35 Burst results for "Fifty Billion Dollars"

House Democrats unveil new $2.2T proposal for virus aid

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

House Democrats unveil new $2.2T proposal for virus aid

"President hi Mike trump Rossi and a reporting Joe Biden house Democrats will square off unveiled tonight a new in virus their first aid debate proposal it's in expected an effort to to be revive a ninety stalled minute talks flight on covert in Cleveland nineteen relief the team house to win Democrats the presidential have new race draft defined legislation by that bitterness scales back there and coronavirus so far aid stability package to two point Biden two holds trillion a significant dollars lead the measure in national would revive polls a six hundred dollar and with per week fewer pandemic than five jobless weeks benefit until the election and include tonight a second is arguably round of twelve the president's hundred dollar direct best chance payments to to try most and individuals re frame the there campaign would also be another round still of despite subsidies an for intensely businesses polarized under the paycheck nation protection there program are comparatively the new democratic few package undecided represents a voters cut from a three point raising four questions trillion dollar about bill how that or passed the if house the in debates may will Senate change Republicans the race favor a package Sager that would mag range army from six Washington hundred fifty billion dollars to one trillion dollars Mike Rossio Washington

Mike Trump Rossi Cleveland Democrats President Trump Joe Biden Senate Sager Mike Rossio Washington
Nvidia to buy UK's Arm, sparking fears of chip dominance

Pivot

04:17 min | Last month

Nvidia to buy UK's Arm, sparking fears of chip dominance

"Talk shortly about invidia buying chip company armed from. Softbank. The deal is worth forty billion and video said it will make it the quote Premier Computing Company for the age of Ai Invidia is best known for supplying ships at rendered images, video games, but it's so much more than Invidia has become sort of the power player in in this. Area and I know you're not a chip expert but this is the this is a critical company for a this this sermon, I wanna get into the idea of what it means for certain companies sort of owning a space and you just recently testified about single companies or or a small group of companies owning spaces, and how dangerous that is why it's It like this was a bit of an a for sale because bank has pledged to raising forty or fifty billion dollars in my understanding is they're they're not gonNA make a ton of money I think about bought this company that bought on for about thirty. Thirty or thirty, two billion just about three years ago, and they're getting a mix of stock and cash. What we interesting is it now I I've invidia. The, most impressive company I just don't know about its now got a larger market capitalization than Intel when I was in business school was considered kind of the most innovative giant company in the world. They've been blown by, and then what happens does apple still WANNA do business within video when they buy a competitor to their? To. Their chip designs so the chip bores looks like it's about to get more interesting and just. Greed. Company gets sold for forty. Billion although. That's a bit of a headline number. It was it includes performance in all sorts of other stuff that does about one point going timeout thirty times revenues, and then Invidia with A. It's got a three hundred billion on market cap with twelve billion in revenues I mean this stuff is just it as obviously very strategic that that literally exhaust might total knowledge of the chip-making space. Do you have any thoughts on this deal? Well, I think I think people don't realize Jensen Wong who's the CEO? Has had it sort of as quiet? Person WHO's super I tried to get him to come to co last year and removes like Oh chips the but I think it's really important to understand how powerful this company has become an how innovative it's bad. You know arm holdings was a designer of chips for mobile phones Softbank had struggled in this area Softbank was sort of into everything but bought it for thirty one, billion dollars a couple of years ago. So you know it needed money because of all the other problems it's having, and this is an opportunity for invidia but it's gone. It's gone well beyond mobile for. and it's it's in graphics. It's a it's been moving into self driving vehicles as an area that it's that it's moved into and so it's just it. Just it just says that you know it's going to buy up everything and like you were talking about all these opportunities that were that are a lot of the focus here is going to be on Softbank because it's been involved in so many deals that have sort of blown up whether it be. You. Know this this the overvaluation, we worker or other issues. It's been the the collapse of the Vision Fund and things like that. So a lot of people like to focus on Softbank because it's an interesting sort of ongoing traffic accident but really invidia is has quietly been. You know becoming the go-to Chip Company not just with graphics in games and things like that but artificial. self-driving another area it's moving into I. Think it's it's going to grow Internet of things and stuff like that and Softbank was just not able to do anything about it, and so I think you have to focus on invidia being on this sort of tear beyond where they started and I think people don't realize. It's one of these companies that you don't pay attention to very much like I'm blanking the other. There's another trip company that just is doing incredibly well, it's run by Lisa. Su That it's just there's there's all these companies that are holding incredibly powerful positions amd also on a tear that are very important to the future and so that you're right there's going to be a real focus on where the chip business is going.

Ai Invidia Premier Computing Company Chip Company Softbank Intel Apple Jensen Wong AMD Arm Holdings Lisa Vision Fund CEO
Medical tech is the new gold rush for investors during the pandemic

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:11 min | Last month

Medical tech is the new gold rush for investors during the pandemic

"More people are seeing their doctors added distance during the pandemic in this long awaited to telehealth has investors intrigued there was already a boom in biotech investing before covid nineteen hit. But now investors are rushing to put money into all kinds of ways to modernize medicine from Boston W.. G. B. H. Radios Aaron Schachter has more personal. Medical Technology isn't especially new push your fitness further with fitbit charge to a heart rate and fitness wristband that helps you make the most of all day workouts and beyond. And the wearables are just one facet of health tech. The pandemic has shown that much of health care can be delivered at a distance and there's been a boon in telehealth platforms, online fitness classes, and Internet connected devices that are vital signs. Harry LARRIKIN IS CO author of moneyball medicine thriving in the new data driven healthcare market before Cova. Did you really have to look at these things and figure out where the world was GONNA go how fast it was going to go there all of a sudden now you're giving people i. don't WanNa say no choice but now they. Need these things and tech investors want in venture capital entities have invested nearly five and a half billion dollars in medical tech from January through June that's according to rock health a company that helps digital health startups. But there are those urging caution about the direction. These investments take all too. Often the technology has attempted to reengineer the process of care rather than leverage. The most efficient process of Care Jed constance is a healthcare consultant. For example, he says, it took years for the developers of medical records technology to get it right because early versions made it difficult for doctors to Talk to patients and fill in the required computerized forms. Constant says there's a history of companies creating what's flashy instead of what's practical and so the venture capital investor backed efforts have found them to be largely ignorant. There are also concerns that new health technology could exacerbate disparities in healthcare between rich and poor communities doctor. My mom is the former chief innovation officer. At Medicare's innovation center she says that smartwatch are fun but the kinds of devices that help most people stay healthy are often more mundane. Can you develop a tool that will help them track their medications with things? That automatically dispense medication for them and or something that will give their physicians more real time data on which medications they're actually taking according to rock health much of the venture money handed out this year went to companies developing online platforms for more telemedicine, digital pharmacies, fitness classes, and more efficient ways to deliver mental health counseling at a distance that's w. g. b. h. Aaron, chapter, and Boston consulting firm McKinsey says the speed of telehealth adoption everything from video visits to digital records means up to two hundred and fifty billion dollars in healthcare spending could soon be going towards virtual care.

