35 Burst results for "Fifteen Year"

California firefighter watches new home burn down

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 13 hrs ago

California firefighter watches new home burn down

"A cal fire captain loses his own family home to the wildfires seventeen days after moving in leave the Dryden was out battling the creek fire when he was told he had to evacuate his own home by the time he got there it was too late you just sat there and watched it burn the fifteen year veteran firefighter thought the home he just moved into with his wife and three kids was secure it's hard to build and watch your own home burn let alone other people's homes burn in their possessions but it really hits home when it's your own house stride in hopes to rebuild his parents home and a family cabin were also destroyed by wildfires I'm Julie Walker

Dryden Julie Walker
Thailand braces for large anti-government rally

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:00 min | 1 d ago

Thailand braces for large anti-government rally

"Thailand is bracing for a large anti-government protests tomorrow. The Roddy. Shuttled to take place at university, which was the site of a student massacre decades ago and comes after weeks of demonstration's. The best attended was in the middle of August. When more than ten thousand people marched in Bangkok calling for Political Change, PA me-meeting learn how Students have no choice. We can only come out. We don't want to grow up and have kids ask us when the country was facing injustice for you doing. The protests started off largely as student movements. Different groups of young people around Johnson is the economist Southeast Asia correspondent. We've seen them spread actually in into high schools, and now they seem to be gaining traction among a large segment of the population. What can we expect from tomorrow's protests? We've got two different versions of what's going to happen tomorrow. The protesters' who are organizing the rallies. At Thomas, university anticipate fourteen thousand people coming the authorities are trying to poo poo that. And say you know perhaps it'll be half as many will show up even survey not taking any chances. There were also thousands of police who are being marshalled to keep the event in order, and we've just had actually the deputy minister who is extremely close ally of the prime minister is going to be running the operations into that sexually monitoring the rally. Marta who all these protesters and what's the back story how did they get started? There's been frustration building in Thailand for a number of years the current prime minister and many of his closest henchman seized power in a coup in two thousand fourteen and for while they promised that that would be elections but there wasn't actually one until last year and even when that election occurred the current time constitution ensure that. It wasn't really a level playing field for opposition parties who ran against pro-military potties and others who eventually came together in a coalition and one so that Prime Minister Pray Challenge Child at full McCoy leader could stay in power. So many ties were very annoyed that they had the liberties. Ko they waited many years for an election and then it wasn't savvy the first place and then on top of all that. A particularly, Popular Party led by a very charismatic young politician businessman who basic he got fed up with state of Thailand and decided to become involved in politics. The long. The short of it is that the Ponti Future forward was dissolved earlier this year in February, and that was when we first started to see some flashbulbs few street protests and anger starting to build about the current government. What the protesters want is, is it just the reinstatement of the party or something else I? Think the core protest is believed that this is all moved above. And beyond future forward, a lot of the platform and policies that future forward advocating for things that many of the press testers would like to advance in Thailand more freedoms. An end to harassing opposition activists to protest is also want to see parliament dissolved the crucially they know that dissolving parliament might not do much good until there is a new constitution of the protesters unified what they want. So. That is one particularly contentious issue in all of this, and that's the fact that some of the boldest protesters' have called for reform of the monarchy. The monarchy in Thailand is deeply revered. It's Tabu to to criticize the institution and indeed a less. Law provides up to fifteen years in prison for anyone to be in badly insulting the monarch the current monarch. King. Vajiralongkorn or Rama, the tents took over from his extremely popular father who died in two thousand sixteen and it's been a bumpy road since then as a result for the very first time pretesting and are openly criticizing some of the things that King Vigia along his dumb in particular, they are unhappy with the way in which he has poked crown assets in his own name and they are also unhappy about the fact that he has taken sutton important military units under his pulse no command and a lot of those stationed importantly right in Bangkok so how significant these protests the government. The fact that these protests have been growing since the middle of July slowly, but steadily ease programmatic and the longer they go on the bigger the headache this becomes the government, the students specific and not going away. They're not intimidated by the dozens of people who've been arrested for participating all leading, Maranda? What are the army and the government doing about this? So far it seems to have been a case of wait-and-see. We've seen a few dozen protesters arrested particularly the leadership, but we haven't seen any really tough crackdown and given Thailand's. Of cracking down on student protests, quite bloody manner, and in particular here I'm thinking of events in the nineteen seventies. One Fair on love People's minds is. What happens when the establishment runs short on patients with all of this, it's difficult to say precisely what will happen but the chances all dramatic intervention I think. NEVA'S ERA in Thailand Verandah. Thank you. Thanks so much.

Thailand Prime Minister Bangkok Thailand Verandah Ponti Future Popular Party Economist Southeast Asia Marta Johnson Thomas King Vigia Mccoy Sutton
Speech Processing for Disease - Dr Ami Moyal, President, Afeka Tel Aviv College of Engineering

The Voice Tech Podcast

03:29 min | 4 d ago

Speech Processing for Disease - Dr Ami Moyal, President, Afeka Tel Aviv College of Engineering

"Center for Language Processing Quick Example was founded by eleven years ago after I spent fifteen years in the high tech industry as a research engineer vice-president technology, and CEO. Since then the centre has grown to be the largest research. Sentiment is bound helpless on Applied Research Field With project completed for the defense industry high companies, the medical field and more. Most recently, the language processing has been researching the use of speech processing, not sufficient diligence algorithms for providing a quicken, readily available three diagnostic assessment of Covid, nineteen infection we belden need for human intervention. When it comes to a rapidly spreading virus such as covid nineteen with millions of potential carriers Goud the global population. It is essential die identified like carry-ons virus at the early stages confection in order to private as testing efforts and break the chain of mission while it's great to hear there's just so much going on in Israel in the in the research failed, and specifically around language processing, you guys are really applying it to one of the most worthy and needed causes at the moment, the pre diagnosis of covid nineteen. Completely, understand the need to prioritize testing efforts. Tests are in short supply so you really do have to get to the right people i. I'm rendered. There was some talk around whether it was possible to use voice for the diagnosis of Kavita. This is a couple of months ago. Remember I'm on the on the what's that groups and things? I'm part of people were skeptical that it was actually possible. So tell us. Is it actually possible to use voice files, voice recording speech even coughs and non? Verbal. nonverbal recordings of of a human voice to be able to diagnose covid nineteen. That is precisely what our current research is into. After consulting with physicians specializing oratory disease and ear nose and throat, as well as with doctors conflict within coronavirus patients, we learned that among the earliest symptoms. So covid nineteen. Vocal the. And throat infection. These affect human localization patterns. We are modeling samples of speech coughing and breathing from both symptomatic and Azima the night to carry us to compare with models taken from healthy subjects. AUTOMO-. We are also modeling vocalisations subject the tested negative for covid nineteen yet are exhibiting similar symptoms shot such as those infected by the common flu. DC will a loaded the commodity who differentiate between someone who is likely a carrier and someone? Well. That makes perfect sense I mean obviously someone who is infected and is showing symptoms is going to sound different to someone who is isn't so I completely understand how you can train these machine learning models to recognize the difference I'm fascinated by the ability to be able to distinguish between different diseases though because I would imagine the you know if you have one type of disease or another, the reaction of your body would largely be the same the produce flam in the lungs which would come up in a fatal throw in different ways I'll be really really interested to know what the difference is. In how that sounds depending on the on which disease that you have

Research Engineer Vice-Preside Throat Infection DC Israel CEO
Podcast listeners are listening longer

podnews

04:45 min | 5 d ago

Podcast listeners are listening longer

"Constantly, listening longer says Cumulus is Westwood One who has published hits podcast download full twenty, twenty reports. It's their fourth annual study among the findings. spotify is closing the gap with apple podcasts by total listeners it's close twenty, two percent say the Apple, the most twenty percents specify the most willing to that today from our show notes and our newsletter. Do podcasts compete with music listening spotify has an RND division. We discover and release some data in April saying as people pick up podcasts listening, they tend to add it to their previous habits. So music listening remains almost the same once people discover podcasts, good news for musicians although possibly not quite so good news for specifiers hoping they wouldn't have to pay anybody for their podcasts guest. podcast analytics and attribution company. chargeable has raised two point two, five, million dollars in seed funding. The company is tracking one billion downloads a month protracted nearest competitor tracks. One point five, billion, we use that. So congratulations to Dave and Harish. Jack. Mates. Happy Hour from stuck on off has become a spotify exclusive in a youtube. Video Jack Announces spotify offered me a life changing amount of money. This is a game changer for us and ads I've never had any communication with Youtube. Former NBC and Fox News Anchor Megan Kelly is to launch her own podcast network without the constraints or political agendas of other media outlets. She says Devil May Care Media's first release will be the Megan Kelly. Show coincidence record for Mac. Os is a simple audio recorder that sits in your menu bar records records loss less if you like. Could be good for safety copies congratulations to podcast host blueberry who have a free virtual events tomorrow to celebrate fifteen years in business. They have Trivia and prize giveaways, congratulations, Todd and Mike, and everyone else at large media has new logo of bold new look from the same great company. You'll find it in our newsletter today and hereditary is building a MAC based audio editor for podcasts. They want your help to learn more about your production process. We've a new section in the news it's going to happen every Monday it's called the tech stuff. It's with our S S dot com or an excellent podcast hosts. Normally, it's not gonNA make it into this podcast. Today it is. It's aimed at developers and technologists working within podcasting Zahir goes. The podcast index has added a language fields taken from the podcast assassin plans to add eight detected language field in future to catch those podcasters who haven't correctly set it. Joe Morocco has also produced svg versions of the podcast indexes logo, which we now show in own search who websites development documentation has moved pages on get hub at hyper catch as now using the podcast index according to Adam. Curry. His podcasting ready Ip v six asks Thomas Harasser. He notes that some of the largest podcast hosts still don't support Ip six and that some phones in India now I six only at least for media files don't support Ip six you're losing listeners especially in emerging markets he says. And Asandra, dear ferrier used Google Cloud Platform to produce transcripts for his podcast in. Italian. Willing to his notes in English on how he managed IT Marco armaments writes a tongue in cheek clarification of apple's in APP purchase rules which are ever. So slightly opaque, and after we reported at bug charitable correctly setting an RSS user agent, we have more details and best practice. Thanks from our show notes and our newsletter today. And in podcast new seventy million is back for season three, its season premiere seventy million takes you inside Chicago's Cook. County jail during a rapid outbreak of covid nineteen spotify podcast launches, incredible feats today, it say daily show profiling amazing achievements made by people from all over the world hosted by Dan Cummings it's a spotify original available everywhere returning last week meddling adults is a podcast game show for charity with two guests solving children's mysteries from classic series like Scooby. Doo It was the caretaker. Linked to how they made it in our show notes newsletter today and good morning podcasts is podcast in English and in Spanish each Weekday Talk to interesting people in the podcasting scene,

Spotify Youtube Apple Megan Kelly Thomas Harasser Devil May Care Media Jack Fox News NBC Audio Editor Dave Chicago Ferrier Adam Joe Morocco Dan Cummings Google
Are We Approaching A Cyber Security Investment Bubble?

Task Force 7 Cyber Security Radio

04:38 min | 6 d ago

Are We Approaching A Cyber Security Investment Bubble?

"So it's been interesting because. From the sale side of things where I sit. As a C. So we're getting hit. All over on the sale. And it seems like there's so many companies out there so much investment happening and some folks feel like there's a potentially cyber bubble as it relates to investing what? What's your what are you seeing? What's your prediction there? Yeah you know. First of all, there's there's no way to a really predictable obviously. So anything you kinda assume as is both true and false the same time colleen Schroeder druce, bubble I think at the end of the day there is a significant amount of investment going on in cyber because there's a significant amount of opportunity also because it's it's a long lasting problem You know there's no such thing as secure computer There's no such thing as a secure enterprise and the reality is even in times of crisis when you look at the past six months. Everything has been increased in terms of the number of attacks, the number of people who are going after. Major enterprises who had a whole lot of change and a whole lot of. Adaptations, kind of the new normal and and it's those moments in time where all sudden you know they just the level of. kind of risk associated with doing everyday business become. So you know magnified So the reality is that yes, there's a you know a lot more investment going on, but I think it's for good reason and I think ultimately at the end of the day the truth is that you know. That that kind of investment is going to yield results from a innovation perspective and from an adoption perspective. Every bubble was really about investing in the right things at the right time. I think that the investments that are gonNA stand out and that are gonna be sturdy going to be the ones that will last the test of time. Is there money out there that's you know kind of being I'll call it i. they thrown around for sure. But I wouldn't call it a bubble. That's interesting. You know and it's interesting to with the pandemic Are you seeing folks? You know investors focus on dumping cash into? Maybe, more money into fewer companies or are you seeing you know a little more risk? You. Know I think it depends on the investor and look I know it's terrible answer but I think the reality is Kinda you know unpack it. Look at the major investors that you know. Basically, have been taking in and consolidating and trying to down. It's a very different investment methodology. Then I'll call the lottery ticket style investment. You know they think. More. Often than not is kind of the stalwart of these e. The private equity guys have raised a ton of money right and they have to put money out a mandated to do it. Which I think you know separates out a little bit of kind of what we do on a daily basis makes us a little bit more. Strategically oriented to to not have to deploy capital in that way But when I look at, you know how the investment maybe kind of market trends have shifted. The reality is I think you know you're you're seeing more investment in companies that are GONNA be Easier to to bootstrap right. And that's just been the trend for the past ten fifteen years ride the US to be needed to go raise a dollars to even start a company, and now you start company on a credit card right? So I think that anybody who is deploying capital the typical type investment that you're GonNa make is is much more aligned with where you see kind. Of the return horizon and given the pandemic I think you're GONNA see a lot more investments that are being made are smaller. Investments definitely staying away from alcohol at the stalwart markets as well. Right. So you know not putting money into kind of crowded space is not trying to reinvent the wheel not going after the space not going after know kind of. Major players, right not taking on IBM you know headlong. I. Think. It's. It's much more about how do I find those niche places where I think I see an exit maybe within a five or you know kind of even less year horizon those types of things that I think it'd be more viable in the short term. and. That's really where I see money headed.

