35 Burst results for "Fifteen Years"

Bishops OK Communion document, avoid direct rebuff to Biden

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

Bishops OK Communion document, avoid direct rebuff to Biden

"Hi my cross your reporting Catholic bishops approve a communion document while avoiding a directory buff to president Joe Biden meeting in Baltimore the U. S. conference of Catholic bishops approved of the first major statement of communion in fifteen years defending the unborn but stopping short of sanctioning a ban on communion for politicians such as president Joe Biden who support abortion rights bishop Michael Burbidge was never the intention to target any individuals or group of individuals the document was approved on a two twenty two to eight vote with bishop Joseph Strickland among the dissenters from the people that I hear from that I'm sure that it's for most of us the scandal factor is quite significant my name is set at a recent private meeting in Rome pope Francis told him to continue receiving communion hi Mike Rossio

President Joe Biden U. S. Conference Of Catholic B Bishop Michael Burbidge Baltimore Bishop Joseph Strickland Rome Pope Francis Mike Rossio
Daniel Craig Is Appointed An Honorary Commander By The Royal Navy

Top 5 Comics Podcast

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Daniel Craig Is Appointed An Honorary Commander By The Royal Navy

"Daniel craig the actor who plays gene who has played Fifteen years now of the same rank in the royal british navy as his onstream double seven counterpart commander really the royal navy gave him an official rank in the royal british navy. I was kind of cool. Yeah no really. I don't know how anyone saying. Have them right. I mean i'll give honorary but still that's

Royal British Navy Daniel Craig
Grassley Will Run for 8th Term in Senate

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:01 min | 2 months ago

Grassley Will Run for 8th Term in Senate

"The other bit of breaking news. Is that your colleague. Chuck grassley with whom you serve at. The age of eighty eight has announced. He's running for re election. And i for one. I'm glad you know pete. Wilson's eighty eight. We are honoring and last night on the thirtieth anniversary of his first year. As governor of california. Those two eighty eight year olds. Put us to shame. Jim talent they do. And i'm gonna tell you they're they're like chuck is is what we lawyers call. And you know this. Better than i do sue generis. Yes so i mean he is every time i see chuck. It's like the same chuck grassley i. I met twenty seven years ago when i got elected to the house. i saw in and And then i served with fifteen years ago. The guy's incredible he doesn't incredible job For iowa and more power to them. And i wouldn't say that normally i mean normally i would quietly. Somebody asked me say you know you'd be thinking he's unbelievable that there's always an exception the rule my role is you shouldn't be in the senate after your seventy two. The john kyle rule chuck grassley the exception because he is one of. I love the history channel rants on twitter right. I love that stuff. But he also takes care of iowa and when he We're gonna be talking about this when he decides to run at ninety four as well. By the way he'll make his eighty eight county drive. He works at very hardy. Takes care of iowa for joni ernst. Can't keep up with them. But like pete wilson. Were drinking the water differently when they made those two jim talent. I asked pete wilson last night. What makes a great senator. So i want to ask you chuck grassley. What makes a great senator. The the most important prerequisite is to have the heart of a servant. Okay and chuck. Does in pete wilson. Does i mean you've got you. You have to be another really important thing goes with that is to have a dose of humble understand and and and they both do.

Chuck Grassley Sue Generis Chuck Iowa John Kyle Pete Pete Wilson Wilson Joni Ernst JIM California Senate Jim Talent Twitter
Pastor Greg Locke's Popularity Has Exploded Because He Speaks Bold Truths

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:23 min | 2 months ago

Pastor Greg Locke's Popularity Has Exploded Because He Speaks Bold Truths

"Pastor greg tell us first of all what. What is the website for your church. Quick before i forget it. Globovision bc bible church dot com global vision. Bbc dot com. How long have you been pastoring. where did you grow up. I grew up here in hometown. A profit not without honor but in his own country led jesus said but it was a tiny little five thousand person town and then it's just exploded. We're kind of like the last bedroom community here in nashville came back home in two thousand and six so fifteen years ago. I started the church from from scratch. And now we're in a three thousand seat tenant and people just keep showing up because somebody saying something. And god's given us a voice to the nation so thank god for it well. This is what. I have noticed that. Those pastors who've been particularly heroic and bold their churches have exploded. Because there's a there's a hunger for this out there even among nonbelievers or among people that they don't believe it. But i don't really go to church. People are really hungry for this. So i find it kind of funny that the free market sometimes does really wonderful things I mean it you know if you have a virtuous population they will choose virtuous and good things and that seems to be what's happening. We know that our friends in california jack hibs and others their churches have gone up. The numbers have gone up speaking a cornerstone chapel in virginia. In a few days they've experienced a similar thing. When did you decide to kinda get bold on. This stuff was there. It was there a moment for you. Was it During the last few years when did you decide to be outspoken. And become a target of people who just don't like bold people the damn kind of broke for me in two thousand fifteen when the supreme court made their ridiculous decision for same sex marriage and so i did a video called. I'm coming out of the closet and that was it. I mean we went from five thousand followers fifty thousand followers to the blue checkmark and pretty soon two hundred and fifty five hundred million and then of i started fighting target over the transgender bathroom nonsense and planned parenthood just back and forth with them and so it just seemed like controversy began to build the ministry and jumped on the trump train literally because i did a couple of bus tours for mike lyndale and some others and so it just seems like every time i would just i would say something people would resonate and they would say you are saying what we are pastors would

Pastor Greg Jack Hibs BBC Nashville Jesus Virginia California Supreme Court Mike Lyndale
EPA rule sharply limits HFCs, gases used as refrigerants

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

EPA rule sharply limits HFCs, gases used as refrigerants

"The environmental protection agency is sharply limiting domestic production and use of highly potent greenhouse gases commonly used as refrigerants the new rule aims to decrease production and use of hydro fluorocarbons spite eighty five percent over the next fifteen years part of a global phase out hydro fluorocarbons are considered a major driver of global warming thousands of times more powerful than carbon dioxide the often leaks through pipes or appliances that use compressed refrigerants such as refrigerators and air conditioners White House climate adviser Gina McCarthy says the rule is expected to reduce harmful emissions by the equivalent of four point five billion metric tons of carbon dioxide by twenty fifty a total similar to three years of emissions from the U. S. power sector Ben Thomas Washington

Environmental Protection Agenc Gina Mccarthy White House U. Ben Thomas Washington
Megyn Kelly Hits Back After Being Labeled ‘Anti-Vax’

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Megyn Kelly Hits Back After Being Labeled ‘Anti-Vax’

"Meghan i wanna do something. Now i regret doing. I've always liked david from. He used to be a fairly nice and influential person. he's been disintermediated from influence by donald trump. because he went crazy. I mean literally whatnot. Now you and i both have trump tattoos and so i can show them off. I can probably stand up with those people who line up in the media who've been assaulted by donald trump verbally lived to talk about it and laugh it off. David was kind of knocked off the balance beam. He's attacked you. This week is being an anti vaccine. I think you actually support vaccines like i do. I get my booster tomorrow. I'm going to Applaud when my grandchildren get back today because their mother has done a study of it and they're safe and qualified for and two of the three of them will be eligible for it. Why is david from attacking. You wrongfully liable ously. Really as an anti dr. Which carried almost slander per se business. It's kind of amusing to me. I'm definitely not an antibac- so i've said repeatedly that i'm provex vaccine. I've gotten it. My husband's gotten it. and i. i think everyone who wanted should get it. But i don't like these mandates. And i really don't like them for children and i've said publicly. I have three kids. Not one of whom is yet eligible for the vaccine. But i did lose my dad to a heart attack at age forty five and i have a heart issue and i worry about my children and their hearts because they've got a genetic predisposition to some frailty there so i'm watching the myocarditis thing very carefully and this should be a decision between their pediatrician. My husband and me and it shouldn't be forced on them. By joe biden or anybody else dr algae and there's a reason that the folks in europe have made a different decision. Our friends in the uk are not requiring twelve to fifteen year olds to get this and even when they get to be older. Sixteen they're only requiring one shot which is all the myocarditis seems to be happening after the second shot. Okay so these are the considerations but people don't consider insane our friends across the pond

Donald Trump Meghan David Dr Algae Heart Attack Joe Biden Europe UK
UN health agency sets higher, tougher bar for air quality

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

UN health agency sets higher, tougher bar for air quality

"The World Health Organization says the negative health impacts of poor air quality kick in at lower levels than it previously thought and is setting a higher bar for policy makers and the public the U. N. health agency released its revised air quality guidelines today since the last update of the W. H. O. recommendations fifteen years ago better monitoring and sciences cleared up the global picture about the impact of six major air pollutants on human health according to the agency ninety percent of the world's people already live in areas with at least one particularly harmful type of pollutant exposure to air pollution is estimated to cost seven million premature deaths and affect the health of millions more people each year and air pollution is now recognized as the single biggest environmental threat to human health according to the agency's European program manager I'm Julie Walker

U. N. Health Agency W. H. O. World Health Organization Julie Walker
The Trump Organization Is Back in Court to Fight Tax Fraud Charges in New York

NPR's Business Story of the Day

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

The Trump Organization Is Back in Court to Fight Tax Fraud Charges in New York

"Trump's longtime business partner. Alan weisselberg is back in court. Today he served as the trump corporation's chief financial officer and he is accused of fifteen year scheme to defraud taxpayers journalist. Andrea bernstein is covering the case for npr news. and she's online good morning joining. I guess you'd better remind us because there have been so many investigations of trump. Which of the various investigations is this. So this is the criminal indictment. That was unsealed back in july. And what's significant about this case is that despite thousands of civil lawsuits for donald trump or his business and to impeachment trials for the former president. This is the first time. The trump corporation has been charged with a crime. The same goes for alan weisselberg that she financial officer who's worked with the trump family for nearly half a century which is the entire span of donald trump's business career.