G. B. H. Radios Aaron Schachte Chief Innovation Officer Boston Jed Constance Harry Larrikin Consultant Mckinsey Cova W. G. B. H Medicare
US trade deficit drops in June on record rise in exports

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

US trade deficit drops in June on record rise in exports

"The US trade deficit drops for the first time in four months the trade deficit fell by seven and a half percent in June to about fifty billion dollars the first decrease since February the commerce department says exports posted a record increase rising an unprecedented nine percent while imports rose almost five percent global commerce has been hammered by covert nineteen but some economists expect the U. S. trade numbers to continue improving as production catches up with the recovery in consumption my camp in Washington

Commerce Department Washington United States
Why Microsoft wants TikTok

CNBC's Fast Money

08:32 min | 2 months ago

Why Microsoft wants TikTok

"We start off with the deal that has got wall. Street. Washington, and the World Talking Microsoft dying and acquisition of Tiktok in this comes after president trump threatened to ban the video sharing APP here in the US over security concerns the president then made an about face and gave Microsoft the go ahead to proceed with the deal shares of Microsoft rallying today. Let's get to Josh. Lipton with the very latest Josh. So Melissa President trump also weighing in here. Take a listen to what he had to say today. Would have closed down on September fifteenth unless Microsoft or somebody else's able to buy it and work out a deal inappropriate deal. So the Treasury of the. Really, the Treasury I guess you say of the United, states, gets a lot of money. So, why is Microsoft interested in Tiktok? Well, it's a wildly popular APP with one hundred, million users already here in the US engagement trends are strong and stuff that users already spent over an hour a day on the APP Tales. Patrick at emphasizes too broad reasons why he says this could make strategic sense argues Microsoft is relatively weak in consumer services with the exception of xbox live gaming service. So Co a delicate immediately become a much bigger player in consumer technology second this is a potential moneymaker in delicate monetize that big pool of fans to advertising business that the company well understands but they are. Real risks to Microsoft's history and consumer focused acquisitions is mixed from Nokia's handset business to mixture. It's live streaming service. There's also the question of focus here and Adela has concentrated on the enterprise market analysts say that has served his company very well and kept him out of that Regulatory Spotlight Melissa back to you Josh. Thank you. Josh with the latest on Microsoft tiktok cloud plowed his business that got Microsoft to where it is today. Guy Me. So if you Microsoft goes down this road of buying this business while it seems like it's the hottest property around in social media does that do Microsoft shareholders? Well? Probably Yeah I mean the market today told you absolutely yes and a lot of people say it style drift and could lead them down a bad road but you know what are we talking about in terms of price tag your I haven't seen anywhere from forty to fifty billion dollars. You probably know better than I and it's it's it's basically rounding. For Microsoft Number One and number two, the move into stock more than paid for the deal. So it's hard not to like. This Mike Real question is clearly I missed that day in college when the US Treasury gets investment banking fees on deals that are done between two companies I don't know how I missed it, but clearly, I did what? What? Exactly? How does the US Treasury come into this equation? I guess it's somewhat of rhetorical question but you know this whole thing is fascinating to me on a number of levels. But the answer, your original question I don't think it's negative Microsoft and the market today told you it's positive. I mean the order to divest is one interesting aspect of this whole affair. Then there's I mean when I read it, I immediately thought like brokers fee Harkening to Donald Trump's real estate days I don't know if he thinks he gets twenty per treasury excuse me gets twenty percent or what exactly the Treasury is GonNa get out of this whole thing Karen on one can only imagine. I have no idea. Maybe one has got. To be in this situation. It really is crazy I don't love the precedent at all. I feel like we're just sort of taunting. China to. have some sort of reciprocal response that I would imagine. We really won't like very much. So I I'm. Kind of perplexed by the whole thing and I mean I don't know what the right Fi is a. The whole thing is. That part is so crazy he did. Trump say either to Microsoft or someone else I don't know I mean. Microsoft can compete with anyone in terms of price. I don't know if there is a possibility of someone else, but I get also Microsoft which sort of want to give it a try why not money is free to them practically, I mean they have cash but if they wanted to do with dad, it's practically free to them. So I know the woman Tiktok doesn't make money, but I still think it's interesting for them to do and clearly guy pointed out the stock market or the Microsoft holders. It. bakes. Well there's two things here on the big kind of geopolitical. If you don't think that the global economy is fracturing at least into pieces than you're not paying attention because that's what the deal the precedents of this deal is number two on the Microsoft Front. I personally. Don't understand why Microsoft would want this the only thing that makes sense if they can get it at a discount because bike dances forced to divest it but I'm not sure I mean again Josh. They don't have a great history on the consumer side. I mean I'm sure guy still remembers the Zun I still have one of those that was an abject failure. Don't know what this does for them. I do it. You know you you lose focus. So for me I don't really like it but you know what? I'm not the stock market and the stock market like ten. This is exactly Brian San Love Brandon Guy. This is exactly why Microsoft wants it because they're not here because because everyone else first of all, that could be a buyer of this is is in Washington under the scrutiny of the government in terms of their social platforms or too big. This totally makes sense I mean think about the business that they just told you about in gaming an xbox and even azure and the fact that ninety percent of the market. Cap Probably is enterprise. That's the whole point. That's why you'd be going after this year to me. This is this makes a ton of sense because they're probably the only guys can step in and buy it at least with this type of ability to navigate both Washington navigate the financials and yes, they are getting it at a beaten down valuation. If you're getting this anywhere from I, don't know seven eight to ten times. Where these guys are in terms of revenue, that's Eba dos gives me e extraordinary and I think it's actually been proven to be. We've talked about on this show why facebook is running scared of TIKTOK. So why wouldn't Microsoft running towards talk? It makes a lot of sense I like it. All right. Let's get more on what this deal could mean for. Microsoft let's bring in is jared Weiss fell jared great to speak with you. You also think this deal makes a whole lot of sense. In terms of the synergies across the consumer business think this deal could enhance for Microsoft. I think at the end of the day, the biggest takeaway should be from Microsoft perspective when you have the ability to go ahead and integrate a lot of the capabilities that tic TAC. TIKTOK has you think about the technology stack that TIKTOK has and it's incredibly sophisticated. So you can then leverage that and marry that with some of the internal capabilities that Microsoft already has on Azure with the second largest cloud service provider the on the planet I think the the capabilities are dramatic. Tiktok knows what you. Want before you even know that. So when you the leverage that with the capabilities of absorb, I think it makes a lot of sense and then to the earlier point that was brought up I think that's actually key. If you then have the ability to leverage that and bring it into gaming, bring that into Cortina the digital search engine, bring that into being I think the the possibilities are significant. So it it certainly makes a lot of sense obviously, the stock market rewarded Microsoft today and you've added more than. The top valuation in Microsoft's Market Kaplan. Is. There a risk though that that tiktok is the next snap in that snap has run into user growth issues and monetization issues or is finding a home in Microsoft good to going to sorta bypass that possibility is outcome. It's a fair point, but you almost have a free call option if you're searching. You have the ability to go ahead and acquire the asset potentially on the cheap, and if you think about it, you've got one party Microsoft, which is potentially the only party that's available to acquire something of this size with with with regulatory concerns, and if you've got tiktok on the other side there, obviously desperate from a seller perspective. So valuation short plays part of it, and then strategically if you think about the ability to go ahead and integrate. Integrate technology into the Microsoft Stack statues getting a free look at not only can potentially accelerate growth drivers of his existing business. He then has a free call option on expanding the total addressable market to go ahead and think about competition versus facebook getting snap. It's ever

Microsoft Tiktok Josh Treasury Donald Trump Us Treasury Washington United States Facebook Melissa President President Trump Lipton United Nokia Adela
Federal Reserve Expands Global Role