Colleen Schroeder Druce IBM United States
The Cat and Mouse Game at the Mexico-U.S. Border

The World and Everything In It

09:21 min | Last week

The Cat and Mouse Game at the Mexico-U.S. Border

"Paso del Norte Bridge Pass of the North here people crossed from Horace to Al Paso or Paso to warez every day they crossed by car and foot to go to work to school to shop to visit family chaos and clutter hustle and bustle and adjacent train trestle called Black Bridge crosses nearby the scene of the tragic shooting. So many years ago. US border, patrol agent shot, and killed a fifteen year old Mexican boy after that. So what happened at the Rio Grande? Well, the facts are disputed. So we'll tell both sides of the story was talking about the circumstances that brought about the shooting the boy's parents say Sergio was playing a game with friends run across the border to the US side touch defense run back without getting. Caught kind of like a game of chicken. Yeah. I mean what kid hasn't played some version of that Game Kisha branch works for Barra Borderland Connections a nonprofit helping asylum seekers. She spends her days at shelters in El, Paso and shelters in Horace. She works closely with migrants and Border Patrol agents all that to say she's familiar with the area and the dichotomy of working with both sides. There are some kids that that play at the border, the border in New Mexico in an opera. There's a community right beside the border wall. There's a a lot of land and there's a trash pile, and so sometimes, the like moms will go out in like pick things out of the trash Powell for their homes like for household items. There are people that go into that space like where we go to visit the wall there some kids that come up to the wall and they talk to us and we'll just have conversations with them. So. Yeah. Are Kids that play in that area, but they play in the area because it's their backyard. But that's in an opera. What about downtown in the Rio Grande Canal by the bridge where the shooting happened according to my cabdriver it's not generally an area where kids play. Do kids play around the fence around the border. No. They don't let them get near. So that leads us to the other side of the story. Border Patrol says, Sergio was a coyote helping undocumented people illegally cross into the United States. coyotes often use coordinated distraction techniques. Draw the agents attention away from his surroundings victim. An Harrah's was the chief Border Patrol agent out of Paso when the shooting occurred he's now retired we used to call those still do they would call it a sacrificial room. Send someone a across or group appeal across to get the agent to react get the agent to start chasing a group and and what they do is soon as the agent leaves that that high. Position they say whatever they want to send. WHAT THE REAL INTENT It's almost like a diversion. So that happens all the time dangerous game, the game of cat-and-mouse. The boys ran back and forth across the border agent Mesa detained. One of Sergio's friends Sergio ran back to the Mexican side. He hid behind a pillar under the train trestle. That's when agent Mesa shot him in the face. Mesa says Sergio and his friends were throwing rocks, both men, Harrah's and George Gomez. The agent I talked with at the beginning of this episode, Say agents are trained for physical assaults cures, Gomez. Goh, there's different scenario that we run the training. Obviously, I think covered drive away from the air run seek cover and backup call for backup deescalate. Behavior. Here's the thing I don't want to downplay rock-throwing. David. With Iraq agent Mesa may very well have been endangered. Peres. Getting right and he's got a he's hunched over the guy that he was arresting. And you got your back towards man. You're you're you're really at risk even under the high pressure of split-second decision making the use of lethal force here has been criticized bystanders video captured the fatal shooting. In the video Sergio unarmed again, Kisha Branch who works at the border. The story that came out in the news is different from a story that we hear from the agents themselves. So I don't. I don't I have I have no answers Sergio's parents of course, do want answers and a legal remedy. Meaning an award of damages, the family believes the US. Constitution. Guarantees Sergio certain rights now the constitution of the United States setup the framework for the American government and the various rights people have with respect to the government right and the constitution applies to more than US citizens the preamble the very beginning of constitution says we the people of the United States so it doesn't specify Melvin Odi is a constitutional law professor at Faulkner University. which generally talking about in the way, the courts interpret these things into generally talking about the people who comprise the United States. We the people of the United States People Citizens Resident Aliens International Travelers in this country on holiday or for business when you're in the United States, those protections apply to you. But when you go back to wherever your home country is, those objections do not apply United States meaning of course, that's going to be. The Continental United States, but also include The US territories the special maritime jurisdiction of the United States which would be like on the seas. As far as the borders. The constitution applies within our borders and again sort of the territories that we control. Chris Galindo is one of the lawyers who represented the Hernandez family. Here's a clip from a video called Justice for Sergio Audio and Spanish here from a univision news investigation. Dominicano. Wasim Anthem Nisa. He says, can we sue the American government to be sure Hernandez was in Mexico and is Mexican the American government said we can't sue them because this is Mexico. Not The United States we're saying not bullet originated in the United States and they have to pay for the injustice. They did Moses Shindo is guy. I WITH MY NEIGHBORS GET TICKET WINDOW GOES ON WE are saying there are certain laws and certain ways. The Border Patrol agents need to treat human beings Mexican or American according to United States Laws Federal K. K. K. K.. You the Sergio's mom pleads God for help for justice this is going to haunt me until I leave this world. This acronym you can. Okay. Vido. Sergio's parents sued agent Mesa in Federal Court for excessive use of force. They claim Mesa violated Sergio's rights under the fourth and fifth amendments. Now here's a reminder of what those are faulkner professor Melvin Odi. Okay so The Fourth Amendment Fifth Amendment each sort of presents a bundle of rights but the fourth amendment in particular. Presents a list of restrictions on government agents were investigating crimes. Okay. So the prominent one is protection against. Searches and seizures. The court has interpreted seizure to include killing the taking of human. Life. Would have been saying. This was an unreasonable search and seizure the fifth amendment includes several closets. Relevant one, but there's a catch all. Near the end of the Fifth Amendment that says a person can't read deprived of life liberty or property without due process of law. So. In this case, the young man's life was taken. And the Fifth Amendment says, you can't do that without due process of without fundamentally fair legal proceedings. The first time this case worked its way through the court system the fifth US Circuit Court. Of Appeals dismissed the case it held Sergio's parents were not entitled to fourth and Fifth Amendment protections under various legal doctrines, but the Supreme Court said the fifth circuit and properly applied those legal doctrines. So it vacated the decision rendered null and void that was Hernandez one in. Two thousand, seventeen, the Supreme Court then remanded the case with specific instructions. It's at another question needed to be addressed. I is a givens remedy available. The Fifth Circuit said, no in this Supreme Court, appeal followed Hernandez

Sergio United States Border Patrol Mesa United States People Citizens Us Circuit Court Sergio Audio Paso Del Norte Bridge Pass American Government Rio Grande Hernandez Supreme Court George Gomez Horace Fifth Circuit Harrah Barra Borderland Connections New Mexico Melvin Odi El, Paso
Is the Netflix documentary "Cutie" breaking federal law?

Best Case Worst Case

08:57 min | Last week

Is the Netflix documentary "Cutie" breaking federal law?

"Alone. Welcome to best case worst case this is Jim Clemente retired profiler former New York City prosecutor writer-producer CBS's criminal minds with today's high everybody. It's Francey, Hague's former state and federal prosecutor. Jim. Across the country and if it's possible, I'm even more outraged. Shall I say enraged than I was last week I find it. I. Don't know very believable. Because I know you but I know what you're outraged and enraged about. I agree with you tim I don't understand what's happening. You know we've we've done what is happening I. Don't know we've done. I don't know how many episodes where we've talked about. Hollywood. We've talked about power position predators. We've talked about a Hollywood sexualizing we talked about that movie call me by your name I remember that one member that you and I saw that. and. Just being outraged at the sexualizing of children and in that movie if I'm not mistaken, there was a nineteen year old actor playing a fifteen year old boy I think if I remember correctly. and. That was bad enough because it was depicting. The sexualization of a child even though it wasn't an actual trial here Jim in the newest entry into net flicks Pantheon, we have a movie called well in English. It's called cuties and it was released just last night as you are recording here. So on September ninth here in the US. Anyway it was released on Netflix said it's a French movie I think the original title was something like Lehman Mignon. Which I would. You know I was a French minor but French is a longtime ago for me I, thought meant the little ones but maybe it means cuties regardless. The Americanized is name is called cuties. And Jim. I didn't see the movie yet. But I've seen a clip of a dance from the movie before we get into the discussion of the movie. Let me just tell people who haven't seen the clips and you haven't seen the description of the movie. What is purportedly about? This movie is described by various media critics who've seen it. As a coming of age tale, a young girl fighting against the patriarchy. Now, how is she coming of age how she fighting against the Patriarchy this eleven year old she joins she's a Muslim child and she joins a dance troupe. Wow. That sounds interesting. Right she's breaking out of her cultural barriers whatever they might be or whatever she perceives them to be. She joins a child's dance troupe with a bunch of other eleven year old well, that sounds perfectly innocent. Well not really however. It's really not Jim because you and I have seen the clip why don't you take it from here? Well, for not I did just see the clip and I was shocked I was shocked at two things one the focus of the camera. On the general areas of young girls very deliberately. Very, sustained, very purposefully. But I'm also shocked by the fact that this depicts a dance competition and in the dance competition, these girls are on stage in public. Doing these you know basically dance moves and I'm using those air quotes that are that are basically saying and touching their general areas and a showing off between their legs I mean. They're simulating sex. That's the that's certainly a very. Easy determination or that's an argument that. CAN EASILY BE. Made. So, this bothers me for two reasons. One is that. It's apparently a competition that they're in in which this kind of behavior is actually. Promoted and encouraged. But the documentary style of it. Is that they are showing close ups of these girls is one thing if they're thirty, forty, fifty feet away on a stage, but to have a camera. where the entire screen is filled with the Crotch of an eleven year old girl and the camera is focused on that and again it's sustain it's not just passing. That is part of the definition of child pornography when a child is centralized in a way and they don't have to be naked for it to be child pornography but the image has to be focused on the Genitalia or on sexual activity, and even if that's mimicking sexual activity is putting a child in a sexualize situation and I believe that this does that. In fact, and I, I don't know what the rest of this movie is about but it's scary to think that this is just one scene in movie that that purports to do things like for example. There's a parental warning apparently on imdb would says, one of the many highly sexualize erotic dance scenes. That purposefully exploit an objectify numerous scantily clad underage girls. One of the female child dancers lifts upper crop top to fully display her bare breast. This they're saying. This is supposedly literally pulled from my md be yes. That's pulled from my MTV which they've changed as of now this this has just been a massive explosive controversy over the last twelve hours Jim and you're absolutely right. I. Hate telling you that because God? Usually wrong. But here you're absolutely right. It does fit the definition at least in the United States the federal definition for child pornography, which is the lascivious display of the genitals for the purpose of arousing the sexual desires of the viewer. There is no other way to describe how these children are dancing and that IMDB description minimizes it by saying it's sexualizing or Roddick with underage girls. They're eleven, years, old eleven what is that? Fifth. Grade. Fourth Grade. That's it's crazy that anyone thinks that this is okay. But the most important thing to me is that I think it might be a federal crime. It certainly fits the definition now in federal law in this country, there is an exception if it's art, but that is required to provide a whole bunch of information to the Attorney General of the United States about the age of the actors when there's any depiction. The age of these actors is clearly under eighteen. There's no question about it. Not Right now, typically Hollywood gets away with it by having someone who has just turned eighteen play somebody who's younger but that's not what's going on here and there was among the years ago called kids I think and they did the same thing they had actually young people and although they didn't actually they sort of hit the sexual parts, they suggested it. But this because of the music that's playing in the background that's clearly of a sexualize nature because of the humping that's going on and the touching of the general areas by these girls, and then you know the cutesy sucking on the finger. To, make it seem like an innocent girl is being sexualize. It's all together. It really does make me. Believe that they are they are violating federal child pornography statute and I think that that's something that you know it's not just well, this is a French movie and we're trying to be open minded this this this description goes on to say. Trigger Warning and eleven year old girl watches a female rap music video where naked women role play through dance both heterosexual lesbian sex acts an eleven year old. Female. Dance Group then mimics these sexual moves, the on themselves and on each other while the camera zooms in on their sexual body parts as they erratically rise. This can be highly distressing to many viewers. Covered Hani legal.