Alan Weisselberg Andrea Bernstein Npr News Donald Trump
How a Young Paul Anka Got His Start in the Music Industry

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:39 min | 2 months ago

How a Young Paul Anka Got His Start in the Music Industry

"Old were you when you met the producer. Don cost of fifteen years old. Fifteen fifty fifty. You say fifteen. That's it's it's a little bit amazing. Are you amazed now when you see fifteen year olds. I don't get the impression that they have to get open. Go you did different scenario. You know you have to realize. Today's works totally different with the technology. These parents pushing these kids out. Because of these talent shows They don't have they don't have to have the The kind of passion that those that started with me you know we were the small little culture people. We all got lucky with all had a gift. We were pioneers. You know today. it's real easy. Yes not easy to get the popularity but back then. I was very confident. is very focused which you had to be and i can still remember the vibe that i had when i left home What i was thinking how focused i was and then i realized what had happened for me that everybody around. It was sophisticated at all from the brothers. Buddy holly you name of chuck berry. We're just a bunch of kids. We have talent but we were not sophisticated most people. Aren't you know you start getting into some kind of journey where you're successful in your crawling along joined to deal with it but you know you don't have any wisdom to deal with it and ultimately hope that you do so that you can deal with it so back then Yeah we were just driving little teenagers. You know right and these teenage songs annoy talent and we had a choice yet. Choices screwed up or not to screw it up and i just decided to stay focused. Whatever came. I was ready for

Don Cost Buddy Holly Chuck Berry
R. Kelly Assistant Says He Made Her Write False Confession

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

R. Kelly Assistant Says He Made Her Write False Confession

"A long time assistant R. Kelly is the latest to testify at his sex trafficking trial Diana Copeland served as an H. R. Kelly for fifteen years and she says well she never saw any of the alleged sex abuse that the R&B star is accused of she did witness some odd stuff when she says he asked her to change into a robe to prove that she wasn't secretly recording him and she says Kelly even had her write a letter falsely confessing to stealing from him she testified also about how Kelly relied on his inner circle for example Copeland says the singer struggles to read and write and had no control over his own bank account well where his royalties were going she also says R. Kelly didn't even know his own social security number I'm a squirrel's Gabriel

Diana Copeland H. R. Kelly R. Kelly Kelly Copeland
The Grim Sleeper Serial Killer

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:58 min | 2 months ago

The Grim Sleeper Serial Killer

"From at least as early as nineteen eighty five to at least as recently as two thousand seven a serial killer lonnie david franklin junior eventually dubbed the grim sleeper roam the streets of south central los angeles where he was born and raised targeting young and particularly vulnerable. Women this killer kidnapped raped beat typically shot his victims with a small twenty five caliber semiautomatic pistol often carried in his shirt pocket. He obsessively took photos of his victims. Both dead and alive both clothed and nude often sexually explicit positions saving them as trophies and keeping them carefully tucked away in the garage behind his home where he worked his youngest victim just fifteen years old not apprehended until two thousand ten. The grim sleeper roam the streets of south central for a quarter of a century incredible. He got away considering how careless he was this murders rather than carefully hiding the remains of victims in some heavily wooded body disposal site. He typically just toss him out of his old pinto an into some urban alley. The bodies are often discovered the next morning after he killed him and he almost always shot his victims. Water were still sitting inside his car. He left so much evidence he took photos of the victim shared them with any of his friends who wanted to see him not the best way to not get caught but no one tipped police off to him and he wasn't caught for so so long. Why how nhi no human involved and h. I was a term thrown around by some lapd officers originally investigating the murders in the mid eighties when the killings began and it was used because the victims were often sex workers or all assumed to be turning tricks on side at least an all or at least nearly all of them addicted to crack cocaine and there were black. The term crackhead was thrown around a lot and hooker. It was like the victims weren't seen as humans reviewed less than human. They were black. Crackhead hookers so who cares. Nhi no human involved so no real investigative priority given but this is not going to be some lapd blame game some apathy from the lapd only partially explains why lonnie was able to keep killing for so long.

Lonnie David Franklin Los Angeles Lonnie
Dave Eggers: Is Limitless Choice a Good Thing?

Sway

02:15 min | 2 months ago

Dave Eggers: Is Limitless Choice a Good Thing?

"So let's start talking about this book the every so it's a sequel to your two thousand thirteen book the circle which is about a search company that bears its will essentially or possibly facebook. Tell me why you decided to write. This sequel in which the circle gobbles up in ecommerce company named after south american jungle so basically amazon and creates the every Which one character called the most monopolistic control hungry corporation ever to plague the world. So why do the sequel tell me how you thought about this. Well i think you know. When when i was done with the circle i had never thought about a sequel never written a sequel to anything and But i kept taking notes. And i sort of you know would jot things down over time and i remember at one point A friend of mine who She treats students at a college. She's that she was on campus psychologist and She was saying that the thing that her students came in with more than anything. The thing that problem that plagued them was choice. There were anxious about a lot of things but more and more students needed how more and more students were plagued with like unlimited choices unlimited. Input too much to think about on a given day and too many choices to make on a given day. And i thought that was really interesting because we would think you know at this sort of apex point of human evolution. We would want all these choices and sort of that would be some sort of glorious now plays to arrive at that we could order anything and have it arrive at our doorstep the next morning but these kids were far more anxious than they had been ten years before in fifteen years before and i thought well that's an interesting starting point and what if there were a monopoly that would not only sort of tell you which choices are correct which ones are the most You know beneficial to the environment and progressive in different ways and they would help you given your preferences and algorithm ick sort of determined personality. They'd help you become a better version of yourself and the ultimate version of yourself as a personal person and a member of the broader

Amazon Facebook
How Fox News Pundit Gregg Jarrett Decided to Fight the Swamp Monsters

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:40 min | 2 months ago

How Fox News Pundit Gregg Jarrett Decided to Fight the Swamp Monsters

"Let's start as we do with all of our guests. Who is greg jarrett. Where did he come from. What did he do and how did he get to this position. Fighting the swamp monsters accidentally serendipitous sleep lawyer. Trial lawyer san francisco defense I i sort of accidentally fell into two tv and started doing a morning program there. And then i took a sabbatical for one year. And now i'm on like i don't know a thirty four. Th year sabbatical the the law firm eventually gave up after a couple of years and called me up and said look. Your name stole on the letterhead. Are you ever coming back. And i said. I'm having too much fun doing this television thing. And at the time. I was anchoring local news. I in maryland and north carolina kansas and then court. Tv launched in one thousand nine hundred. Ninety one i joined them. I was for eight years covering a lot of big trials. was in los angeles daily covering the oj simpson murder case. Then i went to msnbc anchored for four years there then. I moved to fox news where i anchored for about fifteen years but for the last seven years six seven years. I've been Not really anchoring. I've been using my expertise lawyers. Legal analyst commentator wrote a couple of books and that's the thumbnail

Greg Jarrett San Francisco Oj Simpson Maryland North Carolina Kansas Msnbc Los Angeles Fox News
Solar Energy Could Power 40% of US Electricity by 2035

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Solar Energy Could Power 40% of US Electricity by 2035

"A new federal report says solar energy could provide as much as forty percent of the nation's electricity in fifteen years but it would require billions of dollars in federal investment the energy department says the US installed a record fifteen gigawatts of solar generating capacity last year it shifts toward renewable dominant power grid to address the threat of climate change solar now represents just over three percent of the electrical supply but energy secretary Jennifer grant Holmes says solar could produce enough to power all homes in the U. S. by twenty thirty five to do that however the department's renewable energy laboratory says the country would need to quadruple its annual solar capacity installing thirty gigawatts per year between now and twenty twenty five double the current rate and sixty gigawatts double again over the following five years Ben Thomas Washington

Jennifer Grant Holmes Energy Department Renewable Energy Laboratory U. United States Ben Thomas Washington
NY Post Buries Facts About Covid Death of 15-Year-Old Kentucky Boy

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:53 min | 2 months ago

NY Post Buries Facts About Covid Death of 15-Year-Old Kentucky Boy

"I saw an article last night. He just broke my heart reading about this fifteen year. Old boy in louisville kentucky and all i saw the new york post new york post the entire article and why post dotcom dad makes emotional plea. After teams son dies recorded fifteen year. Old kentucky boy died of cove it his grieving father is urging others to take the virus seriously the boy just incline loved music whistling his ipad playing drums and swimming. The joy of the article says but the new york post article links to a small town paper the lexington herald leader article. Then you click on that link and you read about this poor kid and the grieving father and buried in that article comes this reveal. Jason had autism and was nonverbal. His father told the herald leader. He had extensive medical issues a weak immune system and had twenty five or more surgeries in his lifetime. Now that poor kid. I'm not trying to minimize or marginalize. A fifteen year old kids death but do you know how many millions of people probably read the article that went viral about the fifteen year old boy that appeared according to the new york. Post to be healthy fifteen year old teenage boy who loved his ipad and love to whistle. And you've got gotta dig you have to get you got to cut through the propaganda crap to realize this. Poor young boy was severely compromised. He was vulnerable. He had tons of medical issues including a weak immune system.

New York Post New York Post The New York Post Kentucky Lexington Herald Louisville The Herald Swimming Autism Jason New York
Don Brown Discusses His New Docu-Drama 'Call Sign Extortion 17: The Shoot-Down of SEAL Team Six'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:46 min | 3 months ago

Don Brown Discusses His New Docu-Drama 'Call Sign Extortion 17: The Shoot-Down of SEAL Team Six'

"Had an opportunity to watch a movie that i can't wait to share with you. I've heard dan brown on the radio before great great great patriot a former. Us navy jag. Officer is the author of sixteen fifteen books including call sign extortion. Seventeen the shootdown of seal team six. This was a a nonfiction military. Expose on which this movie fallen. Angel documentary is based A real joy to welcome don brown to the mike gallagher. Show done first of all. Congratulations on bringing this thing to the to the big screen. This documentary is gonna be available at salem now dot com it's produced by rpm films available on our streaming platform. Tell us all about the documentary. What the event was that. That was such a pivotal role in your life. Tell us about. What kind of questions are answered by the movie by the book by the whole process mike. Thanks for having me again. I've been with you before you. You're the great patriot in his our country. So well This this docu-dramas very very powerful docudrama movie which tells the story of extortion seventeen or stores in one seven as they say military aviation parlance which marked the largest loss of life in the history of the american vomited. The war on terror in the largest loss of life in the history of our. Us navy seals. We lost thirty americans at day including uh seventeen members of seal team six and the one of the great tragedies that most americans still don't know about this we know about other things we know about six frivolous soundbites to the liberal media gives us but thirty american heroes lost in one swoop and we still don't know. The story is a general laughing. In this case to filmmakers students. Fiving carl horse are going to do a great great job of bringing this story to light. There are many unanswered questions. You say. I saw a preview on the big screen in the palm beach area. Friday night there was a dry that in see one very powerful expose story and we hope everybody will go on a salem. Now m and wash this move movie immediately in pass on your friends Avid involved in this case for seven years my book came out of in two thousand fifteen year. Kind of to have you on then. Chur cover lots of up a lot of things in this in this story and and the movie touches on some of that No one moving. The one book can tell the whole story but these men need to be honored and this movie is very very powerful. Thing is a great great steps in next step getting their story out. And i appreciate you for Forgiving some time today to remember them.