WSJ What's News

04:31 min | 2 months ago

Federal Reserve Expands Global Role

"Back, in March and April when much of the country was in lockdown, the Federal Reserve made a number of bold moves to keep the wheels of finance turning in the US. But the central bank also took action overseas lending. Massive amounts of money to global economy's in crisis, and that marked a huge expansion of the Fed's role on the world stage. Our Wall Street Journal Economics correspondent, Nick Tim rose joins me now with more details. So nick the actions event has taken to bolster the economy during the pandemic have been pretty unprecedented. You looked at how historically the Fed's been resistant to being a backup lender on a global scale. Tell us about the situation prior to the pandemic. The Fed has a domestic mandate, right? Their job is to make that inflation is stable in the United States and. Can boost employment as much as possible within the confines of keeping prices stable, and so they've always kind of shied away from accepting this role of being global lender of last resort. But that really changed in the second and third week of March when the coronavirus pandemic went global and reach the US. Remind us of the domestic actions. The Fed took back in March and April. So the Fed did two things in March I, they cut their short-term interest rate to zero at two emergency meetings, and they also announced plans to buy a large amount of treasury bonds and orange back securities because those two markets which traditionally or the most deepened liquid markets are not functioning properly, and so that was actually kind of a scary moment global finance because you expect the treasury market to be a place where you can trade at any time of day and and it was, it wasn't really working that way in the middle of March. Now, in addition to those steps, the Fed also took action to bolster global economy is, can you explain what actions the Central Bank took? So the Fed activated a network of swap lines and what those are their agreements with foreign central banks that allow central banks to borrow dollars from the Fed. Then they can lend those dollars to their to their own banks. It's a way for the Fed to make sure that if there is a crisis in which. Institutions Banks, life, insurance companies in other countries need to get access to dollars, they can do it. It's something. The Fed does very rarely, but they've done it during times of global stress including during the two thousand, eight financial crisis, and why it helped was in the middle of March. Everybody wanted to get their hands on dollars, and so they were selling, they were panicked selling even safe assets like treasuries. By allowing other countries to make dollars more available, it may have stopped these panic sales of. Treasury. Because if you want to get dollars and you're selling safe assets like treasuries and you now know, well, actually these plans are gonNA. Make dollars available your own market and it helps to slow down that kind of Hanoch hoarding of dollars as you. Right. This is something that happens pretty quietly and sort of under the radar. Why is that? Well, it happened under the radar because even though the Fed announced, they were doing this. There was so much else going on at the time that it really didn't get that much attention. So the Fed, for example announced they were going to make. Trillions of dollars of loans needed through these emergency lending facilities in the united. States but those took a long time to get up and running the dollar swap networks went and took effect almost right away, and so when I may the Fed had lent four, hundred, fifty, billion dollars abroad through these networks, it took much longer for their other emergency loan programs to get up and running. Do you think going forward and having taken. This action will embolden the Fed to intervene in this way again or take a more active role. While the big question now is is what will investors in the United States? In, other countries expect the Fed to do during the next crisis. Obviously, we've never had a global pandemic. We've never had a crisis like this where any concerns about you know so-called moral house were bailing out financial institutions. They sort of went by the wayside because This was virus nobody could have planned for this, but there is the question. The next time? Something like this happens? What is the federal into to do?

Federal Reserve United States Nick Tim Treasury Our Wall Street Journal Econom
Behind the Curtain With Aerospace CEOs: Dave Calhoun

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

03:13 min | 3 months ago

Behind the Curtain With Aerospace CEOs: Dave Calhoun

"Tron. Let's start with you because you sat down with me with the new CEO of Boeing. Dave Calhoun What was your impression? And what was your takeaway from that talk? I thought that Calhoun was very forthcoming didn't didn't dodge any of the questions we had, and he gave a Franken forthright answers and pointed to. Pointed to. showed his awareness that that Boeing has some significant challenges that that need that. They need to overcome and those go beyond the challenges that the entire industry is facing in terms of the novel coronavirus pandemic, focusing on the Max specifically, which has been the topic. I have been most interested in the last year plus he called out to very specific areas that are one could argue or systemic. He focused on the need to to Reim- power I. Guess You could say Boeing's engineering function to make sure that the products they design and develop. Our first and foremost passing muster at the engineering level in that extends into system safety assessments, and the things that the Max is focused on and the other one is the pilot interface recognized very clearly that Boeing. Boeing absolutely missed it when it came to determining what pilots would do in certain situations again. The folks that know them. The Max accident histories know this all, too. Too well and he made, he said. We need to make certain that we that that never happens again and he. You know as our interview shows. He quoted and said that you know that's one thing. We don't think we're ever going to miss again. So those are two things that he pointed out voluntarily that he recognized really need to change. The I thought it was extremely forthcoming. One of my takeaways from the interview was that he said he's going to prioritize selling new airplanes that airlines need to park their older airplanes, and if that hurts their aftermarket business, so be it. That was certainly stood out to from a company that for you know? A couple of years have been hammering away about trying to get fifty billion dollars in an aftermarket revenues which are nowhere near, but certainly signaled a at least a little bit of a shift in priorities now. I think it's a recognition that Boeing is going to succeed by building the best possible airplanes that it can build on. No matter their role many on the air transport side it clearly recognized the long tail benefits of having a strong aftermarket business, and they're not going to get out of that aftermarket business, but you're absolutely right. The the fifty billion dollars in revenue for the Global Services Group driven primarily by commercial aviation is now a a little less important and making sure the products they get out the door are. Are Right when they get out the door. We've been so focused on the Max. It's easy to forget their last major new program. Seven eight seven also ran into a situation where it was grounded. No fatal accidents thank goodness, but really fundamental shortcomings in the developing a product, so calhoun recognizes that we need to get the products built right first, and then we'll worry about services and insularity income

MAX Boeing Dave Calhoun CEO Tron. Dodge Global Services Group Franken
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 3 months ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Pigeonly Uses Technology to Help Inmates Stay in Touch with Family and Friends

Zero to IPO

04:23 min | 3 months ago

Pigeonly Uses Technology to Help Inmates Stay in Touch with Family and Friends

"Butterfield I think as many people know is the founder and CEO of slack, which has just really become an integral part of many of our lives and has seen record growth. We're GONNA. Talk about that on the show. I want to introduce also Frederick Hudson the CEO and founder of Pigeon Louis Frederick you can correct me if I've got this wrong. But last I heard you had evaluation of about five million dollars, twenty employees twenty, million twenty million so I I missed around. I guess missed around. And essentially what pigeon Lee does enable easier communication with inmates who are incarcerated across the United States. For, family members with incarcerated loved ones so connecting people. who mostly live in an analog world with all of us who live in a digital world? Frederick one of the things that caught my attention about pigeon. Louis was that. There's a lot of predatory pricing essentially to make a phone call like a fifteen minute phone call could cost almost twenty dollars like a dollar a minute, and that was one of the animating things here. There's like a market imbalance. It's ripe for Innovation Yeah. Yeah, and that's one of the things that you know. We set out to fix his. In a lot of cases, because this is one of the few industries that that. Operate on the system that allows kickbacks. And, that's how contracts get awarded. It creates a very predatory situation that ultimately the friends and families of whoever's incarcerated. They bear that cost, so it's not even the person who was in prison. That's bearing his burden is to family friends, and that support not going outside there really are. Holding up this you know forty fifty billion dollar industry, so one of the goals of this show is to be very granular and to dive into issues and try to workshop them and see what kind of insights we can gain. That are applicable both to your specific business, but are also useful for all of our listeners out there and Stuart, slack cells to. To everybody big companies small companies, but you have had really good success working with government agencies in the State Department for instance I would love to learn a little bit about. How do you sell to us such a specific channel like a government? What kind of insights have you developed? There's definitely problems with government generally, but I think we have this Era Mentality across the country that you know. Six scariest words are I'm from the government and I'm here to help most of the men and women that I have met who work in in the federal government well-intentioned trying their best, it's. Just. Every federal government plays a saint or anything like that. But I think it's not well understood and we kind of the attitude that we have. which is largely? Dismissive large, throwing up your hands, and what can you do? kind of pessimistic about the possible outcomes helps determine a set of negative outcomes and I think helps entrench. The. Problems that we would most like to see progress on economic inequality criminal justice reform that can go down the list. But as long as we treat kind of government as the as the enemy I think we're going to. Have a hard time solving. Problems that require government help. Frederick. What are you seeing in your business? What is it like working with the government? Yeah, Stuart, raise some good points I think we. My first trip to DC was last year some around last year. This was my first trip going with our lobbyists and meeting with different members of Congress and different congressional offices, and my eyes was opened. To basically what you're just saying that you know there's there's the individuals a lot of these individual offices. They definitely are really trying to do the best. They can and really trying to positive difference and one support initiatives. That they believe is going to make a difference, but there's just so much red tape the so much bureaucracy. There's so many things there's so many layers in order to get something to happen and you know I. I actually started to get an understanding of the inner workings of government. And I saw less as his big beasts and I started to see it more as individuals that actually got to know throughout time.