Jim Clemente United States Hollywood Imdb Hague CBS TIM Dance Group New York City Netflix Prosecutor Lehman Mignon Hani MTV Roddick Attorney General
What Everyone Forgets About Money

Optimal Finance Daily

04:44 min | Last week

What Everyone Forgets About Money

"What everyone forgets about money by Crowning Chris. RINING DOT COM. Washing dishes was how I earned my first paycheck when you're fifteen years old and don't get money from your parents to buy things then you have to work. So there. I was scrubbing dishes in the filthy kitchen of a small family owned Italian restaurant, and it's where I learned a little life lesson work is nothing more than trading time for money a medium of exchange. You provide one hour of time to an employer and they provide an hour's wage. I quickly discovered teenagers time isn't worth all that much a measly four, twenty, five per hour. Not long after starting that job I wanted this blind melon album. You might remember their catchy song no rain. One Saturday afternoon wandering the aisles in K. Marts, electronics, department I saw it for sale. Cool. I'm getting it. The price was sixteen, Ninety, eight for whatever reason I did the mental math to figure out the album didn't really cost me seventeen dollars. No, it costs four hours on your feet washing never ending streams of bus tubs overflowing with half finished plates of meat balls is this CD worth four hours of my time. In this case it was but more importantly, you realize the money tucked in your wallet isn't money at all. It's time disguised as money. In fact, it was Benjamin Franklin who said time is money but in our hectic day to day lives, it's easy to forget this. When you spend your money, what you're really doing is spending your time, which means if you waste your money, you waste your time. anyways throw my teens I worked a series of jobs, bagging groceries, stocking merchandise theater concessions, and mostly saved my earnings my time to precious and then I went off to college started a career and forgot what I learned. have. You heard that saying from Texas big hat no cattle meaning you can look rich but be poor. It's hard to believe people who make lots of money are poor. But then your tax preparer tells you they see plenty of families making three hundred thousand dollars and living paycheck to paycheck Thomas Stanley profiles. These folks in the millionaire next door, the doctor lawyer types who drive fancy cars living exclusive neighborhoods and take exotic vacations they look rich, but it's an illusion. It's the families who make one hundred, thousand dollars spent forty thousand and have a million dollars in the bank who are rich. Isn't the worst irony that the simplest way to get rich and have lots of money to spend his by not spending lots of money. But just because it's simple to get rich doesn't mean it's easy spend less than you earn and invest the difference that simple would makes getting rich so difficult is that spending less than you earn takes discipline the median retirement account is worth twenty, five, thousand dollars, and so the problem isn't paying people more money they'll save more give people more money to spend and they'll spend more money. I know this because back in my twenties, I spent just like the next person you think acquiring loss of material possessions satisfying all your superficial desires is the key to happiness. It took me years to relearn what I knew as a teenager. The things you buy with money that you surround yourself with aren't things at all it's your time. And research shows it's having control over your time that makes you happiest not money and things. So, most people have a choice. You can trade time for money and money for things, or you can trade time for money and then use that money as a tool to buy back time. That's why you save and invest, which reminds me of what stoic philosopher Seneca said quote. It's not that we have a short time to live but that we waste much of it life is long enough and it's been given to us in generous measure for accomplishing the greatest things if the whole of it is well invested. But when life is squandered through soft and careless living, and when it spent on no worthwhile pursuit death finally presses and we realized that the life which we didn't notice passing has passed away and quote. What he's saying is when you're about to die, you realize life is time and doesn't that make time your most precious resource. Here think about it like this see, you've worked forty hours per week for the past ten years. You've traded twenty thousand hours of your time. That's forty hours times, fifty weeks, times, ten years, and on the other side of the trade is everything you've consumed sure necessities like food clothing, shelter and healthcare but probably a bunch of other stuff you've totally forgotten about buried in the back of some closet. Was it a fair trade? Maybe it was maybe it wasn't but people are always telling me they've earned million dollars over the past ten years and have nothing to show for it and it makes them sick. They're not complaining about wasting their money. What they're complaining about is wasting their time. Trade wisely.

K. Marts Benjamin Franklin Thomas Stanley Texas Seneca
Bitcoin Dominance Falling

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:35 min | Last week

Bitcoin Dominance Falling

"Another day. About ten thousand, it dipped below ten thousand by fourteen dollar. Rooney's not a great deal. It's broken the high of yesterday's candle pretty happy with that GonNa Climb out of this. Are we going to climb out of this and easy going to be? Now that it happens and is to start to see some of these questions are discount answer. What can give you can give you understanding probabilities based on the way that I've tried it for the last fifteen years. And I'm very cain right now you know at some. Consolidation down there. As much as yes is daily down trying I get that trend follow I, I get that is come right back down a nestled. It's weight little sod on ten thousand has rejected several times six days to be precise were in seventh and that wake Lee all good news if you have not looked at the bitcoin us a weekly chart. Put The ten and twenty period moving average input you Mac Day in Hawaii the signal on. Mike it even as you get rid of that histogram, you don't need it. And have a look at just how perfect is far as cradles now's not closed of course, three days to go but as we close in on the clothes. Oh It's just looking Surrey. So gorgeous one of my favorite things out there right now in the world is bitcoin of the weekly. Look I as it stands right now we're having percent in the half today and yesterday. Yeah we were up point nine, one percent we close at one, thousand, ten, thousand, two, hundred, and twenty five dollars now Hazel Oughta. Phase one of the mosques plan break above ten, thousand, five, hundred, get us some new hot cinders consolidation Ryan. Jr Don't want to say it pulled back giving me some. You know some some NAS follow through. So chop structure the to our starting to get it. We got to push on he. Loss to Alcan was at one point, six, two percent, very, very attractive looking candidate but I wanna see follow through I. Do not a repeat of you not WanNa. See this market re-test ten thousand again. The guy from. A structure point of view momentum point of view for me trend point of view. I don't WanNa see it back ten all want to continue to move from He. I want that because it gives me up a charities to try it again. And it's been pretty slow of light has been in a building positions really and I've done that now I want to get back to the business of trading, which is the one that on the most familiar with. So bitcoins now one point, four percent for two hours forty into tried to diet ten, thousand, three, hundred, seventy, I don't WANNA say ten five by the end of the day. A theorem yesterday it closed up four percent against I. Having a good start to the five point three percent were three, hundred, sixty, nine dollars and thirty three cents that weeklies looking rather lodge rather sexy chops can't looks like the four hours a matter of fact, this is looking really nauseous broken above that three hundred and sixty della barrier that was sitting around for awhile now as I see this and I go through this with my two eyeballs on looking at the region roughly ramble yes. Three sixty, three, fifty, nine, sixty, two now looking at that on the one, our CIA because why didn't you say if I can get a booster in there? I want not yet. Maybe a cradle will be worth while training father sent nothing to be sniffed at on the big dog as looking very, very narsingdi pushing up through the new that new sitting a high high in that consolidation moving away. Now, looking better than bitcoin moving better than bitcoin ex based on the science up two point nine percent, a twenty, four point, five cents yesterday will not much one percent today. As I just said, it's up a lot more the weekly in the right spot we are really really grinding at a very nonsmoking truck. She here we go to the same things a theory and has pushed new highs within this consolidation Ryan. And by Jingo Blah George I am pumped there may be really good opportunities coming lights on in the deities in more watchlist as last week to Bitcoin cash twenty, nine, hundred, seventy his along still very similar bitcoin. Yes. It out point nine to two point four, five per cent. The weekly doesn't look very good to be fair. But as I go down the four hour trying really hard to walk out of that consolidations not there yet doesn't look as good as eighth. Next out pay if on honest not quite there yet

Wanna Rooney Surrey Alcan Hazel Oughta JR Cain Hawaii Mike LEE CIA
The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

Mom Brain

08:37 min | Last week

The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

"So My name is Dr Marie? Reproductive endocrinology further specialist. My is in Manhattan on Columbus Circle. The practice is called new hope for not center I. Am a father of two boys. Ryan is fifteen years old going through puberty and Adam is eleven years old and I love my boys and my dot com will be he's my favorite history years old any sleeps with me every night I literally feel like we're just gonNA continue a sentence from from before. So we were talking about all your. Treatments in all the different things that you can experience while you're having your IV thing that sounds like somewhat not want to call it a SPA treatment but there it just sounds. Nice. Amazing this it is treated. You know it's funny to warding job honestly, and I really love my job and a lot of time I get attached to my patients because you're helping them have a baby and you know I get Christmas cards every year and saying, Oh thank you give me a baby. What kind of you know it's it's really happiness I cannot explain and actually they send pictures of the kids and the children and I put them on the wall and my house. So I have a wall full of pictures of the baby, the baby's. Saying So let's go back because I. think part of this conversation was really like I the F. One. Oh one if you've ever been curious if you've ever thought about it if you've ever been, you know sort of confused about what it entailed. We really covered all the details. So those of you listening who are still curious about that providence to go listen to part one of this conversation part two is going to be more of like you. I mean, you're just so knowledge what everything. More of the cutting edge stuff because I think that that's really what your outfit specializes in and is so prized for is that you really are on this cutting edge of what does it mean to be able to bring Tila to a challenging situations and to do it in a really as noninvasive way as possible, which is actually fascinating Lee sometimes with better results. So I guess we got cut off at noninvasive chromosomal screening is that right? Am I like looking at this? Okay. Then noninvasive chromosomes screening our next is the following. Let's say Daphne has three boys and now she wants to have a car. And now she comes to my office and tell me Dr Marie I WanNa have a boy now are we gonNa do is we're going to do something called IVF. We suck the ads at your husband's sperm, and then we make embryos right sperm and egg may can embryo it takes down a week to make an embryo Now, a days in the last few years more and more centers are testing the embryos not just for the gender also chromosomal screening. You don't want to worry about having a down syndrome baby and then I'm Houston later on or have a miscarriage and then was centers. Do they take a piece of your embryo and then freeze the embryo and test this piece for the chromosome because it's coming from the embryo? We don't do that with the Knicks are noninvasive chromosome screening. We take the fluid at your embryo where it's growing. Just. A fluid water and with that fluid for the end without taking off your angrier. We're only has this technology and I can tell you a lot of people come to us because they were like you know I don't know if the biopsy off Ambrose rain debut and I don't want south sticking out of my my future baby you know they can out to be tested. So that's that's the knicks or none of his of chromosomes I can tell you I love it because it doesn't put on your embryo if you see how an embassy biopsies down the stretch like this and the Pum, a piece of snaps out. It's a little bit aggressive. So the next I think presents a lot of things and then you can also for tomorrow and you can have your boy if you want just journalists election. Yeah. Fascinating because the the a when it's growing remember we put it in a culture dish and over the week after we had the sperm and egg over the growth of. The DNA is thrown in that fluid. So that's how we do it. So that's I think is cutting edge technology reverted proud to have it at new hope fertility center. Why is it only you guys that have this technology you know other centers have done it for research and stuff, but I did not get a good result when we started this technology. I can tell you my secret sauce by the way to have fun. Waiting. But before we offered the to patients, you have to test it. Right. You have to do on the same embryo both technologies the old one and the fluid L. We got ninety nine point nine percent correlation other places they got sixty, eighty percent Max, and so it's the the lab hasn't really got the as good results if I wanNA, say that's Why it's not. So we have great technology. We have great lab, and that's why we have a thousand nine point nine percent correlation between both understood and has a nice. So we talked before about the Needle Free Ivf, we're you take pills instead of injections, correct pills and patches and everything. Correct. There's no patches. This fills by mouth by GINA NASAL spray. Spray interesting correct. Is it just as effective show? We have to be very careful because if someone is young and they have a lot of eggs, it's not it's less effective. Why because? The shots are more aggressive food for the eggs and younger patients have lot of eggs to feed. So they need more food. So the pills is not enough they need addition to shots but women thirty five years, and above it's as effective as the old conventional where patients plenty of shots That's so interesting and I told you I have a patient and Amazon me she wants to talk about experience about the. Home Ivf because she get, we sent to the house no shots just spilt and nasal spray and that we got a lot of eggs as she made four embryos and that's that's a lot I mean it's this is favor good. So yeah it's effective and then how long can you freeze embryos for twenty five years? So it's good and bad guy, and this is great question. Let me tell you why it's good and. It's bad. It's good because nowadays, some countries by some doctors are struggling with Beijing let's say you come to me ten years ago you've eggs and you at forty now you come to me after ten years. Now you're fifty years old and you. WanNa get pregnant with my own exodus froze ten years ago. Some doctors have issues with that because now they think well, what if something happens to you now you have diabetes and you know so we're GonNa be stuck in situations where actually have a patient I was doing a patient from Norway she froze her ex in Copenhagen ten fifteen years ago. Now she's fifty one and they said we cannot use your eggs because getting you're pregnant at this age is dangerous. But, that exactly so I mean I love the fact that twenty five years but also. Having Siblings Twenty five years apart. This we it. Let's say you do IV after they get pregnant and twenty five years. Oh, my my my brother is. So. There's a lot of things but last last part which is. The great thing about freezing for twenty five years is that there is a lot of abandoned embryos what am I gonNa do with them right. I mean some clinics in this country has adult fourteen percent of the embryos abandoned coupled who left Leftover Embryos And are gone and they're not being the freezing fees because they finish this they finished family. So that's why when you go back to the conventional idea when you tell me, I get tons of eggs but guess what kinds of embryos to that you're GonNa be stuck with for live. So I won't vicious the thing that, yes home ivf or gentle IVF or neither free IVF. It's good effective at your to be stuck situation where you're going to be freezing fees for twenty five years for embryos that you might not need. Right. A lot of my consultations are bishops will finish their family and they just WanNa talk to me about what to do that embryo and I don't know what to say, what are the different options, throw it out, give it to another couple or give it twenty such but