Mike Gallagher Don Brown Dan Brown Navy Carl Horse United States Mike Palm Beach Salem
Starbucks Employees Start a Unionization Drive

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Starbucks Employees Start a Unionization Drive

"Unionization. Oh interesting starbucks isn't unidas. Subjects is not union and there are three stores in. I want to say upstate. New york where they have launched a unionization drive. I think so much has been made the past. I don't know ten twelve fifteen years of the benefits that you get at starbucks in how they'll do your healthcare if you're only x. Hours a week and they'll pay for college janson but but There are some scheduling issues. I think with starbucks and those things look you gotta you gotta take your people have unionization is what it takes then okay. I didn't know. Yeah definitely i mean. I think we're all seeing that. The degradation of worker rights that led to the wage stagnation of the last forty years and frankly is probably contributing to people not wanting to go back to jobs that have been historically kinda crappy for a really long time Unions may have their issues. But this is the type of thing that they're really that they're really good for

Starbucks Janson New York
Vagina Talk With Dr. Nicole Williams

Sex with Dr. Jess

02:28 min | 3 months ago

Vagina Talk With Dr. Nicole Williams

"To have to ask. What made you write a book about vaginas. Why did you go there. Great question i am. of course. i'm a gynecologist. I've been unpracticed for a little over fifteen years and what i've noticed over all of this time is at my patients still kept having the same questions and the same concerns over and over and over throughout the years even though it's great for me to be able to explain it to them one on one i started thinking of my patients and we have seventeen thousand patients in the practice. If my patients have these questions what about other women are they still having these same insecurities about their anatomy that my patients are having and i thought you know with the pandemic. I had a lot of time on my hands and any major knows that when you give an english major too much time to do nothing like their brains go wild. I started thinking. I start answering some of these questions and i was gonna just write a little e book to put on my side just frequently asked vagina questions but i just kept going and going and going. I realize oh my god. I have eighty seven pages. Nobody's gonna read that unless it's like an actual book and that's just started to get it done and there. We go amazing. So what are some of those questions that people have been coming to you with over and over again in the thousands the biggest question i always get is odor. Everybody is so concerned about odor. And i explained to them for the most part. Yes your vagina is gonna have some type of owner odor considered your signature scent which is completely normal. Sometimes it's a little tangy. It might actually depend on what you're eating or drinking generally it's normal but we are bred at to believe our vaginas. You're supposed to smell like you know. Bath powder or chanel number five or you know. Some kind of special bath and body works all the time. But that's actually the opposite of what you want what you really want. If you're trying to attract a partner. I have research in my book about this is that you want your own signature. Sent to get onto your partner. Because he's gonna remember or she for that matter is gonna remember or they or is going to remember that sense especially if it's tied to pleasure is going to bond nut person to you so when i talked to my patients about their odor. Most of the time. It's normal. I secondly you want this smell. Because it's going to help with your relationship on a cellular level and thirdly we are not supposed to smell like betham body works

"fifteen years" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Was fifteen years old shop she he speaking of that soul you got that you want in the studio and that was kind of like what we got to finish this album let's just do this song I think it took two or three takes and add the song down it won't take my microphone to go we would run out of the people had recorded you know couldn't do any Chuck Berry songs the stones and on in the vehicle so we were looking for a song no one else that we went through a hole through the TV crews and I'll never forget and then he goes well she got to really go this one and he goes on okay well we'll put it through no thanks so the the we build the song around because you had it done but that made by and show you clearly yeah yeah the song is called country gentleman's check and you will have the little no they wound up then you could channel all so the total came about yeah which had an uncanny ability to take of records that had been made previously by people that were long forgotten.

Chuck Berry fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The idea come in they G. seventy three where I lived in Wisconsin that's a suburb of Green Bay I met a young man about sixteen years old his name was Pete he was brought to my house as visitor right away I noticed that he was missing his right hand the end of his arm was all bandaged up in a ball as we talked he said he lost his hand in Vietnam I had the feeling that he sells uncomfortable talking about this so I didn't press you should we didn't know each other very well sometime later I learned through the neighborhood teens friends that he didn't lose his hand in Vietnam but understands farm he was making a pipe bomb works gun powder exploded shredding his right hand and several fingers on his left he said he was fifteen years old I believe he was about fifteen years old maybe sixteen and and how old were you at the time I think I was thirty choose did you have kind of like a fatherly sort of relationship with them like what was your relationship like father and then and also just could close personal friend when I first met Jim he was very quiet and shy and reclusive not willing to talk about or even show his arm to other people.

Wisconsin Pete Vietnam Jim fifteen years sixteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Me it has been fifteen years. you know it's tough when you're talking to call us within you know you say look. I've been there yeah yeah and and to have walked to that and be able to speak back to them the very things that they are dealing with a fact listeners probably even right now who say boy I can relate to this and that is what's happening with our family and I understand that that that you know it isn't just transactional this planning for retirement it is a dual edged sword you have a lot going on there is a large emotional component here to planning for retirement and Jeff do you think that that sometimes gets forgotten. the the emotional side I think. is you know I often use the analogy of the ostrich approach a lot of people just think that in the sense well deal when it comes to it's it's certainly not as easy as you might think it's going to be you know no no no you know I know it's it's a it's a tough tough topic you know if you've been touched by this or if you're fearful that you may be touched by this well you know let's get together once you come on in for a visit and we can talk through what what this is might look like for your family whether it's your parents or your spouse because it's so important to not ignore this particular topic so when I come in for a visit simply text the word visit to four oh one two hundred seven two hundred and we'll get together will sit down for a conversation and whether it's just to talk about the long term care issues that you may be facing your family or retirement planning in general week we can help you so simply text the word visit to four oh one two hundred seven two hundred and Denise reach out to you and we'll we'll schedule a time that we can get together and review this very very emotional topic if if you're being touched by this topic in your family..

Jeff Denise fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"To use the bathroom before leaving the house or the store the restaurant or any other location so he put a license plate he's got to play for fifteen years and so the before now she's got nothing but positive reactions quote people think it's funny she told today parents I get a thumbs up Hong so low on the highway people yelling also played in drive through lines of brings a chuckle and smile to the people who can figure it out however in early August she received a letter to the department of motor vehicles saying that the vanity plate was being recall for referring to sexual or excretory acts or functions so let me just how did this happen the DMV is in progress a look at your license plate necessarily this is somebody sawed and took offense to it and told owner this is some chatty Cathy next door who just want to start your trouble for no reason probably jealous identical license plate and told honor the DMV instead of using its brain decided well that's that's illegal get rid of that court I was completely shocked order said I was on my way out the door to go to work at every stoplight never stops I kept taking the notice out and looking at it again I just couldn't believe it I was reading over immediately appealed the recall after a few days of of being brought to my attention a reset of the division of motor vehicles strongly urge them to allow wanted to keep the license plate she had for the last fifteen years this was governor Chris soon she heard he heard about the situation to do said what I just gave you as a quote I recently left a message on her phone to share the good news at our plate will not be recalled I'm glad now there's a resolution set auger it makes me happy but I'm still shocked there's a couple of weeks of gold what the heck is just crazy I mean I could see if it was offensive in some manner but clearly in fifteen years I haven't offended anybody with a plate augur said that she intended to keep the plate your kids were growing up and no longer needed a reminder they love it she said explaining that she consider changing the play before getting a new car a few years ago the kids wanted to keep it again New Hampshire is a matter of you have you sold every other problem in the state is there no crime in New Hampshire does the governor really need to take time out of his day to make sure when you keep her license plate as the D. M. V. have nothing else going on this is what happens when you get big overloading government that has too much money coming in you tax the people too high of the people in government positions think they have all the power like a OC she thinks she has all the power her generation is the smartest generation the best generation ever because they know history eight eight nine four one tag Joe packs Akon free speech rally whatever's on your mind al has been patient in.

fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on The Slowdown

"<music> i'm tracy k smith and this is a slow oh down every year.

tracy k smith
"fifteen years" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on KPCC

"The last ten or fifteen years trying to figure out what what exactly is the story with methane in the arctic we we know that there's quite a reserve it closely it's found in the sea bed in the form of these methane hydrates like ice crystal that sits on the ocean bottom and you can bring it up and and Lexi light it on fire it will it will burn because it has enough methane in it and so that's stable at certain temperatures and pressures and we know that actually since the last ice age the ground has been rising as a result of rebound because the ice sheet melted away and that took up a large weight off the off the Condit and so those so just as a result of that we've seen more methane like venting from the sea bed and and what's interesting is you see you can observe the math inventiveness in bed you can create an inventory based on that but when you go to the atmosphere which is where we expect that gas to end up we just don't see the gas there like it's not making it across the interface from there to the water from the water to the air so the question is if we try to balance the budget where's the missing piece and one idea is that it's actually the microbes the bacteria and archaea of which there are between ten thousand and a million and a drop of water could be eating this as a food source essentially and and turning it from methane and carbon dioxide well as as the oceans warm as the water warms are those bacteria going to disappear themselves that the one that recycle the methane that's a good question I think one thing that we have seen and what we see is that basically it's kind of like an if you build it they will come scenario with the with bacteria so during the deepwater horizon oil spill for example.