Louis Frederick Founder And Ceo Frederick Hudson Stuart Slack Butterfield United States CEO State Department LEE DC Congress
Delivering Biologics Orally

The Bio Report

05:12 min | 4 months ago

Delivering Biologics Orally

"Thanks for joining us. Daniel, thank you so much for inviting them. At least to be here, we're going to talk about Ronnie. Therapeutics effort to develop biologics orally the potential for this technology and the technology underlying this. What's the range therapeutics were talking about? How big a market opportunity are we talking about? That is a great first question to start with so. The the range of biologics there is no constraint on rich biologic. We can deliver for instance we can deliver peptides, insulin, or bt, age, human growth, hormone, or or Therapeutic antibodies like humira percent. Dick's in others. And other Larger molecules that are like factor aid. For instance for there is no constrained on kind of one accuser. We can deliver so therefore. The market that we address is merely. In? Hundred fifty billion dollars overall march that we we can. you know and can get a small piece of that. That great outcome. What's the case for doing this? What problems would be addressed and what benefits would there be? So you know when I started looking at this problem of the. Daily injections and Found that the people have tried turning. Insulin into oral formats or Even inhaled. Insulin end there. Other drugs people have tried. D- owning them in rural in fact over the last fifty years. There have been more than one hundred attempts main Trying to convert a few of these peptides into oil, and the vast majority of those efforts failed on the handful that have had some success in Rene. Say some success what I mean is. bio, absorption, or bioavailability, as it's called or amount of drug that is absorbed is Less than one percent so. compared to Subcu- injection. You're you're throwing a ninety nine percent of the drug. Because the enzymes in the gastric gi track really digestion breakdown in so the the chemistry approaches approaches that are employed cannot protect the drug long enough and well enough do get better than one percent absorption. have. There been other challenges to doing this. You know the the the significant amount of effort that has gone has gone into this chemistry based approaches Tried to block the enzymes with the enzyme blockers and. IMFORMATION enhancers that essentially the new the mucosal lining so. that. those those. Attempts have worked in very small biologic molecules to my knowledge. No one has tried delivering therapeutic antibodies with this approach and right after that will work well. Ronnie has taken. A mind-bending approach to the problem it's it's really fascinating to me as an approach to to problem solving it in the TAC. You've taken in developing the Ronnie Pill. What is the Ronnie Pill? Could. Let me start with the premise that. Led to this the asked a very simple question I. Ask. Why can't we have a pill? That goes into the intestine. and delivers a pain-free injection. and that was a that was the question I started with. And that question it has taken several years to answer that question. And we have. Great data so the a premise was. Created capsule. That is a like a tiny robot. Very low cost. And arrived the stomach acid. Goes into the casten and then. Transformed seven when injection delivers an injection in intestinal war. And The intentional water doesn't have the sharp pain receptors that we have in our skin, so the injection is pain pre.

Ronnie Pill Daniel Humira BT Dick Subcu
Philadelphia budget deal cuts police funding by $33 million

KYW 24 Hour News

01:46 min | 4 months ago

Philadelphia budget deal cuts police funding by $33 million

"Philadelphia city council is on its way to approving a budget that would cut some police funding and fund some police reforms K. Y. W. stem Amanda's joining us live this morning with more on this morning ten yeah good morning Carol a lot to unpack in this nearly five billion dollar budget that would close a seven hundred fifty billion dollar gap so we'll start with the police here actually I said seven hundred fifty billion seven hundred fifty million dollar gap there we're gonna start with police the thirty three million dollars that are supposed to be cut from the department is a fourteen million more than what the mayor and council proposed last week the other also reforms called for that includes body cameras implicit bias training creating a deputy inspector general for police related investigations along with finding a police oversight commission now they're out so their cuts their fire department spending that would stay put instead of going up five million as originally planned as for where some of these savings will go to there's twenty five million towards what the council calls a new normal but it's a new normal budget act which addresses some of the issues that the pandemic and unrest in the city is really highlighted the past few weeks so money to anti poverty measures healthcare healthy food and affordable housing on top of that twenty million for the housing trust fund also the cash that was supposed to be cut from the arts that would stay put and others a lot of outrage over that but the the funding that was supposed to be cut from the arts I will no longer be caught now of course you're gonna have some increases in revenue so that means non resident wage tax that would go up so if you're working in the city you don't live in the city that number that you pay the city that's going to go up a little bit from three point four four three and a half percent also Carol the parking tax that's going to go up a little bit well from about twenty two something percent up to twenty five

City Council Carol Deputy Inspector General Philadelphia K. Y. W. Stem Amanda
ECB set to expand bond-buying to soak up debt

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:28 min | 4 months ago

ECB set to expand bond-buying to soak up debt

"Let's get an update now on some of the day's business stories with you in pots from Bloomberg you and welcome back to monocle twenty four the European Central. Bank is expected to take more action tomorrow, and they'll be new coronavirus virus measures from Christine Lagarde. And hopes of a swift recovery will be downplayed. Yes, of course, the issue be one of the world's central banks, which took very rapid action back in March to counter some of the terrible economic effects. We're seeing from the current arsenal around from the measures taken to counter the current of ours. They announced the pandemic emergency purchase, program or pet. Back in March which involved seven hundred and fifty billion euros of the bond buying? The idea that the central bank step into by that and keeping rates low, the government's the companies and also for Boris with mortgages, etc, that going until at least June twenty twenty one but the expectation. In the market is, the will be more announced tomorrow. Columnists seem pretty certain. ATP will wait in with more stimulus smart at its current pace, it could wait until it's July or September meeting before judging the programs big enough to soak up over debt, being issued by governments defy the recession, and of course there is a lot of depth baby shoot. At the moment since last meeting, we've heard from the European Union moving closer towards a Common Fiscal Response the commission saying he wanted to spend seven hundred fifty billion euros with its Recovery Fund, but as to the tomorrow reckon we'll get at least another two hundred fifty billion dollars of stimulus taking the program to at least not one trillion euros at so tell us a little bit more about economic picture around Europe given the fact that this huge amount of stimulus is needed unlikely. Yes I told him this morning. We're going to get the pay date. So the coaching index is the most timely economic survey we have. We get the figures the May This morning. I'm about nine o'clock, and we're expecting that number to jump to thirty point five. Not just explain what that means. Fifty is the guy is the between expansion and contraction iron, fifty expansion, obviously no economies and you're spending at a moment in April that was thirteen point six. The lowest reading with ever seen toback think in May will jump to about thirty, so that's a lot better than April's reading but he's still pretty terrible. It's actually puts us back in line. Awfully what we saw in March when economies shrank pretty badly around European Union still. About the shape of the recovery. In the beginning or passing my have a v-shaped recovery with the economy bouncing back very quickly. Not many people think that any more more likely will get You even less missing. l-shaped recovery or Nike swoosh or some other recovery which is uncertain and quite wobbly over the rest. Of this year, but it's a little bit of optimism. Coming back into commerce forecasts in the past couple of weeks, I'm certainly markets. Very Optimistic Sense Gotcha will be enough to rescue. The flailing economies around the world

European Union Christine Lagarde Bloomberg ATP Nike Europe
States, cities plead for virus aid as Congress faces crises

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:59 min | 5 months ago

States, cities plead for virus aid as Congress faces crises

"Many states have not yet spent the coronavirus stimulus money they received weeks ago according to U. S. A. radios John Hon many states have yet to spend the federal funding they receive more than a month ago to help with soaring cost related to the coronavirus crisis locating governor's arguments that they need hundreds of billions more dollars from U. S. taxpayers the Associated Press reviewed plans from governors or lawmakers on how they plan to use the money and found that only one third have started distributing the money the reasons vary some governors want permission to use the federal aid to plug budget holes after business closures and stay home orders eroded the tax revenue that pays for government operations others are holding back because they fear a resurgence of the virus could be another wave of expenses Congress approved one hundred fifty billion dollars for state and local governments in late March as part of the two point two trillion dollar response to the outbreak and the money was distributed almost immediately for USA radio news I'm John

Associated Press Congress John Hon U. S. USA
Los Angeles - California Facing Landmark $54.3 Billion Budget Deficit Due To COVID-19 Crisis

KNX Evening News

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

Los Angeles - California Facing Landmark $54.3 Billion Budget Deficit Due To COVID-19 Crisis

"Tough choices ahead for state lawmakers as they work with the governor to fill the massive whole of more than fifty billion dollars left by the pandemic in the California budget assembly budget chairman Democrat Phil ting says they'll be looking at a mix of tax hikes as well as spending cuts nobody likes a tax increase the question is do they want eighteen billion dollars to get cut from schools over the prefer to increases in taxes or potentially look at doing some bonds he says he'll move to get the public input out thirty three point eight out of ten to see how voters are feeling we know voters are she I feel like they're in a very tough situation manager contortions the latest official estimate is that the budget deficit will balloon to fifty four billion dollars for the next fiscal year because of the plummeting income and sales tax revenues combined with the costs of combating the virus

Chairman California Phil Ting Official
US States with few virus cases get big share of relief aid.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:07 min | 5 months ago

US States with few virus cases get big share of relief aid.