Knicks Needle Free Ivf Dr Marie Manhattan Columbus Circle Dr Marie I Wan Ryan Adam Gina Nasal Tila New Hope Fertility Center Daphne Beijing Diabetes Ambrose Houston Amazon
California Creek Fire Zero Percent Contained, Chief Firefighter Says

Environment: NPR

07:22 min | Last week

California Creek Fire Zero Percent Contained, Chief Firefighter Says

"The People Fighting California's wildfires include our next guest chief. Chris Donnelly is spent twenty two years as a volunteer firefighter in Huntington Lake California. Good, morning sir. Good. Morning Steve. How are you this morning I'm okay. We've reported a lot on the sheer extent of the fires. How have you been spending your days where you are? Well we we began this this fight probably on Saturday morning about six am and what we did I was get all of our people out of Huntington Lake. Huntington has about probably five hundred and fifty summer cabins in an additional hundred and ten. Condominiums, we had thousands of people at Huntington and Once I had is on the fire, very clear to me that he was going to burn into Huntington and lives were at stake. So we spent most of the time getting people out. Well, I'm glad you've been able to do that. But of course, because of course, we have been following stories of some other resort areas, vacation areas where. There for the summer there for vacation there camping have had to be evacuated emergency ways. you said you got is on the fire can you describe the landscape the way it looks to somebody who's never been there and what the fire looked like. Yeah. Honey. Lake is quite unique word seven thousand feet, and we are the reservoir for a very large electric generation facility. That's two thousand feet below us. Virtually down a steep just just a cliff. and. So when I heard a sheriff's deputies go through our area to begin evacuations about five thirty in the morning on Saturday. I called our dispatch and and and they told me where the fire was. I drove down there about fifteen to twenty minutes away. And look down into the Canyon to about a thousand feet below us and saw flames and new as soon as the morning wins started upslope of Valley. That that was going to be a threat to Huntington. So I recommended that we do a mandatory evacuation at Huntington and began that vacuum evacuation about seven thirty. Our our teams, we we knew this was coming eventually with so much deadened down and the droughts over the years. And temperatures have been drier and well, it's been hotter and humidity's dryer. So said so much deadened down is this mostly forested area that we're talking about This heavy forest. Read for in white for as much as eight feet in diameter. And Bark Beetle infestations probably killed a third of that forest and Ecorse was. Caused by not not too much water much hotter temperatures in the last ten or fifteen years. and. So we have a lot of lot of fuel out there in the forest. You you focused a lot clearly on the evacuation is everybody out safely so far as you know from your area of responsibility. Absolutely. We made several passes through our small community. And we verified that everyone was gone, and then at that point, we had lots of strike teams which are groups of fire engines each. Totaling about thirty five engines by about two PM. At which time is started releasing our personnel to get their families and get out. So right now, the the only members of our fire department, our one company officer, which we will keep their throughout the battle. But it's simply not safe to be there. Well this helps to explain number that we've been hearing the past couple of days we're told this fire is zero percent contained. Is this a circumstance and of course, it's true of all wildfires to some extent circumstance where it's abundantly clear that the massive -ness of dead vegetation that you've described that the extreme dryness means that you really this is something that is beyond human control. At this point I think that's a that's a good statement. I don't know what the future of Huntington Lake is. But at this point to it does not look good. Has. The fire actually reached the the what had been the settled area of Huntington Lake. Yes. We have loss cabins of on the western end of the lake. All communications are down into the area I am not there at this moment. So it's very difficult to get serious information but about six PM last night, all crews were pulled out to about the middle of the lake. And we don't know if they re engaged or not. You said, all crews have been pulled out to the middle of the lake. Do you mean that they went out on the water? No. Okay this is copulated on the north side of the lake, and so a mid mid way on the shore you retreat retreated to a more defensible place is what you're saying. Thank you for much much better said, yes, Gotcha Gotcha I want people to know if they don't that you are as you describe it a brother in the Catholic church maybe a layman would think of you as a monk that is another thing that you do besides volunteer firefighting for twenty two years. How does that inform the way that you think about an event like this? Well you know I'm a teacher at Saint Mary's College and I've worked with kids since probably nineteen seventy. So it for me, it's all about caring people and touching hearts and. It's it's that center of people that I worry about the most you can rebuild cabins and you can go somewhere else but it's the people. So you know just a a little. Thirty second bit for you. Yesterday morning, I drove by a cabin and made a PA announcement directly to people about you need to get out now. Yesterday I called her and told her cabin was gone. And she shared with me that are great. Grandfather that cabin in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty. And her grandmother talked about the moments out playing in the woods and collecting pine cones and. As she broke into tears. I. Thought. How many stories like this am I going to be hearing? And how hurtful this all is. Income on their summer cabins, they gotTA someplace to go, but it's the hurt and the loss and. Tens of thousands of girl and boy scouts that. Were at Huntington. And Church camps and private Anson. There's so many lives. So many memories that probably won't be there in the future. So for me, that's what it's about. It's about the people. And all the all the loss. Donnelly thanks very much for your insights. I really appreciate it and we'll continue following the news to see if you begin to reach a point where you're able to battle back. Well, we'll look for that moment to. Chris Donald is chief of the Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Department, one of many areas in California facing massive

Huntington Huntington Lake Huntington Lake California Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Chris Donnelly California Steve Ecorse Chris Donald Upslope Of Valley Officer Saint Mary's College TA
Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

Motley Fool Answers

04:39 min | Last week

Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

"Well, it's been a crazy year pandemic thousands of businesses closed millions of Americans, unemployed. The stock market is still up for the year at least so far your portfolio may not be your only acid or even your biggest asset fact according to Edward Wolff nyu economist. For the bottom eighty percent of Americans in terms of assets. Their number one asset is their home about sixty percent of their net worth is in their house. So, how has residential real estate fair during the virus crisis and how might that change in the future here to help us answer those questions is Jeff Strauss, key senior writer and analyst at Bankrate Jeff welcomed the Motley fool answers. Hey, bro thanks for having me. So let's start with the current state of the house in the housing market. Let's get to the numbers. How have prices been holding out during the recession was surprisingly really well, prices are still going up and I. Think I like a lot of people that fill victim to the whole recency bias flaw. That the last time we had a recession home prices just absolutely collapsed. We had fifty percent drops and values in many parts of the country and so back in March when we started going into recession again I think I know a lot weather's thought. Oh, here we go. Again in terms of home prices and that really hasn't happened home prices have held up home sales are down but if you were people have put their houses on the market and so the supply and demand curve has just shifted. So we've got basically more buyers than there are houses for sale. So we're seeing a lot of bidding wars I keep hearing these tales of a nondescript. House getting thirty and forty, and even fifty bids over a weekend. So home prices have held up surprisingly well, they're still going up part of that is because we've got record low mortgage rates and people have more buying power and then part of it also is just that the pandemic has really changed. Qui Bowls thinking about housing I mean if you're going to work earned, your kids are going to school in your house very much. You can make do with less space but now the that were crammed into to one space and people are working from home and taking classes from home it's You suddenly start to think, Hey, I could use a bigger house. You got a couple of interesting points that I. Let's start with mortgage rates. Crazy low. Thirty year mortgage thirty year fixed is around three percent little bit above little bit below dependent where you look. Fifteen year bit below that. One interesting thing I've noticed though is normally the adjustable rate mortgages are the lowest. But from what I've seen there at the same as a thirty year fixed or even a little higher what's going on with fat? Yeah. That is a weird situation and it's funny that you mentioned arms because it seems like nobody really pays much attention to arms anymore with with fixed rate mortgages being so low for. So long at as you said, they're in the the three percent range or even below for thirty year fixed but they've they haven't been much above that the past decade I am I think they briefly spiked up to around five percent but. When fixed rate mortgages are so low it's in they've stayed consistently low. People just sort of You know lose interest in arms. So it's that's part of it. Part of it is a just that there. There aren't as many lenders offering arms, and so there's there's less. Less apply less widely available so that that probably has something to do some of it also is that the without geeking out here too much but the rates were were based on Libor the London interbank offered rate for a long time in libraries going away at a new indexes coming in so that that might have something to do with it. and then in in times of economic uncertainty, we we do see this this pattern where arms suddenly get more expensive than fixed rate mortgages but you know it's intriguing. I talked to a lot of consumers a lot of. Lending officers lot at mortgage brokers. Nobody's talking about arms they're all talking about. The thirty year fixed and they're they're talking about how many points should you pay? Should you do a thirty or fifteen ten? What's? What are the advantages of different types of of fixed rate mortgages and? That just seems like an arms have been sort of forgotten. They were hot thing fifteen years ago but I almost never hear anyone recommending God's

Jeff Strauss Edward Wolff Bankrate Jeff Motley Qui Bowls Writer Analyst
Media Molecule Co-founder Alex Evans is Leaving the Industry

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Media Molecule Co-founder Alex Evans is Leaving the Industry

"A, bigwig media molecule stepping down. This is Marie Davis Andrea over at Games Industry Dot Biz Media Molecule Co founder Alex Evans has announced his departure from Sony Studio. After thirteen years at the little big planet and dreams developer the technical director said on twitter that he wanted to take a break from the game developed from game development and explore other opportunities. Quote a few months ago. I. Did a bit of lockdown inspired soul-searching decided to step down from dreams. deb To dreams fan take a break from game to have a career. I've. Been Lucky enough to enjoy since I was a spotty fifteen year old he his tweets read media molecules are wonderful place. I can't imagine making games anywhere else but I wondered what else old Fart like me could do in this world I've been in the game deb bubble. So long I'm not yet sure what's next, what's next or even out there for someone like me He also reassured dreams fans about the title. With his departure, seemingly having no impact on the current developments of the project. For anyone worrying about dreams don't. What media molecule are doing injuries at the moment is GonNa, blow your minds and though I'll miss them all. Are we cheering from the sidelines thanks to them for the thanks to them for the first thirteen wonderful years, and here's the media molecules next thirteen. The studio responded on twitter thanking Evans for his leadership friendship and everything giving media molecule. The team added we'll continue to be weird and wonderful as you've always wanted, and there's forever space for you on our Stream Sofa I actually inverted that but it's fine. I ever started his career in the industry at bullfrog before working at lionhead for six years on a six years as head of indeed, he co-founded media molecule with art director, Tony creative director Marquee, and technical director David. Smith in two, thousand,

Games Industry Dot Biz Media M Technical Director Alex Evans Twitter Director Marie Davis Andrea Sony Studio Founder Bullfrog Smith Tony Developer David
An Astrophysicist On The End Of Everything

Short Wave

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

An Astrophysicist On The End Of Everything

"So, before we get into it, we need to talk about something that will definitely play a role in the end of the universe dark energy. See Our universe is expanding spread on out and that expansion is speeding up. I think that's due to something called dark energy but they don't really know what dark energy is and there's nothing in normal physics that will do that like regular matter won't do that. You know it has to be something weird and whatever it is we call it dark energy but we do not know what dark energy is made of. We don't know how it got here. You know why it exists it might be just a property of space something called the cosmological constant that space just has this kind of inherent stretching in it, but it may be something different changes over time and could. Get a very extreme. Far. Future. The big rip. So depending dark energy is really kind of dictates potentially end of the universe. So I see what how long do you think that'll take you figure out? Katie like ten or fifteen years. I'm personally not working on dark energy. Partially passing the Buck Katie really. It's a very hard thing to study. Okay. Because it does is make the universe expand faster. Okay. Okay. So Are you ready to start talking about the end of the universe different scenarios as you will. All right. So let's start with heat death. Our Universe is expanding in that expansion is accelerating due to dark energy in in the heat death scenario our universe kind of continues to expand and expand and expand, right? Yeah. Yeah. What happens is that everything is farther apart from everything else you have fewer of these galaxy interactions, you make fewer stars and eventually each galaxy gets more and more isolated. So we will get to appoint. An emily about one hundred, billion years we will get to this point where we can't see other galaxies in the sky anymore because they'll be so far away their light will be stretched out so much that we won't be able to see them. and. So the universal just get a lot darker than our own. The stars in our galaxy will be dying out. So our galaxy will fade away and then. Even, black holes will start to evaporate because that's something that can happen to a black hole is that it can lose its mass through this process called Hawking evaporation. So black holes will start disappearing and then matter decays and then eventually you end up with the universe that's just cold dark empty, and all left is kind of a trace amount of waste heat from the processes of the universe that's called the heat death called dark empty. That's actually just sounds right into but really like that is considered to be one of the more likely and yeah that's kind of what happens if you if you just extrapolate from what we know about the universe's evolution today and assume that dark energy is this cosmological constant this just property of space that it has this expansion built in it takes a ridiculous number of trillions and trillions of years, but you end up with a basically an empty universe. Yeah. All right. So If dark energy acts a little differently than we potentially get to a different and game the big rip right you describe it. As an unraveling and this happens considerably faster than heat death, right? Yeah. Yeah. So the idea behind the big rip is if dark energy is something else if it's if it's a particular kind of stuff, we call Phantom dark energy where instead of just being property of space that actually is something that grows in intensity overtime something that there's more and more of it you know in each little space of of space overtime then it can be something that doesn't just move galaxies apart from each other and isolate them but actually tears the galaxies themselves apart. So what it would do is it would pull the stars away from our galaxy. So we'd see the Milky Way kind of. Dissipating, and then it would pull planets away from their stars and then it would start to actually rip apart stars and planets and thin atoms and molecules, and eventually rip apart space

