences, the whole infrastructure around PCR test they have to be done in labs. So you have logistics of transport you have all of the people working in the lab robots and and so generally, it really drives the cost up and as we've seen the average test costs anywhere from thirty dollars at the absolute low end up to one hundred and fifty dollars for some labs that are charging in contrast be CR, two antigen tests. How do engine chess? What do they look like? What's their cost in time profile they? They look like a pregnancy test and they work like a pregnancy test actually they can be made. A little piece of paper generally speaking. You put some of the sample whether that be some swab that's been mixed with some saline solution or saliva onto a paper strip, and it shows up with a line turns either for example, red if it's positive or blue, it's negative and those can be made in the in huge numbers. They don't require instruments they don't usually require. There's a few on the market right now that to get the. Sensitivity at the FDA wanted they have some instrumentation associated but in reality, these are used for malaria strep for all these different infections they've been around for very long time and they can be done just on a piece of paper and five minutes and they could get down to you can produce them for fractions of a dollar and they might be sold to the public or built by the government for. A dollar apiece or something along those lines. So you're you've been a the perhaps the leading public proponent public health proponent of. Using Antigen, tests much more broadly to fight this. Derek and I wanted to the first time I. Heard you give this argument you convince me about two minutes. And I still don't understand why why don't we have this system because I can imagine a world where if it's this if they're cheaper easy, then you know every kid before they went to school in the morning. Would take one of these fifty cents or one dollar tests, and if they were positive, they would say home in their negative we would know that could go to school like. If, I want to go to a restaurant, why can't I just sat stand investable the restaurant take test and wait for my response and if I'M If I'm negative I get to go to the restaurant it just strikes me as. This is a way to get going again. Why are we not doing this? Can you explain that I can I have a few theories I. mean they're not just theories. They're they're. In the middle of this. So these tests because of this whole sensitivity issue early in March or really in January the world decided that was the gold standard for these tests and I don't think and I that this will maybe come. We'll come across wrong for some people but there hasn't been enough thought place into what exactly does the PR test mean, and is it the right gold standard? The only pathway that we have to evaluate tests like this in the United States are medical diagnostic pathways there pathways designed specifically to ensure that a physician like a detective is getting all of the information they need to diagnose a sick person in front of them so it's really been. First and foremost a regulatory hurdle we have so devalued and de funded public health across our country and really across the world. That we actually didn't, we don't have a regulatory pathway to approve test whose primary objective is is one of stopping an epidemic verses one of diagnosing sick person and that has really led. That's everything up all of the companies that could be producing these these really rapid tests in the millions and millions they have been sitting on these tests trying to hone them trying to get them just a little bit better just a little bit better so that the so that they can pass FDA standards as a medical diagnostic. It's not just slowing down their approval and getting them out to the public. It's actually bottle necking the company's into creating tests that are not going to be as scalable because they're having to use more expensive reagents they're starting to put them with instruments and package them more. They have to actually become more expensive, highly manufactured tests. When in reality, they're just these little pieces of paper. That if we can do the cheap version of they can be made very fast, but they just won't get through the FDA at the moment

FDA Arnie RA Cova Malaria United States Derek Government
Bitcoin Dominance Theory

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:53 min | Last week

Bitcoin Dominance Theory

"Let's do what we don't discuss the mock and what's going on because yesterday we did say bitcoin pretty good troy and I'm going to call it a try. It did full through as hyped with the diaper, which was up three point three, six, percent gutter pretty kate levels there, and we are holding above ten thousand, five, hundred I'd like to say a little bit more Gas. Star if you will from bitcoin yesterday, what we closed up a percent, we close at seven to ten, thousand, seven, hundred, ninety full. Now, what does that mean to me? Or. Quite simply put what that means to me as well. It gave a little back didn't amazed. At one stage, we were up roughly tune off set. And we pull back away from those highs. We did. We did come back about one point full percent. We did touch a high of ten, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, three as we saw to approach that eleven thousand dollar mark and I think if we can get through eleven with, we really are starting to look better. It's it's just crawling. is not doing what it did. If you recall back through the end of July twenty seventh paying the mind where we sort eleven percent, we did say some increase volatility back into bitcoin with multiple falls and falls in sixes and that sort of thing percentage moves. It really has slowed up. But It still looks good. It's just a little bit. Now, the real interesting thing that I've found with the market lightly. And I was speaking to my. To the people that were in the live trading full of warning about this. I was looking at the bitcoin dominance. dude look at the bitcoin dominance shots from the top of my list of sudden missile got there and look over the loss and just can't seem on. This particular child doesn't move very much. So when I tell you that too, it's hot out full point one percent that's actually quite a decent move. It doesn't tend to have massive dice big one percent or a big dies won't percent yesterday was one point four percents that was a pretty big die. Bitcoin dominance using up point four percent now. The reason that I bring this up is it's actually important. There's a lot of things that I have saying when it comes to trading crypto. Remotely mostly when Bitcoin Sideways, what we ended up having is will have oats that work. Well, the FI trying to they taste say becomes a really good option. You know we we can short Xiv we can go along against that market. We'd leverage with spot we tend to say some really good moves. But at the moment. It's not sort of being the case we saw Bitcoin at ten thousand hanging around there and we we really didn't have a great deal of good trends. We did which the spark a big move but like a site spock's moves like they weren't exactly what I was, you know what I considered to be optimal trading conditions. So at the moment. Yes know looking at a A. Little, bit perplexed by what's happening. It's almost like a different dynamic is coming in. Now the dynamic that we haven't had of light has been bitcoin really having a good move member. If you around back in two thousand seventeen, typically ALZ would go up and the money would come and go back into bitcoin and bitcoin within takeoff and it would be a bit say so it was only for. For six months. Leading up until December period. Now. That's the only thing that we haven't seen really strong bitcoin words. The tykes back the throne and so does his hang on, hang hang on bitcoin ongoing now it's GonNa move. Have it saying that? Will we see that will full but it's just a theory on putting at sharing my thoughts on what's going on what I'm saying out there in the mock would damn point seven percent currently on. Bitcoin. At ten, thousand, seven, hundred, ten. The theory looking a lot weaknesses will show when I go through this. You'll say the ALZ even the top ten or thereabouts of have really had a bit of lead been lacking. Three point five percent down was a theorem yesterday. That's what it closed that closing at three sixty full one full and it's now down one point five, three, fifty, eight, point, six, two. So it looks more Barrington bullish except play fish that down one point nine percent today so far has sparked low that were twenty three point eight cents yesterday was down one percents and nothing too drastic yesterday as a matter of fact, the selling in exile place it'll happened to Hoffa now around that open time ten I am we we did say come off quite significantly good two and a half three percent at one stage it has since bounced back on Bitcoin cash now. Yesterday, it was up four percent today. It is down two point eight percent giving back where twenty, eight, point, four, five, and again looking pretty average their lot Quan as well. Yesterday, it closed down one point, six percent of forty eight dollars and thirty three cents. A pretty average looking shot needs to get about fifty dollars really. Could we setting high potential to push US hi through that it's forty seven dollars and seventy one cents at the moment base via up by one percent closing at one, sixty, five, seven, three. With down two percent at one sixty two right now and not much going on there either car down rolling over quite nicely. This could be potential opportunity for shorting on those lower timeframe. So they sitting at nonsense down two and a half percent yesterday closing three point six

ALZ United States Quan Spock Barrington Hoffa
Apple iPad, Watch and Home bundle: Breaking down all the announcements