Lexi Condit fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The last ten or fifteen years trying to figure out what what exactly is the story with methane in the arctic we we know that there's quite a reserve of it closely it's found in the sea bed in the form of these methane hydrates like ice crystal that sits on the ocean bottom and you can bring it up and and lacks the light it on fire it will it will burn because it has enough method in it and so that's stable at certain temperatures and pressures and we know that actually since the last ice age the ground has been rising as a result of rebound because the ice sheet melted away and that took up a large weight off the off the Condit and so those so just as a result of that we see in more methane like venting from the sea bed and and what's interesting is you see you can observe the math inventiveness seabed you can create an inventory based on that but when you go to the atmosphere which is where we expect that gassed and up we just don't see the gas there like it's not making it across the interface from there to the water from the water to the air so the question is if we try to balance the budget where's the missing piece and one idea is that it's actually the microbes the bacteria and archaea of which there are between ten thousand and a million and a drop of water could be eating this as a food source essentially and and turning it from methane and carbon dioxide well as as the oceans warm as the water warms are those bacteria going to disappear themselves that the one that recycle them is the main thing that's a good question I think one thing that we have seen and what we see is that basically it's kind of like an if you build it they will come scenario with the with bacteria so during the deepwater horizon oil spill for example.

Condit fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on KGO 810

"Fifteen year and how's it going also might use it you go back to an office are you have enough money because it's not just the freedom it's the fact of not being in the traffic I work in San Jose and I walked into my boss one day that I'm gonna have to leave I can't do this okay sh let me start working from home your cut your phone's cutting out but I did get you what's killing you you want to work from home I agree I could feel you I could feel you know I love my job I cannot do my job at home you could call a that the technology is there but I do think that doing a talk show with another person there's a dynamic there that could be compromise maybe not though I don't know I mean it could if everybody worked really really hard and and was dedicated it could happen but I I just love this idea and I really do think in a congested areas like the bay area we really need to take a serious look I getting fewer workers driving into the office wasting all that gas spewing all those toxins into the air and you know the AC the office space everything you were employees on the road can solve so many problems and you know I'm all for Massachusetts I hope you're leading the way with your tax incentives out all right coming up we are going we're keeping our eye on the your garlic festival shooting they're supposed to be a press conference starting this hour around four o'clock so we will bring you the very latest came is following it as well I will take your calls also about the Gilroy garlic festival I do have some resources some information for those that have been impacted also how you can donate money that's all coming up I'm Vicky in for chip this is Katie geo.

San Jose Massachusetts Katie geo Gilroy Fifteen year one day
"fifteen years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Guys didn't have cell phones the call one another guys in play basketball together when they were fifteen years of age the first time magic and bird by manager that was a damn incidently finals it might have met each other before but maybe not and then all of a sudden it's it's a you're in the league one for Boston one for the Lakers of course gonna hate each other when they're playing a mean those rivals back then but now a days gas tax all the time it was going on thank you and good to see good to see you smiley face emoji toria I mean this is this is again after games is different did they did that look at the different time stop trying to compare what's going on now to the eighties right anyway can be our pugs these in sac a plugs the welcome thanks for taking my call Sherman I thank you I think you nailed it you know great didn't want to sign a long term contract but I I get what he did he's a great player he wants to get a ring that I have no qualms with him hooking up with his friends you guys are so right it's a players league now no it's completely different but the only thing I have issues I just don't want any you know anything set back against the warriors now to Kevin's gone you know I don't want to the same thing that you know you get all what he said turning car was a little bit negative two back towards the team and that's kind of stuff that just move on we're good with it you came here in one he was a great player I I loved him being here and I understand exactly what he's doing right now play with your friends I mean what better can it be after you even have a range and and you'll do fine and I know him leave and he's I'm gonna play next your side the warriors you know if it's all good it's all good and he will get that the loudest you will get the loudest ovation he's ever had when he does come back because we we cared about him any one answering yep when it's raining it is a great player but like Tom said yes move on that's why I oppose it thanks I appreciate the phone call it's going to get our Boston guy see it's the Boston dug into it with the Celtics in free agency Douglas up gentlemen I you don't it's going on this Hey did I enjoy the Celtics did not fall my dear we started from little rock really that's it don't don't get me started for for for an end to read his and see what they did I like it all all which I can't so that we would yeah my Dr all what you got to enter sorry for me yeah wait while the number one free fall ball lottery no that no okay when I shall like your gentleman did last night when they will Dogo trade I died she was Catholic but Warford of how the soldiers were he was like you know he was a guy in my opinion that kept a keen to get out and he was a leader because they will die old data before card yeah and if I'm not if I'm the before ran ran any was there at the same time I think him and Raymond may have got the the same demanded trade fourteen it was it actually July fifth over the July fourth holiday as well and they did that move in which Utah took what Richard Jefferson and what's in those guys and that was the first big signing but he was before Durant but yeah currying on his standard in place the second longest and right on the team he was the big first free agent though down correct and gentlemen I thought she is leadership because he had that are around a couple teams before you joined all state I thought his leadership will support doubled state just like our chocolate for ones until you decide to go to Philadelphia because he thought the food tasted better and now we're going to play with you well and be okay would speak English record okay shot it and yeah all the shelter can't do anything and this is all because Holbert which we've got lucky Jim seven one of the they they like that it's all because of the whole world and then they you've got one over there who just laughed every time you agree with he knows I'm right now he's taking he's taking it out on you not anything else Hey the red Sox lose in that the London series I got that if you look at it what you're not you're not really funny less socially guys your boyfriend is a hot hot like a lot of guys hello I wanted to go to the clippers want to be that much better because he's not a Laker and there's more account allow quiet then there is right now on the lake I mean they got the overall bench that took the war is just six games and then you have a cool I love her I think the clippers will benefit more than the Lakers what I do too I absolutely do too absolutely things that greeted the two men on by the way just for the record and I want to stop Doug during is yeah but indeed is African yeah it is in the day that's why has trouble they they need I understand them but he has a little bit of an accent I get it but you can understand them he dug doesn't have an accent it did the duggars have no axe and what's a little better but it is your right what I got your back right yeah I wish you would say every time he should start with that every time it to be these the opening salvo do you every single day I swear to god you look like rex Chapman body if it is right or for to make a dollar it was mentioned a good all is like the they don't know room that's a dollar that's Horford two or four super mature guy just do it a handle stuff in I mean those guys is viable off the court as they are on the court in Hartford is better than under right now probably on the cord yes arms of what he does on law and I have always said with Andre you can never discount what he does it does the job in a box score in re you really can't but just keep in the locker room together and if that Boston miss that Boston's definitely going to miss that I don't think they'll miss Carrie I think Kember's probably better for them in Calgary just because again in the locker room with the guys a want to play with them I'm sorry to have you come out to the is flat you can't walk that back and say just messing around guys is look at you like wrong with you and then some of the stuff he says in during press conferences like when elders yeah exactly like that kind of crap like what are you talking about team leader you've you've been in this act like one occasionally does it wind when Duran comes back I re and Iran as the leaders of that that team is coming out so I can we find a however it's going to be every one is going to talk in the balcony staring at you go in a year yeah I don't talk about you it'll be interesting you said something about me it will be interesting wrote some about me said some of them in there angry very at ease and I can be fun very right anyone can be are you might talk about the rate leaving you want to talk about Russell coming one of those things will run out will and coming up next we'll get MBA who did what what do you like what do you not like still little bit to go but essentially all the.

basketball Boston Lakers fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

"It was, I think it was Liz any, I rate them out, because they really are in and of themselves remarkable pieces of work from three remarkable designers who were untested insertive unproven, but clearly had the spark of genius in. And in the end, I'm grateful to have that tortuous wonderful experience on because I think at Braun has done. Has advanced it advanced what camp, what admits what campaign setting could be. It kind of took campaign settings to a new level of the time, it broke new ground in terms of its layout, in terms of the presentation in terms of the amount of detail in the way, it was written in the way, it was presented. And a lot of the things that we did back, then we still do today because they have held up over time as being a good way to do things. Excellent. Wow. Any other closing thoughts? No. All right. So where can our listeners find each view on social media? If you're willing to share that. Don't find me, please. I don't know. I Chris Perkins on social media in the form of Twitter at Chris Perkins, the end the. Nice. James. I also on Twitter as a kwela James, that's a. Q. U. E. L A, James. That's the name of the campaign setting created in high school. Dot com. I was gonna say, yeah. You had a website with that. Domin- firmer call right? Yep. Because I much of nerd. Bill. Yes. I'm also on Twitter. I think it's just Bill Slavic. Search my name, you'll find me. And also got a website that has all of my. Vast credits that Infinity care. Look at. I will look at it is ridiculous. We've been in this industry for so long, that those are almost unreadable. Pictures, little pictures. That's really cool. Yeah. Nice little portfolio. That's great. And Keith I think everybody knows your Twitter handle hell. Kalki right. And yeah. And you can also follow manifesto on it at manifestation on Twitter. So. Yeah. Thank you gentlemen so much. I really appreciate you taking the time for this again. And this is I think this is gonna be a lot for the fans. And everybody's excited to see where everyone's going to go next. So thank you for all the work that you've done. Thank you for giving us the gift of a wonderful setting a wonderful world that you've created together, and we look forward to seeing what comes next. So thank you. And I'm also looking forward to seeing what happens next since, you know. These guys are doing the new one without me, and I wish them a lot. I can't wait to sit days. Awesome. Well, thank you for listening. And be sure to visit our website at manifest zone where you can find subscription links to our show post comments on episode and find links to our Twitter Facebook pages and whatever option you prefer let us know what you think of the show and join us next time as we venture to Ruegen drawl and traverse treacherous paths in Dr goon until next time keep exploring..