Katie
The Decline of Local News is Solvable

Solvable

03:32 min | 2 weeks ago

The Decline of Local News is Solvable

"Margaret. Sullivan is the media columnist for the Washington Post and formerly the public editor of the new. York Times. Her new book is called ghosting the news local journalism and the Crisis of American democracy? I talked with her about the scale and seriousness the collapse of local news and what can be done to fix it. Or Margaret thanks for joining us on solvable and let's talk first about the dimensions of this problem. There's no question that we are losing local newspapers. I think something close to two thousand. If I read that right in your book have gone out of business in the past fifteen years and the ones that are remain aren't exactly thriving, and of course that matters a lot to us journalists says our friends that's the system we came up in. But why does this matter so much as you say in the title of your book to American Democracy. It matters because. While newspapers are certainly not the only way that people are informed about their communities in their public officials, they have been over time perhaps the key way that people get information about how their local governments are functioning and how communities have a base of. facts from which to operate they may disagree on the facts or what to do about them but they sort of have this shared substance that that makes sense to everybody. As that has dwindled away largely because of the dissolution of the underlying business model based on print advertising. Largely, people are are less informed people are less civically engaged and it. It hurts the underlying the underpinnings of of the way our society in our government is supposed to function. So it's primarily an accountability problem. Right if simply put if the press isn't watching government officials can get away with more corruption mismanagement. I think you said it exactly right Jacob. It is primarily an accountability problem but I I see another aspect to to which I just like to mention which is has nothing to do with really watchdog journalism or that accountability piece, which is that newspapers have traditionally been away that communities helped knit themselves together whether it's about coverage of concerts or restaurants or theater or interesting people or obituaries it's sort of village square for the community. That has nothing to do with whether the town council or the city council is mismanaging your tax dollars, but it does have to do with sort of cohesion within the community. So it's it's both of those things and probably a bunch of others to. But why is it important that it's news organizations versus you know bloggers or people posting smartphone videos tweeting about what's going on their town or community Weisensee. Citizen Journalism the replacement for all this. Citizen Journalism. If that's what we want to call it is is part of the solution. One of the things it can't do very well, though is publicized to the same degree that a front page headline or a big homepage treatment can from the Chicago Tribune or the Sun Times you know it's a lot easier to ignore a gadfly citizen as these folks might be seen rather than a big institution that's powerful.

Margaret. Sullivan York Times Public Editor Washington Post Margaret Chicago Tribune Jacob Sun Times
Impact Of Climate Policy On 2020 Presidential Election

Environment: NPR

04:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Impact Of Climate Policy On 2020 Presidential Election

"On the most recent Pew Research Survey of top issues for voters this year climate change despite even make the top ten. But not for Varsity precaut-, she's executive director of the Environmental Justice Groups Sunrise Movement. She helped editor book called winning the Green New Deal and her organization gave, Joe. Biden's initial climate platform, an f rating but as Biden became the likely democratic. Nominee for president precaut-. Joined his climate change task force to make sure aggressive climate policy had a place on the ballot this year when we spoke earlier today, I asked her about how you seen his climate policy shift while she's been helping shape it. We have seen his client plan improve considerably over the last three months now, championing policies to decarbonised our power. Sector by twenty, thirty, five, we've seen him increase the level of investment from a one point, seven trillion dollar green jobs and infrastructure plan to a two trillion dollar plan over the next four years on the whole our core goal was to go in and increase Joe Biden's ambition and the Taiwan upon which these benchmarks are happening to decarbonised economy and ensure that. Environmental Justice and climate justice except core and at the heart of his agenda climate seems to have fallen out of the headlines Lately. That's even with record breaking heat fires hurricanes. Instead, the news is dominated by pandemic and economic collapse racial justice. What's your level of concern that climate change may not be getting sufficient political attention and and how do you get that attention? I think the key here is to understand the climate crisis is essentially connected to every single one of crises that are emerging whether it is the uprisings against white supremacy or whether it is the tens of millions of jobs that are been lost in this economic downturn in large part I believe the climate crisis is even thinking because we have racial and economic inequality in this country for example, I believe that after hurricane. Katrina. We would've had a green new deal past fifteen years ago and yet here we are. Fifteen years later, we've got a double header storm and communities engulfs out. That are still suffering We would have had green new deal following hurricane. Maria when thousands more were ricans perished but because we do not value black lives and brown lives, indigenous lives, poor lives as much as others, we have not taken the drastic unnecessary measures to prevent suffering. Do you think climate plays out in local political races as well or do voters think of it mostly as something that has to be addressed on a national issue? Now, I think it absolutely plays out at the local level. The climate crisis take so many different forms in different communities in Iowa overseeing the role that corporate agriculture and factory farming plays as being really detrimental to communities for Detroit. The level of fuel infrastructure contributing to asthma and disease for the majority black community. Earlier, we have seen the election of drama. Or Eliot Angle in New York which Jamal Boom and actively ran and champions agree new deal when his opponent refused to do. So the climate crisis is affecting people at the local and state level not chest. Politics. So, have you thought ahead to if president trump is reelected? What will you approach be to try to advance your climate goals with a presidential administration that may be less receptive Joe Biden would have been. We're still figuring that out. What I'll say is everything that has happened with the green new deal at the federal level and many of the substantive state legislative battles that have been one have been under the shadow of the trump administration, and so I do believe that there is absolutely still space to fight and contests and win, but it will be far far easier. If we have item presidency, Vaujany precaut- is Executive Director of the Sunrise Movement and her new book is called winning the green new deal partially, thanks for coming on the program. Thank you so much

Joe Biden Executive Director Environmental Justice Groups S President Precaut Vaujany Precaut Taiwan Maria Sunrise Movement Katrina Asthma Iowa Donald Trump Editor President Trump Eliot Angle New York Jamal Boom
Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should  Just Keep Going

Good Life Project

06:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should Just Keep Going

"I believe in curiosity I just I. Just think that we can't do anything without it early and just asking people obey the is basically a version of empathy. Enemy. Empathizing with WHO people are and what they do over were you the curious kid like is this something that's been part of your life or somebody who cultivated? Yeah. I mean. I think the circumstances of my life you know being born in Iran and then moving here as young immigrants in the eighties where Iran was like enemy enemy number one if you recall. And like Iran Russia which kind of back there again I kind of felt that like you know I was so curious about this world is culture and I think that's kind of where it started also you know It's crazy. It was crazy. My parents don't speak any the my spirit's English is not great. The they came here when they were forty and fifty. The I mean it's not like they. You know I'm thirty seven. So like imagining myself in three years time taking all of an IV and Chrissy and saying, Hey, well, going to move to China and we're GONNA make this. We're going to make life better in China as a show I mean that's All you can be as curious I. Guess. Yeah. I guess. So how so how old were you when you actually let on? Well, we laughed Iran you know it's hard to tell because at time here was crazy there was a war happening and I think a lot of you especially you a bit younger don't don't really remember that whole window of of our history and our relationship with Sir Yeah, the Middle East Yeah. Yeah it's complicated. It's long and it's GonNa either bore fascinate all of you guys. But the the the the the truth is we you know it's it's. It's it's hard to talk about because there's so many levels to like how crazy it is. One is my mom was married to my dad at the age of thirteen. My mom was thirteen Wendo arranged marriage. My mom is pretty standard. You know it was on the outs in that time period. Yeah. But my parent, my mom's mom was a single mom she was the youngest you know she couldn't make she couldn't make it happen, and so she had to like you know she had to like give I, guess her her daughter La youngest daughter away and so then my dad, my dad's they were more religious than my mom's side was and so. They got arranged. My mom had her first kid at fifteen years old her second kid at sixteen and Arthur kid eighteen, and then had me when she was thirty five. So my siblings are seventeen eighteen in. I'm sorry. Yes. Some teen eighteen basically twenty years than me. So, and then and then the revolution hit seventy nine. And then a war hit right after that because Saddam invaded with you know and then got the support of the United States. You know because we of the Iranian situation and then we were in a war. And so everyone was closed inside as is bombings happening all over Tehran all over the border, and so we were indoors and and you know when when people get doors and there's a lot of fear in the air of uncertainty, you procreate you know and so the baby boom in Iran happened at that moment in seventy nine to eighty five, where like sixty percent of Iranian. Population right now in Iran is under the age of forty. Fascinating you walk down the street and everyone's young. So anyway and then and then. CRAZILY my brother. My oldest brother was sixteen. When he graduated high school in Iran, his name is Amir And then he went to A. He got accepted to a school in. CHICAGO. Right. When he was sixteen. So sixteen twentyish he's in Chicago, ish issue like something like that, and then the revolution hit. And then my brother was like should I come back and. My parents were like you're never coming back here will come to you. And then in that time period. My. Youngest my brother that's closest to me who seventeen his name is. Oh, mead omen was drafted in the Iran Iraq war. And fought three years in that war. With a couple of my cousins who are who are who have passed away who died in that war one of them, which data that were, and then my brother was in war my sister was in the middle there. I was just born. We got the F out of town and we went we went as far as my dad's connections and money and. You know and you know connections could could could take you in that was Dubai. We've got to Dubai who lived in the Arab Emirates and we were there for off and on for about five years and then and then we and then you know a long period of time you know no one heard it from my brother was fight in the war. And trying to and trying to try to like move three pieces ahead while also like making sure the pieces back here it's a chess game you know and and dangerous one. And then my dad then. We had were that Amigos live. We went back to Iran. Might he got back? He was no nine, hundred twenty you know fought three years in a war in a city called Oh mead his name is omitted, which means hope and wherever like was slaughtered murdered and died because it was a brutal war brutal war and he he's a twenty year old brainwashed you know. PTSD. Kid. And in that time period as we're figuring out to go back to Dubai and come back, my sister falls in love. Falls in love with the guy and and then that made things tricky and then, and then we all laughed and my sister stay. So I- sister got the states in two thousand and three we left in eighty five. So An and then we came to the states and again you know the analogy that the Chinese like us like you and me and you taking your family and your son going to China or whatever language that you don't know our culture, the No, and you're like, this is the best news for us. Now you know you're GonNa, you're not going to be easy and so in all of that, you just get you know a a sense of like the world in a very kind of complicated way. A very young age and and not only do they not speak the language they don't know what? Christmases. They don't know what Hanukkah is. They don't have any idea why people are going to church all the time. They have no clue why the cars are this way they don't know why the food is patching. There's nothing that is familiar. There's nothing that you can empathize with as as an Iranian living in the states and being like I know this thing and so in all that you are learning rapidly. You know a very drastic way and so that curiosity might have had something to do with it. I'm not really sure

Iran Dubai China Amir And Sir Yeah Chicago Wendo Middle East Ptsd Chrissy United States Arab Emirates Saddam Arthur Tehran Russia Iraq
A Conversation With Genevieve Piturro  Founder of the Pajama Project

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

03:53 min | 3 weeks ago

A Conversation With Genevieve Piturro Founder of the Pajama Project

"Hello My. Women, friends, I am so happy to share today's gas genevieve paternal with you. Her story is an inspiration, a busy television marketing exact in New York City and she hears the whisper of a little girl in her ear and her life is forever changed. This story speaks to the power of what one person can do when they have set their mind to it. Genevieve is the founder of the Pajama Project. They have given out over seven million pajamas and read books to children with those pajamas in shelters across the US in Puerto Rico. A can't wait for you to hear her story get ready to be inspired. Let's meet genevieve paternal. Welcome extraordinary woman radio. genevieve. While thank you, Happy Cami. It's great to have you here. Where are you joining us from today jokes out of Manhattan in the county of Westchester. Very good very good house Howard things out there. In West Westchester we have a lot more than in Manhattan. So it's amazing how you know half an hour away. It's so quiet and closed in Manhattan but has to be that way so that we can say exactly crazy times for sure. Isn't it upside down world? Yes. Yup. As an why some of our work is so important right now and I really am excited to hear some of your stories and here you know you're passionate around human connection and really just helping people step into leading with meeting. So I'm super super excited to hear more of your story unless you start there let's start with this amenity. You were successful television marketing EXAC in New York. And right in the heart of the city and a little girls question changed the course of your life for ever. So tell us more about that. Yes. Yes. I wanted to climb the corporate ladder. And it was not what my family expected very traditional Italian family and I think everyone's waiting for grandchildren firstborn. warned me. Only I had a culprit clock tick game and I just wanted to be independent and wants to be independent woman and I wanted to be like Mary Tyler Moore show at everything and I would just stay off and watch watcher every Saturday night as. I wish I had met the woman that I took a picture of their statue. That's that's all I got to do. But yes she she broke a lot of barriers and I want to be like her as it is a kid. And I did find the corporate ladder and fifteen years in I thought I had the great job and I had the great apartment like she and I was working on that, wardrobe. So. I heard a voice in me before that little girls question. It was question in me I was so shocked I heard a voice in me ask if this is the next thirty years of your life is this enough to that came? What were you doing when that came to you in the moment I was in my apartment was an afternoon. I don't know what they what? It must have been a weekend and I sat down because I never heard a voice come from anywhere except the babbly of my brain and this wasn't up there was lower. Now I call it my heart voice, and we all have a heart voice we need to listen to it because I wasn't listening to mind until. I screamed at me, but it was just a clear. A, clear whisper. But it was unmistakable and I sat down and I realized, wow, fifteen years in thirty eight years old now I'm thinking was right path. This is the question I have to answer. Really the answer was came to me so fast it was no, you know what was what was the big deal? I was alone and I would be along if I didn't really think about what was important because I realized all of a sudden nothing mattered.