The 3:59

07:29 min | Last week

Apple iPad, Watch and Home bundle: Breaking down all the announcements

"Apple held its big September event today, but there was no iphone. So was the IPAD Apple Watch any new bundle enough? I wrote a Chang charged. With me to break everything down is senior editor at large and apple expert. Sure. I high in a it's been a afternoon for there's been a going on. Let's let's break it all down I. Guess by sequence of when they announce their their various products is talking about the apple. I have to remember. Okay. Yeah. It was secrets quartz. Which? In apple years like three years. Let's let's talk about Apple. Watch was the first off the bad. It was the Apple Watch series six and Apple Watch S C you break down these products rest yeah. It's interesting. So the Apple Watch is very clearly increasingly becoming a health device and to people who've been watching this is not a surprise. Apple found a lot of success turning it into a sport device. That started with the second generation Apple Watch when they made swim proof as what they called it not really waterproof pet swim proof and ever since then they've really been adding a lot more features for health and fitness will now they're adding even another feature for health, which is that going to measure your blood oxygen levels and this is going to do it in. Two ways one will be to do it. If you just want to do it now you push a button and it'll measure over fifteen seconds and uses all sorts of infrared lights in some magic by being you get a number and then it'll also do it in intervals just kind of behind the scenes. So just like with the heart center, if suddenly some something seems completely. Off The watch tap heuristic and say, Hey, you might want to look into this, which is what has saved a lot of people's lives. Yeah. Idea civilized was a big deal that that Promo video they ran to for really unveiling these products just was laid it on pretty heavy about the fact that this is this can save your life. Now I must have been Apple Watch. The reality is that this type of technology is very impactful right I mean it's it's kind of stuff like it's it's really sappy to talk about like how disability functions inside of the iphone arena video game console change people's but they do right there. There are entire people who who were stuck indoors not able to do anything or they were blind and they weren't able to live a normal life and they're able to do so much more now because of the technology that's come from why from. Different phones and all sorts of other stuff. So it's not surprising apples laying this on thick because on some level they they've actually saved lives. They deserve to be able to say that, but I think it's going to be interesting to see whether people buy into this idea over. All right. It's still a nerdy thing. It's still an expensive thing and that's that's a hard sell to people who haven't already bought it read just to be clear like the. Blood oxygen like what is it? What does it actually do be able to detect and monitor that like what is that allowing Apple Watch to do so in a lot of ways, this falls under everything else that we've always heard about various health functions and it was actually in the t at the ending card on their announcements. If you go watch the video, you go to the very end it says this is not meant for medical purposes, right? So. This is really just kind to help you quantify your body and your life, and this is one of the problems we've all had with fitbit and everything else. It's cool to get this data and sometimes it's helpful. But reality is once I've gotten him for like six months. One more do I need right and you know my wife doesn't care about any of the data that she She hasn't even tracker steps anymore. She just cares about whether she closes the rings. That's it right. So it's it's actually a lot of this data is is kind of you don't it's helping with all that right in kind of helping you set goals and get there. But a lot of the state is unnecessary. Apple's doing it because they say look it's going to help us with the. Overall kind telling you what your health is and maybe will maybe it won't I don't know. But we'll see we'll say how how much does this they start for? Yes. So that's the other thing is that this device is going to be three ninety nine to start, which is not cheap and you know, and the other thing also is that they have this cheaper phone watch which. is to Sunday nine starts called the Apple Watch S E and I guess for special edition we never know what these letters mean and one of the things about this thing is that basically a repackaged Apple Watch series three, right so it has the fall detection, which is something that the introduced a while back in a lot of people were really you know they were thinking hey. Elderly people you know they have this I fallen and I can't get up little buttons. Now, they can do their watch. So they're adding some of these functions that they do see a lot of. People. Kind of getting interested in into this device two, hundred, seventy, nine dollars in Stephanie Cheaper. We'll see whether people want it, but it says something yeah. That's two hundred ninety nine seems a little too expensive considering the the series three is still around one hundred and fifty dollars a year. It's not a huge difference between the two, seventy nine and the three, ninety nine. Series six that like I don't know there's that struck me as little expensive for those quote unquote affordable model. I mean think about Black Friday, right one of the things that I have always of found interesting about apple having covered it. Now for more than a decade, is that in a long time ago it apples pears didn't move like there was never a sale on their phones there was never a sale on their. Computers it was very rare and it was only a little bit. But now we're starting to see a sales on them when they come out right and we're seeing prices dropped dramatically during holiday sales. So to seventy nine to start yeah, that does feel a little heart but I wouldn't be surprised to see that creep down to two hundred by the end of this year the other the other big lot unveiled was two new. ipads. So let's let's go into the IPAD at the higher end version what what is new about this new air? Yeah. It takes a lot of the feeling of the pack pro. So it actually has a this more square look to it, which if you care Kinda Cool Stephanie Different and it also has a bigger screen that is actually looks a lot like the IPAD pro so you may remember the IPAD pro they got. Rid of the touch ID, right that button that allows you to use your fingerprint. So this one does not have the face unlock like the IPAD pro instead touch ideas now in the button on the side that you do the power button, that's kind of course. So they that's how they were able to lower the prices from the IPAD pro. It still has a very powerful chip they say it's much more powerful than chromebooks. UPS and all that, and we'll see you know everyone has to do their tests, but it's ships in October for five hundred, ninety, nine dollars again, not cheap and way more expensive than the cheapest chromebooks out there. So we'll see whether people are interested. Yeah. I'll say that pay particular attention that touch ID because it's it is abundant on the top of the screen, not screen top of the device itself it's basically the power bun. I would be intrigued to see if they stick that into the iphone twelve, it would be really smart because right now face ideas essentially useless when you're wearing a mask. So having some sort of touch ID center and I don't think they've got the under glass fingerprint sensor thing down pat yet this would be a good a good compromise.

Apple Chang Senior Editor Fitbit
As Skymiles Lose Relevance, Credit Card Companies Struggle to Spur Spending

Business Wars Daily

03:39 min | 2 weeks ago

As Skymiles Lose Relevance, Credit Card Companies Struggle to Spur Spending

"Remember vacations. Not, so long ago. The idea of getaway was enough to persuade customers to pledge loyalty to one credit card or another spend enough. They'd say in your credit card points could earn you a flight to a tropical beach, a posh hotel stay or an upgrade to a luxury class of travel. But Americans aren't hopping on planes very much these days and right now many countries won't even allow you as travelers to visit. So credit card companies are scrambling to come up with new relevant perks that will keep customers happy and justify any hefty annual fees. That might take some work while customers have been more satisfied with financial services like retail banking and mortgage lenders. Overall during the pandemic credit card satisfaction fell that's according to Jd power and associates a recent survey by consumer finance website value. Penguin found that more than forty percent of rewards. Cardholders surveyed have closed a credit card since the pandemic began another third considered it to prove their value to customers. Card issuers are making it easier to earn and redeem rewards at least temporarily, and they're focusing on the priorities that customers have now American Express executive scoured consumer data for insight into how membership rewards point redemption change during the pandemic customers began. Shopping for hairdryers and golf balls instead of hotels, airline tickets according to a report in the Wall Street Journal maybe because they had to do their own hair and we're looking for socially distant sports. One source speculated well in any event to adapt the card issuer created a range of new rewards in statement credits depending on the card you have you may get extra points for groceries, food delivery, and streaming wireless services. One card offers ten points per dollar spent at us, gas stations and restaurants. Another gives you credits were dell products at a free subscription to the meditation, APP, com both handy for adapting to the new work from home normal. Rival chase is the customers are more interested in cash back than travel rewards right now. So the bank is partnering with MasterCard to reissue its chase freedom card focus on cashback rewards starting. September. Fifteenth the new Chase Freedom Flex will offer a welcome bonus and has added three percent cashback allowances on pandemic friendly categories like meal delivery and drugstore purchases. Most other categories earn one percent cashback on its travel rewards card. The Sapphire reserve chases lowered its hefty five hundred, fifty dollar annual fee by one hundred dollars through the end of the year and Sapphire Reserve card holders can now use the cards. Annual three, hundred dollar credit to offset grocery and gas purchases. Instead of just on travel competitor AMEX was already slightly ahead of the curve in the wide variety of merchandise that can be redeemed for awards. points, and Amex rewards can also be used to pay for purchases on pay pal websites like Amazon best buy and Walmart all pandemic era staples but tweaks to programs may not be enough to keep customers using their plastic credit card debt recorded the steepest drop on record in the second quarter as consumers cut back on spending and you stimulus money to pay off debt the New York. Times reports. Shrinking Americans typical sky high debt seems to be a good thing but consumer spending fuels large part of the economy as economic uncertainty looms. It's unclear whether frugality is the new black or if the right rewards will coax consumers to pull out those platinum and Sapphire Blue Cards. Once. Again.