Twitter Braun Chris Perkins James Liz Dr goon Infinity Ruegen Keith
"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

14:01 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

"Though, the RPG's stuff is great, but I love to see when it goes beyond our hobby. And so when the computer game came out, when the novels grade line of novels that James, worked on Keith Sturgis out the comic books to me that makes the setting the world come even more alive because it's it goes beyond just. Yeah. I'm still holding out for a TV series or movie, but I don't know that'll happen. We even got a CD of music. Oh, yeah. Yeah, that's crying s pretend. That was that was my, my little side project while you guys were frantically writing Sharon city of towers, I was working David Davidson on a musical score. My first real delve into music producing. And you know, we still use that music to this day. It's, it's on our wizards of the coast, telephone lines are whole end. When you your first draft of it was an actual musical. Wasn't it showing the musical? Yeah. We still hear it on, dragon talk fact, and I have to say, David Davidson was a joy to work with he, he took sort of my touchy feely notes about what I wanted all the different tracks sound like made the marine thing. Nice in our relatively short amount of time. I think I'm not the only one who would love to have more music for LeBron's. So if that's if that's on the table, it's quite a collectors item now to by the way. Oh, yeah. It's hard to find. I still have my CD someone asked me about that on Twitter. They were there. They said, oh, I fell my showing both, but I don't have the CD anywhere. Get it and them like EBay. Good luck. Well. Yes. Lawson some manifestations somewhere. How has your work with ever on influenced your design work since then, like, is there anything that you took with you after that experience? Like you know that, that changed the way your things, certainly one of the things that Bill point to earlier in that is focused, what's happening on the present so that it's relevant to what's going to happen in your campaign was a heavily step forward is still a thing that I bear in mind, whenever I see stuff coming in from the freelance from a freelancer or something like that. And there's a pages of history than one page of where you are. Now. Dude, you got this backwards. I think you're, you're right about that. Like the starting point is what's important, right? I, I think for me, also alignment, is something that, that with Ebermann we were doing a more conscious, you know, orcs and goblins aren't evil, you know, serve really exploring intelligent creatures can choose their own path. And I feel that something that certainly for me. But also just more broadly has been braced within the hobby that you don't see quite as much if you will, you know, genetic evil as, as you often did in the past. Bill, james. Yeah. You know. Going back to the ten things getting right to the heart of what you need to know even use that now in my storytelling, on computer games, as you know, I'm telling my other writers get right to the point, we don't have time. So dilly dally. And the fan needs to the the player needs to know what's going on right away. So I think that, that really started to jail for me when we working on nice. For me. It's funny because making a new world for DND. Is this huge undertaking that happens once in a lifetime host? And now I'm working on the magic. We'll building team where we do it three times a year. So it's a very different world in a very different process. But I think without having done Evren doing that now would be a lot harder for me. I think I, I have learned a lot of particularly the things that the Bill is saying, getting to the point right up front that kind of often all you get a chance to do for a magic world. So getting that, right? Is important. That's not entirely fair. Magic worlds. Yes. Specially if you're doing three years. Yeah. That's great stuff. So can you just tell us about a brand game? You played or ran. Any particular campaigns that really stuck out to you. I sort of already did. The. PC's emerging from the ruins of Eric defined the order of emerald. That's that was the that first campaign that I ran the in the main one was built around an agent of the emerald claw who was acting as a patron to the player. Character, sending them into Vic, eventually turned on them. And it was awesome. Nice. I remembered adventure ran entirely Sharm which is basically a beautiful microcosm of the entire setting. Are Are you? you pretty much base a whole campaign there? If you really wanted to just started with a body falling out of the sky in feet. Nice. Yeah. Really, Sean that, that could have been a campaign setting onto itself. Yeah. But what I love about is the strata of the city and you just keep going down down down down in discover new layer of injury is you go. So as the campaign involved, they just kicked finding themselves going deeper darker, darker in the Dylan's becoming more. In human. If not physically than, you know, emotion. Yep, that's a wonderful metaphor. Nice for me. I remember the the original play tests that I was doing while we were working on it. I think Christian James were both in that game. And. Some any of the images that we came up with came out of the player around the table. For example, the whole the whole scene with the, the nose on the flying discs chasing the air. Shen with we played that because I had these little disks from my Star Wars figures forgot about that. So I use those as the, the base for the Knowles and history was born. So that's the origin of the source lead. Awesome. Very cool, Keith. I know you're in stuff all the time. You're always talking about him. Favorite say for me. One of the things is I love doing one shots at conventions of often. I'm trying to say what is a story that feels like this is absolutely uniquely ever on that. You wouldn't play you know, sort of normally at home. And so a lot of times I've done convention one shots like one adventure. I did it as a all the players were to Connie goblins that it was like goblin strikeforce, they, they ended up fighting van Lenore elves who've been corrupted, by the Dow here another time. I did it is the sort of car, Nath e eighty where you know one of the players is ambi- one of them's Necker Manser, you know, one of them was a flame skull, actually. But it was like as said the unday team. And I just love doing that sort of thing of just same. What's something you don't expect? But that does. Fit within the world one game. I've always wanted to run is the, the war, they survivors of the war for Redmond who get back together like they get together once a year in some random place. So everybody plays a war for for, they all had sort of different roles in their, the regiment, and on this particular occasion, when they get back together something bad, happens iphones that ties to some that something that we sort of brought up earlier, but, you know, really nail on is the impact of the war not just on the world itself. But there's so many interesting hooks that it offers you in creating interesting player characters and to me that idea of the war only ended two years ago. If your for example, the fighter, did you fight, and if so who for and, and, you know, the idea of the adventure include who fought together were even the group who fund on offs at some? There's so many interesting sort of stories you can explore in that. James, you had a thought I think. Okay. Norman. Jim Ben for me the. Everything we created forever on. And I think it's all wonderful fantastic amazing. And I'm very proud of the work that we all did on this. But the war forged always sticks out to me as the thing. I remember most thing I go back to I've got the whole line of miniatures we made up yourself, and they, they encapsulate the setting in all the ways we've talked about and. And I think they can even go beyond into other settings of people want to use them. There. So I've got one more question that isn't on the list and I'm not asking for any secrets or anything like that. You know, but. James James Jura you're on loan from the magic team. Correct, working on the next hardcovers that I have that correct? Yes. Although it's more of a sharing arrangement than loan working on the budget things at once one of which is the around book, which we haven't officially announced yet. I thought the two. They. Announcement at the end of the descent. So people Mel about it, but we haven't done what's what we consider be the formal. Hey, this is the big release announcement of the press release. So we sort of teased it out. So it's a it's not secret secret. Okay. All right. We'll we'll stop talking about there. Right. You're, you're working on a new addition. As as the as the designated wizards of the coast Representative on this topic, I can say, for this cast that this, this wouldn't have happened had had Keith not decided to release on the PDF and the warm reception that it received. Gave us gave us confidence that the time was right to do something to build on that. Nice. Yeah. The I think the Brown community of fans. The site -ment that came out when that product released was it was amazing. It was amazing. The sales amazing be part of it, and, and I'm glad to know that, that's what sort of served as a catalyst for was coast. The day we used to announce things pretty far in advance. So people had allowed time to sort of ruminate on them. Now, we've taken a more surprise delight approach, partly because of the fact that there's so many other offerings out there that if you announce thing too soon, it can quickly disappear into the maelstrom. No. But if you if you announce things fairly late people. Stay excited at the time by the time of products. Release, we've found that to be very successful for us in this day in age, nice fairness. So no more year long promotional campaigns for setting. Back in the day, we had to serve the masters of the tree. Right. Yes. Right. This is true. I will add that it's been great working with Keith on the book. He and I are exchanging a lot of emails, and it's, it's good to be having least part of the band together. Nice those questions sort of what, you know, any emotional feelings related to that. It is a. I certainly agree with James. It's, it's wonderful to, to sort of again. I mean, it's been fifteen years, and it's wonderful to be a working together. Again, it's just I love the creative energy of at n I hope that I'm not too much of a pain to work with. Excellent. Well, that's all the questions I have for you. All. Is there any additional stories or sentiments or thoughts related to ever on your experiences with a are three three winning not the three minute, but the three finalists, the entry is in my file cabinet polos out periodically Justice remember, the experience of how we got down to those three and Bill can relate to what I consider relate to the black binders of proposals that we went through that were wheeled in on. Officers. I had to take them with me in a suitcase. The east coast because it overlap with my vacation. Liz, Jerry, Elizabeth hurt her back carrying them. Yeah..

Christian James Keith Sturgis Bill David Davidson LeBron Sharm Twitter Sharon city EBay James James Jura Necker Manser Lawson Evren Eric Sean Dylan Shen Knowles
"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