Genevieve Manhattan New York City Pajama Project United States West Westchester Founder Mary Tyler Moore Westchester Puerto Rico Howard New York
"fifteen year" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

04:25 min | Last month

"fifteen year" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Course, this is all related to accountability. So I wanted to talk about your last episode of flood lines where you have this interview. there's lengthy interview with former FEMA director Michael Brown. You spoke with him for what six hours six hours. Yeah An and and you play the highlights and lowlights. In the final episode of foot lines. Why was it so critical to to sit down with him and and talk about what happened Well I mean I I thing is just I think a Product like this. Due Diligence and we really wanted to talk to people who were involved. In, the decision making we got it from him. We got it from general honorary. We talked to the police chief Eddie Compass We wanted to get their sides of the story and understand what it was like being in that pressure cooker but also it was important for us to talk to Michael Brown because he has become in lots of people's is the face or the scapegoat of the failure in responding to Katrina. And we wanted to talk to him about what the mistakes he that were made actually were looking from the inside whether we could trace the the history of those mistakes whether we could figure out. from his perspective. How we could. Do better the next time but also wanted to get a sense of personally what is like to be escape goat. Whether he had come to terms with his role in it whether he was willing to provide an apology for all the people who are demanding it from him in New Orleans we got a really. Complex Think. Human. Interaction on that and It's one of the pieces that I'm really glad we did it's worth listening to in full. There's a point where he he says that people need to understand that the government's not gonna come and save you. In. The midst of a disaster. Right. My paraphrase in that correctly does what he says no biting shining armor, right? It's GonNa be scary. You're going to be scared. It's going to happen and and then after your interview you went in and revisited one of your subjects. Leon Williams and and played some of this for her. Where he got he you know he don't to say he apologizes because. He's Reluctantly indignantly apologizing to her. that was. A it was meaningful though it was meaningful for both him and her and I think She says the knowledge man matters and. I don't think anybody walks away from it. Having their baseline emotional reaction changed I mean she still thinks he did a bad job at what he at his at his job. But it does represent to me part of the kind of reckoning that we need to do. After these kind of disasters where we do have people you know we can't. Abandon the process of holding people to account because it's been fourteen fifteen years and we can't stop talking to the people who were affected by it just because it's been fourteen fifteen years because. As we try to illustrate. Those were rubber rations they continue to a person's life they continue through generations, and so the act of reckoning is one that we will have to be doing and engaging in purposefully. As long as. We Can Ban. Thank you so much for talking with me. Thank you. And remind people the best ways to go and find flood minds. All right. So YOU WANNA go your browser the Atlantic Dot Com slash outlines place ago and he can also type in flood lines in any year the ways you podcast. Is True is well worth the listen man thank you so much. And just one postscript to this. We're taping on Friday. August twenty first. Big weather have right now is titled. To hurricanes.

Michael Brown Leon Williams Katrina FEMA New Orleans director Eddie Compass Atlantic Dot Com
"fifteen year" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

08:26 min | Last month

"fifteen year" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Sources podcast. So let's cue the music. I'm Brian stelter and this is our weekly podcast edition of reliable sources. Our chance to go in depth with media leaders and newsmakers. fucking about how the news gets made and how it should be made differently. I've always been really really interested in how Hurricane Katrina was covered. By the media. And how different the story of the storm looks? In. The final telling. I'm borrowing that phrase the final telling from. An extraordinary podcasts by the Atlantic called flood lines. The podcast was released earlier this year. And now here we are in. August. Always toward the end of August I, think about Katrina. And the aftermath. We are now the fifteen year anniversary of the disaster. One of the worst disasters in. Americans lifetime's. Do People still think about it that way. What about the failures of government and society and the media? Was the final telling tell us. Well Van Newkirk is a senior editor at the Atlantic. He's the host of bloodlines and he is here to tell us ban. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. When I say it's been fifteen years since the storm hit. How does that land with you? Well. We were reporting flood lines mostly throughout the summer of the fourteenth anniversary and We were always trying to think ahead of what it would be like of what the commemorations would be Obviously, all of our considerations on that front have Kinda gone out the window in the middle of the pandemic but we always thought this show would be an opportunity to reach people for whom you know this receding from their memory folks who are who are grown listeners. Now, who were kids when Katrina happened for people who only absorbed it through a lens where? They, weren't able to get all the information I. Mean I was I was a teenager when Katrina hit. So people like that. We think fourteen anniversary last year the fitting for Serie. This month are opportunities for us to Really get the story that people providing to us out there in a way that that has challenge some people's assumptions about what happened what are you remember of that initial news coverage a in two thousand and five you know what stands out to you the very first memory that always come to me thinking about how I actually watched and experienced. Katrina from Durham North Carolina where I was wasn't the time is the Kanye West George. Bush doesn't care about black people. I was watching the telethon. I was really following closely all the coverage, but that was the one where a lot of different thoughts kinda crystallized in my head about what was going on you know but then other other things that were challenged for me. Even as I was reporting this where we're all the reporting on the the looting, the crime in the city I I had of course, already had a sense that that was a bit sensationalized, but the extent to which it wasn't Asian allies. I didn't really know until we started reporting for flood lawns and that's one of the reasons why this is so important to revisit. You know we're talking about one of the most misunderstood events in American history. What things ample of that finding you know that you all are revisited or visit for the first time So the episode in the new, Orleans Convention, center was to me maybe the most illuminating The Convention Center of people don't remember was a place where thousands and thousands of people gathered after the flood during the flood to escape. It wasn't the official evacuation or shelter last resort point that was the Superdome and so people were there the federal government clam they did not know about. People being there. So it was a big story about win the federal government no in why would they take so long to get them help but underneath all that was apparently now first responders and maybe some federal sources were afraid to go to the convention center because they had heard reports about just epic episodes of violence between armed gang members who were shooting maybe shoot having gun fights inside the Convention Center so. You could see why in that telling why they would not maybe not respond. So quickly to the Convention Center if it was so dangerous nowadays, we call that misinformation or disinformation right and so the misinformation on this front you know they're in the in the final telling out of those thousands and thousands of people who were in the Convention Center I believe authorities collected nine weapons that's not done nine completing Folk nine pieces of total contraband from people who were there which I believe if you screw up a couple thousand people from any city in, put him somewhere. You're going to get somewhere. You know get a handful of weapons, but there was no evidence this type of. Just, read. cartoonish violence was happening in this place and those were the actual very first that we heard coming out of the Convention Center. So they colored how Americans, not Americans how people who are going to help how they saw the situation on the ground and colored who got that help the fastest. It also speaks to the The the way we received information of so messy. So scattershot I think during the Iraq war, it was like in looking through a story through. A paper Straw a plastic Straw, and all you're seeing is what's through that? stroia seen a tiny little sliver of what's happening. I remember when it seemed like the national media discovered the Convention Center Situation You know. What was day four something of this crisis and it was so disturbing that it seemed like the cameras were there. But the cavalry was not that the federal government was not really local government was not there and it was an example of the media being ahead of. Where the rescuers were. So I don't I don't I know that you're you know there's also a lot of errors in the news coverage of this event but I I get the sense. The entire time that the press was almost alerting the government to what was going on is that is that a segment yeah I mean I am a member of the press I don't want to be too down on the press because there were people who were doing the kind of journalism especially around the Convention Center that finally got the help there I think there are lots of different vectors of misinformation and disinformation including the government itself. In this situation I'm glad you mentioned the Iraq war. Because actually I. believe what was happening in terms of how people were getting the news the information was similar you had a demand. From viewers that we get around the clock coverage that we get all these updates on then we get as much information as possible but really there's a real bottleneck at the actual seen in how much information come through. So how you know how we feel that that gap that void is people take secondhand reports they go in amplify things that have been reported and often times we get things like somebody one looter is is arrested coming out of a of a of a of a store and so many people. Talk about that one looter it seems like you've got fifty people talking about looters and it's really fifty people talking about the one looter. Yes. Yes got. Well, it looks even.

Convention Center federal government Iraq Katrina Hurricane Katrina Atlantic Brian stelter government Durham North Carolina Van Newkirk Bush senior editor official
"fifteen year" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

05:11 min | 5 months ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"An education. You know and Oh also dealing with you know how do you explain to your small child or your young child like what this means you know. What is a pandemic wire? We wearing masks. Why can't I go over to my friend's house? Why can't we play on the playground? Wise the movie theater so this is incredibly challenging for everybody and you know most people are doing pretty good at it. Well you tell you what if you're with people you love. It's a lot easier and so that's why it's nice if it's a family that really gets along that's it can be okay. How about you Robert? You doing all right. Yeah overall I had some incredibly horrible illness Late December of last year that lasted like a month and a half under. If you have it I I would love to be tested there. My own hospital has like Lsu exhibiting symptoms. Don't come anywhere near and so I'm like if I had it and I'm over it I would love to get out donate blood plasma or why. Fortunately son got back from Asia and On the twenty eighth of March he was in Bali Vietnam. He was traveling all over was living with a bunch of kids in Bali. Finally convinced him to come home bout about a week. After he got home he got sick. He had a headache. He was weak. He had muscle pains. He coughed and we couldn't get him tested. He's much better now. He's fine now. He's one hundred percent now and I told him you might be in luck. You're one of the first. You know he just graduated from college last year. We might be one of the first people in your age cohort to be able to go out and work because you've got. You might have immunity. Steve Gibson also got weirdly very. Ill wasn't able to get tested. He's recovered so people like you like you and Steve and my son You could be the golden you might have that yellow card you can carry around saying. I'm I'm cove it free. I got the immunity now. Just doing whatever I can to keep friends and family com safe and anything anybody needs. I can get it done nice and all our local businesses are closed down except for essential services like many places but well in a way. We're lucky because we're all of us are already a little bit introverted. We're used to staying at home. Skype chats and this is a dramatic change. Innocent really is one of my one of my hardcore like extrovert friends was saying how like how horrible this was and I said this is exactly how I feel when you invite me to a party where I don't exactly I love you guys. It's so nice to see you. I am so glad you're all doing so well And I thank you for being friends for more than twenty years now since the tech TV days When we started when I started twit I did and I bring this up every time offer. Both Patrick and Kevin Partnership in the company but they declined which is a good thing. Because you'd still be working for a living right about now but I'm Kevin Obviously didn't need me did much better without me and I'm glad you're doing so well and I'm glad the family's doing well. Patrick I love you. I hope you find a home at someplace we will. Somehow at some we will but A lot of America look at maybe about as close as we can get a unless the real estate prices. Come down a huge way in Portland. I love Portland. We both love the mere fact that Powell's books is in Portland. We want Yeah in Powell's books in the shelving system running around with a flashlight. Robert Heron great to have you to. It's always a pleasure to see a former lab rat. I have much to thank you for and you are. You've always treated me really well even even in the earliest days of being attacked TV and being the underlying on culver help just ever since then and throughout the last fifteen years we've had it's been fun to watch career all of our careers and party and it's it. I'm glad I know you people really I find it quite slow guys hug. I love you guys and it's been really fun Fifteen years I look forward to fifteen more no. I don't think so fantasy a couple of weeks ago that maybe on this episode say. Hey It's been great. Thanks so much. I hope you all have a good life. I'll see later and just walk off enough. I'm Don couldn't do couldn't do it. I love this too much. Thank you guys. Come back real soon. Okay we're seeing all these stay safe. Stay safe stay as we do every Sunday afternoon. Two Thirty Pacific. That's five thirty eastern time. Twenty one thirty. Ut See you can watch us to live. Took DOT TV slash live? Is the live stream audio and video there.