Amex Sapphire Blue Cards Sapphire Reserve Wall Street Journal Dell American Express JD Penguin Executive New York Walmart Amazon
30 Miles Napa Cabernet Sauvignon 2017

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:14 min | 2 weeks ago

30 Miles Napa Cabernet Sauvignon 2017

"I. It's. From she wind binder DOT com. We have another wine review. This one's little different in kind of the same same time. It's from all. Three dollars and seventy five cents is fourteen, ninety nine. It's a Napa Cabernet Sauvignon. THIRTY MILES NAPA Cabernet Sauvignon twenty-seven teen. Shot. I don't know about fifteen dollars for an all. Usually for a storebrand, they have some advantages in pricing. So a seven, nine nine. storebrand trader Joe's. Grocery store. No matter. Is probably equivalent to attend a twelve dollar one. And a regular basis just because there's no, there's no marketing there's no advertising. You know there's a lot less distribution costs. There's just those costs and the difference between a legitimate. Eight dollar wine and. Then twelve dollar one is usually significant. There's usually more. Wine production techniques taking place. You know the really inexpensive wines, they very simple productions it styles dot good and bad. But you like a little bit more involved production techniques, slow up extra money there for that, and you can get that at a lower price with storebrand. But a fifteen dollar naphtha cab. I expect a fifteen dollar. Any fifteen dollars ready to be pretty good. And the difference too in a fifty dollars to Cabraha. Twenty. Isn't all that much it's usually marketing. It's usually. More well-known winery. You know. Better better av a little higher status in a it's usually. This wine that much better. Sometimes, it's that much better but the fact. that. So little has it here to buy a fourteen, ninety nine. All, these Cabernet Sauvignon. Because what was actually? kind of bargain is, is it a Barton? Actually. It's a good wine I've been drinking. But the economics are cheap wine change go to fifteen bucks but here's the one thing the solar for me. All these nine, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, nine, champagne last year was one of the best wines I hadn't twenty nineteen and every sparkling wine had Susan I've got an answer to that and it's I haven't had a lot of. The website I love it bad some wines but none of them came close to that so far. So taking a chance on all be one. Hasn't been that much of a chance and this is really good. It's. Intense. It's got good flavor. Well, balanced nice wine. If you just want WanNa fifteen dollar one that I don't know it's actually a twenty one or twenty, three dollar one only perfect fifteen. All these polls, the trademark took their their brand names. You can tell trader Joe's wine to make support them which helps a little bit by going on the National Trade trademark registry. Will come. Lose the gadoe trademarks. You'll how if a whole nother story? But you gotTa know what direction that one came from. With all the owning the trademark. You don't nothing. But that means they also can. If the economics of the original deal change, they can go out and. Get a new producer. Whatever happens there they can still change. Even though I think was released twenty nineteen. Sit around while my all didn't have until recently. It's been around. There is there is A. Cabernet Sauvignon Glut Napa and Sonoma. Stuff. They had bumper crops for couple years in a row. And then Calvin nineteen pretty much shut down all the restaurants which are exactly where they were selling a great deal I. N. Cabernet, Sauvignon. And then big to do gatherings shutdown. People who are buying wine are not having people over that they don't know where they've been. So there's A. Glut been exasperated by what's going on. You'RE GONNA start seeing Cabernet Sauvignon. Selling. Cheap cheap earth GonNa see brand you've never heard before. And then they'll go away in two years come out because they can't just hold off the stuff backing here you're stacking up next year is release.

Napa Cabernet Sauvignon Storebrand JOE Cabraha Sonoma Barton Calvin Susan Producer National Trade
GM acquires stake in electric truck maker Nikola, will help make the company’s first vehicle

CNBC's Fast Money

02:09 min | 2 weeks ago

GM acquires stake in electric truck maker Nikola, will help make the company’s first vehicle

"Big tech was falling today. There were some big jumps in two automakers not named Tesla shares of General Motors and Nicholas Surging? After the two into two billion dollar partnership for the details it's got to fill about Chicago Phil Melissa Nice Move Higher Not only for General Motors. But also for Nikola, which is back over fifty dollars a share and this agreement between the two companies really is a win win situation. Why do we say? That this is a case where both companies are going to benefit general motors getting size and scale Nikola no longer has to think about Sh- shelling of billions of dollars to start up manufacturing. Here's what each of them get GM expects at least four billion dollars in benefits in will have another customer that it will be supplying its battery technology to its fuel cells to that is important as they looked for size and scale Nikola gains the access to GM's. And as much as some people want to knock. General. Motors they have vast experience and knowledge when it comes to electric vehicles. Nikola. Also will save about four billion dollars in development costs and the Nikola Badger. Electric all electric pickup truck that comes out and twenty twenty two that will be built by General Motors I. Know Some people are saying well, is it GonNa look just like? The GM pickup trucks that are going to be electric? No the top of it will be different. The interior will be different the software that goes inside of it in terms of the infotainment system that'll be different. Yeah. The guts will be the same the batteries, the motor that that's all going to be the same, but it's the top that's going to differentiate the badger pickup truck from. The GM electric pickup trucks is you take a look at these two stocks. One more time. Remember that General Motors also is getting a board seat with Nicholas. So look at the end of the day Melissa you're going to see more of these types of deals within the auto industry. It's unrealistic to think that all of these startups as well as every single automaker is going to come. Up with their own battery platform, their own tech platform, you're GONNA start to see them coalesce around large platforms like this. You Got Ford and Volkswagen together you might see some startups going with them. You've got Tesla and it's GonNa, continue to sell its technology, and then you've got whatever Toyota decides to do. That's

General Motors Nikola Badger GM Nicholas Surging Phil Melissa Tesla Chicago Toyota Ford Volkswagen Twenty Twenty
Germany promises Elon Musk full support to get Tesla's Berlin plant ready

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

04:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Germany promises Elon Musk full support to get Tesla's Berlin plant ready

"Moving onto the stock, then volatile day for the Nasdaq and for Tesla Tesla finished down five point eight percent on the day to four hundred and forty seven dollars thirty seven cents. So just a bit above where the split happened at around four forty two but that did compared to the Nasdaq finishing up one percent today. So this provides a good illustration of the potential downsides of the at the market structure that Tesla has employed for this potential up to five. Billion, dollar capillaries that we had talked about yesterday. The stock is now down about ten percent from when that agreement was put in place, which demonstrates the risk of not just raising at that fixed price at the time. Of course, with the structure, you have to be comfortable with that risk and presumably not wanting to raise that money badly enough to do it at a lower price and status giving yourself the option if the price stays at that level or goes. Hi. I'm not sure currently on whether we get any sort of updates or when we get updates on whether or not Tesla has issued new shares as a part of that equity distribution agreement. So I'll try to do a little bit more digging on that but if anyone has the insight on that, please let me know for now though because the stock has fallen would be surprised if they have acted on that and issued any new shares we did have just. A couple of pieces of news specifically related to the stock today one is from significant Tesla investor Baillie Gifford. An investment firm that has for a long time held greater than five percent of the outstanding shares up Tesla stock that five percent level requires additional disclosures around trades with the SEC. So in an SEC, filing baillie Gifford has disclosed that their ownership stake in. Tesla has dropped below five percent of the company. I would assume the selling has been happening for. As has been dramatically rising, of course. So for firms that already had a significant portion of their portfolios in Tesla, it just becomes too overweight and they end up trimming it back to add more diversification to their portfolio. See the same sort of stuff from our best Baillie differed managing partner James Anderson said quote. The substantial increase in share price means that we needed to reduce our holding in order to reflect concentration guidelines which restrict the weight of a single stock in clans portfolios. However, we intend to remain significant shareholders for many years. Ahead, we remain very optimistic. About the future of the company, Tesla no longer faces any difficulty in raising capital at scale from outside sources, but should there be serious setbacks and share price. We would welcome the opportunity to once again increase our shareholding. We are privileged to have been decimals largest external shareholder over a period for the development of the company. We are mentally grateful for the extraordinary efforts and achievements of Tesla and driving forward a transportation and energy revolution in the face of persistent skepticism and often downright hostility without tussles efforts. The possibility of hurting climate disaster would have been significantly reduced and. So pretty strong statement there from Anderson I think safe to say that Baillie Gifford is not reducing their position Tesla due to any perceived weakness in the company rather just their funds management structure. In other news on the SOX Today Bank of America analyst Jon Murphy has increased his price target from three hundred, fifty dollars per share to five hundred and fifty dollars per share I believe that the second highest now on the street in terms of a base case Murphy noted the strength into the underlying business that the high stock price affords. Tesla. Saying that it creates A. Positive feedback loop due to the low cost of capital that Tesla has available to it. Through follow on offerings I would definitely agree with that positive feedback loop that helps Tesla not only raise capital, but it should help them get better terms on debt perceived strength of the business by the market can help desolate negotiations with suppliers. Again, especially, help confidence in customers Tesla's can exist going. Forward to service their vehicles, if they do decide to purchase and hey, it's probably helped a lot of investors be able to afford the product, which is also not a bad thing i. think the downside is that with a high stock price, there's potentially less upside available. So it can be a little bit more difficult to acquire talented recruit talent because you don't really have that one. Hundred X upside in the stock anymore like you might add twenty billion or thirty billion. There are offsets to that too though of course, some of that reduced upside comes alongside reduced risk, which is also important in making career decisions anyway back to the Bank of America note, despite the two hundred dollar price target increased to five fifty Murphy does maintain a neutral rating on the stock. Last thing today's quick update on a musk being in Germany. As we said earlier this week he's there for Giga Berlin meetings as well as with cure vac and Bloomberg has shared a couple updates from those Giga Berlin meetings according to Bloomberg. Meyer who is the German? Federal Minister for Economic Affairs and Energy told musk quote. We are very proud of your car plant and Brandenburg and we wish you good luck with that. You'll have every assistance you need and. Bloomberg also notes that construction thus far has progressed relatively smoothly I think we're all pretty aware of that and they write quote a summer twenty, twenty, one production start is still the goal Brandenburg's premier Dima Vodka said in an email statement and.