"Alaska Hawaii Montana and Wyoming not epicenters of the corona virus pandemic yet. These four states scored big this spring when Congress pumped out direct federal aid while the two hottest hits States New York and New Jersey comparatively little given the vast numbers of cases and deaths they had seen analysis shows that states with small populations like these took in an outsized share of the one hundred fifty billion dollars in federal money that was designed to address corona violence related expenses when measured by the number of positive tests for the Kovic nineteen disease their whole ranged from two million dollars per positive test in Hawaii to nearly three point four million dollars per test in Alaska in Wyoming with less than six hundred positive cases. The one point two billion dollars it received from the congressional package equates to eighty percent of its annual general state budget by comparison New York and New Jersey received about twenty four thousand dollars and twenty seven thousand dollars respectively for each positive Corona Virus. Test other states with high numbers of Corona Virus Cases Including Massachusetts Michigan and Illinois received less than one hundred thousand dollars per positive case. The money for state governments is a slice of the two point. Two trillion dollar federal stimulus passed in late March but in the corona virus fight the disproportionate share going to small states has consequences states with high numbers of infections and deaths say they need that money for immediate expenses related to fighting an outbreak that threatened to overwhelm their hospital systems from staff overtime to setting up makeshift hospitals. Some states with relatively few cases have been able to reopen their economies faster and have more options on how to spend federal largess many now trying to determine how they can spend the windfall while keeping within the federal guidelines

New Jersey New York Alaska Wyoming Hawaii Congress Montana Massachusetts Michigan Illinois
Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway loses $50 billion in first quarter

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 6 months ago

Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway loses $50 billion in first quarter

"Airline stocks are all lower after Warren Buffett said he was done Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway has sold its entire stake of the four largest airlines a steak is biggest ten percent Berkshire Hathaway itself posted a fifty billion dollar loss in the first

Warren Buffett Berkshire Hathaway
Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway reports nearly $50 billion loss

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 6 months ago

Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway reports nearly $50 billion loss

"Warren Buffett's company reported a nearly fifty billion dollar loss on Saturday because of a huge drop in the paper value of its investments AP correspondent Shelley Adler reports even the very successful Warren Buffett is not immune to the financial woes that come with the corona virus Berkshire Hathaway says it lost nearly fifty billion dollars or over thirty thousand dollars per class A. share during the first quarter normally some forty thousand shareholders will be heading to Berkshire's annual meeting at this time but buff it plans to lead in the breezy aided online a version of it Berkshire is sitting on a pile of more than one hundred and thirty seven billion dollars in cash because Buffett has struggled to find major acquisitions for the company

Warren Buffett Shelley Adler Berkshire Hathaway Berkshire
BURST+VIDEO+EXPAND- burst 02

The Non-Prophets

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

BURST+VIDEO+EXPAND- burst 02

"Through nonprofits as well get faces. New Voices added in changes. Thank you use a good thing and we have some articles. We wanted to look at today. Did we just start us off? I one here. It's an editorial. Sorry Senator Holly. It's unconstitutional to bail out. Churches with three hundred and fifty billion dollars in small business aid from American atheists American Atheist Center for Inquiry Freedom From Religion Foundation and secular coalition of America corrected. Senator Josh hollies claim that the The SBA Small Business Administration is wrongly telling churches and lenders that churches and religious nonprofits don't qualify for the new Cova Nineteen Relief

American Atheist Center For In Senator Holly Cova Nineteen Relief The Sba Small Business Adminis Senator Josh Hollies America
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:54 min | 6 months ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"And fifty billion dollars approved by Congress has been used in less than two weeks the small business administration also says it stopped taking applications for a separate emergency loan program as well if you tap the Jamie to pre button in Iraq he has a new article about this and down at the bottom he writes Democrats say they're in favor of the extra money for the P. P. P. program but they also wanted to attach more aid money for hospitals and state and local governments and then Jamie says with most lawmakers back at home there was a limited window for Congress to approve mas smoke more small business aid as the Senate had a scheduled session on Thursday afternoon with the house slated to meet on Fridays you can catch up on what Congress has been talking about as far as helping that program out but again the small business paycheck protection program is out of three hundred fifty billion dollars ninety six point five W. DPO Orlando turns first for severe weather on channel nine Eyewitness News meteorologist Brian shields seventy one degrees by this afternoon coming up a track in the rain and storms and how long this wet pattern sticks around good afternoon I'm Jeanne lex or we're still not up to seventy one degrees it's actually really sixty three degrees in Apopka still talk about the way home of the Scott and as checking out the radar right now it's a lot of light rain in the Lucia county and also the only county Brevard orange has a few pockets of dry areas continuing coverage before Scott back breaking news for about a half hour forty five governor Andrew Cuomo extends stay at home orders to at least make fifteen one month will continue to close their policies what happens after then I don't know we will see depending on what the data shows LA in California and DC have done the same Florida's order expires on April thirtieth for now today president trump expected to lay out his plan for re opening the country he's supposed to take the podium around five so maybe six fifteen the debate's been going on for.

Andrew Cuomo president Brevard Brian shields P. P. trump Florida DC California LA Congress Lucia county Scott Apopka Jeanne lex Orlando Senate Jamie Iraq
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Fifty billion dollars in the building the president just signed that is simply not enough that's why Pelosi says the next bill should focus on aid to cities and states schools broadband and other key infrastructure the governors and the cities and municipalities need resources for some Republicans including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of expressing misgivings about another stimulus bill president trump seems to be on board he says with interest rates near or at zero percent now is a good time to borrow money to pay for infrastructure projects Linda Kenyon Washington Michigan now has the fourth most cases of corona virus in the U. S. governor Gretchen Whitmer says the country needs a better national strategy and that president trump should use the defense production act to make sure states have enough medical supplies are needed is right now and while we see some business is ramping up we know that they're gonna be through who don't get the kind of care that they need because of we just don't have it right now Whitmer's been critical of the federal government's response to the virus outbreak president trump has clashed with other democratic governors as well his advisers are reportedly telling him to be careful of feuding with Whitmer who's a considered leading vice presidential prospect for whoever's opponent in November will coming up on K. L. I. F. there's some cruise ships that are just hang it out there and they have six people on board that's a good way to put it they are just hang it out there they don't get out there it's really a nightmare for those people on board we're going to have the latest information on that and apparently bottoms up while we're all locked down we'll have that story coming up I don't know to do that while you're on the.