Robert Heron Portland Steve Gibson Lsu Powell Patrick Bali Asia headache Bali Vietnam Ut culver America Don Kevin Partnership
"fifteen year" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

05:33 min | 5 months ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"If you blind date be it. There's no difference and It's it's a little frustrating to see some of the stuff that's out there And then you hear something. It's amazing and it's like oh so I don't know it's it's curious the whole thing but you were. We were talking before everyone you went to commercial and the rest of US ran into the bathroom. it's good that they have that catheter retired so I I think I like headphones can you and your have. You taught me about headphones back with graders. Us right way back when concern. It's so amazing. All the headphones that are out these days. Yeah and then I bought. And this was Scott. Wilkinson's recommendation he reviewed it Recently this little Dak. It's called a hip. Dak from I fi- and it's it's a battery backed up. You know so it's got its own power and you and you take the USB out of your Mac book which has an okay Dak or Using it with X. P. S. thirteen. And so you just get the digital audio from your device you can use it with your iphone with a right cable and this really makes it big difference then you can put on some put some decent headphones in it sounds good and his way. I'm a little more portable you know. Yeah well my workstation. Yeah yeah actually. Some good speakers with these might be pretty might be pretty good. It's funny like Audio quest who makes Expensive Speaker Cables But they do a whole series. This is their high and one that I got in for review The dragonfly tax in that thing. This is the Dak was the actual physical. These things are ridiculously good. I would start with the black unless you have like. Some player headphones. That require a lot of power. Those things complete overkill for the vast majority but the the dragonfly back is Amazing I am listening on hi. Fi men Electro plane are whatever you should. You should look at Dan Clark Audio and and The a onto that they just came out with. I'm actually getting a set of those in for To take a look at but Dan Clark if they're closed headphones are astonishing. If you're at my age I should probably just wear hearing aids and these are pretty third and there. It's funny 'cause when he came out with the original aons you know I was talking to Mike. You're you're delivering something. It's like as good as your primary product but for half the price and part of his thing is he's just out there kind of blow up the industry and deliver as much mys- breaks his heart. Because there's so many kids listening on these little white ipod headphones or iphone headphones. I don't think the music I really don't that. Also be something. I remember the revision. Three offices I kind of became like you know the man I hear you hear you can make music sound better. I'd like a set of headphones. And then disappear come back. It'd be like you know and even like Santa Sony. Md are seventy five zero six. Which Roberts probably wearing right now or has near like for eight hundred bucks. Yeah those are good head right now. Yeah Yeah heard with an external or a USB Dak That I love from a company called Shit and they're full Cho C. H. I. E. They're very good. Yeah I I do something that gave me a physical knob like old school analog Knob for volume control. It happens to perform perfectly and you're looking for a headphone amplifier. Take a company called J. D. S. Labs I know these guys friends But they're Adam amplifier for ninety nine dollars When you go to someplace like audio science review it's outperforming. The this is a ninety nine dollar inexpensive product. They did because they they do There elements was society. I my old headphone amplifier. Dak kind of trashed they had. Just come out with the element. I fell in love with it. And then the the primary engineer spent a couple of years kind of experimenting and figuring out how to lay out the boards and he's created this. You know I was laughing because they had this like you know. Thirteen hundred dollar said of this very serious audio companies speakers and it was picking up all the noise from thirty four inch curved monitor. It was really frustrating because if there was a pause something. Or if there's a quiet passage I would hear noise from the Monitor. And then this ninety nine dollar headphone amplifier. You could basically like shove it up against the alternator of car and it picked up nothing. I mean you know I it was it was next to this monitor and it was picked up nothing. And it's an amazing like companies like these guys like GPS labs and and again like Mr Speakers. They're delivering astonishing audio quality for not that much money and It's amazing stuff. You guys talk about a Navy Excel. It is talk about T- screens and projectors and content and what's going on in the industry and Yeah Good Roberts Roberts kind of if you if you ever want to know about television's Robert I. He's he is calibrated. Several of my. Tv's thank you Robert Very much. You are very well without his calibration. I wouldn't know if the field is redder. Blue our our show today brought to you by a longtime sponsor..

Dak Roberts Roberts Mr Speakers US Dan Clark Audio Dan Clark Md Wilkinson Cho C. H. Scott Mac Robert I. Mike engineer Adam J. D.
"fifteen year" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

06:32 min | 5 months ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"You can't oh I didn't know that I I've been using and just have to use apple's messages you for for SMS right. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah you can. You can use it on on Apple. The here's why I don't use signal I remember. Now it's time to a phone number for a normal person. That's fine but if you have if you like. Kevin and maybe me and you have more than one phone. It's no good. You Bernard Phone Leo you just. This is the one on my bedside table. Most of the game I keep my school. Google voice account around just for having that burner number and an account and texting system. That you know what I'll give that out to the public so if I use the google voice number then I could put signal on every phone and just say Oh. It's this number. This is it's number. I don't think that work. I have a separate number for both. I have my so you have to signal accounts. That'S THE PROBLEM. You have one free phone number. I only use signal. You can only do it to your main numbers. That's that's the problem if signal. Look what we just need apple messages with Android Support. We need something that works on. Irs and Android That has a desktop client. That's not tied to a phone number. Frankly that to me is a privacy issue with signal. I don't know why they do that because I know they published a couple of documents recently outlining how they're aware of that buried condition and how it is an issue for a lot of people to join up and it is something. I know the number and they have a way. They've come up with might actually work but they needed to get it implemented in right now. I think they're more concerned about that. New Trust Act or whatever the hell it was that was looking to circumvent and the earning act. Oh yeah that's the name. It's Ernie is more clever than I than I thought I could give. Congress credit for because Congress and the Department of Justice and every government in the world is trying to eliminate end to end encryption. Their position is oh no law enforcement needs to be able to know everything you're doing or we can't stop child pornography or terrorists or whatever. The offensive flavor of the month is but the but the problem is at least in the US. They've done it in Russia they've done in Australia. They've done it in Sweden They've done it in many countries where they say. No no you can't have end to end. Encryption it's up to the signal or whoever you're GonNa make an a plain text version available on forsman if they ask for it. They can't do it in the US because people like us. We'll get up arms so they thought they were clever. Oh we gotta I know will threaten to withhold section to thirty protections the ones that say not responsible for the content on your website your blog you know the the comments on your blog or the videos on YouTube. You're not you can't go to jail or be sued for those because you're just a carrier but they say if that protection you have to earn it by. Yeah you gotta earn it. By following quote best practices in terms of encryption or just in terms of offering your best practices but what they're really team has encryption and who is the final arbiter best practices. Sure they've created a committee but it's all deferential. To the Attorney General the United States of America one William Bar who thinks incriptions the worst thing that ever happened so Stein and Dianne Feinstein who is one of the sponsors of the earn it act so Dick Blumenthal and other sponsor said it's not a bad encryption. We just don't want child pornography. What COMPANIES TO BE RESPONSIBLE? They have to earn their section to thirty protection. But it is about encryption. The funny thing is Dick Blumenthal is going on and on about how you gotta use encryption that needs cut sponsoring this stupid act. It's very offensive. And it's just it's or willow. They don't realize that this is a whack. A mole game encryption is never going away right so you down messaging and guess what you just take up file text file encrypted put it on dropbox chat with someone else you go back and forth and you just keep doing them and it's like it's so ridiculous it's just people are gonna find ways around this. Have you ever used? I loved Magic wormhole about that. That the problem. The problem with using dropbox is dropbox has a copy of courses encrypted but it's there and they you know maybe that sets up a red flag or something magic wormholes point to point so if. I want to send Patrick A secret plan to dominate the world. I would I would use magic weren't hold encrypted and it would give me you know an English pass phrase you know nasal walnut glow nasal walnut. And then I would call. Patrick said Glow Nasal Walnut and hang up. Then Patrick Fire up his magic wormhole type glow nasal walnut and it would do a peer to peer connection. And so no third part. Well I guess the phone company know about it can bit torn had something like that Dan. Recently Right Yeah. Something they did. That was encrypted like that. The problem with bittorrent resilient zillow is they never they never talked about the they never. It's not open source never revealed the protocol So it seems like a good idea. Yeah you'd have a unique identifier. Anyway what are we talking about Google Fi? Oh Yeah and the IPHONE so I hope this doesn't depress you Kevin but John Prosser who by the way I don't I don't know who this guy is. But he's been leaking on twitter and he had every detail of the IPHONE. Se including the name before anybody else did. He even said the release date would be Wednesday. Just tweeted a couple of days ago should have some iphone. Se Plus News for you soon. Really odd there's another one coming. Is that the larger version. The larger version PEOPLE ARE UNHAPPY. About how large this one is. Four point seven the naming conventions of the IPHONES are so confusing. Well Anyway Yeah. I think I'm going to get one I think is is You get the plus. I love the exile. Wasn't that a nice phone. What's the difference between a SE plus an x?.

apple Google United States Dick Blumenthal Bernard Phone Patrick Fire Kevin Congress YouTube zillow Ernie Irs Australia twitter Sweden
"fifteen year" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:28 min | 5 months ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"We use took about twenty. We can't get the TETON anymore. We bought a ready for this Scott when I first set up to it when we first step video which was in the In the brick house we bought thirty five of them. Wow Green cameras travesty or left John are all not all thirty five thirty three. We're using it right now. What I'm on right now is the old vic is that's pretty funny and you know we see and it's so funny because we've been totally eclipsed we had mark branly on a couple of weeks ago and he's shooting everything on reds editing on four or five. Mac PROS THE NEW ONES. The ones that start at six thousand dollars with. Xt Artists plays. He even has wheels and an monitor stands. That's how well he's doing and The Times have changed quite quite apparent. I'm still funny that you're shooting your movies and the same camera that we're doing it on. That's yeah and I did though I just bought a Mark. Four five cannon. Yeah shoot video and gets to my next project. I'm hoping to show what I think is the most underrated state for beauty in America Nevada. The Vada you think of you know Vegas and area fifty one but you think in the northern two thirds so I got. That's about thirty five hundred bucks. Maybe get some tests. The video looks is sharper than than the Vecsey out but Yeah so another old timer is actually in this in the Chat Room Karston Bondi. Who produces this show? He's producing it home these days. He can't come in to the studio. That's that's no one can accept me but Karston was also one of the people who went to La with Kevin and Robert and stayed with them until two thousand five state with G. Four TV he says Mark Devito. He misses Mark Veto. Most of all the TV folks. He had the dirtiest mouth of anyone. I've ever met saying something given some of the people we worked. There were some pretty foul mouth. Scott it's really nice to see you. I ran into Scott when I came back to facebook. And it's the only good thing that's happened to me in two weeks on facebook but it was great to see it's got goes. Is this you really? And then he says all right prove its you? What did I used to yell during the tapings of Internet tonight and I had no idea so I so I do remember you yelling foul obscenities every time you busted to take which is pretty much every time Scott didn't remember that that's the funny thing Carson remembers the lowest shouting then. I actually had to ask you like okay. Name three executives Ted and that gives you meant driven. Yeah I knew it was you. I I mentioned appear Hammersley Greg Driven and whoever could forget the weirdest CEO? I've ever worked for? Larry Weinberg Yeah. Wow that's good teams. A nice guy driven once once told me that Larry Weinberg came up and said you know. Leo's not bad looking into.

Scott Larry Weinberg Mark Devito mark branly Mark Veto facebook TETON Greg Driven John Mac The Times CEO America Vegas Leo Vecsey Nevada Karston Kevin
"fifteen year" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on KGO 810

"Fifteen year and how's it going also might use it you go back to an office are you have enough money because it's not just the freedom it's the fact of not being in the traffic I work in San Jose and I walked into my boss one day that I'm gonna have to leave I can't do this okay sh let me start working from home your cut your phone's cutting out but I did get you what's killing you you want to work from home I agree I could feel you I could feel you know I love my job I cannot do my job at home you could call a that the technology is there but I do think that doing a talk show with another person there's a dynamic there that could be compromise maybe not though I don't know I mean it could if everybody worked really really hard and and was dedicated it could happen but I I just love this idea and I really do think in a congested areas like the bay area we really need to take a serious look I getting fewer workers driving into the office wasting all that gas spewing all those toxins into the air and you know the AC the office space everything you were employees on the road can solve so many problems and you know I'm all for Massachusetts I hope you're leading the way with your tax incentives out all right coming up we are going we're keeping our eye on the your garlic festival shooting they're supposed to be a press conference starting this hour around four o'clock so we will bring you the very latest came is following it as well I will take your calls also about the Gilroy garlic festival I do have some resources some information for those that have been impacted also how you can donate money that's all coming up I'm Vicky in for chip this is Katie geo.

San Jose Massachusetts Katie geo Gilroy Fifteen year one day
"fifteen year" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"But then on t shirts that read contract. You you are celebrating fifteen years. The fifteen year anniversary of trap music. Yes, I am. We all are. Yeah, we wanted. Everybody wants me everyone. It's it's. It's a music that has. It's a music. This five people who wanted to have music is fine. Yeah, but but but it is, it is a genre that's come to define hip hop as we know what today you look at all the stars that have emerged from it and people credit, many like yourself. As the full fathers of trap music, you releasing a new album, and I love how you described. You said this is going to be the Ted talk of trap music leaning the Jonah. What does that mean? Well, when when trap music was introduced to the world in two thousand three on August nineteenth, when I released my second trail. It was, you know it. It was really inspired by, you know, activities that we engaged in due to a lack of options in the undeserved areas of the community. And you know, just as we always have, we taken with the devil meant for bad and had God use it for good, and we took those experiences set them to music and turned it into a commerce that allowed us to change our lives and our families lives forever. And I bet they didn't see that coming. I know what I didn't see coming was the way you use the money. So you know, I always grown up, you know, seeing hip hop as as an avenue for expressing wealth, but was really interesting. Was the puff that you took, you started making money and then you had a conversation. I, I believe it was with your uncle and said, hey, let's let's grow this money. Let's do something with it when no, it wasn't a conversation. It was. It was a demand uncle told me to, wow, he said, give me the money. Give me the money. Before you spend gay rights. And I, I kinda gave it to him and you know, and didn't really think anything of it in a couple of months. He drove me down the street and in our neighborhood showed me a house that I actually used to crack out of and you know, and it was rehabbed and had a family living in it. And he said, that's how we deed. And I was like, what for real, he's I, yeah, and we're going to get to more and then we're going to get four more and so on and so forth. We ended up doing about sixty five homes before it was over..