12:34 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

"Because, you know, popish sort of setting in dinosaurs. You know, are the lost world sort of fits. And so it's really cool sort of hitting, let's give them this actually interest in central sort of role yet, but it's also part of the theme of Corvair, which is the people, there are quite industrious and smart. And if they see something like that they're gonna use it. Yep. Very nice through. It also allows for just the you can just imagine what the dinosaur trade is like and also just as long as we're talking about things that excited us, we're going. We've talked about how the war forage evolved dramatically another part of the setting that was really completely evolved over that phase was the else. And I really love the elves Avron part of it. Is this exploration of what is it mean to have a culture where people can live for, you know, thousand years, so they have this, this culture, very mired in their ancestors in tradition? But that was entirely something that, that we sort of developed during that initial period and just saying, how do we make these more compelling and interesting than what we have the other super. Linke ever. Another thing that came out of our discussions, and the concert, where the elemental airships or no mental vehicles. We got some really good images of those sort became they in the lightning real became the beltway get around, if you've done some money. So how did that come about? Was that something that y'all requested or was it something that the designers just the artist I should say, just came up with on their own as a cave? We think this might be thing. No that that came out of the four of us talking. You know what we need for the pups? What do we need for new are what we need to hit this, this period of the world's history. And you know how we use magic elemental. Industry in all came together like that. And then we asked them, and then they drew these cool chips that were even better than what we that's beautiful. That's I don't think any of us envisioned like this Tele mental ring going around ship until press did one of his his sketches, then it's like, okay you got me. I think we asked for, like a Ella mental strapped to the hood or something like that. Yeah, man. So. If, if there's a single feature of ever on that you wish you could go back and you know, or, and have the opportunity to expand on what might that be for you. Bill. Do you have anything? Oh, wow. Yeah. I mean. I've been looking at the book I was looking at the book recently. When Keith asked me to do an interview on his side, a couple of months ago and. I think the original book still holds up really well and. I think if I had to do it again. I would've added another twenty pages to talk about the ten things you really need to know that ever run. I kind of squeezed that in at the last minute, and we that's the room we had for it. And I think it's one of the, you know, the best starting points for the book and in hindsight, I could go another ten pages talking about that stuff in, in a similar vein time time and space, not being objects out of had probably more starter adventures to give even more Adam setting because there's a lot going on. Yeah. I think I remember that as, as a GM running run for the first time where we had the, the events in the back of the book we had shadows, the last where we had that whole arc. And so on, but, but you're right. It only touched on certain pieces in there so much remaining in the world to even explain. That's, that's actually what we do with this podcast is we're like, wow, you know, let's talk about the tone to planes and you know, what, what can happen there, what kind of adventures and stories. Can we tell there, I think in hindsight, if I had to do it again, because the adventures were kind of? We were so concentrated on the campaign setting. The adventures. They didn't get short shrift. But they were the next thing to do so. But I would plan them a little better and I think we probably should have done like around the world in eighty days type of adventure on that would have been awesome. Give you the a broader sense of the world. He was just talking about. Kief yet a some thoughts. Oh, yeah. No, I mean, I, I completely agree. I think that is something that would have would have been wonderful. I also really agree with a bills point. I think that the sort of ten things you should know, is this really strong opener. I will say when I did last year the way finder. Skied Ibran, really the first chapter of that is, basically taking that ten things you need to know in just giving it a page per topic. And so, yeah, I just completely agree. I think hitting those core concepts and end just sort of explaining them in enough detail that people can really engage with them is a great thing. This James was there anything for you that, that stood out. No. So it's funny. I don't disagree with anything that anybody has said, there's also a part of me that is like, maybe we made it too big. It's this vast setting. And the fact that we had to do a number of supplemental books to cover other continents. Sometimes, I guess, my, my understanding of what makes it good campaign setting his changed over the years. And, and a tighter focus can sometimes be good. I get what we didn't do it. And I guess alternately I'm glad we didn't what but. James. I agree with you. I, I think we did go to big, but we took baby steps in the first baby step was getting away from all the history and telling you what was going on in the world today. Again that was our that was our biggest breakthrough for designing a new campaign setting for Dave. Compared to something like the forgotten realms? The, the vast scope of Brown is still much more tightly focused in terms of theme and flavor. Not to say anything against forgotten realms. But the way that it was developed over the years, it does have sort of a kitchen sink. Aspect to it. I love our corporate overlords. Don't. But, but everyone has that coherency to a story that unites the whole world in its history and its present? But the other interesting to that, that going along, those lines, not leaves it cohesive. It was the first setting that we actually developed fully with the rule set in mind. Yes. So. I just wanted to them, one thing, I think that's really interesting about that point. That really struck me is the fact that the world's actually smaller than what I really wrote that. When I submitted the hundred page document there were probably twice as many nations in part because I was looking at it is look at the actual world. You know, there's tons of things and part of that process in that initial dry was really sort of paring that down in same, which of these are the most compelling, which of these are really interesting. A bunch of stuff to. Yeah. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. And I remember like Fairhaven. For example, I think was a nation, you know, and the came on there, there's a bunch of things like that. And into me the point is I agree with James. I mean, even as is part of it is here, we are fifteen later years later, we still haven't delved into sedro him as much as I would like as I'm saying is, you know, thank goodness. Is that sense of as designers it's easy to think bigger is better? But since you only have so much time and space to actually develop things, you know, you gotta make sure you don't go. So big that it all just ends up being vague and unknown. Right. But you also in hindsight, being twenty twenty never know what's gonna take either. You know, you wanna put you wanna put your best feet forward. I don't think we put anything in the both that we weren't, proud of which is, you know, compliment everybody involved, and honestly, in fifteen years philosophies change if we were to do it today. I'm sure we make different decisions just based on the fact that there is so there's much more competition for people's time. And lots of other ways people can spend their money in not a lot of time to create your own stuff anymore. So those things may have weighed on us a little bit more than they did back in two thousand. I do. Like how much that they're like, there's so much content in everyone. And I think that's really cool because it allows you to, to tell a number of different types of stories, you're not sort of pigeonholed into a certain John or anything, if you wanna do cosmic horror, you've got the Delk here, cult culture, the dragon below. If you wanna do pulp action exploration, you've got zendaya in other places, and if you do are you got Sean city of towers. Wanna do you know, martial arts mystics you've got star Luna in murder on the artist's press at the lightning the lightning rail. Exactly. And I, I think that that's actually benefit. Now, the ironic thing, though, is that when you ask if you asked to say if you ask thirteen DM's what it is. They like about Aron, you'll get twelve different answers. So. I I got. I stopped about the moons. Marks that two or the planes, one of those planes. We have this thing together. Yeah. We had a thing for the baker's doesn't like I do like that. Of course, I it was a while end when those were coming out because, you know, it's like the numerology in such before someone pointed out that it was a baker's dozen that we were like. Yeah. I never thought that fairly now. Okay. But I don't think it bet. Rich Baker to. Yeah. That's true. And people when the fantasy setting search, I came out there were was a conspiracy theory that it was all nepotism, because clearly I was related to which Baker. We were really tight on the rules of that submission process. Everything we reviewed was blind. I had no names on them at had no who wrote them, I didn't know which ones for inside the company, which ones from outside the company. They, they, they sank swam on their own merit. Nice. Very nice. So what are some of the things course of your favorite things that you've seen evolve with Eber on over the years, we've had fifteen years of Ron, Brown products and campaigns? And, you know, like all sorts of source material, articles et cetera wonder what are some of the things that have evolved since that I run campaign setting book came out? So to.

James Rich Baker beltway Linke Eber GM Keith Adam Kief Ibran Brown Dave Aron Ron John Luna murder fifteen years thousand years eighty days
"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

13:36 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

"The beginning, where people just get our back straight, and we're like, well, no things, wouldn't be quite so great that easily. Right. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, it's there's still tension there, still unresolved conflict, and it still lingers. What are the interesting things to is as were flashing the world in just making it a bigger place and finding homes for some of the things that are part of the canon, or, or sort of icon of dandy monsters, how we had to sort of reach back into history and really go well, past the one hundred years, when the war started in start talking about things like demons in the world, dragon news in the world of dragons have been around forever. What is the drug Hamad prophecy comes out of this? You know our our dragons these these game masters who kind of manipulate other races into doing their, their desires for them, or they simply monsters, were not really sure there was a huge giant empire down in zender ick. All these things were created to help fill the space into. To make history field deepen robust. And that was an interesting exercise. When she said, yeah, also to give you different places in different environments to play. Zander traditional lost continent rate, and then you have the far east troop and all those kinds of things. Yeah. Absolutely. So I want to touch on a little bit about your experience when when you came together like I'm assuming there's a moment where you I got to get y'all set in a room and you're looking at each other, and you're like all right. We're gonna do this, what was that like for you? Well, one of the things I'll say, for me because, you know, for me, this was the experience of I was just a random, you know, hopeful freelance writer used to write in my basement and here I am coming to wizards of the coast home of the indeed. So that was first off very exciting. Intimidating also, it was kind of funny because we get there and James says, we'll see you sister in New York and I was like, well, we s in it turns out that he played the day with my sister. And so is just and we did not realize this like until we were in the room together. And we're like oh, you know how? But for me it was day to it was just this really exciting moment. First off to again, be at the heart of DND, but also just because it is the nature of something like this, especially in entire world, that one person's ideas, you know, sitting in isolation or never gonna be as compelling, as when you get a group of creative, people sort of bouncing refining in, in seeing things from different perspectives. And there's so many things we'll talk about this later. I'm sure a just so many little things that, you know, oh, I thought that was a need that, you know, the war forger perfect example, where I thought this idea of, of them being sort of hand created was was interesting, but moving that to the greater sort of industrialized unsaid ads. This whole other level to them. End end it was just this, you know, I was there for a week initially, and it was just nonstop. It was just really exciting every day we were coming up with amazing. Thanks. Offensive for and supporting it with, like an internal logic and also just. I keep going back to this tapping into something on that works on a deeper level, like when you have or fortune there mass produce as opposed to gums, which are like individually crafted, and there's the it's the humanizing and impersonal that says a lot about the race. Like you're just you're just unit two six nine four off of the cannabis Sembler line in metro, you're nothing but a cog in a greater machine deal with that. Well, so as far as our experiences go in those early days, we kind of had different roles. So James was pregnant from wrong a game designer on the team. I remember it. So he was he was going to be creatively steeped in this for months. I was a creative director in charge of the campaign settings that supported the core DND game. So my job was really more behind the scenes tactical lighting up. Freelancers lining up concept artists working on schedules and helping keep everything on track, and then helping to pull the book together at the end Bill had the strategy of the line in mind. He was he was he had to internalize wherever on was going to be two years from now. Five years from now. What support products we're going to buttress it? How is what we were doing going to dovetail with the novel. So he was white whereas James, and I were on tactical level. Bill was up on the strategic level as well as guiding the tactical execution of the books, the I kinda served as the uphold it altogether. I guess you could say. Keeping everything on track with everybody, because we were throwing so many ideas around. It was like lightning in a bottle, and I was trying to catch it and put put it in the book. So I can Bill. Go ahead. Go ahead, say lightning in a bottle is a good way of describing that. I remember that, that week as being just constant ideas flying around the room. Definitely a highlight of my career, I only been wizards two or three years at the time. So I learned a lot, I could imagine that the must've been like fast and furious just sitting in that room and cranking ideas out, and belts, many creative, people really don't people awesome. That's amazing. So and as Chris said, we also had we had three great concept artists working with us in. They were they weren't in the room all the time. But we had sessions with them, and they would just come back in the insurance out sketch after sketch after sketch, which helped us in turn. Redevelop what we were thinking about him. And giving a even knew or life in it was exciting. It was very exciting. I mean, I don't even know looking back to the war forged. You know, one of the ideas that, that is sort of part of them. Now is this idea that they have this semi organic matter, unity, sort, of, like, ten girls that sort of form, their muscles. I don't know. Maybe as remembers that that was a direction given to Steve Prescott, or if that was just sort of something he came up with the design in that in there. I. We we played off there aren't a lot. They listened very carefully. They, they understood what we were asking for, and they made it even better. Steve Prescott aren't is to me. What defines my visual impression of Evren, because that's, that's what was so prevalent at the time that year of promotion. And the, when the first campaign book came out that was what left impression on me. One of the things I did to help sell the concept throughout the company was put together a, a slide show or a movie trailer, using all of their art, and we put music to it, and that kinda helped us get the rest of the company to understand what we're doing and to get excited about it. Please to have that for Yeltsin version of that for gencon. Remember? That I do not. But it's probably on my computer somewhere with the coasts storage. Locked in the vaults. That sounds that sounds. Absolutely amazing. Exciting. A can imagine what that must have been like in that week and even continuing on afterward. Oh, it's a longer than a week. Yeah. So that was the beginning. So I guess, I guess at least the next question is, what was you talked about some of the design experience as you move through it to the finished product. But like did you did any of you have any particularly favorite moments where those like like things that just stuck with you? That, that was awesome. I remember designing the crests for the dragon marked houses, and working with the artists actually flush those out because all their crests were based on monsters in particular type. That was just a fun experience for me writing, those art orders, and then seeing what the artists came up with. It's often one of the most gratifying experiences just that was coast to general is seeing words turned into art by some gifted soul. That was cool because they those crests actually helped me understand the identities of the houses. Even more. Well, yeah. That's. There's so many ideas that probably came that you guys came up with that. I'm sure that when you went to that artist and said, we want to we want something that's like this has this feeler has this representation. Yeah. Like like you said, Chris coming back with that. And seeing that actualized that had to be like, so gratified. So rewarding the other thing that was in truly gratifying was Wayne Reynolds. Yes. Getting to work with him and have him develop some truly extraordinary approach to covers nice James? I had a moment at some point early on development where the scene of story took took form in my head and that scene. Eventually years later ended up as part of my, my first around novel in the clause of the tiger. But it was when we were talking about the silver flame, and the cathedral. This idea formed in my head of somebody who doesn't believe it at all in talking to the kittens at the head of the church and just about humbug but, but then is, is transformed by realizing this, this kid is authentic knows what she's saying. Nice Keith, I think that ties to me to one of the things I really enjoyed about the setting to as someone who's always been fascinated by Malaysian folklore was just sort of taking very different approach to religion daddy's than in safe or. Realms which at the time was the dominant thing. N just that idea that in Ebre REM were were sort of exploring questions of faith in a way that often doesn't come out in a world where the gods. Come down and beat each other up. In their system model of ways. That that's all that's come out over different ventures in the years that I've just really enjoyed I remember when we came up with that concept or at least the discussions about it and the fact that we wanted a world where faith was just that it wasn't. It wasn't proven by the God coming down every ten minutes to talk to you. In that, that made for we still got to have clerics that to have divine magic, but we did it in a more realistic way. I guess warling the world that we live in. I think to me, it comes back to that of we talked about before about different things feeling relatable. And I think it's exactly that point of this is, you know, we're in a world where you can't just call up your God with dividend spell, but shifting to just sort of moments from the experience to me, the big one just for the, the five second. Oh, my goodness, moments is, is the to lent a half lanes. Just because that was a perfect example of were sitting around the table and everyone same. We've got these nomadic half lanes. That's fun. That's interesting. But I don't know what makes it a little more. Interesting on what are they writing? And at this point, I started another we all call who was the person who actually said it. But it was someone you know, says dinosaurs and everyone's just like half lean on raptor. You know, like a it was just this. Oh, that's ten times better than than it was before. And just those shorts of moments just something at the table. And everyone's like, yes, that is good. Awesome. Well, I remember we're going through the monster manual. We got to the dinosaurs cetera. Woodward, put them. Flings especially.