president Pelosi Mitch McConnell trump Michigan Gretchen Whitmer Senate Linda Kenyon outbreak
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:28 min | 8 months ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Fifty billion dollars in fines and get out of Massachusetts in a settlement over the Merrimack valley gas disaster Lawrence mayor Dan Rivera says the deal is as close to what justice can look like for those who were affected city councillor Julie over here outlining her plan for income based parking tickets in the city major ticket companies are drilled before Congress over the fees they charge growing concerns about the possibility of coronavirus getting up bigger hold in the United States the centers for disease control and prevention taking some precautions the CDC's Dr and shook it says they're trying to work with local officials while the number of coronavirus cases is still lower equipping them with guidance about how to address this threat should it arrive in their communities virus has not been labeled a pandemic but she says they need to prepare as if it were to become one we don't know exactly what will occur here but the transmissibility has us wanting to be prepared there only a handful of U. S. cases so far but shook it says that might not last saying efforts to contain the virus may not hold for the long haul Cherie Preston ABC news at least four hundred people now in Italy have come down with corona virus twelve people have died from the disease since Friday assumption college has twenty one students where they are right now the school's president Francesco says a radio says they have banned students from traveling to certain parts of that country also communicated with the parents of all of our students studying in Italy indicating what we are doing that as well as getting them to speak to their sons or daughters to take the necessary hygienic precautions you know caught washing hands and don't don't sneeze or cough into your hands and the conchology Beverly's reportedly offering three dozen students studying internationally the option to return home early this evening president trump will talk about corona virus in a press conference we're being told I will start right around six thirty this evening at WBZ newsradio will carry it for you live the airline industry is continuing to react as well as delta airlines houses flights between Minneapolis and Seoul South Korea will be suspended from February twenty ninth through April thirtieth the number of weekly flights between Seoul and Atlanta Detroit and Seattle also will be reduced until the end of April delta says its service between Seoul and Manila we'll get going on may first it was originally supposed to start March twenty ninth three democratic senators are proposing some sweeping reforms to the airplane certification process in the US this comes after two deadly crashes that lead to Boeing seven thirty seven Max jets being grounded the bill would create a new aircraft certification commission and it would increase oversight of manufacturers it sets new requirements for manufacturing employees handling certification tasks that are performed on behalf of the Federal Aviation Administration the justice department is currently investigating the crashes and the department of transportation is reviewing the FAA's Max's certification that is correspondent Brian shock there's a hiring freeze at the TSA A. B. C.'s Ribeiro tells us that could mean some long lines at airports in the coming months the TSA is temporarily freezing hiring and overtime pay to help offset cost of living raises for employees now leaders with the TSA employee unions say that could lead to long lines at airports in the heart of the spring break travel season the freeze could be in place until early may the TSA is tamping down fears of airport crowding releasing a statement saying additional officers were hired prior to the freeze and it would manage resources by prioritizing overtime during the busiest travel.

Massachusetts
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Of the fifty billion dollar north American bottler category say analyst at Bloomberg intelligence as companies are mixing water with salt for electrolytes and then adding baking soda to make it less acidic you know the more value a is a product has like this that has reported benefits like anti aging immune system support someone they can generally we don't charge more for it this is caught the attention of influencers like the NFL's Tom Brady and actress Gwyneth Paltrow and essentially a core natural adequate fina deciding Nestle pure life coca Cola among those selling water promising better hydration and she says it's part of an even larger trend creating more sub segments of this bottle water market in different ways with flavored shelter soon to be C. B. D. waters what have you researcher I. R. I. says some alkaline water sells for about twenty five percent more than the regular stuff Denise Pellegrini Bloomberg Grady Louisville helpwanted dot com presents the world's worst boss the one of those jobs on huge national jobs like smoking for anyone with a pulse we'll just call him Dave officer thank goodness you're here you said was an emergency and it is we have some positions in senior management that need to be filled Pronto not this again telling you our benefits are criminal and you can stay on the force for ever all right boys roll out I'm so glad you're here don't be a David find your perfect local employee at Louisville helpwanted dot com local jobs that work Louisville helpwanted dot com presents the world's worst boss the one of those jobs on huge national jobs like smoking for anyone with a pulse we'll just call him Dave Dave did you forward me this email from Svetlana yes you want me to interview her for a job it says she's looking to get down to business it also says she likes gentle bear cub a man who knows what he likes I'm gentle Dave this is a Ukrainian dating site corporate said we should hire more diverse candidates don't be a Dave find your perfect local employee at Louisville helpwanted dot com local jobs that work.

David Denise Pellegrini researcher Nestle Dave Dave Dave Louisville analyst officer Grady Louisville I. R. I. Gwyneth Paltrow Tom Brady NFL Bloomberg intelligence fifty billion dollar twenty five percent
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"And not smoking cigarettes the study also found when kids followed their moms along that healthy path they were eighty two percent likely to be less likely to be obese in adolescence and yes genetics do play a role but researchers say the steep runup in child obesity seen in the span of fewer than two generations cannot possibly be explained by genes alone it's eight minutes now in front of the hour on this morning rasa kaye is back with more of america's first news gordon today marks the start of a us trade where china beijing promising to answer about thirty four a billion dollars a new tariffs on chinese imports to the us raising concerns among us agricultural manufacturing and technology exporters at a montana rally last night trump was defiant china fifty billion dollars and another two hundred billion dollars frankly is waiting the president's ready to implement tariffs on an additional two hundred billion dollars in chinese imports and beijing has said it stands ready to retaliate in kind rescuers call it a race against the reins to free twelve boys and their football coach trap now for twelve days in a flooded cave in northern thailand torrential rains expected sunday could force more water into the pocket where they're stranded on a rock shelf about two and a half miles from the cave entrance us air force captain jessica teaches part of the effort whatever decisions made on how to best extract the children in the safest way possible we're going to be here back our partners a former navy seal diver who volunteered in the rescue effort has died running out of air while attempting to return to an underground command center inside the cave after delivering oxygen tanks to the boys environmentalists are helpful the epa will at least slow down it's rollbacks of obama era climate regulations now that controversial administrator scott pruitt has stepped aside the current deputy administrator andrew wheeler will be acting boss and despite being named in multiple lawsuits or allegations related to sexual harassment or racial discrimination former fox news.

jessica andrew wheeler administrator obama football montana harassment deputy administrator scott pruitt america thailand president china trump china beijing us gordon two hundred billion dollars fifty billion dollars eighty two percent
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Of alcohol and not smoking cigarettes the study also found when kids followed their moms along that healthy path they were eighty two percent likely to be less likely to be obese in adolescence and yes genetics do play a role but researchers say the steep runup in child obesity seen in the span of fewer than two generations cannot possibly be explained by genes alone it's eight minutes now in front of the hour on this morning rasa kaye is back with more of america's first news today marks the start of a us trade war with china beijing promising to answer about thirty four a billion dollars in new tariffs on chinese imports to the us raising concerns among us agricultural manufacturing and technology exporters and montana rally last night trump was defiant china fifty billion dollars and another two hundred billion dollars frankly is waiting the president's ready to implement tariffs on an additional two hundred billion dollars in chinese imports and beijing has said it stands ready to retaliating kind rescuers color race against the reins to free twelve boys and their football coach trap now for twelve days in a flooded cave in northern thailand torrential rains expected sunday could force more water into the pocket where they're stranded on a rock shelf about two and a half miles from the cave entrance us air force captain jessica part of the effort whatever decisions made on how to best extract the children in the safest way possible we're going to be here back our partners on a former diver who had volunteered in the rescue effort has died running out of air while attempting to return to an underground command center inside the cave after delivering oxygen tanks to the boys environmentalists are helpful the epa will at least slow down it's rollbacks of obama era climate regulations now that controversial administrator scott pruitt has stepped aside the current deputy administrator andrew wheeler will be acting boss and despite being named in multiple lawsuits or allegations related to sexual harassment or racial discrimination former fox news.

scott pruitt andrew wheeler administrator obama football montana beijing harassment deputy administrator america jessica part thailand president trump china us two hundred billion dollars fifty billion dollars eighty two percent
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Of alcohol and not smoking cigarettes the study also found when kids followed their moms along that healthy path they were eighty two percent likely to be less likely to be obese in adolescence and yes genetics do play a role but researchers say the steep runup in child obesity seen in the span of fewer than two generations cannot possibly be explained by genes alone it's eight minutes now in front of the hour on this morning rasa kaye is back with more of america's first news today marks the start of a us trade war with china beijing promising to answer about thirty four billion dollars in new tariffs on chinese imports to the us raising concerns among us agricultural manufacturing and technology exporters and in montana rally last night trump was defiant china fifty billion dollars and another two hundred billion dollars frankly is waiting the president's ready to implement tariffs on an additional two hundred billion dollars in chinese imports and beijing has said it stands ready to retaliate in kind rescuers a race against the reins to free twelve boys and their football coach trap now for twelve days in a flooded cave in northern thailand torrential rains expected sunday could force more water into the pocket where they're stranded on a rock shelf about two and a half miles from the cave entrance us air force captain jessica teaches part of the effort whatever decisions made on how to best extract the children in the safest way possible we're going to be here and back our partners on a former tiny seal diver who had volunteered in the rescue effort has died running out of air while attempting to return to an underground command center inside the cave after delivering oxygen tanks to the boys environmentalists are helpful the epa will at least slow down it's rollbacks of obama era climate regulations now controversial administrator scott pruitt has stepped aside the current deputy administrator andrew wheeler will be acting boss and despite being named in multiple lawsuits or allegations related to sexual harassment or racial discrimination former fox news.