Ted fifteen years fifteen year
"fifteen year" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on WDRC

"The lane thing doesn't kick in when you're going thirty right right lane departure lane the lane departure only takes in after thirty five as does the break but the low speed on the collision when you're backing up and whatever a going forward i guess too i don't know i haven't it doesn't explain it fully even in the manual and i haven't tested it it's like i'm probably never going to test to see whether the break really stuff really works i don't want to put myself in that situation really don't want exactly so but everything else said that has worked i mean everything ever the thing that really is impressive though is the radar cruise control that when you just go on the highway and you said it and i said it for the maximum distance when i'm on the highway there's no because if i want to if it starts slowing down too early i can hit i can override it and i can go around the vehicle in front of me but that's just amazing when the first time first couple times use it now i'm used to it the the worst thing about it is when i get into my old vehicle and driving on the highway and i've got it in cruise control i'm like it's not slowing down down myself because that's amazing when it slows down and speeds up and and you realize how they integrated and so it actually is very very comfortable for you to use like i said the only problem is when i go go to the fifteen year old vehicle in its yeah socks i gotta do everything kind of read trains us you know and there's some concern there start getting to more of those semi autonomous features that have been integrated now you you know people are they they go rent a car or something for the weekend that may not have it well the for example the blind spot monitors that you know the thing that sort of preliminary because that always catches i.

fifteen year
"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Under the old system and this will take place in 2019 will be the first year this do you think this is enough was this a lottery reform that that you wanted or do you think maybe more should be done to discourage teams from designing teams that are intentionally battle this is where we are i voted for a tougher reform a few years back but it cut voted down which was flattened it out even more in the idea of flattening out these odds mean flicked you're either in the play offs or you got a chance to get better towards the top of the draft you know and the teams that don't make the playoffs that are legitimately trying hard but just aren't as good or their small market they haven't been able to attract free agents you know the draft is really important in early gets more important early than any other league because the bed players can take a team to a championship because they can handle the ball every twenty four seconds and they can also play defense you know the other twenty four seconds and you know the they're only five guys on the court aren't eleven on a football team or whatever it is so or nine baseball team you know an individual guy really can't affect baseball team they don't touch the ball that often basketball it star driven and you get the lebron james you know you're probably gonna win the championship and so we got to figure out who has the best chance to get the next lebron if the rubber is one uh at that level and so it's probably the worst teams but you flatten it out so that everybody out of the playoffs at no has a decent shot in it reduces the urge to be the very worst team in legitimately just be terrible on purpose and you know this is not good to sell tickets if not good for the integrity of sport it doesn't look good it's tough to say the celtics are playing someone who's doing that you know fans enjoy the game thanks for coming you know they they're not can enjoy the game as much new right so anyway that's the reason to vote for a flattening and it did get flattering letsie l works you insist paid or do you think there's any.

lebron celtics football baseball twenty four seconds
"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

"In the year uh as is improved himself his numbers and his play every single year these been the nba the gone up which is really unheard of i mean just steady improvement now he's got this year were you know with this obvious physical setback but if gordon can come and be a you know a great contributor an allstar level you know i i that sky's the limit for us over the next five years but don't know exactly how to play up yeah i mean i know there are a lot of passionate celtics fans i don't know how much they get to see western conference basketball whining know about gordon hayward is that he was the best player on a team the utah jazz last year that made the playoffs in the west in the west is a difficult place to make the playoffs western conference allstar which is saying something yeah exactly i mean you look at the players it over there so i mean he's he's a very very good players will be really interesting to see how he sort of assimilate into this team once he gets back healthy you mentioned you know having added star not necessarily a big decision you have to make but a big decision you guys do have to make that coming up the end of the season what to do with marcus smart smarts of really unique player wake in that when you look it has may be box score stats are what is shooting percentages and right now it's thirty one point three it doesn't tell the full story of his impact on the games how do you guys evaluate what marcus smart's value is to the boston celtics now will there's a theme here chris of i'm not gonna talk about contract negotiations in advance so you can ask but i'm not going to answer that i ask how how do we well you can ask of it's a little boring if i just say i'm not going to answer but we evaluate marcus smart game by game along with all the other players and he's a phenomenal contributor he's you know a real heart and soul glue guy for the team he makes so many plays the contribute to winning at when we've won a game you.

nba gordon sky basketball gordon hayward marcus smart boston celtics celtics western conference utah five years
"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Two thousand seven so it was the end of july who took all of july after the draft in the trade for reality to convince kevin to get her now that's interesting so i do know that's another owner to owner wants so you've been involved in the only two that i two of the biggest transactions in celtics history the kevin garnett trade in a career victory yet will i'm involved deputy i'm definitely evolved in all the things that go wrong i think that's it go right you know it's danny and its brad nitz corinne people like that i want to ask you something about your team because it's been a great start to the season but you said in the beginning of the year that you weren't really sure if your team was a true championship contender i'm paraphrasing those were not your exact words but do you feel at this point that your team is a true championship contender or do you feel like you're maybe one superstar way even with gordon back were twenty three games in we don't have gordon um i think we're a team in the top tier of the nba but i can't say when i watch golden state and cleveland the finalists lebron's been seven straight finals as far as i can tell there are a couple or three teams that are really up their houston san antonio always seems to be there we'd love to be in that mix but we're gonna have to prove it for we said if you have gordon hayward on the roster healthy next year ju look at that core now with the young guys tatum and jaylen brown taking steps and playing so well and say okay we need to add some roleplayers tweak it deeper bansard you look at that and say we need one more star cause you to the their sort of that hierarchy of stars normally on a championship roster you mentioned golden state is a super team we all know what they have steph curry durant draymond klay thompson owen one record against this this here that's true is pretty darn without gordon hayward on your team so that lead me to that question do you feel you know with the healthy gordon you have enough or genie that one more star we don't have to make that decision will look in february at.

celtics nba lebron san antonio tatum gordon hayward kevin garnett cleveland jaylen brown
"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Seasonticket is sponsored by ziprecruiter looking for your next great higher but short on time you just need the right to smarter two with ziprecruiter you can post your job to over one hundred top job boards with just one click than they're smart technology notifies the most qualified candidates to apply no wonder eighty percent of employers riposte on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate through the site in just one day right now you can post jobs on ziprecruiter for free that's right free just go to ziprecruitercomtalk ticket that's ziprecruitercomticket ziprecruiter the smartest wade hired welcome back if you like seasonticket be sure to subscribe to us on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts remember subscribe means the best way to make sure you get our latest episode as soon as it's available all right we're back here with boston celtics coowner ceo and managing partner with grouse back where you mentioned something before about the people that have decided to join this organization and come to boston brad stevens al horford gordon hayward cairo irving it's funny there was a narrative a media narrative that this was a place where you couldn't attract star free agents or stars in their prime did you ever feel there was any truth to that when you guys were trying to add players to the roster it seemed to be true it seemed that it was a tough place to attract people and you need the trade for them we hadn't ever had free agent taproom before so we really didn't give it a real try but anyway of feels knell like we are a a real destination people people are choosing us and i think the fans have a lot to do with it and brad has a lot elected.

Seasonticket wade ceo managing partner brad stevens apple boston eighty percent one day
"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Cavaliers getting that deal done that so two guys that obviously have done a lot of deals and business and just made up their mind that they were going to get this deal consummated no in that deal with you had to give up one of the brooklyn pick since the last brooklyn pick in 2018 and that takes me back to this draft you guys finally win that draft lottery i'll try not to bring up two thousand seven although those band did win it i was sitting out there who were that you've got how it you had to be excited because i know two guys on the age of paying a huge on television with next to magic johnson enjoy lim be going who's that guy nobody cared uli was pretty well that was me by the way and i really had a fun time when winning that letter yeah i know especially after a seven when you didn't i know that one was that one was tops so you were the lucky charm i'll take whatever happened though seven it it ended up working alpha isn't that the truth i mean having the new big three no we did not we went from the second ranking to the fifth pick in seven yeah he doesn't remember yeah no that was tough at the time but it worked out great gotcha championship with kevin garnett paul pierce in rowan but you win this loud we have the number one pick and you guys make a decision to trade down to number three you make a deal with the philadelphia seventy six or through take marquel folts at one you guys take jason tatum who's been fantastic this season at three why was jason a better fit for you guys denmark marco faults while i will tell you that when the picks come up danny makes them so we look to danny to lead our talent evaluation and so the trades or another thing that's there's more input and there's more back and forth in the more aspects to it and he leads that process as well but he really has a total of thought.

Cavaliers uli rowan philadelphia jason tatum brooklyn johnson big three kevin garnett denmark danny
"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Nobody i know around the celtics for sure thinks the celtics is a business it's a brooke love it's a great passion it's our tradition we don't run it like a business we we do have business aspects to it but we run it for love and the people and you can start with brad stevens and the way he loves the team in the players and you talked with about kyrie irving you know there's a lot of love going around this team it's not a business and that's why actually why it's going well this year we maybe that's a whole different topic but anyway it was really tough to see gordon lying there and then the way everybody's rallied round him has been inspire yeah definitely says something about the character of your team i think a lot of self expands work wanna know is there any chance gordon can come back this year from that dislocated ankle and fractured tibia while i've been told that it's a long road back but it's better to have broken a bone than not to in a sense breaking a bone in something in look at paul george who had a different injury but a horrific braley at one with uh and he's back playing at an all nba level so we're very hopeful that gordon come back over the long term but we don't every predictions about when that's going to be we have the disabled player exception for the year now that tends to show you where everybody thinks that medical community doesn't think he's rushing back anytime soon we won't russianbacked you mention that disabled player exception for 84 million there are obviously some stipulations in terms of using that has to be a player who's in the last year of his contract what would you pag wickets the likelihood that you guys do use that exception this year well i've never actually or if i did it was a slip or a mistake really predicted what will do with contracts is not my my mindset we're going to maintain oliver flexibility all of our options with that but vans no over fifteen years we do everything we can to put it at the best possible team out there on the court if we see and opportunities that i'm sure will use it speaking of putting the best possible team in the court he had a great team last year number one seat in the.

celtics brad stevens gordon paul george kyrie irving nba oliver fifteen years
"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Seasonticket is sponsored by ziprecruiter looking for your next great higher ziprecruiter offers simple tools and powerful matching technology to help you find qualified candidates fast it's the smartest way to hire try it for freeziprecruitercomticket that's ziprecruitercomticket well everybody and welcome this season ticket i'm your host chris gaspar it's friday december first we have a great show clear today and a very special gas we are joined by boston celtics coowner coa managing partner with grouse bet thanks for joining us here on seasonticket chris glad to be here yeah great to have you here in it's a great time to talk celtics guys get another win last night against the philadelphia seventy six years 10 aid to 97 a td garden you're now nineteen and four on the year that's the best record in the nba i have to say wake i did not see this coming after gordon hayward went down just five minutes and forty five seconds into the opener and cleveland did you see this record coming in that sixteen game winning streak that fueled it no way i hope that with our team that we thought we had together we could be a team that surprised everybody seven away just in terms of going on streaks ambient super good i thought we had the makings of a really good team but them seeing gordon go down so horrifically i've got a i was just thinking we'd be scrapping to be um just scrapping we'd be scrapping and trying to build and see if we could survive the year um and if they are off to a much better start than i thought what were your emotions when according to go out this horrifying a you know for him really in it it's it's certainly a politically correct or whatever up marketing spin move it probably sounds like say really you just think about him but knowing him as i have just barely started to get to know him at the time but new he's a great guy and his wife and young family interest i really did think of them they made a huge move to come to us in an here he is in pieces on the court it was just heartbreaking for him in robin and then uh then you start to think of boy it's bad for us to have yet obviously very disappointing for gordon.

Seasonticket celtics managing partner philadelphia nba gordon hayward cleveland chris gaspar boston grouse forty five seconds seventy six years five minutes
"fifteen year" Discussed on The Peggy Smedley Show

The Peggy Smedley Show

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen year" Discussed on The Peggy Smedley Show

"Absolutely so i have a fifteen year old and um there is no way that i'm going to reach out to him next quarter and say now sun on um on in november the seventh there was an issue with the bathroom and i really need you to clean up the battery of it and i'm not going to give you a pat on the head today but next quarter let's talk about it it just doesn't work it doesn't work in real life it really doesn't work in organization it does when it's like my job is to pick this up and put it down i'm going to do that every day and then once a year you can come and tell me if i'm doing it fast enough that that makes sense but we're trying to tap into people's minds and their creative ability and their cognitive ability then he constant coaching soak for me what that looks like is it's not just about you're doing a great job it's also you you really mess that project up let's talk about that let's talk about how we can always be in front of these things are how to communicate better for me it's it is that instant feedback just like i would give my son and peggy i want you to think about something different you brought millennials and i love that they are the world's largest and fastest consumers of everything and it's all about experiences and i want you to try this on i think millennials are consuming employment i think they look at employment has this is just like me consuming content on netflixing flicks are me consuming time meta jim this time that i spend and i want my time to be meaningful impactful uh but i also want to know if i'm doing a good job and so constant feedback this kind of caustic coaching model really works with especially a millennial audience.

peggy fifteen year