Tesla Tesla Tesla Baillie Gifford Jon Murphy Bank Of America Brandenburg James Anderson Baillie Giga Berlin SEC Bloomberg Musk Meyer Economic Affairs Dima Vodka Germany Managing Partner
Censored? Joe Rogan Experience is missing episodes on Spotify

podnews

02:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Censored? Joe Rogan Experience is missing episodes on Spotify

"Hello. Everybody I have an announcement Hello Joe Rogan. What's your announcement starting on September first the entire Jr library will be available on spotify the entire. Library you say 'cause the Joe Rogan experience is now in spotify but forty-six episodes missing including conspiracy theorist Alex Jones far right journalist Milo Yannopoulos an anti Semite Owen Benjamin neither spotify nor Rogan is saying why Rogan's also announced that it becomes an exclusive on the first of December. In his podcast Adam Curry's says he's building something called podcast two point Oh. It's a new podcast that outlines an alternative to the apple podcasts directory. I. Think we've figured out some incentive for develop AC- says he'll also be on the first show from Joe Rogan's new studio in Dallas. spotify down rejecting new podcast served with non secure audio addresses according to e mail seen by pulled news audio served using HDP rather than https also doesn't play in chrome on embedded players. Apple podcast expressed a preference for https back in May two, thousand eighteen but haven't yet insisted on it. The vintage video podcasts spend three hundred and fifty dollars on ads for their show in podcast APP overcast called them one hundred and nineteen new subscriptions they say quote the campaign was worth what we paid for it. That's Nice Hobby, radio has launched hard m. n. a new podcast APP built specifically for Minnesota Nice Idea Patriot has raised nine hundred million dollars in new funding says CEO Jack Conte Patriots. Valuation is one point, two, billion dollars, and the IRA has the full sheduled for the IB podcast upfront event in September and the host comedian Francesca Ramsey. And in Podcast News, Here's how to promote your podcast a stunning story of a plastic surgeon asked by wanted terrorist to make them look unrecognizable full marks to plastic surgeon podcast for that. News from the Ramsey network is the Dr John Baloney show a show that provides real talk about life relationships and mental health challenges. It'll come out three times a week and seventy million is back for season three starting on September the fourteenth each week that people denominated podcast from Antica? Williamson. Co brings localities taking action from the school to prison pipeline. To racialist policing to the spread of covid nineteen in jail.

Joe Rogan Spotify Apple Adam Curry Dr John Baloney Francesca Ramsey Ceo Jack Conte Semite Owen Benjamin Williamson IRA Minnesota Milo Yannopoulos CO Alex Jones Dallas.
Zoom stock surge beats even most optimistic forecasts

MarketFoolery

01:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Zoom stock surge beats even most optimistic forecasts

"Shares of zoom video accompany that went public in April of twenty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, six, dollars a share. The stock is now at four, hundred, fifty dollars a share. Yes what can I add? This is we were discussing whether this quarter. is in the hall of fame of for a publicly traded stock quarters or whether it's just goes straight to mount rushmore as one of the very elite. perhaps only four of all time I'd I'd like to know what others earned the competition for this, and it probably comes as little surprise that obviously in the April may June or or sorry May June July. Quarter this company grew tremendously, but to have grown from doing a reasonable amount of forty, five million in revenue a year ago for the quarter to six, hundred, sixty, three, you know that's one of the reasons six, hundred, sixty, three, million for the core. That, this is a hundred billion dollar company already.

Mount Rushmore
Samsungs Galaxy Z Fold 2 5G: All the details on the $2,000 foldable

The 3:59

11:57 min | 3 weeks ago

Samsungs Galaxy Z Fold 2 5G: All the details on the $2,000 foldable

"Just large galaxy. No twenty three weeks ago. Now it's time for the Godsey full to five Jeez chance to shine. That is a mouthful brought her Chang, and this is your daily charge. Joining me is he not reporter and Samson expert tooken extra me Machar, thanks for having me. So the gutsy full to five G. and that is a really really long name. I'm just GONNA. Keep that point. It got a minor tease at Samsung's event a few back but now it gets the spotlight to itself. So just before we get into all the specs in all the other details, let's let's get the important that other way how much does this thing cost? So in the US is going to cost two thousand dollars. So basically, it's twenty dollars more than last year's model. So it's a lot of money. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That does a huge amount of money. All right. Well, this is. This is a foldable and I get the full supposed to be expensive and it is Simpson's third foldable annexed assessor to last year's fold, which famously had allowed durability issues. So what's different about? Full to in what did Samsung do to make sure this phone holds up What we saw with the flip that they had this spring was that they really had addressed a lot of the issues that the first fold had. So they dealt with the problems with the hinge kind of the crease all of the things that people were complaining about they fix those We're GONNA see a lot of those improvements in the new Z. Fold to as well as. A few like updates from the flip earlier this year. So they've redesigned the hinge and it's the same as what we saw in the flip. So you can have it. You can rest the phone kind of you know at a eighty degree angle or whatever you know set it on your table. They also have these brushes inside the hinge. So in this, they had those earlier, but this is kind of the latest greatest version of those basically to kind of mixture, dust doesn't get in the device or you know whatever is in your purse when you wrote this in there. So they, they've done those sorts of things to address a lot of those issues that we saw last year got in in case God forbid something does happen phone are there any special warranty programs or anything they're doing to kind of make sure that folks peace of mind that spending two thousand dollars on something we're kind of seeing the same sort of offers that they had before were. They'll replace the off the. Screen like a one time replacement for around one fifty. So it's less than if you had to go replace the screen on your own. So that's the sort of thing to kind of try to make it. More. Realistic. Well, if the screen breaks I'm not going to have to pay two thousand dollars to get a new phone I can pay one fifty that replaced the screen and it'll be like new again. No let's about how this differs from the previous model obviously. There's a five gene, the name. So clearly will have five, the Axis. But how much five G. is we've talked about in previous episodes you there's different flavors of it. Right so how much access does this phone actually get on the five networks? On this phone basically is all of the five G. networks like this is a really or at least the major ones that we're using right now this is a very big advance over the folds in terms of a lot of things there's five G.. One of the biggest complaints about the first fold was the tiny screen on the front of the device. It wasn't really useful enough to actually use. The fold as a phone people were tending to just automatically have to open it and use kind of that bigger tablet size screen. So what they've got this time is a screen on the front that stretches across the entire front of the device and it just makes it look last year. It's more useful. So I think people will up using this more when it's closed, not just always having to open it. Yet with the five G., we have a five G. model at all last year for the fold in the US. So this time you know five jeep bigger screen. A lot of things that just make this more attractive and the other a features or bells and whistles that. Help this phone stand apart from his predecessor. Another big thing it's kind of that flex. Mod is what they call it. So that's what we saw I with the flip where you could set the device on the table and the screen will stay open in you know whatever degree you put it in. We're seeing that with this one as well. So they're saying, yeah, you can set it up for like shooting You know a video or whatever or you know or if you're watching something or whatever you can just basically has a built in that's the screen and the device itself So you know that's a big thing that I think people really like that was kind of a cool thing that came with the flip. So. That's one of the bigger changes that they kind of also made some good camera changes with this Basically, they addressed the biggest complaints that everyone had with last year's device and fix those in this one aside from the fact that it's still a two thousand dollar phone. You asked him we were on we talked about the the narrow sliver of customers who are willing to buy a thousand dollar note twenty now this is. A two thousand dollar phone I know it's foldable but. Questions about how useful that is who is Samsung actually targeting with this particular phone Samsung. Is actually targeting note owners with this phone. They found that the people who would traditionally gravitate towards the note lineup. Kind of those early adopters who want the latest greatest tech are willing to spend a lot of money to get a flashy device to get a bigger device and. They're finding that people who were buying the fold are a lot of people who have bought the note in the past or still do the notes It's the way they distinguish the flip and the full term. Each other is they see the flip is this sort of like. Cute. Phone that becomes smaller and put. You can put it in your pocket and it's more of kind of. Everyday lifestyle device and they see the folds as really kind of letting you transition from a phone to a tablet like get more done doing more with multitasking and access different APPS like Microsoft Office. You know things that you would do on a tablet but now you also have an inconvenience of the fact that is also your phone right and then you mentioned MC sophism I'm just curious in your. Demos with this device, how like whether they showed off how you use after how took advantage of this bigger screen? Well, they've kind of had this thing since the first generation of fold where it's called continuity where you could start an APP on the front and then open, it will open at work in the bigger screen and pick up where it left off the issue was there were not ten of APPs that took advantage of it I hope that we start to see more apps soon that work with it. kind of sense than. Samsung has been working more closely with Google and Microsoft and Youtube an office and things like that, and then there's that flex MoD. Also where APPs could you could maybe have you can take like a screen shot of something in an APP over here and then drag it to another APP on another part of your screen more with multitasking. So letting you have multiple APPs open at once is a big thing with the fold You know kind of more of that tablets sort of experience instead of just a phone experience. Give everything that's going on. We're still in the middle of pandemic a still dealing with the recession with millions unemployed. What do you think about Samsung unveiling a phone at this price point? It's kind of the same situation that we saw the note where people who? Would want to buy. This are probably people who were not hurt financially by what's going on right now because they're not traveling, they're not going out to dinners they're not going out to bars. Some people are probably saving money right now and they may see, hey, this is a lot flashier device from what was last year. It. Sampson's had a year to work out the kinks. Maybe this is worth investing in. The two thousand dollars is not unrealistic based on what is actually going into the device is just kind of a question of individual people have to decide if they're willing to pay two thousand dollars, but we have to remember this technology is still really early like foldable screens. This is basically just the second year first full year of seem devices with these. So it's not like these have. been around forever like like regular led displays Five G. is brand new. That is also expensive it adds cost to a device. So you know it's just kind of what you're willing to do but then you know as we've talked before, there's kind of factor of with foldable. You get these because you want people to see them. It's kind of how like iphones used to be like. The newest generations had to have some sort of little tweaks to make it. Make people know that you have the newest device, not that s off your device or whatever that you didn't buy like a two year old phone or year old bound. So it's the same sort of thing with this with you know when people are out using a foldable people, stop them ask what is that? Can I see what is and right now you really don't want anybody close enough to you to touch your phone or see it or or even be out that much to have people see it. So you know it's kind of the whole if you're in it just for the flash flashing aspect is probably not worth it but if you're in it because you want a device that transitions from phone to tablet. It would be attractive for people and thinks, lastly, I heard this phone grants some unusual perks what do you actually get with this phone? So it seems has this sort of VIP program for the folds and you get a membership with it. It's kind of unclear how this actually work works. They said there'll be some benefits like six months free of of this like premium fitness workout system like fifty dollars off like a hare service, six months of free of linked premium. Free Golf membership you know a Michelin Star meal that you can get delivered to your home It's it's a bunch of things where it's like. Okay like you know, I don't know how much people take these and the other thing is they said that these are going to be coming to people who bought the previous fold people who bought the flip. So it's not like you have to buy the new fold to take advantage of this if you really want access to whatever these things are under hoping to add more benefits We'll have to see same is actually done this for a long time with its phones. It'll have like when you buy the new galaxy whatever you get. Six months free of dropbox and you get premium bird blah blah. Blah. So it's not that unusual for them to have kind of bundled promotional partnership deals with their device but these are kind of bigger and more like real world things. You just have you know premium flip board on your phone. Clearly geared towards towards a different customer segment. Than just premium clipboard. People. Who have two thousand dollars to spend not exactly well, thanks for your time Shara. If you have any questions about the full to his up on twitter at the daily charge, you create coverage on the phone announcing dot com the charge. Roger. Chan next listening.