scott pruitt andrew wheeler administrator obama football montana beijing harassment deputy administrator america jessica thailand president trump china us two hundred billion dollars thirty four billion dollars fifty billion dollars
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Of alcohol and not smoking cigarettes the study also found when kids followed their moms along that healthy path they were eighty two percent likely to be less likely to be obese in adolescence and yes genetics do play a role but researchers say the steep runup in child obesity seen in the span of fewer than two generations cannot possibly be explained by genes alone it's eight minutes now in front of the hour on this morning rasa kaye is back with more of america's first news gordon today marks the start of a us trade war with china beijing promising to answer about thirty four billion dollars in new tariffs on chinese imports to the us raising concerns among us agricultural manufacturing and technology exporters at a montana rally last night trump was defiant china fifty billion dollars and another two hundred billion dollars frankly is waiting the president's ready to implement tariffs on an additional two hundred billion dollars in chinese imports and beijing has said it stands ready to retaliate in kind rescuers call a race against the reins to free twelve boys and their football coach trap now for twelve days in a flooded cave in northern thailand torrential rains expected sunday could force more water into the pocket where they're stranded on a rock shelf about two and a half miles from the cave entrance us air force captain jessica teaches part of the effort whatever decisions made on how to best extract the children in the safest way possible we're going to be here back our partners on that a former tiny baby seal diver who had volunteered in the rescue effort has died running out of air while attempting to return to an underground command center inside the cave after delivering oxygen tanks to the boys environmentalists are helpful the epa will at least slow down it's rollbacks of obama era climate regulations now that controversial administrator scott pruitt has stepped aside the current deputy administrator andrew wheeler will be acting boss and despite being named in multiple lawsuits are allegations related to sexual harassment or racial discrimination former fox news.

scott pruitt andrew wheeler administrator obama football montana beijing harassment deputy administrator america jessica thailand president trump china us gordon two hundred billion dollars thirty four billion dollars
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WWL

"Of alcohol and not smoking cigarettes the study also found when kids followed their moms along that healthy path they were eighty two percent likely to be less likely to be obese in adolescence and yes genetic stoop play a role but researchers say the steep runup in child obesity seen in the span of fewer than two generations cannot possibly be explained by genes alone it's eight minutes now in front of the hour on this morning rasa kaye is back with more of america's first news today marks the start of a us trade war with china beijing promising to answer about thirty four billion dollars in new tariffs on chinese imports to the us raising concerns among us agricultural manufacturing and technology exporters at a montana rally last night trump was defiant china fifty billion dollars and another two hundred billion dollars frankly is waiting the president's ready to implement tariffs on an additional two hundred billion dollars in chinese imports and beijing has said it stands ready to retaliate in kind rescuers call it a race against the reins to free twelve boys and their football coach trap now for twelve days in a flooded cave in northern thailand torrential rains expected sunday could force more water into the pocket where they're stranded on a rock shelf about two and a half miles from the cave entrance us air force captain jessica status part of the effort whatever decisions made on how to best extract the children in the safest way possible we're going to be here back our partners on a former tiny navy seal diver who had volunteered in the rescue effort has died running out of air while attempting to return to an underground.

america us china trump president beijing thailand montana football two hundred billion dollars thirty four billion dollars fifty billion dollars eighty two percent eight minutes twelve days
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The fifty billion dollars in tariffs in the trump administration is imposing a china is being blasted by silicon valley we get details from kcbs as my colgan tariffs are a bad idea says call gorgino seal the silicon valley leadership group which represents more than three hundred fifty hi tech companies here the irony is that the president announced that this was going to be good for silicon valley it's a shame he didn't ask silicon valley before he made that statement this is bad for silicon valley america's innovation economy our employees their families but also industries across america does he expect a lot of other sectors to be impacted because china won't go after tack necessarily they're gonna go after agriculture and other parts of our economy that are going to hurt people in all fifty states president trump's are the tariffs are necessary to address what he called unfair chinese trade practices the silicon valley bureau why colgan kcbs president trump's longtime personal attorney has gone to court trying to stop stormy daniels moyer from speaking publicly about the ongoing case cbs news correspondent gary nunn reports michael cohen former personal lawyer for the president has gone to court in california seeking a gag order against michael avenue to stop speaking publicly about the lawsuit that he filed on behalf of stormy daniels cohen contends that has a seemingly unquenchable thirst for publicity and is a threat to his right to a fair trial dottie recently on with stephen colbert has made an estimated one hundred twenty one tv appearances since march cohen is being investigated for paying hush money to daniels about her alleged affair with mr trump twelve years ago gary nunn cbs news after now meet a county judge refused to delay the trial of gauche shift defendants max harris and eric lawyers of both sides are gearing up for what's expected to be july sixteenth start of the closely watched proceedings he cbs reporter highly quad tells us it's expected testimony could take months derek and max harris are charged with thirty six counts of manslaughter for.

daniels derek reporter michael cohen gary nunn cbs max harris eric lawyers county judge mr trump china stephen colbert dottie california moyer attorney silicon valley america president silicon valley leadership grou fifty billion dollars
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Changes to deal with the fallout from yesterday's inspector general's report on the bureau's handling of the clinton email investigation and report a mixed bag for the fbi critical of former deputy director or director james colman to the point of calling him in subordinate but ruling up political bias in the decision not to charge hillary clinton cbs's paula reed tried to argue that this report vindicated the president's concerns about certain people within the fbi and how they handle about the investigation into secretary clinton's use of a private email server and also the origins of the russia probe that's not entirely true in fact the president has repeatedly claimed that the clinton investigation was botched or rigged but the office of inspector general it's specifically found that bias did not impact the clinton investigation that her interview by the fbi that the president and his attorneys have repeatedly criticized they found that it was appropriate and that there was truly no prosecutable case against her five fbi employees were singled out for making statements showing antitrump bias the first shots been fired in what could be a trade war with china as the president signed off on those new tariffs up to fifty five billion dollars worth of chinese imports could be in line that these terrorists they could go into effect later today the wall street journal's bob davis impose fifty billion dollars the chinese it back and then president trump has said if that happens so put on tariffs on another one hundred billion dollars worth of goods and chinese have said they'll match that as well so yeah we're off to the races house republicans have unveiled a draft immigration bill that would include a path ship for so called dreamers emigrants it would provide twenty five billion for border security including starter funds for the wall and would address the controversy over separating children and parents caught sneaking across the border some republicans have expressed concerns over family separations but attorney general jeff sessions has defended the policy really a very short period of time normally the adults are only held in custody for a week or two or three and he had a message for those parents stop crossing.

deputy director james colman president fbi china wall street journal trump jeff sessions hillary clinton paula reed secretary russia bob davis attorney one hundred billion dollars fifty five billion dollars fifty billion dollars
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Amount of fifty billion dollars this is eleven times greater than argentina's quarter which is reflective of the support of the international community for the country is very news and shows the integration of argentina to the world which allows us to have this level of support the upper house the parliament in canada has approved a law allowing the recreational use of marijuana senators made a number of amendments which the house of commons will have to decide on before the law can be passed canadians will be allowed to grow up to four plants at home for personal use onto the bill which the government has promised to enact by july world news from the bbc a prominent dissident lawyer has been released from prison in vietnam and glenn van die was put on a plane in hanoi boned for the german city frankfurt he had been sentenced to fifteen years jail for belonging to a banned group and conspiring to overthrow the state another activist lead to hard who had been serving a nine year prison sentence was also exxon to germany the chairman of the chinese technology corporations said t e has apologized for errors that led to the imposition of a one billion dollar fine for the us government said t e agreed to pay the fine and overhaul its leadership structure after the us commerce department find it had violated trade bounds with north korea and iran police in singapore of arrested two south korean journalists who are accused of trespassing in the home of the north korean ambassador police said they were called to the residents and thursday afternoon to man to work for the south korean broadcaster s s were arrested two others are under investigation around three thousand journalists are expected in singapore ahead of direct talks between president trump and the north korean leader kim jong un next week the.