James Bill Chris Steve Prescott Hamad Zander Evren cannabis Wayne Reynolds writer director Woodward Yeltsin New York Keith one hundred years five second ten minutes three years Five years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

16:14 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Manifest Zone: Exploring the World of Eberron

"This is manifesto, the podcast that explores the breadth and depth of the world of everyone is a tabletop RPG setting. I'm one of your host. Chris Ron, I'm bigger. I'm Chris Perkins. I'm Bill Slava's. I'm James Wyatt. And if you haven't caught on by now joining us to celebrate fifteen years of Evren in this bonus episode is the entire design team responsible for the original, Iran campaign setting gentlemen, I'm honored and thrilled that you could join us. I cannot express strongly enough. How much I appreciate each of you giving us your time for this recording. So happy to have you here. Thanks. You're absolutely welcome. So what we have here. We got a few questions, just a few that we're going to ask. And basically, we are going to explore a sort of what everyone has meant to you and how you see it in, you know where you see going. So I'm gonna open up with a question feel free to jump in, and we'll, we'll go ahead and get started. So my first question for you guys. What does it mean to you as a setting in terms of themes in concepts? I want to lead on that. I will. Okay. The thing that I always think of is the opening scene, or sequence in raiders of the last arc where you have player characters risking life, and limb to retrieve some ancient relic from the ruins of syndrich in than they come out. And there's the order of emerald claw, vastly outnumbering them ready to take that artifact away from them. It's it's this pulp adventure. Feel with a twist to at least that's how my games usually go. Excellent. That's, that's sort of the angle, I typically have gone with when I run on gains is that sort of pulp action feel that caught my attention, but at Baronne also tied to raiders of all star is that feeling of globe-trotting where you're following the red line across the globe. Indiana's course onto his next adventure to new too far flung locations that are real kind of set pieces and immersing those places because up to that point, the world's of DND often weren't didn't feel like worlds at all were often constrained to a continent or even a smaller area ever on courage, you to go far afield. Yeah. We didn't episode on traveling abroad where that's that was one of the big selling points for me was the fact that like in gray hockey, I felt confined to a particular area and I love Grayhawk, don't get me wrong. But with Iran, I felt like I can go and explore all these different regions. So thank you for that. Thank you. I think of like a backpack covered with, like stickers all over the world, right? I've been to I've been to shadow marches. I've been to Kabar. What haven't I been to the frost fell? Let's go there. My next character will have that on his backpack. Obviously, I agree with everything that's did come up. You know, these are the sort of core things just though at a different thing. You know, one of the things that's always been important to me is that idea of exploring magic as part of the world, just because magic as performed by wizards in such, you know, is something that feels like this is over bible tool, and so just that idea of saying, if we'd had arcade magic in the renaissance, what would the world look like today? And so that's just something I've really enjoyed sort of exploring as we've developed. Themes of what it's like to live in a society. That is just survived a war. And in the parallels, of course, the Cold War on our earth. And also to the industrialization of the modern world and how societies cope with mass production, how they coped with disenfranchised soldiers who have lost their way at war's end all these sort of themes touch on things that we can relate to his humans. I think what makes ever on resonate with the fans is are these human themes that run through its stories? Yeah. To me it was the, the period between the world wars. That's, that's kind of what I focused on, when I was doing the, the original writing, and, and the idea of that's when the pope's will beginning to come to life than new are at an we built that altogether into the into the setting and all of that place to my mind. When the nose run top, the flooding discs fans the city of Sean, that Neville, always be the, the moment to me of. Labral. Nice. A lot of people may not know that are maybe talked about this before keys how the setting evolved from its roots, which was the tales of swords and sorcery. This idea of detective fiction of Chicago gangster vibe with trench coats in the doors in how it evolved to be this sort of greater DNA experience the ever talked about that before. Are we certainly talked about it on some level? But I think it's a great thing to talk about while we're here, because it is definitely the case, that, as I said, you know, part of what was interesting to me, was this exploring development of magic, and in thrilling tales of sources sorcery. The initial pass, I did on which, again, I didn't remotely thank sort of really had a chance. I just thought it was fun. It was much more. This idea of, you know, the fighters pack a rod, and I mean a rod. And one of the things that came up was this issue that it was interesting. But if you go that far does it still feel like the indeed, you know, if if we know monger, you have to have swords to have swords sorcery, you know, to a certain level. But yeah, what other thoughts when through your mind? When we in that period, Chris Bill. I were part of the selection process of the people who have the privilege of reviewing the eleven thousand plus submissions, the best one and privilege in quotations there. I shan't it started off on. It didn't hit about like the three thousand one and you realize I've read this already sixty times, this is no world ice world. Duck world's lots of those. So what stood out about it was it's clarity as far as it knew exactly what it was aiming to do it new genre? That was trying to capture ended. Did that very well? And I think when Bill and I looked at it made enough the first time we looked at it, but certainly when, as we were warming to it the sense that you could take anything that's Indian d input. This kind of pulp spin on it, and create something interesting in fresh. Nice that was the you know, that was in my pile. And that was one of the first ones that stood out to me, mostly because it was different. It was too tongue in cheek. I thought, but it was there was something there that kept during my mind back and after I got through the various, you know, everybody wanted to do game of thrones because that was just the hot new book at the time and we had, like twelve thousand versions of ice world. I kept coming back to Keith sin said, you know, this isn't it, but the idea is here. Let's, let's try this one, and it the I think Kristin me came to that conclusion first. And then we had to convince the rest of the committee. Nice. So that actually really does tails into the second question I had, which is what went through each of your heads. When you when you got your first taste of Evren, either, like Deering, sending search or even or after it, James, do you wanna take legal, not sure, I think what Bill just said resonates with my experience a lot to that. When I first saw it, I wasn't sure it was for me the tongue in cheek aspect of it. The. I think he's mentioned sort of a direct analogue to everything instead of a gun. You've got a rod. There's something that works just like telephone, but it's not a telephone. Was a little off putting to me, but Bill in Chris managed to successfully convince me for sure that this was something we could run with what was the what was the selling point from Chris Bill for you. I think for me it started to come together as we were flushing out the world talking about the main continent, and tapping into real world cultures to sort of help us ground each of the various nations. But also, I thought the art had a tremendous effect on me on particularly when watt around developing the war for forged which were as I recall, part of keys original, at least, not in name, they worked. Hitch. They were the spa born exactly. But the idea, I really riveted the idea of the, the solar built for war who doesn't know what to do anymore now that the war's over, and it was the first, it was the first real human theme that struck me about the story about the agony of war, and the, the consequences of war, and a we had done dragging. Let's course which was set during the war, we had seen Grayhawk evolve in various incarnations through wars that we never got to. Really get a sense of what they were all about the last war really kind of because it was such a. On World War. Feel to it. I felt sort of like band of brothers. There's no end to the number of stories, you can tell in that kinda milio. And so the combination of the art and the, the humanizing aspects of some of the stuff we were creating really sort won me over. I'm sorry. So for me the. The thing about it was before we had the art before we had the one hundred page bible. We had the one pager in kid came out to work with us to do the ten pager, and I began to, to, to see as I said, I was looking for something we could develop and, and it was really coming together for me that we could keep everything that made a game DND because this wasn't asking us to throw anything away. But everything was additive and, and that really was exciting for me. Nice. Yeah, I just wanted to echo, what Chris said about the war forage because that's also, again, one of my favorite elements and I just feel they capture so much of what is ever on in the sense of you have the fallout of the war. But you also have that concept of this race, sort of represents the industrialization of magic and such as he said, that's the thing they weren't in even up through the ten page because I was like, oh, I didn't wanna add new races. And one of the things I remember in developing the hundred pager was you all sane? What are races that actually really captured this thing you know what racist that feel magical? And even then as, as Chris said, they were originally, spelled boarded was the idea that just one day she had the. Amid sorta handcrafted them and that sort of Yonne them they, we developed the whole idea of the drag marked houses of this greater industries, -ation and to me, that's, that's where you see this whole process that the whole world went through of the starting with, you know, sort of very broad ideas. But then as we went further and further along sort of taking thing insane. How do we make it better? How do we make it more intriguing? And that was really exciting. Nice. Very nice James. You had something you want to add. Yeah. Thinking about the war. I remember a point when we were just guessing, what name the setting that we actually talked about calling it were forged because that is such a crucial part of it at occurred to me as Chris was talking about dragging Lance and Grayhawk the way we usually see war in a fantasy game is is in very clear cut good versus evil. Right. The evil dragon armies are trying to take over the world or use the evil. It's writing his name, where the, the warrior in ever on, was just a human war at with all the, the bad reasons, and bad decisions, and horrors of that there's no glorification of war in the last War, I think that something really powerful about it. Also tried to make each of the nations. You know, both likable inhalable so that it was no good guy. There was no bad guy. Yeah. I thought I thought that you guys really pulled it off if it would have been easy to say, oh, the, the Carnegie, or the villains, because they're of this type in, they have undead armies. But when you get right down to it, and you see the reasons why they did what they did you sympathize with them. And that's extrordinary. Absolutely. Yeah. I was just gonna say I mean, in part of what I like about that is this basic point that no-one won the war that, you know, ends because of the morning, which in and of itself, sort of touches on the Cold War, you know, the fear of mass destruction that we live. And so it is that in that sense of, you know, none of the nations are entirely good, or evil. None of the nations are winners. The only one that. That. Had a decisive end was a Jerry because it cost. So I think one of the other interesting things about a war that lasted one hundred years is that we are. We're in a setting where races have very long lives, or some of them do at least which is very different from a human experience. And so there are people who have had to endure, this war for far longer than some others, which I find fascinating. Because I think there's a lot more stories and lot more pain in a lot more experience that they players, for example, could draw from or or create for their characters, and you've got a whole generation of humans, who this is their first moment of peace. Right. And we have talked about this before. But I do feel that was the thing that in the very beginning. A lot of even authors for the setting didn't quite yet. That, that it was this point that we are only two years away from the end of, of sin century of war. And as the setting continued on, you know, more and more people picked up on that in braced, but I think there was a certain level of.