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Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Georgia governor allows local mask mandates, with limits

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last month

Georgia governor allows local mask mandates, with limits

"After suing Atlanta's mayor and city council over mask mandates last month Georgia's governor has reversed course signing a new executive order that allows local governments to enact mask mandates to help them fight the corona virus pandemic governor Brian Kemp's latest order allows local governments in counties that have reached a threshold requirement to require masks on government owned property only two of George's one hundred and fifty nine counties are currently below that threshold the mandates cannot be enforced with fines fees or penalties against private businesses or organizations and penalties against individuals cannot include a fine greater than fifty dollars war prison time also mask requirements cannot be enforced on residential property while on other private property including businesses only with the owner or occupants consent I'm Ben Thomas

Atlanta Georgia Brian Kemp George Ben Thomas Executive
The Future of Travel

This Week in Travel

04:35 min | Last month

The Future of Travel

"Hello and welcome to another episode of this week in travel. The only travel show that really isn't even about travel anymore because no one can travel and it's not weekly. So it's pretty much ally. With me as usual, Oh, I should add I am coming from the beautiful state of Wisconsin. Now. Officially pulled up stakes and left Minnesota permanently So no more of that. With me metropolis of Horton Ville. Yeah for the time being at least. For for at least a few months. That voice you hear is, of course Mr Chris Come at you from Lovely San Jose California, how are you doing Sir I'm doing well, sir. Excellent. Also from California the Lovely Jen Leo, how're you doing jen? I'm doing great and I'm back from a three week cross country road trip. So I actually do get some travel in this summer, Gary. Well I technically did to it's just an involved a U. Haul. And almost. Packing. Thursdays so Excellent. Also chuckling in the background Mr Spud Hilton. How are you doing? Sir Doing Great I just came back from the corner liquor store. So that was that was my big trip of the week so. That's not So my question for you is Muscatel thunderbird. You know I find that ripple tends to be a highly underrated wine of a fine vintage So sometimes, night train sometimes ripple. We used to get when I was in college was on the debate team we'd travel and we were poor. So we would get mad dog twenty, twenty. Oh. Yeah. Oh my God that was. Nasty. Nasty stuff. Our guest. This week is actually somebody does know about Travel Robert Cole. He's a strategist. He's a consultant and he knows a whole lot about the hospitality industry. Welcome to the show. Sir Well, it's great to be here. Big Fan of the show longtime listener first-time Gust so. I'm surprised we haven't on your head you on the show before. Creek Chris was saying is on show you know seventeen hundred total. So I figure hey, I made the top two thousand. What the heck this show. That's true to something. Right. Now, that's very pleased to be here. All right. Well, let's get onto some news stories. spud brought us this one. Gun seizures at airports are up threefold. And I don't think there's a fold increase in travelers going through airports. So. What do you think is the reason for this we went up from five point wh. Why should say it per capita thing I think. So it's fifteen point three guns. Every million passengers screened in July compared to five point one per million in two, thousand nineteen. So the rate has gone up. I don't think it's an absolute increase what thinks the reason will you got to protect yourself from? The? COVID? Vaccine? Virus. Roller. Arms or definitely the way to go there. I mean it's the TSA which you know brought this up has a great instagram account where they like to. Show Hey, here's all the guns. We got this month. and. The picture that they have on this one is you know it's every picture of a gun is so postage-stamp because there's so many they just the for whatever reason it's gone way up they don't speculate on why but they are quick to remind you. That civil the civil financial penalty for bringing an unloaded gun to check point is two thousand and fifty dollars and it starts at forty one hundred dollars if the gun is loaded and actually TSE's. Instagram site, you'll find out that most of them are loaded. Usually and carry on luggage. They're not necessarily there patting the person down. Yeah, you're actually allowed to take the gun in A. You know in a check luggage you have to pay. You're flying obviously, right. But. These are people who brought them in their carry on luggage and just thought, Hey, I'm a gun on what's the problem here? And apparently, they're folks who clearly don't fly that often or don't pass the sat very often.