trump president iran germany exxon hanoi glenn van die marijuana kim jong un argentina singapore north korea us chairman frankfurt vietnam bbc canada
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Fifty billion dollars of your taxpayer money and then on top of that it was four or between four and seven billion let's say four i don't wanna over guesstimate here four billion dollars in cash cash was is a gangster obama gave them four billion dollars in cash when we got the hostages back one of them took picture of skids and skids and skids of of cash it's incredible american greenbacks benjamin's cash going to the number one state sponsor of terror will we get a refund i doubt there's gonna be no information counter for this one hundred and fifty plus billion dollars will be lost but then we can have our way with iran listen i think in my opinion based on reports that come i don't think they're honoring the nuclear greenman anyway took the money and ran they play john kerry and barack obama for the fools that they are and this deal expires in twenty twenty three anyway the problem is this emmanuel macron his friendship with donald trump he is in favor of the iran deal staying where it is there in lies the problem this is where the concessions that might come in could be a problem because aside from france you have russia you have china you have germany and you have a great britain involved all have said they want to preserve the iranian deal i think it's a bad deal i agree with our president that needs to go away i'd like to know what you think on that should donald trump get out of the iran deal or renegotiate to appease our allies and it's there so it has to be addressed the paris accord climate agreement will trump cave and re enter it costing us endless amounts of dollars so what concessions can he make what concessions should he make eight five five four hundred savage eight five five four hundred seven two eight to my name is lupe you are listening to the savage nation and remember dr savage will be back tomorrow live from washington dc he's going to have a million great stories to tell you i'm not going to steal his thunder and share them with you here he's going to have a lot of great stories and it's going to be a show you cannot miss then in the meantime check out the pictures of his sojourn and the adventure that he's.

obama john kerry donald trump france president dr savage iran russia germany paris washington four billion dollars Fifty billion dollars billion dollars
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WTMA

"We just cannot leave them alone there too even though they can probably handle themselves it's much better region when you have the united states backing israel and even better with the united states embassy in jerusalem so important to us we should make mistakes like we did hawaii i don't think they want to become a state but i understand what you're saying that they're better off not being a state don't have to pay all of our crazy taxes laughing it doubt i'm not laughing adopt because we give them eight billion dollars a year in iran and frankly i'm like michael set like michael says they're a big country now when are we going to cut the aid off from them i'll tell you what the dave is something that i am in favor of reducing and or eliminating we also give over a billion dollars a year to the palestinians so i don't know why we're funding this conflict between the two to be quite honest with you we we we basically paid for a wall between the palestinian territory in israel yet we don't have money for a wall of our own at that that that can't be now we have to put our own i'm one hundred percent in support of israel but we have to put america's priorities ahead of israel where when do we ever do that we don't do that never we're talking about fifty billion dollars to iran that was their money that was iranian money so why why are you always seeing that we gave them that money that was not our money that was how was it their money we impounded that money after the shaw loss after the shaw was overthrown yeah that that that was forty that was forty years before and that's dress that's dressing it up if you want to get technical but no that was american taxpaying greenbacks that went to them that was that was very money we could we.

united states jerusalem michael israel shaw iran america eight billion dollars fifty billion dollars one hundred percent billion dollars forty years
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Fifty billion dollars of your taxpayer money and then on top of that it was four or between four and seven billion let's say four i don't wanna over guesstimate here four billion dollars in cash cash was gangster obama gave them four billion dollars in cash when we got the hostages back one of them took a picture of skids and skids and skids of of cash it's incredible american greenbacks benjamin's cash going to the number one state sponsor of terror will we get a refund i doubt it there's gonna be no information counter for this one hundred and fifty plus billion dollars will be lost but then we can have our way with iran listen i think in my opinion based on reports that come i don't think they're honoring the nuclear agreement anyway took the money and ran they play john kerry and barack obama for the fools that they are and this deal expires in twenty twenty three anyway the problem is this emmanuel macron his friendship with donald trump he is in favor of the iran deal staying where it is there in lies the problem this is where the concessions that might come in could be a problem because aside from france you have russia you have china you have germany and you have a great britain involved all have said they want to preserve the iranian deal i think it's a bad deal i agree with our president that needs to go away i'd like to know what you think on that should donald trump get out of the iran deal or renegotiate to appease our allies and it's there so it has to be addressed the paris accord climate agreement will trump cave and re enter it costing us endless amounts of dollars so what concessions can he make what concessions should he make eight five five four hundred savage eight five five four hundred seven two eight to my name is luke you are listening to the savage nation remember dr savage will be back to morrow live from washington dc he's going to have a million great stories to tell you i'm not going to steal his thunder and share them with you here he's going to have a lot of great stories and it's going to be a show you cannot miss then in the meantime check out the pictures of his sojourn and the adventure that he's.

obama john kerry donald trump france president dr savage iran russia germany paris washington four billion dollars Fifty billion dollars billion dollars
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Net exporter due to fracking and natural gas and this has brought down the cost of energy it's made it more plentiful obvious way and we've often pipelines and there is just a you know get out of a way and and left this economy start chugging and there's one other thing apple apple's decision to repatriate two hundred fifty billion dollars now of that two hundred fifty billion they're going to have to pay thirty eight million in taxes the single largest tax pay at any any corporations are why are you smiling and their why you'll laugh because it is a made two hundred fifty billion it and that in addition to repatriating that they're going to invest another three hundred fifty billion unrelated to the 250 they're re repatriating the create twenty thousand new jobs and build a new massive campus employee headquarters in a state that is not going to be texas or california can you imagine the bidding that's going to take place among states for that headquarters you imagine the deals apples going to be a but wait but wave but wait a jumping out of myself you so two hundred fifty billion minus thirty eight is going to be repatriated why because the american corporate tax rate has been reduced from thirty five or twenty one percent that means that the number one corporation in the world has made the decision that the united states is the place to do business guess what that's going to have may cabinet 'cause you're going to have foreign investment in this country the likes of which you haven't seen yet somebody called it a howitzer somebody in the drive bys not the drive bys but somebody in in punditry media called this a howitzer it is that big a deal once apple repatriate this money and that's a genuine stimulus folks that's not an obama stimulus the obama stimulus was of the stimulus at all it was redistribution of existing wealth this is two hundred we'll call it two hundred and tend to be no rounded up to be easily understood we'll call it two hundred ten billion dollars is going to be infused into the us economy that wasn't there it's not being taken from somewhere else in the us economy and redistributed like obama's was this is taken two hundred and fifty billion dollars that was not here in putting it at a giant sarande.

apple texas united states obama natural gas california corporate tax two hundred fifty billion doll two hundred ten billion dollar fifty billion dollars twenty one percent
"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"fifty billion dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Sport fox for fifty billion dollars the reshaping the entire landscape of entertainment and we'll see where that will you know that's going to go but the fact that matters what i made the rest third reference to an f when a shallow you know aren't islanders anyone even though she yes you know she is once i played the tape of the man begging for his life and the cops voice you're going to agree with me i did it last week on thursday or friday i couldn't sleep at night thinking that there were maniac cops like that roaming the streets who have guns and clubs and kill people just for fun so i would i would i would ask you to go to michael savage dot com and look at the picture of the cop look at his face and then try to listen to the videotape the audiotape of the killing video shows police killing of daniel shaver in mesa arizona if you could watch that tape and honestly say to me that up is not a psychopathic murderer i would ask you to question your own let us say of activity and again i've been the biggest supporter police for over twenty four years on this radio show in all professions and all walks of life there are rotten apples in talk radio that iraq there are a rotten apples people pretend to represent american conservative values but they're worse than drug cartel dealers in terms of what they do to the competition in the police world there are rotten apples in doctors there rotten apples and you saw the one about the doctor were carved his initials on the liver of patients.

daniel shaver arizona iraq fifty billion dollars twenty four years