Chris Bill Chris James Wyatt Evren Iran Chris Perkins Bill Slava Grayhawk Chris Ron Indiana Chicago hockey Kabar Baronne Keith sin Jerry Kristin
"fifteen years" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Little business for me over these last fifteen years. So I don't little bit about podcasting from the very beginning, but one thing that has changed significantly is how easy it is. So. A podcast consists of a few different things. And so you're gonna have to solve two or three different problems. I most podcasts are audio only we do audio and video, but that's nuts. Unless you're rabbis a really good looking fella. I would say this should be an audio podcast. That's how most people listen, they listen in their car that listen, you know, at bedtime. Whatever they're not really wanting to watch a screen, so th and then that simplifies things all you need is a way to record audio. If you have a laptop and, and a headset microphone, that's all you need. If you want more complicated, I'll give you some hints on that. Secondarily? Once you've recorded the audio you might want to edit it put music in front of it. Whatever you wanna do to dress it up. But now you've got show a show that can range anywhere from thirty seconds to unlimited some of our shows are almost three hours long, that's up to you. But now to turn it into a podcast you've got to do a couple of things. First of all, you have to have that show available. Download because that's how podcast works. It's really just downloading a file that you either play as you're downloading it. We call that streaming or download it and play later on demand in effect. And so you have to have somewhere to put that podcast. People can download it and then the final thing that makes it a podcast. The reason it is a podcast is because there's something, and this is the most technical aspect of it'll called an R S S feed. Really simple syndication. It's a simple text. File it structured. Very highly structured that says, in effect, here's the episodes of the show, and when there's a new one, here's the newest and the reason you make that is so that people can use podcast application like I tunes or Google podcasts. Many of them pocket casts, overcast can use that -plication it will periodically go to where the RSS feed lives, it's a second files you've got the podcast filing the ourselves for go there and see if there's anything new. So the RSS feed is a way of saying there's a new show. The podcast app will then say, okay, let me download it and they are s feet will have the information about how to download it. It'll download the file it'll be on the person's phone or device, and they can listen to that in a nutshell is the whole is everything you need to know. But I'm gonna make it so much easier for you. That used to be, we had to do a lot of work to get that to work. There is a really good solution that does it all. It's anchor. A N C, H R, like a boat anchor dot FM. This is was recently bought by Spotify, but I don't see any reason to think that they're going to change.

Spotify Google thirty seconds fifteen years three hours
"fifteen years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"In place for fifteen years packing that up moving the whole thing transitioning your life. If any of you have experienced that then you know, exactly what I've been doing. And why I haven't been on the radio for quite some time. It's been quite the transition, but Sawyer and Finian my dogs now have a blended family with my fiance. We have Rosie the Yorkie and biscuit, the cat who has joined us. I'm working fulltime in my fiance's company, a dog's best friend and just having a blast. It's been a wonderful transition. Although I'm completely dependent upon GPS. And I still make wrong turns at least once or twice a week, which is better than when I first started here. So I think that's optimistic. One of the things I'm doing now that I'm training full-time is I'm back to teaching puppy kindergarten. I taught for many years, and then couldn't get enough puppies to populate the classes in South Carolina. But here it's a little bit more prevalent with puppies. So we teach puppy kindergarten in several different locations and a dog's best friend. Also does a boarding training program where people send us their dogs. We work on training, the dogs to do lots of family manner behaviors. And then we transition them to their owners we teach the owners how to work the dogs once the dogs will learn to work for us. And so the dogs are successful at home. Most of the time we get really young puppies in this program, which is great. It's really fantastic, especially if they've only been with their folks, you know, couple nights like a month. They come to us. It's great because we get them when they're young and we're able to make these huge impression during this critical development period, we still can take adult dogs, and we take lots of those as well. But a lot of times after a dog has gone through months of living with someone that hasn't train them or years with someone who hasn't train them. It's a lot more challenging the dog may have habits that are bad now that we need to fix or may have fears that could have been prevented that haven't been prevented because they weren't addressed during that critical development period. So because I'm working so much with puppy. These days, and because you know, how much puppies mean to me two of my books were about puppies. I've decided to dedicate this first show back to live surefire ways to ruin a puppy. So if you don't want to ruin a puppy, or if you have a friend who's about to get a puppy, and you want to make sure they don't ruin a puppy. This is definitely the show for you. So when we come back, I'm going to tell you five surefire ways on how to ruin a puppy here on get positive results on pet.

South Carolina Rosie Sawyer fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Fifteen years that is until August of two thousand eighteen Email by Joe Hollowell. Our president just ask if he get out of meeting with myself, and Chuck Weissenbach our principal. That's where she found out a parent had turned in her marriage certificate showing that she was married to a woman something that violated a contract she signed when she decided to work at Ron Cali. The gist of it was that I had four options that I could resign that I could dissolve my marriage that I could kind of stay quiet till the end of the year and keep my job as long as possible. If it stayed out of the media, that's precisely what didn't happen. Fitzgerald story reached well beyond Indiana being picked up by the likes of the Associated Press, the New York Times and even getting her an appearance on the Ellen Degeneres show. So they all knew you're a gay students. Didn't know where the parents didn't know, you tempted quiet, and but the whole all the other teachers new the principal knew everyone knew that you know, you let people know who you love you trust. And so, yeah, the majority of the people who were there knew how long have you been married we've been married for years since it became how long have you been together? Twenty two years. She wasn't fired. But instead was placed on paid administrative leave FitzGerald has also been banned from the Ron collie campus archbishop, Charles Thompson of the archdiocese of Indianapolis one minute is not about her sexual orientation, but about the church's teaching that marriage is a covenant between a man and a woman as revealed by God, he did however say there's nothing in church teaching that says being gay or lesbian is a sin the amount of support. She received from students alumni parents and others was both immediate and abundant on an ally. In that I support misfits GIO. I had quite a few issues last year. And she was always there for me. Her door was always open those Ron collie students met with the archbishop to talk about changing the contract, but they came away with the feeling that changes the last thing he wants now FitzGerald has filed a discrimination suit against Ron collie, and the archdiocese her attorney David page for a fact that the school is choosing who to enforce this contract against FitzGerald says it's not just a lawsuit to her. But a mission is my mission to simply convinced the Catholic church and Catholic high schools across the US to implement positive and permanent policy changes that affirm the LGBT plus community and acknowledged the rights bestowed upon that community by the rule of law and has hasn't just impacted FitzGerald. Another Ron colleague guidance counselor. Who was also gay Lynn Starkey filed a discrimination complaint against the school and the archdiocese for the eighteen of eighteen on John Herrick.

FitzGerald Joe Hollowell Ron collie Ron Cali Ron collie campus principal Ron Catholic church Chuck Weissenbach Ellen Degeneres Lynn Starkey president John Herrick Associated Press New York Times US Indiana Indianapolis Charles Thompson David