Robert Cole Mr Chris Lovely San Jose California Mr Spud Hilton Horton Ville Wisconsin Minnesota Jen Leo Muscatel U. Haul Instagram Gary TSA
"fifty dollars" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:57 min | 3 months ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Fifty dollars a visit T. mobile dot com to find out how to save up to fifty percent four hundred fifty dollars the eventual pre pay card for eligible device pay off about fifteen days it makes me very C. T. mobile dot com meal time it's coming soon what's going to be today gas station hot dog frozen microwave mini meal soup from an envelope or are you ready for something uncommonly delicious like the famous hook and ladder sub from firehouse subs the hook and ladder is one of our most popular sucks for good reason we start by piling yourself high with freshly sliced smoked Turkey breast and Virginia honey ham then we top it with melted Monterey Jack and then from there it served piping hot and perfectly toasted roll this is no ordinary self this is the melt in your mouth medium **** peace the hook and ladder from firehouse subs save time in order yours on the firehouse subs out for a firehouse subs dot com and we'll have it hot and ready to go at a rapid rescue to go area inside firehouse subs this is no ordinary sub shop this is fire house subs enjoy more subs save more lives at Walgreens we know summer may look a little different this year that's why we've made it easier to enjoy the moments you do make with new ways to shop we shop online and pick up in our drive through or quicksand day delivery on select items with post mates you can keep summer calling this week find great deals like buy to skin care items from your favorite brands like aveeno in ponds get a third item free Walgreens offer valid card while supplies last restrictions and exclusions apply see Walgreens dot com for details are you to tell you about boost mobile's new upgraded network stronger signal faster speeds and more coverage than before so now you can get everything you want faster like people's music you can.

"fifty dollars" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:28 min | 9 months ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Fifty dollars to the care of the every weekday at four fifteen PM for your chance to win good luck and happy holidays from southwest kia this traffic report is sponsored by DFW airport prepaid parking DFW airport makes parking for air travel easy is a click with new prepaid parking online just click park in save up to fifty percent plus use your toll tag to make parking even easier visit DFW airport dot com slash park please North Korea getting ready to deliver on its promised Christmas gift to the U. S. that story's coming up in just a couple of minutes but first traffic and weather together on the asus Christmas Eve morning seven twenty eight now John wolf is in the ten eighty traffic center yes in the bad news in Lewisville at all those lights are not Christmas LifeLock to lighten southbound thirty five he just before valley ridge only the right lane is open their traffic getting by very slowly it's backed up from four oh seven it would have been back to probably cross the bridge by now if it warrants Christmas Eve day so to say anyway a very bad accident there southbound on the Dallas north tollway before alpha had the two right lanes blocked slowdown coming these you come down from Spring Valley Plano west bound from white Rock Creek over the old Denton the left lane is going to be shut down for road work until nine fifteen this morning let's check in with Randy fuller for Tarrant county problem it's official we ARE accident free in Tarrant county now the north and one twenty one mid cities is cleared and bad for that back up quickly and winding thanks to Tito he happen to be in the area and gave us a buzz on the Kerley traffic tip line the tip us off in an Arlington westbound twenty that's moving it posted speeds from three sixty the green oaks expect fifteen minutes stretching through south Arlington and fort worth pretty quiet downtown thirty to one twenty one no delays at all and this report is sponsored by B. M. W. becoming from south like he's been one fourteen from wake chapel to the north end of the airport just twelve minutes to go all the way to the thirty five the merge that same triple to get twenty three minutes in total providing legendary performance exceptional offers at a premium ownership experience B. M. W. only makes one thing the ultimate driving machine that's B. M. W. I'm general Phoenix report seven thirty eight breaking traffic alerts when they happen John your Christmas Eve forecast now for exigen temperatures gonna be in the sixties today pushing the seventy degrees very warm for this time of year forty five.

wake chapel Phoenix Kerley official Randy fuller Spring Valley Plano Dallas asus DFW B. M. W. Arlington Tito Tarrant county Denton white Rock Creek Lewisville John wolf
"fifty dollars" Discussed on The Production Show

The Production Show

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on The Production Show

"Frustrated has more on his Graham salerooms and can't a to the office and they feel fifty dollars..

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"fifty dollars" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"Let green chef do the meal planning grocery shopping and most of the prep work for you week after week recipes include pre made sauces dressings spices getting more flavor and less time for fifty dollars off your first box. Green chef go to green chef dot US slash inside. That's green chef dot US slash inside. For fifty dollars off your first box inside of us. Brought to you by the company this to me a product that sells itself, you know, me. I you see b they have this magic bomb that works from the outside in tinctures that work from the inside out the little droppers. So I've got those got this magic bomb that had next surgery. So I'm rubbing it all over me myself. You're you. You ask everyone that comes over US to rub on you. Yeah. And you know, it's funny is a lot of people like I have friends in NHL who use it. And they swear by I swear by. But I'm telling you if you ever come here with an ache besides me, besides me being a pain your ass, if you ever come in here with some I'm gonna put it on you're gonna rub it right on you. Rub it right in Europe, dairy, and I promise you you're gonna love it. My friends have said do is still really work. I'm like, yeah. Dude. It really works. They have a super CBD breath spray the fits in your pocket or your purse killer way to calm the F down man with a site of fresh sweet breath. In fact, h hemp CBD was just showcased in shape magazine for calming you down naturally. That's pretty cool. You could check out that article too. I think that tweeted it actually for our listeners they can go to H hemp dot com and use the code Rosie twenty to get twenty percent off give it a try use it consistently for at least.

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"fifty dollars" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Write a few questions for you. It's spring to the audience. Maybe about the economics of alcohol still I mean for fifty dollars worth of gasoline. You could still up maybe eight dollars ten dollars per sack of sugar, maybe the benefits an economics of it. Well. Sure. How do you feel about the FDA station that they took after the farmville was signed with the CBD being a drug or is that pretty much settled? Did you could also you see vis a nutritional supplement? Okay. Well, I can to you know, when it comes to the economics of making alcohol in my book, we go over that in detail where you can see exactly how we figure that out. And again, discharges mentioned the books alcohol can be a guess, it's probably at your library. She can look at it. There. And what we show is that if you're using a waste product like well, for instance, I'm using apple pulp from a local, apple juice company. You know, they squeeze it somewhat to get the juice. I take the pulp left over and I make alcohol from the sugar in that. And when I do that, I don't have a price I'm paying for for that actually get paid a little bit to take it away. No. When I make the alcohol from that, my costs only thirty four cents a gallon. That's all in labor cost of my equipment supplies, that's cheaper than the big oil companies. Oh, I'm waiting for them. Big oil. You know, that's that's the the the thing about alcohol. It's like you can do the right thing and not pay more to do it. You know, when you put it in your car, so thirty four cents a gallon. Well, that means for fuel. I make a pretty nice return on investment without the tax credits, which are also in their which can actually make it even cheaper. But you can't count on those every government changes. I'm and you know, you don't really need tax credits. But the oil companies should get them. They get five dollars a gallon tax credits for gasoline. Now the other question about drugs or supplements. Yeah. You know, it's tricky because the industry really wants to be respected that I'm. I'm talking about the Kannada industry, and.

apple FDA eight dollars fifty dollars five dollars ten dollars
"fifty dollars" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on KTOK

"Fifty dollars. For each treatment instead of fifteen hundred or three thousand a lot of patients fine. Okay. That's an avenue that I could get. Well. Okay. So let's let's reset this for a second. You're listening to super health. That's Dr Brian Frank. I'm Kyle drew talking about various options when it comes to stem cell therapy. There's a lot of people who maybe have been putting this off. They know that their hip is aching. They know that the doc said ou might need knee replacement. They're in pain they're walking around gimpy and they have explored stem cell therapy. And they go, whoa. So that's the price of this stuff. Without knowing that there are three different versions of stem cell therapy. And the most expensive one is the one that you hear advertised all the time. But on this show, we talk about all of the effective ways of getting stem cell therapy, including classic prolotherapy. Which is what Dr Brian Frank is talking about today. It's impressive that you say that each of these have about the same response rate. So so we're not talking about I'm kind of getting the one that's not quite as effective, but at least it's cheap. No, we're talking about things that have pretty much equal effectiveness. But here's a version that is affordable relative to the expensive stem cell therapy. It's affordable. And it's one of these things that has a great response rate. And it's using your body's own natural stem cells to do the regenerating is that a decent summary of what I just heard. Yeah. That's a that's a great description. And and you know, I also liked it always mentioned to my patients. I'm an anesthesiologist. I've spent decades in the operating room, I'm not opposed to surgery sometimes you need surgery. But I oppose the surgery before it's necessary. You know, when when it's because the vast majority of surgery in America is is elective that means were electing to do that. It's not emergency. And so I'm just a big proponent of doing things conservatively. I because gee whiz. You know, there are problems that can happen in surgery. My my own mother had a total knee replacement and the surgeon was great. He was a friend of mine, but she didn't do very well with it. She had a number of other health problems at probably entered into that. But she really would have done better. If she was taken the conservative route, I get it. And that's the thing is that if there if there's only one option. Presented to a patient. Well, then obviously the patient's going to go with that one. And only option if there's a number of options, then you get to decide together, then the process of deciding your treatment can actually be collaborative with your physician rather than just something that I mean, again what I see out there. In in various physicians offices, Dr Frank I know it wouldn't surprise you. But it it's it is surprising to me how sometimes a patient will walk in. And the doctor will just say okay here the things that we're doing today. And here's how we're going to treat you, and there's very little conversation with the patient at all. And the patients you said, he yes, sir. Yes, ma'am. No, ma'am. No, sir. Well, there's very little no, ma'am. Or no, sir. But there's a whole lot of. Yes. Whatever you say. And whatever the price is. Yes. Yes. Yes. I love your approach dock. And I know that when patients come to you I've seen it personally hands on when you were treating my wife, and I know that you spend time and others who have come to you of reported back to me they've been spies, by the way. Dr Franken is we'll just tell you. I've had spy and they've all reported the same thing, man. This guy is caring, man. This guy spends a lot of time, man. He gives me great options. And he understands that I have a wallet. That's not an. Inexhaustible? I want you to give Dr Frank McCall, if stem cells are something that you're looking at I want you to consider prolotherapy. Classic prolotherapy..

Dr Brian Frank Dr Franken Dr Frank McCall Kyle America Fifty dollars
"fifty dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Fifty dollars you could. Skip that with network capital underwriting. Fee that was three hundred seven fifty again so another fee that's wasteful they occur your fees admin fees other miscellaneous charges that add. Up over one hundred plus dollars a lock and fee and application fee nowadays are, average in two to five hundred bucks again another fee don't have to pay. When you really dial this number eight hundred. Seven hundred eight zero six eight now the. One I dislike the most, most of our listeners, dislike is originate What is the point of this back in. The day it, was straight commission to the guy that. Was doing the loan. For you the. Feeling is charging an, interest rate, shouldn't that, be enough that's the way I feel at, the end of the day I'm not paying an interest rate plus? Admin, fees plus all these nickel, and dime fees fees on fees on fees it's. Doesn't sound like something, I want you guys messing around with so for customers who don't like unnecessary fees contact our boys and our. Capital their numbers eight hundred seven hundred eight zero six eight the beauty to this company is that they don't charge processing underwriting origination Adleman rate lock and cetera. I believe, in their business. Model it's exactly what the homeowner in two thousand eighteen is looking for try them. Out of the number of about the provide to. You because they're fast, they're absolutely easy. To work with they help. Homeowners from credit scores, five hundred, and higher so it used to be if you were under six hundred year out the ballgame the market just moved the guidelines just change that's one. Of, the perks that this rising rate environment so make contact give you this number, twice have your phones ready register. And, locked the tenure fix if that's too aggressive look at fifteen look at Twenty look at twenty five star. Shorter and move back if you have to don't go straight to the thirty year, fixed that was. All thanking you a lot of, times that's not your best deal it's kind of I think it's..

six hundred year Fifty dollars thirty year
"fifty dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Dot com But when you give. Fifty dollars echoes so far that this is kind of an illustration of how wealthy we are as a nation we in America Are so wealthy the fifty dollars which is not a ton of money can feed in Guatemala or in Haiti a kid four a year you'd think it's, like it's a month may be right year year because food for the poor works with all kinds of organizations around. The world to keep costs, down but fifty dollars from you to food for, the poor. Feeds a, kid, for year and also provides water for life a lot of these kids their families have, to walk miles to get, clean drinking water, I mean again it's hard for us to imagine the level of poverty in places like Haiti and Guatemala which are in our hemisphere. Not far away Let's be honest this. Is? Why I believe in the free market, and I believe, in. A small government so that people can be empowered not to ask the government to help but that we are the government we. Can help we don't need to go through the government in the. Bureaucracy of the government but you have to give to organizations that do. Great work like food for the poor so Metaxas talk dot. Com is our website. If you, go there you can give if you give fifty dollars as we. Said that feeds a. Kid for year, this is the sort of thing to mention to have mentioned the sooner but, this is something you can, do with your kids right like a lot of us have kids they're gonna lounge whatever and I think we try to teach our kids to tie right at ten, percent of your money should go to God's work it's not all about you and buying candy or whatever you're doing. So the idea that just, fifty dollars can feed a kid for years it's, an amazing. Thing to, be, able to tell your kids here's what we're doing my daddy you're putting in half or, we'll put in thirty dollars, and you kids Like fifty dollars a, meal out like medium price meal out for family of. Four? You know and so you you give, one meal and, then. Feeds one child entire you new your kindle by two cocktails yeah that's about it no no seriously it's just it's nuts so. I wanna say for fifty dollars you can feed for a year. And obviously were hoping that some people will give a lot more than. That if you give fifty dollars we want to thank you. By sending you some. Bumper stickers, four four bumper stickers how do we settle on four I don't know Four beautiful Eric Metaxas show bumperstickers they're big they're bold they're beautiful and you'll, be the, envy of of? Everyone, I mean you. Drive, of, the. Parking lot if you. Drive down the highway for example when, people see the stickers they will burn almost literally with envy that's just what happens beautiful and I'm sorry but. Yeah we want to drive, people to burn with with with with envy and not literally, of, course, but they're. Beautiful so we want to say? Thank you and There's no way to get them unless you give. To food for the, poor you can't buy these stickers so if you give one hundred fifty. Dollars we will give you four stickers as, we said but then we also give you another four, stickers of, Metaxas super now Metaxas super you're not allowed to display these stickers unless, you actually subscribe to Metaxas super so to keep you out of jail we will give you a free subscription. To Metaxas. Super figuring hundred fifty dollars you get a free annual subscription to Metaxas super and as, we've said many times we're building..

Eric Metaxas Metaxas Haiti Guatemala America fifty dollars hundred fifty dollars thirty dollars Fifty dollars
"fifty dollars" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on WEEI

"Are two hundred fifty dollars or universities universities that have dow lissette we we love brady we love everything he's done here but let's face facts here he has elected to be a guy who's going to in his down the road appeal to the elitist that's what he's doing and peyton manning has decided on taking the other road he's still sell the pizza cut that meet he'll do that stuff everybody picks out where they want to go with their brand he is elected to go highbrow as brand yeah on and i don't see how you can't you can't see see any seeing that your question was i wanted you to say not drew from wherever to say who giselle crowd was you couldn't say or you wouldn't say 'cause he didn't want to irritate or piss anybody's sleep i end saying you won't say it you put you put the ball on the tee and you refused to hit your so so worried about people worry the call we had this morning happens you don't like the guy that wins more than the other guy.

peyton manning brady two hundred fifty dollars
"fifty dollars" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Four hundred and fifty dollars but then he had a change of heart you heard about a food shortage at a local food pantry so he and said are you ready for this he gave all his video game money to the food pantry to help those in need he told the local news station you know i don't really need that steph video games those are once people need food and water to live and they don't have that and i already have it so i don't wanna be greedy i just wanted to help them are you went through a lot of really tough times as a young kid his family often couldn't afford a place to live so growing up they spent many nights on the street or in and out of homeless shelters he sent in the sixth grade he lied to a classmate about where you live because he was too embarrassed to say that he was living in a homeless shelter and he said it was that moment that he knew that he had to excel in school so that one day when he was growing up his own kids wouldn't have to suffer through that same embarrassment so we started studying in studying working really hard at school and bullies would pick on him because he always had a book in his hand and he's always reading and they teased him with the nickname they called him harvard well richard just graduated high school he was his class valedictorian he also just accepted a full ride scholarship to that very school they used to tease him harvard it is that is a great story my favorite so far this week one final one for myself jv there's an sm swingers dungeon in england that has been fighting with its neighbors people don't like the place they don't like the handcuffs in the whips and the low cut tops and the tight jeans on men with a tiny the little blue pills in the pocket as these l heathens go into find multiple partners you know people are not shy about calling the cops on the regular cops have been there several times for various reasons and the most important reason of all the people called the cops went several witnesses called when they saw a child being led into the dungeon officers rushed to the scene busted in there they found the.

england harvard fifty dollars one day
"fifty dollars" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"Great so user code almost thirty for ten percent off your purchase of over fifty dollars we love this brand kelly flower foods changing the game for people with autoimmune diseases and beyond just won't want to eat some low carb aw enjoy this episode is also brought to you by bright sellers and just got my box me too i've already gone through two bottles of wine no had people over keep having over carlee came over over and we have the chardonnay and then i brought wine to someone dude that's what i'm literally yeah it's great it's great for brain to parties or get togethers the wine is awesome bob so bright tillers is a monthly wine club so it matches whatever your flavors or whatever you like with wine and it sends you wind in the box it came supersafe amazing bottle so i got it last month and i had four bottles justin loves to drink wine and chill the house like if he would like he would be happy for the rest of his life just chilling with me drinking wine so we had some and then yeah whenever i go to people's houses now it's like it's so easy because i don't want to ever have to like go out somewhere before i go to someone's house and buy something so it's like i always have something on deck to like bring over yeah and i also got wines that i had never heard guessing so a petite virgo asian and blank.

fifty dollars ten percent
"fifty dollars" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

Radical Personal Finance

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

"Let me help you answer that question let's pretend that your electric bill is a hundred and fifty dollars per month take a hundred and fifty dollars this month and divide it by usually what i do is divided by thirty point five if you remember that many months' some months have thirty days some months have thirty one and february of course has twenty eight fight use thirty point five is my easy number that winds up with three hundred and sixty six days which is close enough to take a hundred and fifty dollars and divide that by thirty point five and you wind up with four dollars ninety two cents severe electrical bill costs you a hundred and fifty dollars per month that means it's day you're spending about five dollars to light and heat and cool your home now i don't know if for you that would be a high number or alone number i don't know if you would consider that to be a worthy expense or not a worthy expense but it's a number that you should know and that you should know not immediately you should at least be able to connect with it so he would be another example of a question how much does your household cost you on a daily basis now this is much simpler if you rent admitted mui said of household how much does your dwelling place cost you on a daily basis this is much simpler if it's a rental cost because we can just measure pure cost assume for a moment that you're rent is fifteen hundred dollars per month assume that your electrical bill is a hundred and fifty dollars per month assume that your water bill is one hundred dollars per month assume that your cable tv and or internet and or satellite bills total one hundred dollars per month and right now we're at one thousand eight hundred and fifty dollars per month now you may have a couple more bills but let's just go with that one thousand eight hundred and fifty dollars per month your normal monthly cost how much is that per day will divide by thirty point five and you have the number of sixty dollars and sixty six cents per day.

mui fifty dollars one hundred dollars fifteen hundred dollars sixty six days sixty dollars five dollars four dollars thirty days
"fifty dollars" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Release at new make fifty dollars or hundred fifty dollars and that's it right eyes so it's it's uh it's were we've been very very fortunate that uh people of kind of uh picked up on at the way they have and the we've had um interest from media and light museum or whatever let's just off the wall but it's it's uh you know we've been reeling so i look to understand a little bit better like harding the speck out what what are the requirements for your lifestyle how much money do you need to make you just say oh canyon insurance i need food i need housing and then you say okay this how much i need or do you also say i need to save some amount of money for the future well on the saving is a luxury uh that uh we have almost a taped a we're paying for of we just pay the rent by by the food and one and pay for webb space and hosting of various kinds and uh uh we don't really have any money left over so why we've we've uh we're just we've we've been treading water for five years now i hope that the the amount of money hasn't really gone up and it i mean it's gone up a little bit but for the last five years we make anywhere from 40 to 60 thousand and split that among two people and take into consideration how the taxes work and how the healthcare works when you have to pay for yourself and stuff uh if there's not a whole lot leftover that is simeon tents artistry and i so i am increase like what what would you do have some kind of blacks one thing happened and you are all of a sudden need of monte is that like wings growing up the buy back i'd done i didn't actually see the movie i deserted by the strangest by desert the strategy that so flying blacks one is totally overloaded at this point i meant in terms of like the.

monte light museum harding webb simeon five years hundred fifty dollars fifty dollars
"fifty dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And fifty dollars is the median rent for one bedroom here in california twobedroom is it about twenty one hundred dollars the most expensive cities are no surprise there the largest city san francisco san jose los angeles san diego and sacramento and when you look at the number of people who have said they would they would move out of california or have thought about moving out of california because of the high cost of housing statewide i'd it's fifty six percent have considered moving in inc in la county it's even higher than that in la county it's fifty nine percent who say they have considered moving because of the cost of housing in california now some of them said they would they would relocate to a different state most of most of the people said it was a different state some people said a different party california other places in the same area even two percent who said that they would consider moving to another country just to get away from the high cost of housing we've lost a lot of people to texas remember rick perry doing his move to taxes tour everyone went on john and ken show and he was such adult hugh it was just it was just like a statement that he was reading almost like off a teleprompter and they'd ask a question when early answer it uses anyway they they they make this push because you love to tax one bedroom and texas about a thousand dollars two bedroom texas median rant about 1200 even in dallas the most expensive city for renters in dallas two bedroom 1500 your kid would would move in with one of his friends and pay said what is that 750 yeah i had a friend about a house there like a big house like a fourbedroom house with landon stephanie would act like in texas in it was like three hundred thousand three fifty something like that you start to feel silly when you hear things like this you start to feel silly when you think about how much further your money could go in a place like taxes if your job is mobile a lot of people in the entertainment industry it's not that simple right they've got to be here the gotta be an la they've got to live with fourteen of their closest friends because this is where their jobs are but if your job is a mobile one.

sacramento california la county texas rick perry john ken dallas landon stephanie san francisco san jose los ang twenty one hundred dollars fifty nine percent fifty six percent thousand dollars fifty dollars two percent
"fifty dollars" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Somebody's life fifty dollars their how's that for an awesome segue fifty dollars a a fifty dollar tax deductible contribution we'll have an impact a fifty dollar tax deductible contribution to food for the poor will directly feed one hungry child in haiti for a year and directly give that one child in haiti water for life can't do nothing about the war on trump can't do anything about the race four in america you can make sure that just one child in haiti we'll have water for life if you contribute fifty dollars to food for the poor now i'm trying to be rulli provocative and i'm trying to get inside your head in your heart because this is our last day partnering with food for the poor this summer but come on now you know that's pretty powerful don't you come on now there are very few places we're a fifty dollar contribution can make any difference here's one food for the poor call eight four four right now eight four four eight six to forty six seventy three that's eight four four eight.

haiti trump america fifty dollars fifty dollar
"fifty dollars" Discussed on GSMC MMA Podcast

GSMC MMA Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on GSMC MMA Podcast

"Which i i don't think it's necessarily going to be a joke it's going to be an intriguing matchup of styles in my my opinion but it definitely gives people who may not have the chance to actually ordered the fight on their own maybe they don't wanna go to the bars but maybe it's a place where you can take the family and maybe feel a little more little safer than going to the bar so i actually look it is a good thing i'm pre positive price point is being that forty to fifty dollars for you know for ticket which means by the time you go to the movie theater and you drop fifty dollars on a on a movie ticket you buy your popcorn you bided drink your brain you know one other person bring your your your spouse or your date it's cheaper to actually stay home and order it yeah definitely gives i mean seriously i mean image because it really i mean i just don't see how let me it's but it is a nice way to see it it's on a bit among on a large screen would you would you go to a theater to see it over go onto the bar i would definitely go the bar and if anything i'd go to my buddies house in we split the paper view but but let's just talk about theater i mean you ever watch the comedy innovator it gets really loud who people laughing and everything i could not have are yeah i know i can't imagine it i can't imagine watching fights on a huge theater and this i i don't i just don't know how that plays out in complete darkness.

fifty dollars
"fifty dollars" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"fifty dollars" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"And that's a a coop fifty dollars a month for adult and and ten bucks a month for kids the unlimited care he buys directly from the the you know those people the provide medicines and so on the pharmaceutical companies and and that's 95 percent discount that's 48 cents i think for a x ray in his office he if you need stitches he get stitches you need a leg set you got a leg said that's all included at the he's got an incredible well story to tell and those are the kinds of innovation in healthcare that we ought to be incentivizing from governmental standpoint but of a today what we've done it is done those folk and fed no word we won't allow you to participate so that's exactly the kind of flexibility in choices that we believe ought to exist so that patients and families and doctors that are making these kinds to defeat and and not washington dc now well so back to the discretionary powers you have a here's my main question and i think if winger premiums down and especially the high cost of deductibles for people i mean it's expensive of people even walk into a doctor's office or co pays or whatever i mean if you have a high deductible than you're going to be incentivised never see a doctor that's not good everybody should go once a year even though i don't follow my own advice get no you're absolutely right in the problem that with the high deductible the you know is that when you've got a deductible of sixty five hundred dollars or even ten thousand dollars and you're making you know fifty sixty seventy thousand dollars a year a well you may have an inch current card and and uh and and the pboc you've got coverage but in fact you don't have any care because you can't afford the deductible and.

pharmaceutical companies washington fifty sixty seventy thousand d sixty five hundred dollars ten thousand dollars fifty dollars 95 percent